xt7gb56d2r0v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7gb56d2r0v/data/mets.xml Lexington, Kentucky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1916 v. : ill. ; 28 cm. Quarterly, Publication suspended 1922 and resumed with v. 1, no. 1 (May 1929); v. 5, no. 9 (May 1933) not published; issues for v. 37, no. 2-v. 40, no. 1 (spring 1966-spring 1969) incorrectly numbered as v. 38, no. 2-v. 43, no. 1; v. 40 (1969) complete in 3 no. journals  English [Lexington, Ky. : University of Kentucky Alumni Association, Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky alumnus University of Kentucky. Kentucky alumni 2002- Kentucky alumnus monthly Kentucky alumnus, vol. 2, no. 08, 1916 text Kentucky alumnus, vol. 2, no. 08, 1916 1916 2012 true xt7gb56d2r0v section xt7gb56d2r0v  
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 Vol. VIII November, 1916 Number 2 I
THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS l
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CONTENTS  
En1’roR1AL CO)IMliN'l`S— g
Announcements ................... 3 1
The Plan .... . ................. 3
The jubilee .................... 4 ‘
joseph Hoeing Kastle, ’84 ................. 5 1
To joseph H. Kastle--a Poem. By Barry Bullock, ’03 ........ 6  
Address of Dr. Joseph H. Kastle at Alumni Banquet in ]nne ...... 7 1
Golden jubilee Briefs ................... IO
What All Are Saying ................... I4 °
Alumni Secretary Entertained ...,............ I4 ·
Alumnae Banquet .................... I4
WHAT Som; AR12 Do1Nc—
Dr. A. M. Peter, ’S0 .................. I4
Dr. L. E. Smith, ,11 .................. I5
E. F. White, ,15 ..........,.....,.. I5
P. R. Cassidy, III ................... I5
Dr. Thomas H. Morgan, ’S(J .............,. I5
Hero of Santiago Battle Dies ................ 15
Marriages . ....................,. 16
Another Record Broken ...............,,. 17 `
Early History of Athletics. By Prof. A. lll. Millar ......... 18
UNIVERSITY SECTION—- ~ _
Athletics ...................,. 21
Rhodes Scholarship Examination . . .· ........... 22 W
Woman’s Club .................... 22 1
Chemical Society Meets ................. 22 }
Mechanical College Course \Vins Recognition ......_... 23  
VVar Orders and Cadets ................. 23 ;
Y. M. C. A. Secretary ................. 23
College of Law ................... 24  
College of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering ......... 24 I
College of Mines and Metallurgy .............. 26  
Student Section ..................... 28  
Class Secretary Section .................. 30 l
Alumni Clubs .,..,................ 34 l

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  OFFICERS OF THE ASSOCIATION IS
. i Tg ...,4
  gg     Alumni Representatives on Board of Trustees —
  ,i   G120R<;1c G. Bnoex, London, Ky. Em
  fg, S ]0nN E. Biaowx, Slielliyville, Ky.
; ii wg P1i11.11· P. ]onNs’roN, _lR., Lexington, Ky. TH]
:   -§ ]. I. LYLIZ, New York City.
1 it ;~ Saxiuizi. B. MixRi . gif jg \V. C. Trigg. *01. ll. ii. I>rag<¤<». *0li. J. I*.. li§=
Palrunr are }'C(]IIL’.$`{(`({ to nzriztioii T/iv A/izniiius to our Ad·z*er·lirm‘.r.
:1: 2}: rl: :j: >|:
_ Our It/1tI}IA’.Y are lo Prof. Art!]/(ll! for //1u ]][I[.\`[}'tl{i()lI.\` ]IL‘}'¢’l.H.
y \\’lli 4: sk 4: 4: 44
S/0gt111——Ttt·0 T/iouxuiirl by Nizieleeii Tzveiily.
         
A fvictnre of f/ze prize reiiiiier, I/ic Jzzzziurx, will tip/iet11· in I/zu znzrt irxiztr 0f
T/ic /ill!/}IlIl(.Y_,' nlxn, ti [ltt`I`1H't? 0f {/ic .S`0[>/itiiiiozuv. _
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Many interested alumni and friends have asked:
T'“` 1"““· \\”hat is the plan? It is generally agreed and =
understood that the terms “pla11" and “remedy" Q
are synonimous. The plan of the Alumni Association, and which The Alumnus i
. . . . . . ,` t
champions, is the plan ot a complete reorganization of the University. The
Alumni and friends realize that a proper reorganization cannot he brought about `
overnight, nor in a fortnight, nay—may he not in a {ew short years, as a  
reorganization such as the University must have works slowly, but work it must i
if the University is ever to amount to anything. In this work oi reorganization, 1
The Alumnus desires to say to the Alumni, former students, friends and to the ;
press of the State that the work will necessarily lie slow as the ailments are
millly and deep rooted. It may, therefore, require more time, greater ellort and  
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,     6 THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS.
    credit to himself and to his Alma Mater. At the time of his death he wa~
  Qlfijl Director of the Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station, having succeedetl
      `- Dr. Scovell in that position about the Hrst of November, IOIZ, during nearly all
A     of which time he was also Dean of the College of Agriculture. His connection
    with the Experiment Station began ]uly 1st, 1<)II, as head of the l)epartment o'
  ?‘j*jl Chemical Research, then just organized. He filled the chair of Chemistry in tht
I     University of Yirginia from 1909 to 1911, succeeding Dr. Mallctt; was chief oi
    ~ the Division of Chemistry of the Hygienic Laboratory, United States Publit
l   Health and Marine Hospital Service, at \\i2l$llil`lQlOll, 1905 to 1{,O(), and Professor
l ii" of Chemistry of the State College of Kentucky 1888 to 1905. He received hi~
      ` Master`s degree at the State College of Kentucky in 1886 and the degree oi
  tl T, Doctor of Philosophy at Qlohns Hopkins University in 1888, where he was ;.
    favorite student of Dr. Ira Remsen. In 1895 he was married to Miss B. Callit
    \Narner, YQI, who survives him, with two daughters, one of whom is now gt
    senior in chemistry at the University of Kentucky.
I       \\'e cannot recount Dr. Kastle`s achievements in chemistry here nor list hi~
    ‘ numerous scientific publications. Perhaps his most striking work was that nit
    oxidases, begun while he was Professor of Chemistry at old "State," this
    being at the time a new subject, bttt one which has proved to be of the highesi
    importance in biological chemistry. It was as a teacher that most of us knew him;
  itil? best. He possessed in the highest degree that ittborn faculty of inspiring his
      students with the desire to think out and work out for themselves the probleni~
      placed before them to the uttertnost analysis.
  Y_   But it is those of tts, and they are many, who knew him affectionately ;i—
2 ji g,_ "Little _lo" who feel his loss most keenly. A delightful and inspiring personality Aj
    was his; always the life and leading spirit of a company of fellows; a culturt·~E
`   tj; gentleman and true friend, possessed, withal, of a rare individuality which math
j   jh him our own "Little _lo" who will never grow old in our memories
~       " ‘Some` time,;` you said. Find so. 1 dare to dream bm
.     lz '.l hat X ottth and Spring will somehow linger by _
  Till once again we catch the silver gleam bY
A   lil Of lost stars set against a May-time sky;
`_l·`,:l That once again the apple-blossom days, Ht
  The gray, sweet woods, soft-blurred with springtime haze da
  May hud us. fared down dear remembered ways. v`
{-{lll ‘Some t1me,’ you said. And so I dare to dream."  
  r·é"”‘“” W
C _   TO ]OSEPH H. KASTLE. be
    Hy fftlffy ]}1lff<}t`f‘, `O$. cm
fg   You loved the helds, the woods, the streams to
    In gold and crimson dressed, an
    The smiling dales and laughing rills bc;
    By Autumn's sun caressed-— ml
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THE KENTUCKY ALUMNUS. 7  
,c mp This blessed land your heart enthralled i i
;ceerobleui~ This sprig of rhyme.
lately :i=
rsoiialit? ADDRESS OF DR. JOSEPH H. KASTLE, ’84, AT ALUMNI
°"lt""i“ BANQUET OF UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY,
ch inane JUNE 5, 19]:6.
The following address was made by Dr. I. I·I, Kastle at the Alumni
banquet of the University of Kentucky upon the presentation of his portrait ,
by members of the Alumni to the University: -
“My Friends——I had before me recently, a copy of a note from the Hon. '
Henry \\’atterson, addressed to ljrofessor Anderson, in which he said ‘that the
days of his speech·making ended long ago] As we grow older, we can i
sympathize and appreciate this very sensible point of view, and if the precise ’
truth were known, there are doubtless many of us, less gifted than Mr. E
VVatterson, who might also wish, that the days of our speech—making might °
be over.  
“As an old farmer friend of mine, once complained, we Kentuekians ean`t I
cut a watermelon, without making a twenty minutes speech about it. To speak  
to you, on this occasion, therefore, in fact even to be present—is somewhat of I
an ordeal to me, and if I consulted my own impulses, I would read about this i
beautiful gathering, amid the quiet surroundings of my own breakfast table ,
tomorrow morning, or in my own study—so dillicult it is to control these   `
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I   H S IIIE IxEN I`UCI~.X ALUMNUS.
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  5,   delicately organized things that we call our emot10ns——so tlnn and gossamer-like wt
  ii;   " the veil tl1at separates our smiles and tears. HC
      HI €V€11 Bild m)‘S€lf 50m€\vhZ\t at a l055 for words wherewith to tliank m;
·       you adequately or suihciently graciously, for tl1e many kind things vvlneh m;
  j ,` have been said of me on this occasion, and for the generous spirit of love gg
y   and affection that has prompted the gift of this portrait on the part of certain co
t :¥` . of the Alumni to the Universitv
i .t,,· ' V me
  “lo 1ny way of thinking, lt 15 a happy way in wlnch to express your co
    affection for an old friend and teacher, thus to honor him during his lifetime, fo
      as the- years ot his labors slant somewhat to their close, and a fine, splendid way su
V     . in which to contribute to the higher ideals and traditions of the University, su
  El i e ma
i `1i,_~ , APPRECl;\'l`lZS bl’IRl'l`.
E i' ` _ }'O
    `_ “I am grateful to all of you here tonight for the appreciative manner in Wi
  li Z wlnch you have entered into the spirit of this occasion. You have come tn W]
,\ ,_ ,. · .
A.} ;, L the feast in your wedding garments—to be happy and to be glad—with some- th,
      tlnng of the gladness and happiness, of a time, ‘when all the world was young]
    · I am grateful to the artist who painted this portrait——Mr. Ferdinand Grahznii thi
N my VValker, of I.Oll1S\.'1llC-—?1ll(l for the rare svmpathv which he displayed witle ra-
2 i ??`=` i . I ' _ '
5 { iw { the moods and tenses of a somewhat high-strung man, and for lns gentle, kindly Wi
gi i“ T; i efforts to break the monotony of the sittings which otherwise mi »·ht have nroveii Y
¤’ i I,,L' · . _   1 \\(
Q_     tedious and irksome. I am grateful to tlns young lady friend for her appre- su
Q,   ciative and exquisite reading of my simple verses, and to a dear friend, of VO
i 1 g longer standing, for the exquisite songs that she has sung—to my dear daughter pa
,, ;y it for the gentle, graceful way in which she has unveiled her father`s portrait, and 93
y,   to these two dear friends for all the kindly things which they have had tls an
E`   say concerning me, and for the generous estimate, which they have been good
,~   enough to place upon the little that I have been able to accomplish in my an
V   chosen field of work. I am likewise grateful to these dear women for their vi;
t     pains in making attractive and beautiful this old room. In fact, with Tinv 'l`iiii. wi
  I am disposed to say-—‘God bless us every onc.’ wi
1 ‘ 'i
~~ ·     “I trust, however, that I shall always have the good sense to perceive thatl of
  111 no way deserve the many kind things which you have been led to sav of mr. ho
V     or the many gracious, charming courtesies which you have been so good as lr an
gzip extend to me on tlns occasion. Indeed, I have always tried to keep in mind wlizrt cr
  old ]ohn Dillon said relative to his great achievements in the domain of phvsie mz
_   and chemistiy, namely, that if he had been able to accomphsh anything over ani tu
gu   above that ordinarily accomplished by his fellowmen, and bv his coutemporaricé
{Ea, in the little, quiet world in wlnch he moved and lived, it was not by reason