xt7gb56d4w3v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7gb56d4w3v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19640923  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 23, 1964 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 23, 1964 1964 2015 true xt7gb56d4w3v section xt7gb56d4w3v Social Activity Increased

Cooperstown, Shawneetown Plan New Activities
WILLIAMS
Kernel Staff Writer
Married students have a "definite need lor
By TOM

held around the basketball court,
community cook-ofloodlights are now being installed to illuminate the area.
R. W. Blakeman, manager of housing operations,
emphasized last week that the lights are to be used for
"special occasions, not night basketball games." The
Town Council will decide when the lights are to be
turned on.
ut

said Dr. Kenneth Harper, dean of men,
explaining his hopes lor increased social activity
among married students.
"When a student works to support his family, goes
to class, studies, and tries to fulfill the duties of a household there Is a definite need for recreation.
"He needs a break to rebuild himself, and it improves
his school work," continued Dean Harper.
Possible programs listed by the dean include dancing
lessons; qualified lectures on child care, family budgetcard playing classes; and parties.
ing, and
Not forgetting that the improvement of study habits
is a main goal, Dean Harper included tutoring services
similar to those available to athletic teams, and renovation of vacant areas in the housing projects into study
halls.
"We are ready to put these plans into action as soon
as we find a desire among the residents," the dean said.
home-makin-

Jack Hall, assistant dean of men in charge of married student housing, added that any activities are
"limited only by the initiative of the Town Council," and
the support of the residents.
In anticipation of future events similar to the recent

Mr. Blakeman also talked about a new TV antenna
system for Cooperstown. The system has been under consideration for some time and experimentation began last
spring.
"We are ready, willing and able to spend the money,"
Mr. Blakeman said, "if we can find the right equipment."
Cooperstown is in what technicians call a "dead
spot," or area of poor reception. Equipment installed on
D Building as a test has proved unsatisfactory, according
to Mr. Blakeman, and progress is temporarily stalled.
Three changes account for this increased activity for
married students. One is the appointment last July of
Mr. Hall to the new post of Assistant Dean of Men
in Charge of Married Student Housing.
His attention is directed specifically toward married
students. He hopes to work with the Town Council improving communication between married students and
the administration. Mr. Hall was formerly Director of
Men's Residence Halls.
Finances for Cooperstown and Shawneetown are now
handled through the office of Dr. Robert F. Kerley, vice

president in charge of business affairs and treasurer.
Necessary expenditures for running the projects are
paid out of a fund supplied by rents.
Prior to last July all married housing affairs, including finances, were handled through the office of the
dean of men. This change, according to Dean Harper,
"frees us for our primary function of programming."
Programming includes social activities and renting
apartments.
The third change which has accelerated married
student activity occurred last April. Elections were held
in Cooperstown for a new Town Council which has the
responsibility of initiating and promoting programs.
According to Fred Dellamura, mayor, "this was the
first time a real campaign was waged and the winners
are anxious to do a good job."
Other officers and representatives are: Gil Wood,
vice mayor and representative
for A Building; Mary
Jeppson, secretary and representative for D Building;
Larry Buxton, treasurer and representative for E Building; Larry Crosby, rpoits director and representative
fo B Building; Ken Wade, B Building; Harison Fields,
C Building. Jim Cross was appointed by the Council to
represent G Building, filling the vacancy left by Dellamura when he became mayor.
Some repreesntatives
who won the election have
graduated or moved from the project so that both wings
of F Building, one wing of A Building and one wing of
D Building are not represented on the council right now.

Positions Available

Jim
Vol. LVI, No. 12

m. wm

University of Kentucky
SEPT.

LEXINGTON,

23, 1964

KY., WEDNESDAY,

For Judicial Board

jl

Applications lor members hip on the )iuli(i.il Board will

Eight Pagej

Student Forum Expanded;
Extra Debates Planned
The University Student
Forum has undergone an administrative change aimed at
providing expanded speech
training programs for high
school anil college students
throughout the state.

Howell Brady, a Junior speech
major from Mayfield, heads a
four-ma- n
executive committee
charged with revamping Forum
programs. Bill Grant, senior jour- nalism major from Winchester,
heads a special topics subcommittee while Gary Hawksworth,
senior journalism major from
Brandenburg, and Art Henderson, Junior chemical engineering
major from Maysville, head committees on Junior colleges and
student programming.
Dr. J. W. Patterson, associate
professor of speech, will continue
as faculty advisor and coach of
the intramural speakers.
In one of the committee's first

moves, David Rouse, freshman
political science major from Lexington, was named an associate
member of the committee. Rouse's
work will largely be in assisting
Brady with the high school "Debate of the Month" and in doing
demonstration
speeches before
various high school groups
throughout the state.
During the year, the Forum
also plans establishment of speech
tournaments and clinics for students at UK Community Colleges
and other Junior colleges in Kentucky. Also planned is an increase
in high school visitations by UK
student speech demonstration
teams, and monthly debates between outstanding high school
debate teams.
Here, the group will provide
intramural defor
bates, discussions and general
speaking events for
debate students. Scheduled for
October will be a debate on Johnson vs. Goldwater, and Decem

ber will feature a student discussion on the phases of the
President's Academic Analysis.
Grant's subcommittee hopes to
attract nationally known speakers to the campus to engage in
informal Forum debates.
The Student Forum was organized in 1960 to furnish training
and experience in speaking activities for students interested in
intramural forensics, and to promote discussions on public affairs
among members of the student
body.

Kentuckian
Supplements

Supplements to the Kentuckian
be distributed
Wednesday
through Friday in room 210 of
the Journalism Building.
Students who purchased the
19G4 book are requested to bring
ID cards when picking up their
supplements.

Jin
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Seated around the meeting table are the new
members of the Student Forum Executive Committee. They are (from the left) Howell Brady,
chairman; Dr. J. W. 1'atterson, faculty advisor and

full-tim-

two-ye-

will

non-varsi- ty

be available Thursday, accord ing to an announcement made
by Steve lleshear, president of Student Congress.
The Judicial Board, one of
these recommendations, the conthree organizational branches of
gress president appoints students
to the Judicial Board.
Student Congress, has jurisdiction over all student violations
Beshear said the new board
which involve University or
members must be approved by a
authorities.
majority of the legal votes cast
Beshear said applications for
by members of the assembly in
the board would be available
attendance.
Beshear said that for a stuThursday at the east infoimation
desk in the Student Center and
dent to be eligible for appointin the offices of the dean of men
ment, he must have completed at
and the dean of women.
least two full semesters at the
e
Beshear pointed out that bestudent
University as a
fore the new constitution was
and be neither an officer nor
last year, members of
of Student Conadopted
representative
the Judicial Board were appointgress.
ed by the congress president with
The president said members of
the approval of the assepibly. He the board must have an academic
said the method of selection of
standing of 2.5 or higher on the
4.0 system. He said members must
members had been changed and
noted that the new constitution
not be on academic or disciplinincreased the number of members
ary probation.
on the board from five to seven.
Beshear said he would be the
The constitution provides that
member of the
only
Beshear appoint, with the apJudicial Board. The board will
be made up of a chairman and
proval of Student Congress, five
six associates.
students in good standing to
serve as a screening committee
The constitution provides that
two of the members of the board
to review applications for the
be women and two members be
Judicial Branch. At least one
member of the screening committerms.
appointed for
tee must have had previous JudiThe Judicial Board does not
cial Board experience.
have jurisdiction over violations
According to the constitution,
delegated to another board by a
vote of the Student
"The screening committee shall
recommend to the President of
Congress assembly. The board
does have final jurisdiction over
Student Congress twice the number of students as Uiere are posiconstitutional interpretation and
all election disputes.
tions open on the Board." From

coach; Art Henderson, programming; Bill Grant,
special topics, and Gary Hawksworth, junior college programming. Several debates are scheduled
for the coining months.

two-thir-

Kyian Queen Contest
Judges Announced
Judges for the Kentuckian
Queen Contest, to be held Oct.
2, have been announced by the
committee arranging the contest.
William Hickey, Lexington
Herald photographer, Morton
McAnaly, active member of the
Lexington Junior Chamber of
Commerce, and Mrs. Jack Fife,
wife of Lexington insurance executive, will choose the young
lady who will represent the University at the Mountain Laurel
Contest.
Ken Brandenburg, senior engineering major, will act as Master of Ceremonies at the pageant.
The queen candidates will be
guests of honor at a luncheon in

the Student Center at noon on
the day of the contest.
This years committee chairman for the contest is Sally
Gregory. Other members are
Elaine Evans, publicity; Susie
Sandra
Hodgetts, decorations;
Johnson, programs; Donna Hax-doentertainment, and Ann Allen, Pam Robinson, and Cerelda
Harden, arrangements.
Candidates will represent women's residence halls, fraternities
and men's dormitories.
Junior and senior women are
eligible if they have a last semester of a 2.3 standing and an
overall standing of 2.0 or above.
n,

Kernel Announces Deadlines
Beginning Monday the following deadlines will be observed for
copy appearing in the Kernel:
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING must be in the Kernel advertising
office (Rooms 113 or 111, Journalism Building no later than 4 p in.
the day before the notice Is to appear.
MEETINGS AND ACTIVITIES announcements will be run in a
new column not more than four times prior to uny meeting or activity. Such notices are to be left at the society desk in the newsroom (Room 114, Journalism Building) no later than 3 pin. the day
before they are to appear first.
WEEKEND SOCIAL NOTICES will be run in the "Social Sidelights" column in the Thursday Kernel and must be left in the
newsroom no later than noon Wednesday.
Iuite announcements will be run only if time and space iMiiiuts.
liate classifieds will not run until the next day.

* 2

- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Wednesday, Sept. 23, 1964

Appalachian Teachers Keeping Up
Receive Study Grants Miller Charges LBJ 'Hiding9;
LBJ Pledges Excise Tax Cut
With The Candidates

By RICK BAILEY

Krrnrl Staff Writer
school tcacl lers have received grants from
Thirty public
l lie U.S. Oil ice ol
Education to attend the NDEA Coun-a- t
the University during the
selin and Guidance Institute
academic )tir.
present

The grants, which provide instruction in rural sociology, psychology, and education, are primarily aimed at the depressed
areas in Appalachia.
For that reason, 21 of the
teachers are from Kentucky. One
each is from West Virginia, North
Carolina, Georgia, Arkansas, Mississippi, and Ohio.
The teachers have their tuition paid and receive a stipend
for attending the Institute. They
also carry a full academic load.
The fall semester will be devoted to studies in societies and
cultures, while the spring term
will be a continuation
of the
first semester and also provide
practical experience for the
teacher.
Following completion of the Institute in May, 1965, the teachers
will have earned a master of science in counseling and will also
have a counseling certificate for
work in secondary schools.
Dr. William Carse, associate
professor of education and director of the Institute, said he was
happy with the progress though
he added the staff had a hard
time keeping up with the teachers.
Dr. Carse was also pleased
with the facilities in the new
Frank Graves Dickey Hall. The
Institute has a permanent room
of its own, several counseling
rooms, and a classroom to observe group counseling.
d
The Institute is the first
program al the University
though a summer institute has
been in operation since the National Defense Education Act was
passed in 1958.
The University was accepted
because of its nearness to the
depressed area problem. Also, the
Department of Rural Sociology
at UK has made a study of depressed areas for many years.
Dr. Carse heads a staff of five,
including Dr. Donald Clark, Dr.
Joseph Lyons, Dr. Milton Cough- year-roun-

COMING
NOV. 7th

enour, and Mr. Rudolph Green.
Three graduate assistants are
also helping with the Institute.
.They are Mrs. Gettie Crisp, Mrs.
Maria Mason, and Mr. William
McFall.
The teachers themselves also
are impressed with the Institute.
Willis Haws of Warfield said,
"There is a great need for counseling in the mountains, and the
Institute is one of the greatest
things I have seen to provide
training for counselors.
"In Martin County, less than 20
percent of the high school graduates go on to college.
I am
hoping I will be able to help
when I return," he added.
Miss
Janet Van Hoose of
Paintsville called the Institute
"the most practical classroom experience I have ever had. It's
strong point is that it combines
both theory and practicability in
getting to the root of the Appalachian problem."
Other teachers in the Institute
are Donald K. Back, Morehead;
Ollie J. Buck, Blackey; James A.
Bailey, Mt. Sterling; William
Banks, Letcher; James D. Casey,
Berea; Donald E. Cline, Lexington; Iola F. Crisp, Martin.
William O. Duncan, Ashland;
Andy Dunn, Jenkins; George W.
Gray, Fort Oglethorpe, Ga.; Adrian Hall, McDowell; William O.
Hall, Ripley, W. Va.; Lois Yvonne
Hamm, Mt. Vernon; William A.
Lee, Wallins Creek.
Patricia R. Lewis, Georgetown;
William Martin, Lexington;
Frances Mashburn, Gastonia, N.
C; Glen D. Mills, Walker; Billy
R. Moffett, Stonewall,
Miss.;
Ronald G. Reed, Pocahontas,
Ark.; Mary Reynolds, Morehead.
Clarence T. Scott, Wallins
Creek; William B. Sheeley, West
Union, Ohio; Edmond C.
Dorton; Marjorie Waldon,
Williamsburg; Alvin B. Webb,
Jenkins; Stella Wise, Eubanks;
and Ann Wright. Lexington.
Sow-ard-

By The Associated Press
IDAHO FALLS, Idaho President
Johnson is "hiding behind a
smoke screen" to avoid campaign
debate on his personal fortune
and other issues. Rep. William
E. Miller charged today.
The Republican vice presidential candidate continued h i s
g
attack on the President as he swung into the second day of an intensive campaign swing that has been dominated alternately by slashing
criticism of Johnson and vigorous defenses to allegations of
conflict of interest against himhard-hittin-

self.

In a series of statements and
speeches from Washington to
Billings, Mont., Tuesday, Miller
said Democrats were raising questions about his congressional
service in an effort to divert
public attention from the Bobby
Baker case and other scandals.
He continued hitting at the
personal financial activity of
President Johnson, arguing that
there was public "suspicion and
doubt" about the way the Johnson family acquired a fortune
centered on a television station,
a federally regulated activity.
Miller described the President
as a man without convictions,
one whose ethics needed close
public scrutiny.
The Republican nominee pressed his attack against Johnson
in a statement issued today as
he set out on campaign stops in
Idaho Falls, Ogden, Salt Lake
City, and Provo, Utah, and Portland, Ore.
In stops Tuesday in Indiana,

Iowa, South Dakota, and Montana, Miller dwelt in detail on
his connections with the Lock-po- rt
Felt Co. in his congressional
district in upstate New York.
Democratic National Chairman
John M. Bailey and some state
Democratic chairmen have called
upon Miller to explain his connection with that firm.
Tuesday night in Billings,
Mont., Miller said, as he had
previously, that he had opposed
"disciplinary wool legislation," on
behalf of the company and said
he had done so to protect the
jobs of its workers. He said he
had no stock holdings in Lock-po- rt
Felt.
Miller had said earlier he was
an assistant secretary and director of the firm at a salary of
$7,500 per year.
Miller drew lively, enthusiastic
crowds at several stops.
In speeches to farm audiences,
he renewed his pledge that a
Goldwater administration would
mean a U.S. agriculture secretary who was a farmer and was
familiar with the problems of
farmers.

Atlantic City President Johnson promised the nation yesterday a cut in excise taxes next
year and he warned of "those
who rave and rant about the
dangers of progress."
"We will not permit federal
revenues to become a drag on
our economy," the President told
the United Steel Workers.
Johnson spoke to the union's
convention in the same hall
where he was nominated for

president last month.
Although he called it a
speech, it was perhaps
the President's most impassioned
and biting address since the campaign began.
He said his Administration
would help the poor, the helpless,
and the oppressed through a program of medical care for the
aged under Social Security,
through strengthened unemployment compensation and minimum wages, and through equal
opportunity for all Americans.
"We will do all these things
because we love people instead
of hate them," Johnson said, departing from his prepared text,
"because we have faith in America, not fear of the future; because you are strung men of vision instead of frightened
crybabies; because you know it takes
a man who loves his country to
build a house instead of a raving,
ranting demagogue who wants
to tear down one."
The President also warned the
3,500 union delegates to "beware
of those who fear and those who
doubt and those who rave and
rant about the dangers of progress.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Sept.

Warren Commission Report
Release Sunday
Ready ForHurricane
By The Associated Press

The Warren

Commis- ioi.

Report on the assassination
of President John I'. Kennedy
will be relayed to the world
by newspapers and radio and
television stations beginning
at 5 p.m. Sunday.
The release hour was announced Tuesday by White House
press secretary George E. Reedy.
He declined to permit publication in advance of the manner in
which the report will be released
for publication, its size, the method of distribution and other pertinent information.
The report will be given to
President Johnson Thursday
morning by Chief Justice Earl
Warren and his six fellow panelists who, with him, have been
the assassination
Investigating
for nearly 10 months.
On Monday morning, the report will go on sale at the Government Printing Office. Hardbound copies will sell for $3.25,
and paperback copies for $2.50.

Gladys

Hurricane Gladys edged closer
to the mainland today, bringing
with it rain and heavy seas that
lashed the
Coast
from Virginia to New Jersey.
High tide flooding, with 10 to
waves, was expected as
the big hurricane continues its
slow movement to the north
northwest. At last report, it was
about 225 miles southeast of Norfolk, Va.
--

Auto Accidents
WASHINGTON A new automobile accident report, challenging the theory that chances of a
mishap increase in proportion to
the rate of speed, says the key
factor is the difference between
a vehicle's speed and the average
speed of other traffic moving in
the same direction.
A report by Bureau of Public
Roads experts issued Tuesday
concluded that an automobile
traveling 40 miles an hour on a
highway with a
speed
limit is just as likely to be in
le

Mr. Burrows is Chief Reliability Projects Engineer and Is responsible for conducting research
and development In the fields of
structures, mechanics, propulsion,
chemistry, and materials related
to space vehicles.
He received his B.S. degree in
from
mechanical
engineering
Iowa State University in 1942
and did graduate work at the
University of Virginia.
After graduation Burrows joined the national Advisory Committee for Aeronautics at Lang-le- y
Field, Virginia, where he con

ducted aero research for 12 years.
In 1956, he became chief of the
Fluid Mechanics Unit in the propulsion and Vehicle Engineering
Division of NASA.
Burrows was also chairman of
the Propulsion and Mechanics
Environmental Panel. In 1960, he
became Chief of the Structures
and Mechanics Division's Reliability Coordination Oflice.
Burrows leads the first of four
seminars sponsored by the student branch of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics.
The next speaker,
scheduled for Oct. , will be Henry
Builage Jr., Chief of the Liquid
Propulsion Systems Division of
NASA, Washington, D. C.
The speaker for Oct. 29, has
not yet been confirmed but he
will be from the NASA Manned
Houstan,
Center,
Spaceflight
Texas. The final seminar, scheduled for Nov. 19, will feature
John B. McKay, NASA Research
Test Pilot and Aeronautical Engineer assigned to the 5

.

X-1-

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volved in an accident as another
car going 80.
Among other conclusions:
Chances of an accident for a
car going 20 miles an hour would
be sharply higher than either
the 40 m.p.h. or 80 m.p.h. vehicle
I The death rate is highest at
very high speeds, but lowest at
average speeds.

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Girl Admits Hoax
Police said Tuesday that Margaret Little, handicapped since
birth with cerebral palsy, admitted making up the story about a
gang of
attacking her
because she was a "misfit."
teen-age-

UCF Quota Challenge

rs

Lt. Robert Hammond said the
that
girl told her sister-in-la"she made up the story" and had
slashed herself with a razor
blade.

Issued To University

w

University employees were challenged by IBM employees
to meet or exceed this year's epiota lor the United Community
Fund (UCF) at a breakfast held Monday at the Student
Center.

The girl told her parents last
Friday that two girls and three
boys accosted her while she was
walking home from school, ripped
her clothing, slashed her with a
razor blade and then warned her
not to return to school.

The challenge, made by Clair
Vough, IBM General Manager,
was accepted by Dr. John Oswald, who is serving as University Chairman for UCF. A pledge
of $58,000 has already been made
by IBM employees.
team captains and
Fifty-fosolicitors, Mack Morgan, Executive Secretary of UCF, and Dean
R. D. Johnson, who is serving as
alternate University Chairman,
were shown the film, "The Story
of UCF." The film reviews the
activities of the 25 agencies in
Lexington that are supported by
UCF funds.
to
Material was distributed
the team captains and solicitors
who will be contacting University personnel. Each Thursday
for the next four weeks a progress report will be made.
According to Dean Johnson,
the challenge to meet or exceed
the IBM pledge can be easily
met. The number of University

Aerospace Engineer Scheduled
As First Seminar Speaker

Dale L. Burrows, aerospace
engineer in the Propulsion
and Vehicle Engineering Laboratory of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's George G. Marshall
Flight Center at Huntsville.
Ala., will conduct a seminar
here tomorrow night at 7:30
in the Student Center Theater.

23, 1961

DALE L. BURROWS

and IBM employees is the same,
and, last year, on a per capita
basis, University gifts did exceed
those of IBM.
Dean Johnson stated that any
University groups or department
interested in seeing the UCF film
should call extension 2157. The
film has a special introduction
by Dr. Oswald and is an excellent covering of Lexington charitable organizations.

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* Where The Heck Is The Door?

The 'Closed' Door

With all of the standing in line
that highlighted this semester's registration, one of the "lesser" purposes
of registration seemed to have been
put aside -- that of signing up for
classes. Hut some students found
classes not so easy to enter. Many
were closed early because some of the
departments said there was not a
large enough classroom available to
accommodate all those who wished
to enter.
The basic purpose of any university is to provide a place and an
atmosphere for its students to get an
education. Tart of this is the necessity
of providing enough classrooms for
these students.
For the past
Kastle Hall and
been empty. When
in these buildings

year and a half,
Pence Hall have
the classes housed
were moved to the

new Chemistry-Physic- s
were to be renovated

building, they
for use by the
Anthropology, Ceology, Political Science, and Psychology departments.
They are still waiting for this

The plans now call for
classes to le held in Kastle Hall by
Sept. 1, 1965, but there is no definite
date set for entrance into Pence. The

j

renovation.

final bids for the construction

!

con-

tracts have not been let for either
building. The plans are still in the
hands of the architects.
The Kernel realizes that earlier
bids for these renovations were too
high, and that the University could
not afford to undertake the operation
under those conditions. We can also
sympathize with the large task which
the University faces in getting ready
for the opening of school each year.
However, we feel that since space is
so badly needed, he University
should have made the
renovation one of its first concerns.
Kastle-Penc-

:

CIA5SR00,W$

L

e

This situation has existed too
long. The Kernel suggests that the
University give its immediate attention to finding larger and more classroom space.. Then perhaps the students won't hear, "Sorry, but the
classroom is too small to hold anyone else."

1

--

Gnashing Of Trade Teeth

fLJ

r

"

I

I

British Deal
By RALPH McGILL
was wincing and some
of teeth in world trade cirgnashing
cles, including those of the United
States, at news of Britain's recent
dollar deal.
A consortium
of three British
companies have contracted with the
Soviets to build a polyester fiber plant
costing about 30 million pounds.
(The pound is worth about $2.80.)
The major product will be dacron.
The plant will go up atKrasnoyabsk,
one of the new industrial centers in
There

multi-millio-

n

(Rachael Carson's Silent Spring"
still stands as a warning and an indictment. )
The British trade success will
bring on reverberations in this country, West Germany, and Italy. Each
could have competed for the near
$300 million textile deal. This country should have been able to capture
the near $150 million agricultural
chemical and technical know-ho-

package.

American workmen are out of
jobs. Automation grows apace. ForWhat added further to the gnasheign trade is necessary to keep the
huge and efficient US industrial sysing of teeth is that both parties anadtem in good health. The Russians and
nounce that a second deal is well
vanced for the supply of a second the block countries are a major
market potential.
plant to produce related fibers. A total of some 50 million pounds for
The problem of trade is a political
and technical know-hoone in this country, but the fact that
plant equipment
will How into the British market.
the US Chamber of Commerce enNor is this all. A third portion of dorsed the sale of wheat to the
the package deal is for Soviet purUSSR last year was significant. The
chase of yet another 50 million Chamber did so in the face of the
pounds worth of capital goods and usual fanatic, irrational protests from
mid-Siberi-

British technical direction and information, chiefly in the field of agricultural chemicals such as lertilizers
and pesticides.
The Soviets have been through
another agonizing reappraisal of
their agricultural failures. It has been
determined (wisely, US experts believe) that the future demands a vastly expanded use of fertilizers, chemical
sprays and new techniques, learned
or being learned from the Americans.
The Russians have, of course, been
producing pesticides of their own. In
fact, they already have discovered
dangerous residues of some in fish
taken from lakes. But they have not
yet produced the dusts and sprays
lor the vast crops necessary to feed
their population.
They are likely to overdo it in
some areas, as have we, but they are
in a hurry. This country is undergoing an agonizing reappraisal of
the pesticide program. The latest is
the discovery, in the Midwest, that
substantial residues ol a chemical
used to kill pests in all. ill. i are in the
i:ilk of cows that ate the alt. ilia.

the extreme political right. There will
be increasing pressure f rom American
business for a realistic, common-sens- e
change in attitude so that American
industrial production and techniques
may be competitive in world trade.
We cannot isolate ourselves either
politically or industrially without suffering the historical fate of all nations
that have sought to escape from the
reality of their world by withdrawing
from it. Rulers of ancient China once
built a mighty wall about their domain. In 1938 the French felt secure
behind the Maginot Line.
There is yet another story. Yugoslavia and Romania have joined to

construct a $400 million power and
navigation system on the Danube.
This w ill eliminate the more than 100
miles of rapids that have made that
stretch of the Danube impassable for
trade.
Who will sell the generators, the
steel, and all other e