xt7gf18sf35p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7gf18sf35p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19670410  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 10, 1967 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 10, 1967 1967 2015 true xt7gf18sf35p section xt7gf18sf35p Tl tSentocky Kernel
The Souttis Outstanding College Daily
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Monday Evening, April 10, 1907

Curry Tops List
Of New SG Reps;
1,064 Votes Win

"....

'

2,056.

Phil Pat ton, a current SG
representative, stood on the losline with
ing side of the cut-o1,059 votes. He was just five
votes short of the 23rd assembly
ff

Ford Foundation

Jo Reform Ph.D.

By

dation and 10 major universities
Saturday opened a $200 million
program to reform the nation's
doctoral degree studies in the humanities and social sciences and
to improve college teaching.
About 10,500 Ph.D. candidates in the 10 institutions will
be affected by the experimental
project during the next seven
years.
About $ 160 million of the funds
will be provided by the universities themselves this includes
federal funds available to them
and the foundation will contribute $41.5 million.
The program will make it possible for Ph.D. candidates to devote tliemselvcs to their doctoral
studies and the writing of their
dissertations, without the frequent disruptions, often for interim employment, that lead to
long delays and a substantial
number of drop outs.
The experiment will also create
an organized system of "apprentice teaching" to assure that
Ph.D. holders will be better prepared for careers in college teaching.

Haphazard

supervision

member, Mike Hawkins, who
polled 1,064 votes.
Three representatives ninning
on the SPER ticket were successful. They were: Beth Paulson, 1,272; Pat Fogarty, 1,183
and Taft McKinstry, 1,182.
Neither of the candidates endorsed by Students for a Democratic Society, Linda Manning
and Frank Geminden, were suc-

of

Continued on Page 2

Val-lcbo-

The Campus Committee on
Human Rights Wednesday will
"Bitch In on
hold a
Social Change at UK" where
students can air opinions on
Negores role at the University.
CCHR President Bill Turner
said last night the committee
"feels the student body and faculty were aroused to concern
following Dick Cregory's speech.
A lot of people have feelings
in the area of equal rights and
during this forum they'll have a
chance to discuss them."
The session, scheduled for the
Student Center patio, will begin

1

,

N

Car-micha-

1,195; Jim Eaves, 1,186;
Pat Fogarty, 1,183; Taft McKinstry, 1,182; Janie Barber, 1,173;
Dave Ratterman, 1,161; Jane
Tiernan, 1,121; Bob Abrams,
1,097; Nick Carter, 1,095; Stokes
Harris, 1,088; Mike Hawkins,
1,064.

candidates

Unsuccessful

were: Philip Patton, 1,059; Joe
Bolin, 1,057; Mary Korfhage,
1,050; Rick Bryant, 1,040; Sally

Sherman,

1,040;

Linda Waddle,

Ben Harper, 958; Michael

970;

o

f

In fact, Geminden ran last
in the election with 301 votes.
Some 64 hopefuls were in
the race.
Steve Cook and Rafael
were elected president
and vice president of SG.
New representatives, and the
number of votes polled, are:
Curry, 2,056; Joe Westerfield,
2,024; Todd Horstmeyer, 1,544;
Tom Sweet, 1,538; Betty Ann Carpenter, 1,466; VVally Bryan, 1,400;
Cathie Sackfield, 1,393; Jimmy

Fowler, 953; Pat Carpenter, 944;
Brint Milward, 926;
Les Rosenbaum, 921; Michael
Schroeder, 904; Cheryl (Clancey)
Downs, 898; Rosemary Cox, 894;
Charles Goodman, 850; Roger
Freeman, 841; Diane Brown, 820;
Cregory Hume, 797; Mike Gordon, 792; Marsha Nestor, 782;
Linda Manning, 779; Robert
Coodman, 772; William Fisher,
757;

Dennis Perkinson,

755;

Au-

brey Brown, 721; William Fran-

cis, 716; JimCleason,715;Sharan
Hudson, 714; Jane Robinson, 713;
Bruce Reynolds, 712; Carolyn
Jackson, 707; Eliot Hammer, 674;
Jeffrey Craddock, 639; T. Rankin Terry ,.601; Thomas Pat Juul,
588; Mike Sullens, 558; Joe
530; Kathleen Wall, 495;
Jon Chellgren, 491; Frank

Ma-guir- e,

Cem-inde-

n,

301.

CCHR Sets 'Bitch
two-ho-

1

cessful.

lilly-whi-

te

Around, And Around, And.

1.300 Students

Si n Petition

Council Move Here
Greeted Favorably

For Prof Names
More than 1,300 students have
signed petitions urging that professor's name not be omitted
from schedule books next pre-

Three University political scientists expressed optimism that
the forth coming move of the Council of State Governments to registration.
Jane Tiernan, a junior math
Lexington would heighten interest in state government in their
major just elected Student Govown department.
"I see the incentive for more ernment representative, who
The Council voted unresearch in state government be- started the movement, said a few
animously Saturday in a meetcause now instead of writing to hundred more names may be on
ing at the Imperial House to Chicago for information and waitpetitions still circulating. She
move its headquarters to a site
ing for weeks to get it, you can would like all the lists returned
offered by Gov. Breathitt near
jump in the car and run out to to her by Wednesday so she can
Spindletop Research Foundaheadquarters," he said.
present them to Dr. Elbert W.
tion.
Mr. Reeves suggested the UniOkerman, dean of admissions and
over whether to
Speculation
versity might study phases of registrar.
the council would come to Lexstate government and intergovA booth was set up in the
ington has been active since early ernmental relations more than
Student Center and Donovan
in the semester when Colorada it
presently does.
Hall a week ago Thursday for
Springs, CoL, and Bloomington,
Continued from Page 7
Continued On Page 8
Ind. were named as other possible
sites.
"It will be a great boom to
Lexington and a help to state
government in Kentucky," J. E.
Reeves, an associate professor,
said of the move. He predicted
an incentive to more concentration on state government at UK.

ml

In' Wednesday

at 12 noon and end at 2 p.m.
Turner said three microphones
will be
to handle the dialogue. He said two members of
the Sociology Department and
Dr. Neil Eddington of the Anthropology Department, will
moderate the forum.
Turner outlined seven challenges the committee was presenting to the student body for
discussion at the "bitch-in.- "
They include:
era of bas"The
ketball at UK should be over.
"Student vigilantees for the
'South shall rise again' take night
set-u- p

ROBERTS

New York Tlmri Newt Service

NASHVILLE
Roving bands
of Negro students smashed car
windshields and stoned police
Sunday in Nashville's second
consecutive night of rioting.
"
By early last night, the riot
" f'
S
toll stood at more than 30 arrests and more than 15 injuries
to policemen and rioters.
The police said, however, that
t
r.
the only serious injury had come
outside the riot area when a Negro
was shot in the neck, apparently
by whites who wanted to retaliate for the outbreak.
hi
The rioting began around preV:t V
H
dominantly Negro Fisk University at about 9 o'clock Saturday night after police had
ejected a Negro student from
the University Dinner Club, a
Negro restaurant, at the request of management.
Students at Fisk and two other
universities predominantly Negro Tennessee A. & I. and predominantly white Vanderbilt
had been openly resentful for
nearly a week at the Tennessee
State Senate and other segments
of the white community who
tried to prevent Stokely
the chairman of the
..
Student Nonviolent Coordinating
I.D. pictures were taken during the two weeks of preregistration Committee, from speaking at
but, as usual, a number of people waiting until the last minute. Vandy
So the I.D. line ran around two floors of the Journalism Building
Continued on Pare S
and out the door Friday afternoon as everyone who'd put the
picture-takin- g
session off showed up at one time. Those who had
been there Thursday or before were ushered right in. There was
no line.

-

n,

Bv FRED M. HECHINGER
New Trk Times Ntwi SerrWe
NEW YORK The Ford Foun-

Students
Rio ling

'

(r)

Joe Miller, 1,370; Bill Moss, 1,352;
Beth Paulson, 1,272.
Laura Mulligan, 1,211; Mike
Davidson, 1,201; Allen Young-ma-

10 Universities

131

3 il Al GENE
Fisl

An assembly of 23 representatives emerged late Saturday to join
the new Student Government administration selected in a campus- -

wide election Thursday.
The new assembly was announced about 10:30 p.m. Saturday to a waiting crowd of
about 20 outside the SC office.
Counting Thursday's 4,784 representative ballots had begun at
8 a.m. that day and ran until
after 10 p.m.
As the group waited for the
voting results, some sat on the
floor for an impromptu song session led by David Holwcrk, the
Capcd Crusader, who ran fourth
in the president's election.
were
At least 1,064 votes
necessary to become a member
of the assembly. O. K. Curry
Jr. polled the most votes with

Vol. LVIII, No.

rides in their cars and pester
other students.
"The intangible social examples of "drawing the lines.
"Do UK fraternities realize
that their 'brothers' at other

i

7

v

I

-

i

FXxifiA

schools are Negro.
y

"Is the Student Center Grille

an example of the Union of South
Africa.

"Is

an intellectual community conduceant to liberal
ideas? Then why are people
afraid to talk about the greatest
problem in America?
Con tinned on Par S

Research Awards Announced
Winners in tlie annual Research and Creativity Contest were announced Saturday. They include Don Cash, Biological Sciences;
Elizabeth Oexmann, creative arts; Ruth Mooney, humanities; and
Richard Crunk let on, physical sciences. Hie four display Oswald
awards named in honor of University President John W. Oswald.

The contest was initiated during the Centennial year.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April

2

10,

19f7

Universities Rapidly Becoming
Arts Centers, Peter Selz Says

Pete Seeger,
Others Sing
Here Tonight

"The University is rapidly
becoming the center for the arts
in our society," Dr. Peter Selz,
director of the University Art
Museum at the Berkeley campus
of the University of California,
said in a lecture following the
opening of the Festival of the Arts
Exhibition Sunday.
Speakingon the place andthe
responsibility of the university as
a participant in the arts, Dr.
Selz told the group that the University is a major force in the center of everything science, social
legislation, medicine, politics,
and art.
He cited evidences of the increased emphasis upon the arts
in universities by the number of
being added to art
department faculties, the unprecedented growth of art departments within universities, and
the establishing of University

The second annual Southern
Folk Festival, staring Pete See-Ke-r,
will appear in Alumni Gym

o'clock tonight.
The Festival is being brought
to campus by the local chapter
of the Students for a Democratic
Society, and will include such
at

8

singers as Rev. Pearly Brown,
Eleanor Walden, Rernice Rea-goand Mable Hillery.
Seeger, playing a five string
banjo which has become his
trademark, is considered by many
the best known folk singer alive.
The Weavers, a quartet Seeger
organized in 1950, are often
credited with launching folk music into the big time, and had
sold over four million records
before Seeger left the group to
go solo.
Seeger has recorded over 60
LPs for various recording companies, and has written such
hits as "Kisses Sweeter Than
Wine," "Where Have All The
Flowers Gone?" and "If I Had
a Hammer."
n,

PETE SEEGER
Rev. Brown is a blind street
singer from Americus, Ga. He
will sing slave songs, hymns,

and spirituals.
Eleanor Walden is president
of the Atlanta Folk Music Society and a singer of traditional
ballads and songs of the labor

artist-teache- rs

movement.

Mable Hillery is a blues
singer while Bernice Reagon is
a member of the original Freedom Singers.

Art Museums.

He suggested the reason for
this emphasis the cultural explosion now taking place in our
country. "No longer is culture
for the 'elite'; rather it has be- -

The Festival included an
afternoon workshop at 3 o'clock.
Tickets may be purchased at
the Student Center, Kennedy's
Book Store, or at the door.

UK Bulletin Board
Applications for student organization office space in the
Student Center are now available in the Student Center Board
Office.

The Campus Committee on
Human Rights will meet at 6:45
p.m. Monday in Room 115 of the
Student Center.

Applicants for the LKD Turtle Derby to be held at noon
on Friday must be turned in to
Room 201 of the Student Center
by Tuesday.

MOW

The final examination of
James C. Bryant Jr., candidate
for the Doctor of Philosophy degree, will be held at 9 a.m.
Tuesday in Room 206 of the
Commerce Building. The title
of the dissertation is "Ecclesiastical Controversy in the Tudor
Drama."

IPUM

For Your Convenience
Featuring

come democratized," he said.
Dr. Selz said that with the
increased growth of art departments in the university all kinds
of questions can be raised relating to the integration of the arts
in the academic community.
"The university has never made
up its mind as to whether art
actually belongs there," he said.

"Some contend that the studio
has no intellectual contribution,
but I would ask 'Does the studio
have no more intellectual contribution than the chemistry laboratory?' or 'Is the artist less acceptable than the mathematician?"
Dr. Selz believes that the university needs the artist and his
unorthodoxy to add to the intellectual stimulation.

One of the most outstanding
developments in art today is the
University Art Museum. "One advantage of theuniversity museum
is that he can have a more scholarly attitude than the public museum," he said.
"But this art museum must
be good because for many students this is the most aesthetic
period in their lives."
The current exhibition now on
display in the University of Kentucky Art Gallery shows some 50
paintings from outstanding university art museums across the
United States and can be seen
through May 10 from 9 a.m. to
5 p.m., Monday through Saturday, and from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. on
Sundays.

Ford Will Support
Ph.D. Reform Plan
Continued From Page 1
graduate students, who serve as
teaching assistants, has been
widely criticized and was even
taken to task for such outbursts

support of this program will seek
to meet special needs, rather than

fellowprovide
ships.
In discussing the future of the
Woodrow Wilson grants, the Ford
of undergraduate dissatisfaction
fellowas the Berkeley student revolt Foundation said that the
ships had been so successful that
in 1964.
rise to great numthey had
Equally important, in the bers of given
equivalent federal grants.
view of the foundation, is the
The foundation said it expledge of the participating unipected to make grants to the
versities to end obsolete pracWoodrow Wilson fellowships for
tices that have, in the view of
the cost, over the next three
many experts, deterred able stuyears, of its national network for
dents from completing their gradrecruiting prospective college
uate work.
teachers, for 100 dissertation felThe institutions participating
lowships annually at universities
in the program and the foundation funds assigned to them are: not included in the new program,
and about 50 fellowships in
The University of California
Canada.
at Berkeley, $4.3 million; UniverThe Wilson program has been
sity of Chicago, $4 million; Corabout 1,000
nell, $4 million; Harvard, $4.4 awarding
graduate fellowships and a
million; University of Michigan,
smaller number of dissertation-yea- r
$4 million; University of Pennsylfellowships annually.
vania, $4 million; Princeton, $4
Commenting on the Ph.D.
$4 million; Wismillion; Stanford,
Reform Program, Mr. Bundy said
consin, $4.4 million; and Yale,
that the better graduate schools
million.
$4.4
Foundation officials discussed "no longer have to scratch for
plans for the experiment with students" and that "the enrollment wave in education is about
about 25 universities, but conto sweep into the graduate
cluded that the 10 finally selected
were best prepared to move fast schools."
on the projected reform plans.
"Having historically operated
McGeorge Bundy, president of on the assumption of a shortage
the foundation, said additional of good students, the strong gradd
institutions might be included in uate schools are now
to make room for the
this or similar experiments in the
future.
greater number of students who
e
At the same time, he announced are well qualified for
that there would be a cutback doctoral education.
as yet unspecified in funds for
"Moreover, since a growing
the Woodrow Wilson National portion of the basic cost of doctoral education is being paid by
Fellowship Program, which encourages careers in college teachpublic funds, higher education
ing. Since 1958, the foundation has a new' responsibility to imhas given the program $52 mil- prove the effectiveness of the doclion, at a rate of about $5 miltoral process, and so to use fedlion annually.
eral aid at the graduate level more
In the future, Mr. Bundy said, wisely for more students."
across-the-boar-

d

first-ye-

Places

still open for
summer
projects . to Greece,
Russia, Lebanon, Southeast Asia,
and others through the National
YMCA. Contact the University
YMCA in Room 204 of the Student Center. Cost is $600 to

...

COMPLETE LAUNDRY

are

$1,500.

and

The last of the College of
Nursing lecture series for the
current academic year will be
held at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday
in the University Hospital auditorium. The topic for the panel
discussion will be "Organizational Structure: Influence on
Nursing Practice."

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The Kentucky Kernel
The Kentucky Kernel. University
SUUon, University ot Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington. Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except holidays and
exam periods.
Published by the Board of S'udent
Publications, UK Post Office Boj: 4SU6.
Nick Pope, chairman, and Patricia
Ann NickeU, secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894 and
as the Kernel
published
since 1915. continuously

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, April

10,

I7-- 1

30 Arrested, 15 Hurt During Fisk Riots

Continued From Page 1
The Nashville Banner, an
afternoon newspaper, called Mr.
Carmichael a "firebrand" and an
"interloper," urged Vanderbilt
to withdraw its invitation to him,

and reminded the university that
it depended upon white philanthropists for financial support.
The Tennessee State Senate
and two posts of the American
Legion joined The Banner's position with resolutions protesting
the scheduled appearance by Mr.
Carmichael, a Negro who is best
known for his advocacy

of" Black

Power."
Sunday morning the Negro
students responded by shouting
"Black Power" as they battled
a
"task force" of police400-ma-

n

men.
The students chief weapons
were bricks, rocks, and bottles,
but two policemen said they were
injured by pellets from an air
gun, and Thomas Mayhew, press
secretary to Mayor Beverly Briley,
v
was stmck on the leg by a
cocktail.
Later Sunday Avon N. Wil
Mo-loto-

The spokesman also said that
the incident appeared prearranged in that student pickets
appeared in front of the University Dinner Club "only two
or three minutes" after the stubeen the "design" of Carmichael dent was ousted. But he did
and the result of "the blindness not say whom the police susof white people who have re- pected of arranging the disturfused for months to see trouble bance.
Mr. Carmichael was one of
coming."
"Stoklcy Carmichael," Mr. several speakers Saturday afterWilliams went on, "didn't have noon at Vanderbilt University's
to be present in town when this two-daImpact symposium.
started. His bully boys were here Other speakers included the Rev.
and they knew what he wanted." Martin Luther King, the civil
Neither Mr. Williams nor rights leader, and U.S. Sen. Strom
Nashville Police supplied the Thurmond, the South Carolina
names of any of Carmichael's segregationist.
Vanderbilt's invitation to Mr.
aides who might have been in
the city at the time of the riot. Carmichael had been strongly
defended by The Tennesscan,
Mr. Carmichael was in
200 miles away, Sunday Nashville's morning newspaper,
which looked upon the apfor another speaking engagement and was not available for pearance as serving a useful academic purpose.
comment.
"Those who would ban Mr.
A police spokesman said Carmichael was seen on the Fisk Carmichael fail to understand
campus a half hour to an hour the significance of the phenomena
before the riot, but is believed that give him standing," the
to have left Nashville soon after. paper said. "The problem is not
liams, a Negro lawyer who has
led civil rights forces in Tennessee for more than a decade, noted
that Mr. Carmichael w as not present for the rioting, but said he
believed the disturbance to have

y

Knox-vill-

Turner said CCHR was preparing written invitations to be
sent to basketball Coach Adolph
and

Rupp

Bernie

"bitch-in.- "

Athletic

Director

Shively to attend the
He said the group

was also planning to invite members of the Student Affairs staff,
which includes Vice President
for Student Affairs Robert Johnson.

-

Classified advertisements, 5 cents per
word ($1.00 minimum).
Deadline for acceptance of classified
copy is 3 p.m. the day preceding publication. To place classified ad come to
Room 111 or 113, Journalism Bldg.
Advertisers of rooms and apartments listed in The Kentucky Kernel
have agreed that they will not include,
as a qualifying consideration in deciding whether or not to rent to an
applicant, his race, color, religious
preference or national origin.
FOR SALE
SALE
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$30 to $40 per month. Collections ex4A5t
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FOR

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CCHR has not only invited
administrators but also student
leaders including newly elected
Student Government heads Steve
Cook
and Rafael Vallebona.
Turner also said various student
religious organizations would be
invited to enter into the dialogue.

tions. I have been wanting to
tell people how I feel for a long
time and I want to hear what
they have to say."
Lee Rathbone, an active CCHR member, said, "It is time to
heed the facts. We have been
hiding behind the bushes at this
"We want to establish some University for 100 years."
sort of dialogue to discuss isMiss Rathbone, who helped
sues they don't normally discuss the CCHR organize a recruitwith people they talk about," ing campaign for Negro students,
Turner said. "I think many of said "in asking them to come to
the problems at UK have stem- UK we had to sit down and
med from lack of communica- - ask ourselves what were we asking them to come too. We decided we must not only work externally but internally.
"The Jim Crowe image at this
University is enough to drive
liberal white students away let
REWARD
along Negro students," Miss
REWARD Lost one UK Ring. Male's, Rathbone said. "The only way
white gold, blue stone, with initials the situation is
going to change
R.M.G. Contact Bob Guinn, Arch.
lOAlt
is make the people aware."
Dept. Office, Pence Hall.
The "bitch-in"- ,
which is the
FOUND
first program of its type at UK,
FOUND Backetball in Cooperstown.
apparently has already met oplOAlt
Call 7464.
position.
PERSONAL
Turner said about 40 "posters
have been torn down since we
PENNY ARE YOU MAD?
lOAlt
put them up Saturday. In fact
I saw a boy last night tearing
REBELLION WANTS
THE S.W.O.C.-lOAlt
YOU!
them down."
PAM GOETZ You are blond, beauti"In case of inclimate weather,
ful, intelligent, loyal, kind, and you
are going to win LKD Queen. We Turner said the "bitch-in- "
would
are behind you and so is everyone be
held in room 245 of the Stuelse. All the way LKD.
The MaglOAlt
nificent Imps.
dent Center.

-

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WALLACE'S

APPLY NOW!
Applications for the Board of
Student Publications are available in the Program Director's
office In the Student Center.
Applications should be returned
to the office of the Vice President for Student Affairs in the
Administration Building not later
than April 14.

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Although Negro leaders had
warned the white community frequently in recent months that
there was tension in the city
over segregated housing, many
whites here have come to look
upon Nashville as one of the
south's most progressive cities
in race relations.
School desegregation has proceeded smoothly for the most
part. The police department is

3

been ojiencd to Negroes in suburban shopping centers as well as
in downtown stores, and in the
Tennessee state government. The
Governor s Office here is the only
one in the South to have a Negro

receptionist

3?

Pasquaiesj
241 SOUTHLAND

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Washington columnist and
associate editor of The New York
Times has won two Pulitzer
Prizes. His column covers
national and world affairs with
clarity and directness. Look
for it here in

The Kentucky

Iernel

V W'4

1

jf

407

OHIO

OHIO STATE
MIAMI

mumimP

S. LIMESTONE

PURDUE u.
U.

U., Ohio

UNIVERSITY

U.

EASTERN KY. U.

W.VIRGINIA

BOWLING GREEN SU

U.

of CINCINNATI
OF KENTUCKY

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desegregated and has a Negro
lieutenant. Clerical jobs have

5

278-31-

WANTED

out why."

e,

CCHR Sets 'Bitch In' Wednesday

Continued From Page 1
"What are the rational reasons for the great Negro exodus
at UK?"

C7

Stokcly Carmichael he is just
a voice. The problem is that
more than a few Koplc listen
to him. Society needs to find

7

buttons

I

* Iernel

The Kentucky
Tc South

I ESTABLISHED

Outstanding College Daily
University of Kentucky

MONDAY, APRIL

1894

10, 19G7

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

Walter
Steve

Hoccto, Editorial

M. GnANT,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

William Knait,

rage Editor

Business Manager

Unfreezing Progress
are released. Last month, nearly $11
million in frozen Kentucky funds
was released in two installments.
The releasing of the latter funds
will allow the letting of contracts
for Louisville's Riverside Expressway.

It is encouraging that the federal government has announced
the unfreezing of $1 billion for
road building. Funds were withheld last fall when there was the
danger of inflation, but now Budget Bureau Director Charles L.
Schultze says the money has been

Perhaps some damage has been
done by the freeze, but it hardly
will be as disasterous to Kentucky
road building as it might have been
had the freeze continued for another six months. There has been
a dropping off of contracts awarded
since last fall, but hopefully the gap
can be filled quickly.

released because "the outlook for
price stability in the months ahead
is

promising."
It has been our belief since
the money was frozen that the highway construction program in the
United States should not suffer
any cutback at a time when the
number of automobiles and traffic
deaths is increasing in such alarming proportions.
The unfreezing of this federal
money will be particularly important to Kentucky, where Interstate
highways are plunging into isolated
areas and opening them up to
new industry. Interstate75isagood
example of this; it is being routed,
in the Kentucky-Tennesse- e
area,
either along the edge of or through
the Appalachian Mountains. The
only other significant highway in
this area is U.S. 25, which is antiquated and dangerous. Holiday
traffic jams on U.S. 25 of up to
14 miles in length are no longer

.

highways and has made significant
improvements on other antiquated
primary roads. Most of Kentucky
Interstate and Parkway work will
be completed or under full construction by the end of 1968. Other states
are fighting for completion of their
Interstates by the 1972 deadline
originally set when the Interstate
program was given the
Kentucky's expressways truly are
man-mad- e
objects of beauty, which
provide swift, safe transportation

for

Judgment Day Cometh
And it came to pass that early
in the morning of the last day of
the semester there arose a multitude smiting their books and wailing. And there was much weeping
and gnashing of teeth for the day
of judgment was at hand, and they
were sore afraid. For they had left
undone those things which they
ought not to have done, and there
was no help for it.
And there were many abiding
in the dorms who had kept watch
over their books all night, but it
naught availeth. But some there
were who arose smilingly for they
had prepared for themselves the
way, and made straight the path
of knowledge. And those wise ones
were known to some as the burners of the midnight oil, but by
others they were called the curve
lousers. And the multitude arose
and ate a hearty breakfast.
And they all came unto the
appointed place, and their hearts
were heavy within them. And they

V

"Forward, Men

I'm 100

For You"

Letters To The Editor

Other Course Evaluation Questions

go-ahea- d.

the Commonwealth's residents
and annually bring thousands of
uncommon.
dollars into the state through KenKentucky's share of the unfro- tucky's second most flourishing inzen $1 billion will be $15.3 mildustry, tourism. We are glad the
lion, a sum which will be increased hold is over and that the countin July as additional federal funds down has been resumed.

The following is from a bulletin of tfie National Secretaries Association.

1

The Commonwealth to date has
impressively built its Interstate

came to pass, but some passed
not, but only passed out, and
some of them repented of their
riotous living, and bemoaned their
fate, but they had not a prayer.
And at the last hour came among
them one known as the instructor,
he of the diabolical smile, and
passed papers among them, and
went upon his way. And many
and varied were thequestions asked
by the instructor, but still more
varied were the answers which
were given, for some of his teachings liad fallen among fertile minds,
others had fallen fallow among
the fellows, while still others had
fallen flat.
And some there were who wrote
an hour, others who wrote for
two, but some turned away sorrowfully. And of these, many offered
up a little bull in hopes of pacifying the instructor, for these were
the ones who had not a prayer.
And when they had finished they
gathered up their belongings, and
each one vowing to himself in this
manner: "I shall not pass this way
again." But it is a long road that
has no turning.
for

To the Editor of The Kernel:
I have just seen