xt7ghx15n55k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ghx15n55k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19170329  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1917 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1917 1917 2012 true xt7ghx15n55k section xt7ghx15n55k THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
VOL IX
FRED

VICTIM
3--

1

OF WILDCATS

HEN 707 EXCEEDING

0. MAYES WINS

EGG-LAYIN-

ORATORICAL CONTEST

Defeat Handed Hoosiers Will Represent Patterson
In Opening Game on
Society In Contest
Stoll Field
With Union

MAC WHIFFS TWELVE DR.
Aggressive

stickwork together with

PATTERSON IS

Fred O. Mayes, a Junior in the

84
Col-

a loose iperformance on the part of lege of Arts and Science, was the winthe Hoosier infield in the lirst inning ner of the annual oratorical contest
accounts for the three scores made by
the Blue and White baseball tossors
In tlieir opening ga mewith the Indiana University nine on Stoll Field,
Tuesday afternoon when they defeated the' 1916 champions of the Big Nine
conference by the score of 3 to 1.
And 'his name is McClellan. The
star pitcher for the Wildcats Avas the
big doings thruout the entire nine innings. He had the opposing batters
under his thumb so completely that
they ,vere able to make only a very
few scattered safeties off of his masterful delivery. The Springfield wizard whiffed an even dozen Hoosiers
and came within an ace of pitching a
game. Their lone tally came
in the final frame when, after McClellan had given the first man up a
free pass to the first sack, two consecutive foingles were made.
The Kentucky players acted in the
following manner during their spasmodic session at the bat in the first
inning. Scotty, the lead-of- f
man, was
given a passport. Charlie Haydon sacrificed, Scott advancing to the keystone sack.
Chicken Park, the old
Krupp, then came to the plate and
smacked the first ball pitched to the
right fidld fence. Scotty ambled home
with the first marker and Curt took
his stand at the triple corner whence
he scored on a wild pitch by the
martyr in the box.
Waters was up next. He poped an
easy one to the third baseman. With
two men out and the bases void,
George Park advanced to the rubber
and cracked out a single. He ads
vanced and scored on successive
by Jones and Itodes. Roark retired Che side when he was struck out.
The team, collectively, showed up
well for so early in the seaosn, to
such a good advantage, in fact, that
they bid fair tt cop the majority of
contests in which they engage.
the only new man to bo sent in,
replaced Roark at second in the fifth,
accepted three chances without a bobble, and looks good. Itodes covered
(Continued on Pat I.)
no-ru- n

bin-gle-

Cam-bro-

SENIORS, NOTICE!

No. 25

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, MARCH 29, 1917.

of tho
Patterson Literary Society,
which was held in chapel Monday
Mayes' subject
night.
Mr.
was
"Chaos, Cosmos," in the discussion of
which he gave a picture of the present world war, ending with a vision
of what peace will bring. He will represent the society, in the annual contest with the Union Society.
It was announced at the contest
that the will of President Emeritus
James K. Patterson contains a clause
providing for a $200 scholarship to be
used by the society in honor of the
"grand old man" of the University.
Dr. Patterson was unable to accept
the society's invitation to attend the
contest and present the medal, which
he gives the society each year.

Other speakers who participated in
the contest were: J. W. Kallbreier,
"The Fatal Thrill"; Hume Wilson,
"The Practical Dream," and A. B.
Crawford, "The Dignity of Man."
Judges of the contest were: Dr. Edwho 'presented the
ward Tuthill,
medal, and Professors Bradley and
Jones.
The oratorical contes,t of the Patterson Society is held annually on Dr.
Patterson's birthday. Monday was the
of
anniversary!
eightytfourth
the
"grand old man's" birth and he spent
most of the day at his home on the
campus, receiving congratulations and
best wishes from his many friends.
Dr. Patterson became president of
the University in 1869 and under his
supervision and guidance tho institution grew from a small college into a
retired
Dr.
University.
Patterson
from active service in 1910, but he
still takes tho same deep interest in
tho University.

INTEREST

RECORD

G

The Kernel, following the lead of
tho daily papers, would not feel complete unless It had more space devoted to Hon 707 than to the war in
Europe and domestic disturbances in
America. This busy biddy has now
tied the consecutive daily laying recstraights.
From
ord with eighty-twour contemporaries we glean the following facts:
Hen 707 not only lays eggs, but eats,
drinks and sleeps after the manner of
other chickens. In order to get to
her food when it is covered with foreign substances she scratches. Also,
after every egg she cackles. Maybe
she is only laugihing at the referee
and his assistant accountants.
The following will watch the coop
today to see that the dally egg is laid
as per schedule: Professor R. H.
Professor J. J. Hooper and Ralph
Kenney. Students of the Ag. Department will ask for a holiday in case
the egg is laid.
o

Wil-kin-

PHILOSOPHIAN
REAOY

PLAY

FOR

CURTAIN

"A Southern Cinderella" To
Be Presented Satur-

day Night

CAST

WELL

TRAINED

Finishing touches are being put on
the annual play of the Philosophian
Literary Society, "A Southern Cinderella." which will be presented in Buell
Armory Saturday night, March HI.
For several weeks the members of
the cast have been working on the
production under the direction of Mrs.
Will Irwin, who has coached several
successful plays for the Lexington
High School.
This is the fifth annual play the soLast year a
ciety lias presented.
of
"Twelfth
splendid performance
Night" was given. Several memUers
of last year's cast will appear in "A
Southern Cinderella."
A room at Patterson Hall has been
furnished with the proceeds from former plays. The money this year will
bo used to start a library for tho
UNIVERSITY'S TRACK
society.
ARTISTS WIN RELAY Tho cast is as follows:
Madame Chartoris, an old aristocrat
The University relay team, comLoulso Will.
posed of Kinno, Grabfeldor, Kahn and
Johnnie Roll Randolph, a coquette-Viv- ian
Knight, won the midnight relay raco
DoLaino.
hold at the track meet iu the Armory
Miss Roslo Alnterberry, a settleat Louisvlllo Saturday, March 24, outment worker Eyrl Richmond.
classing the teams from the UniverEnid Bellamy, a Southern Cinder-ollsity of Louisville, Georgetown
Elizabeth McGowan.
and Horea College.
Katherlno Hawke, an English nurse
Tho four men with Dr. J. J. Tigort
Zula Ferguson.
loft Lexington on tho L. & N. SaturCaroline Hawke, her sister, an
day morning to attend tho meet. In
Edith Sachs.
dash hold that morning,
s
tho
Clammy Judy Johnson, a black
Grabfeldor won the preliminaries and
widow
Esther Helburn.
in tho finals came fourth. Irvln Mahl,
MISS MORANCY PLEDGED.
of tho Columbia Athletic Club, broke
Chi Omega fraternity announces the
tho world's record in this event. Tho
team with their coach returned Sun- pledging of Angela Morancy, of

All Seniors are notified that invitations must bo ordered at the University Book Store before April 1.
Cthoice of leather and cardboard is
idven. Tho B. A. Wright Company, of
Philadelphia, has the contract to furnish the limitations and tho book Btore
Is acting as its agent. Bo sure to order yours before Sunday.
C. P. HATTER,
Chairman of Committee. day afternoon.

a

Col-log-

Blue-gras-

IN TENNIS

REVIVED

FOUR-YEA-

THIS YEAR

R

MILITARY

COURSE IS ADOPTED

Stiff Schedule Arranged Provisions For Reserve Officers' Training Corps
With Kentucky ColAccepted
lege Teams
WILL AWARD LETTERS UNIFORMS
Contrary to former years, tennis
promises to assume an important position In the realm of sports at the
University this spring. The sport
was revived last season, when our
racquet artists carried away two of
three matches they played.
Five games have already been ar-- l
ranged for this season by the manager, two to be played with Georgetown College, two with Kentucky
and one with Centre College.
Arrangements for a trip to Knoxville,
where the team will engage the University of Tennessee boys, are also
being made.
With Captain Klnne and Paul Anderson, Jr., two of last season's team,
as a nucleus, the University should be
able to account for most of the
matches. Besides these men there
are several others who expect to try
hard for positions. Letters will be
awarded to the team members as in
other sports.
Besides the match games arranged
with the several Kentucky colleges, a
tournament will be held in Lexington,
either on the University courts or at
Woodland Park to decide the champion team of the State. All Kentucky
colleges were asked to join this and
Berea, Georgetown. Centre, Kentucky
Wesleyan and Kentucky responded to
the invitation. Plans for this tourna-- l
ment were outlined about two weeks
ago by representatives of the various
colleges who met here. R. G.
of Kentucky Wesleyan; A. C
Bruner, of Centre; E. S. Walne. of
Georgetown, and McClarty Harbison,
at this
of Kentucky, were present
meeting.
Wes-leya- n

Dem-are-

DECLAMATORY CONTEST SATURDAY
The members of the Union Literary Society will compete in a declamatory contest in the society room Saturday night at 7 o'clock for the
of tho history set recently
presented
the society by Judge
Barker.
The history is iu five
All
volumes.
illustrated
those desiring to enter the contest
must present their names to the president of tho society at once.
cloth-boun-

d

DEAN LAFFERTY ILL.
Judge W. T. Lafferty, dean of the
College of Law, has been ill at his
homo on East Maxwell Street for several days. During his absence, J. D.
V. Chamberlain, Senior in the Law
Department, has had charge of his
work.

FURNISHED

Provisions of the National Defense
Act, recently adopted by Congress establishing a Reserve Officers' Training Corps at the University, were accepted by the Executive Board at its
r
session last Wednesday. A
course in military science, leading tv
a bachelor of science degree, to be
directed by the commandant, was also
established by the Executive Board.
Under the new plan the cadets will
be required to drill Ave hours a week
instead of three and they will come
under more direct supervision of the
War Department.
four-yea-

Uniforms will be furnished cadets
by the War Department during their
Freshman and Sophomore years. After
drilling two years, students may elect
to drill for the remaining years of
their University course or they may
If they
be excused as at present.
adopt the former course they will be
given an allowance of 30 cents a day,
together with a uniform for each year
they drill.
After serving four years in the battalion, students are eligible for six
months' service attached to a unit of
the regular army with a Second Lieutenant rank, for which they will receive a salary of $100 per month.
The military course is designed to
interest University students in military training and at the same time
give them a liberal education with
collateral studies in various departments. Captain John C. Fairfax wiH
direct the course.
At the same session of the board.
$3,000 was appropriated for carrying
on the work of the Probe Committee,
upon recommendation of Chairman R.
G. Gordon, of the Probe Committee.
Fire escapes were ordered installed
at Patterson Hall In accordance with
recommendations of the State Fire
Marshall.
The Committee of Deans, composed
of Dean F. Paul Anderson, Dean A.
M. Miller and Captain John C. Fairfax,
made the following recommendation
in regard to adopting the provisions
of the Reserve Act:
"To the Executive Committee, Board
of Trustees, University of Kentucky:
"The Committee of Deans, having
been directed to make recommendations regarding the adoption of the
military system known as the 'Reserve Officers' Training Corps,' which
system is embodied in the National
Defense Act, an act of Congress of
June 3, 191G, do therefore respectfully
make recommendation as follows:
"1. That tho proper authority of
the (University of Kentucy make to
the War Department an application to
have established and maintained at

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

ftft2
Personally Picked
Triangle, Metro, World and V. L, S. K.

THE ORPHEUM THEATRE

Go Where the Go 'iCo
AdmiMton 5c and 10c

MEET ME AT

Feature Pictures.
First Class in Every Appointment

"WE GIVE

BEN ALI

Featoreaiid Comedy
Pictures

THEATRE

FREE TICKET WITH EACH ONE PURCHASED."

to 10:30 P. M. WAY TO WIN SUCCESS
Admission

Chnge if Fktire Each Day

1

A

Ten

"Superior Vaudeville"
ALL NEW BUT THE NAME

Same Management, Same Classy Shows
"If a Laugh was worth $1, You'd Leave Here Rich"
10, 15,

20,

GRAVES, COX
&

COMPANY

Boxes

30,

Cincinnati Mayor Says Hard
Work Necessary To
Achieve It
SPEAKS

TO

SENIORS

y

3550

1917-191-

YOUNC MEN
Jwant the new "style ideas'
as soon as they're ready

build.

"The mission of the great world
nation is to receive what has been
given by those who have gone before,
to use it, add something and pass it
your service
J We're
on," said the Rev. Benjamin J. Bush,
with new
speaking at the Y. M. C. A. Sunday
night on the subject, "The Mission of
a Nation."
We must learn to live together and
::
: : ibulld this country into a brotherhood
Stetson and Knox Hats,
as strong as we may. No nation other
than America was ever charged with
;: New Regal, Hanan and :; being the richest nation of the world,
and idle wealth is as dangerous as
dynamite in the earth. America faces
Nettleton Shoes.
a great task. It has a great duty to
perform, and it can perform this duty
:
:New Shirts and Neckwear? only if every man of you doeB his
share."

"This is a world of sacrifice. I believe no man has accomplished anything worth while without sacrifice.
Men who have succeeded are those
who were willing to sacrifice themselves for what they were seeking to
accomplish. Everything must be done
degree, however.
in a moderate
There must be time for recreation,
for fun, enjoyment and for sport and
athletics."
Mayor Puchta was elected Mayor
of Cincinnati by the largest majority
ever given any mayor of an Ohio city.
He is president of an engineering supply house of the Queen City and' is
familiar with manv of the difficult
problems which confront a young engineer.
3.
While at the University, Mayor
Give them a "once over"? AT THE ADA MEADE. Puchta was the guest of P. Paul An
derson, dean of the College of Median
today.
Engineering.
For the remainder of this week five leal and Electrical
r
acts will feature one of the
season's best bills. The feature will
MECHANICAL NOTES
be that elrly, breezy act, "At the
Party."
George A. Puchta, mayor of Clncln
i!
Boys, get ready for "splash week" natl and president of the Queen City
X
j starting Monday, April 2. Earl's Six Supply Company, lectured to the
INCOUPORATED.
Darlings of the Sea will feature the Seniors of the College of Mechanical
great
bill. Wednesday, April and Electrical Engineering Tuesday.
DAY AND NIGHT SESSIONS 4, a diving contest will be held and His subject was "City Administration"
BOOKKEEPING, the prize will be a silver loving cup. and he spoke of the handling of the
BntlifM.PtiaMirai)hy
your name at the box office. affairs of a city and the duties inTYPEWRITING aai Leave
TELEGRAPHY Remember, starting April 2, Earl's volved.
Diving Nymphs and four more feature
hi Pietidenl hu yeaia of eiperienot in Mercantile tad acts. Advertisement.
C. R. Lyle, of the Armstrong Cork
Banking

at

all-sta-

GRAVES, COXf
& COMPANY

I

five-ac-

buiinrw, alio 40 yean educating

20,000 young

wb and women fen tuccatt. liFXi.trrnow. ftktri. arils.
CMe 150 E.Malnl.,iKarPoilQfu,cxulleDtfioL
AMrm WILUUB It. SMITH. Uxlarftoa. Ky.

SPECIAL HATES TO
University Students

W. B. Ward, of Sandy Val-

ley Seminary, Talks In
Chapel

TALK IS INTERESTING

"All things naturally divido them"A cound body, n sound mind and
selves into fours and throes. Today's
a fixed' purpose, something to strive
quadrium is science, mathematics
said Mayor
for, spells success,"
history and arts. Today's trivium Is
George Puchta, of Cincinnati, in adeconomic prosperity, social employdressing the Seniors in the College or

land-gran-

($'

HUGHES

School of Danolm

Mrs. Hughes, Member of American
National Association Masters
. of Dancing

OUTLINED BY

Mechanical and Electrical Engineering Tuesday, on the subject, "How to
Attain Success." "You never knew of
this institution an Infantry unit of the any great building being built without
senior division of the Reserve Off- a plan. So it is with a man.
icers' Training Corps in conformity
"One of the principal elements in
with existing Federal law and the reg- attaining success Is work," he said.
ulations as promulgated by the Sec- "You have got to do It. If you would
retary of War, especially as modified succeed you can't get away from It.
t
in respect to
institutions This world is so constituted that some
of learning.
must lead and spme must follow.
"2. That in connection with the There must be employers and em
above recommendation, the course in ployes. And we who are employes
military science leading to the degree must serve loyally, giving more than
n. S., hereto appended and marked we are paid to give.
"A" bo adopted as part of the regular
"James J. Hill, the great railroad
curriculum of the University.
builder, summed tip the reason for his
"3. That proper steps be taken to success
in words characteristic of
have both of the foregoing recommen- the whole attitude of the man, 'When
dations put into full force and effect I was a brakeman receiving $40 a
after the end of the present academic month I did $80 worth of work.'
year and before the beginning of the
"There was never before such an
academic year
opportunity for success for men who
"F. PAUL ANDERSON.
can and will think and work. The
leaders of business are searching for
"ARTHUR M. MILLER."
young men who are willing to put
character Into their work, honest and
REV. BUSH SPEAKER
thoro effort. Character, young men,
AT Y. M. C. A. MEETING is the big thing you must seek to

25,

"FOURS AND THREES"

UNIVERSITY
EVENINGS

Cents

cADA MEADE
Prices

OPEN 10:00 A. M. TO 11:00 P. M.

TUESDAY, THURSDAY,
and SATURDAY
HOURS: 8
MR. JOHN CLARK

lo 1

k

o'clock

MR, HENRY KELLER

FURNISHING MUSIC.

Eat Your Sandwiches
and Hot Chocolate at the
WOMAN'S EXCHANGE

ment and religious peace," said Pro207 W. Short St.
fessor W. D. Ward, of Sandy Valley
Seminary, in a chapel address to tho
students on "Pours and Threes" Tuesday. "There's enough potentiality In
the heads of the young men and wo- Where All is Well and Good
men here to revolutionize the educaCandy
HottChocolate,' Home-mad- e
tional methods of Kentucky in the
and Ices.
next ten years.
Professor Ward said that the only
difference between us is that some of
Progressive Shoe Repairing Shop
us think while we work and some of
Lexington, Ky.
Following 140 S. Limestone
us work without thinking.
Rubber Heels and Soles a Specialty
"Fours
are more of Professor Ward's
and Threes."
'Four things have gone before. The
Metropolitan
civilization of the Nile, medieval civ
ilization, the Atlantic slope civilizaThe Place for Good Things lo Eat
tion, and the Pacific slope civilization,
to
a civilization which was just about
commence when the European war
broke out. In my opinion, the Pacific
DENTIST
slope civilization will be a big con For any kind of dental service call on
flict between the yellow and the white
races.
1ST CO K AJPSID1S
'The four and three of great ideas Office hours 8 a. m. 6 p. m. 5 Phone
is that the Jews originated righteous
ness, the Greeks originated reason,
Rome first developed discipline and
B.
the Anglo Saxon idea was the idea of
SHOP
service to mankind. The day of com
The Closest Shop lo University
gone. Men inher
mon brotherhood is
ited the first three and are a part of
15c
HAIR CUT
10c
Shave
the fourth."
15c
Shampoo
Professor Ward pictured the map
Glover's Shampoo. .35c
of the United States as the life of a
man. "The Atlantic coast plain is rep 153 S. Limestone St.
Lexington, Ky.
of infancy. When the
resentative
pioneers first began to explore the
country in which they lived they
D. PURGELL CO.
climbed up the Appalachian mountain
326-3- 30
West Main Street
side. That was youth. Down the
LEXINGTON, KY.
of that slope is the dead
other side
level of service. When we are mountRUBBER
ing the Rocky Mountain slope we are
retrospective; into the Pataking a
JUST THE THING FOR USE
cific Ocean is like going Into eternity.

McGURKS

SAM GULLO

Restaurant

Dr. J. T. Slaton

8M--

W.

Martin's Barber

J.

APRONS 50c

IN THE LABARATORIES
"The passions are anger, hate, envy and jealousy.
Their cures, the
threes, are sympathy, pity and forgiveness. The love quadrium is the
love of country, love of home, love of
mankind and love of God.
"Kentucky's old quadrium was the
speller, a bottle of milk,
South Limestone
l
a hunk of oornbread and a sore toe.
Her trivium was reading, writing and
Even the seasons themarithmetic.
Most State Men Know Us
selves divide up Into four. The sun,
Meal Ticket
the moon and the stars constitute a Let u meet you
three."

Martin & Stockwell's
Restaurant

blue-backe- d

t

giving them practical pointers on the
treating of steam pipes and wires bo
as to withstand all attacks of heat
and cold.
Society, the
The Westlnghouse
Sophomore .Mechanicals' organisation,
and Insulation Company, of Pittsburg, hold Its regular meeting Saturday
adCuff button, Sigma Nu crest. addressed the Seniors of the Mechan morning at 11 o'clock. They were
LOST
Saturday morning. dressed by George B. Wurtz, of the
ical Department
Finder pleaBe return to Kernel
He spoke on the insulating Industry, Lexington Weather Bureau.

Franz Josef Spengler
The Photographer

in your Town

Hat pleated the exacting
student and the best people generally for fifteen
years. Can he show you?
311 W. Main St.

Phone

1092--

y

* PtftS

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

The

Boot Shop

Walk-Ov- er

MAKERS OF HISTORY

"Lexingtons Bigger and Better Mens Store'
OFFERS TO THE COLLEGE YOUNG MEN

(PHOENIX BLOCK)
Four years ago tlio Httlo town of
Cadiz, Kentucky, sent a representative to the University of Kentucky In
tho person of Prank Street, then a
country youth who marveled at tho
sight of the tail buildings and other
wonders of the city. But that wonderment lias long since ceased and Street
now enters tho Fayetto National Bank
Building as nonchalantly as ho would
enter tho Now Dorm, tho thoro is
considerable difference in tho structures.
Strcot had not been at tho University long before the old students were
forced to acknowledge that the country youth was one of tho coming big
Now, In his
men of tho Institution.
Senior year, Street is considered one
of tho most prominent students in the
University and is allied with many organizations.
After graduating from the Cadiz
High School, Street decided to further
his education and consequently came
to tho University; and that Ms aforesaid education has been furthered can
not be doubted. Why, friends, even
in his Sophomore year he became a
member of Alpha Zeta, which, in the
parlance of the streets (no pun intended) is "some .punklns." And such
a figure of speech is not altogether
amiss when it is understood that
Street is purely an agriculturist.
Street was a member of the apple- judging team that represented the
University of Kentucky in 1916 at the
national contest. "While the team rep
resenting this institution did not
stand very high in the judging contest, our hero was placed fifth. And
there were expert judges from all
parts of the country at the meet.
Our hero has a leaning toward Patt
Hall that compares favorably with
the tower of Pisa. He just can't stay
away from the hall and on any pre
text journeys thither. But you can't
rule him off for that, as our friend
the English instructor would say.
Men are known by the works they
leave. Street is editor of the
It will foe some spicy book.
And Street already has intimated that
he will leave as soon as the edition is
off the press. Even as the first edition rolls from the presses our hero
doubtless will be seeking the tall, uncut where outraged students and indignant instructors will hesitate to

Shoes that

FEEL RIGHT
LOOK RIGHT

WEAR RIGHT

Tans for the Cadets a specialty
COME IN AND SEE US.

CHAS. COIIKN, Manager

Thrifty Students
Wanted
We will give employment to a good number of thrifty students during the summer
vacation as demonstrators of the great usefulness of the HOME AND SCHOOL REFERENCE WORK in the various counties of
Kentucky. Good salaries or a very high
rate of commission will be paid to such as
are suitable. All who enlist with us before
April 15 will have the benefit of our free
training class which will meet one hour
each day, outside of school hours, and will
be conducted by men and women who are
experts in the lines you are expected to
follow.

For information call at 407 West Sixth
Street or call up 2228-Y.

Midland Publishing Co.

COLLEGE MEN
Enjoy the Summer in Cool, Comfortable

Kahn

Clothes

Measure

$1 5.00 to $35.00

You've tried the rest
Now try the "BEST"

$

Typewriting to do.

a specialty

THESES

I

j.O. Box 585, U. of K.
'iWiwwwH-H-i- qo

tq

HUMPHREY'S STUDIO

.

FOR YOUR

CALAGIS & CO.
107 WEST MAIN STREET
BEST SODA FOUNTAIN IN THE
CITY. FINE HOME-MADE

candies

PHOTOGRAPHS
341

We6t Ma,n'
"

Won't You Come in and Look?

Kaufman Clothing Co.
Spring Style
All the new nifty Spring
styles are here ready to
show you.

Both High and Low i hoes

HAVE A LOO

.

The Special Shoe Co.
206 W. Main St.

Cy. Hanks Prop.

Lexington, Ky.

The College Boys' Store
GRADDY--RYA-

CO.

N

INCORPORATED.

Clothing,

Tailoring, Shoes & Furnisftir.gs

"Wear for Young Men & Men Wko Stay Young"

J. Franklin Corn, State

Rep-cs-

'

We're Beginning Ou
Eleventh Season

follow.
By tho way. Street is a member of
With the majority of our olu customers c mi g
the Mystic Circle and president of the
Justrighc
back.
strong proof
Senior ags. In tho list of his accomClothes stand the test
plishments these were about to be
omitted.
New Spring
When June rolls around, as it has
been wont to do in years past, Street
will receive his sheepskin and depart
for home, where lie will engage in the
ancient and honorable work of tilling
tho soil. Our hero will go back to the
farm and mingle once again with tho
cows and chickens. Perhaps after he
145 West Main Street
rotums and becomes well established
in his community he sometime will
got lonely, and, as spring approaches
Calvin Rice, secretary of the A. S.
but one must avoid sentiment in She told many of her experiences in
tho dark empire and what good Chris- M. E., addressed tho student branch
such articles.
tianity had accomplished and how of the A. S. M. E. of the University
much bettor tho conditions were since Saturday morning at the third hour.
MISS VAUGHN SPEAKS
wortc His address was relative to the soAT Y. W. C. A. MEETING tho missionaries have started
thoro. Sho told many stories of her ciety and he told of its Influence in

that

Justright Tailoring Company

WANTED.

University Lunch Stand

clothes than you would just
ordinary clothes.

$18 to $25

S.

MRS BARNETT

You pay no more for these good

Patterns at

Agent for Kahn Tailoring Company, of Indianapolis
210-21- 1
City National Bank Building
J. W. Milam State Representative

$

Hart, Schaffner & Marx

Pretty

J. D. GEDDES

tot

The World's Best Clothing

Phone

16350C"

zL

Patronize Our Advertiser

Tho regular meeting of the V. W.
C. A. was hold Sunday night at Patterson Hall and Miss Vaughn, a returned missionary from China, spoke.
(Miss Vaughn has been In China for
fifteen years and was forced to leavo
that country on account of the war.

work and tho girls enjoyed her quaint other places. He went into the hissenso of humor.
tory of tho association, tolling of Its
Tho meeting Sunday night will be organization and work.
glvon over to tho "Eight Week Club"
and .Miss Eliza Plggott will have
charge.

Patronize Our Advertiseri.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

Pife 4

The Kentucky Kernel
Published ovcry Thursday throughout tho College year by the student b'ody of
the University of Kentucky, for tho benefit of the students,
alumni and faculty of tho institution.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL is tho official newspaper of tho University.
is issued with the view of furnishing to its subscribers all tho college nows
It
of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of Interest concerning tho universities of other States and Canada.
FIVE CENTS PER COPY.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR.
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Postoffice as second-clas-

That's Oil Right.
Hick: Havo you heard that John
D. Rockefeller is having his namo
printed on all tho American toothpicks?
Quick: No. What for?
Hick: Wants to have his name in
everybody's mouth, I suppose.

manuscript of youth. Another spring shall come and
we know not whither we shall be. The world's gone
mad for blood and no man knows when his will redden
the green. Perhaps another spring will find America's
Easter finery but sackcloth and ashes ; perhaps another
spring will find Kentucky's sons on foreign strands and
Kentucky's daughters in the hospitals tending the
wounded.

But no matter. Spring is here and we are here. Hey
ho, and hey nonny no, as the Bard of Avon had it long

More
A bird

ago.

Said tho tree,
n little .bird,"
havo nothing
the tree, "for

s

EDITORIAL STAFF.
William Shlnnick
Dlllard Turner
Wayne Cottlngham
J. Franklin Corn
Miss Eliza Piggott
Thomas Underwood
J. R, Marsh
Miss Mildred Graham
Eugene Elder
Herbert Schaber
Harry Cottrell

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

Assistant Editor
Managing Editor
"Squirrel Food"

Wo just found out that Adam was
the ilrst woman. According to tho
Dlble Adam was tho first made. (Blue
print, maid for made.)

OB

r

Sporting Editor
Exchango Editor

Break it Gently, Please.
This is the day iPullet 707 breaks or
does not break the world's record.
Wo hope sho does but look out. "Tho
best-laiplans of mlco and men gan
aft aglee."

Y. W. C. A.

.. Mining
Literary
Agriculture
REPORTERS.
Thornton Connell.
W. C. Draddy.
BUSINESS STAFF.

John S. Sherwood.

I

AMATEUR'S

Frederick M. Jackson

EDITION

The Kentucky Colonel

Says:

Squirrel Food.
a chostnut tree.
"Who are you?" "I am
was tho answer. "You
on mo at that," replied
I am a Httlo burred too."

flew into

Love Pome.
FIRST WORSE.
I love you in tho Winter,
sA I love you in the Fall.
Just the same.

d

You say it.

Since the walk to Patt Hall Is near-inWORSE TWO.
completion, why not namo it the
Business Manager
Eugene Wilson
But, Dearie, when the Spring comes,
The Amateur's Edition.
"Heavenly Way," as it leads to tho
The attention of the readers of this Then, I love you best of all.
place where tho Angels dwell?
paper is hereby called to the fact that
Am I to blame?
Are you to
The Merry Springtime.
this issue of "Squirrel Food" is en
blame?
Cases of "The Lion and Mouse"
tlroly tho work of student contrlbu
happen often. "What we were going
Spring has come again and the staff of the Kernel tors. Tho editor of this colyum had
STILL WORSE.
to say was that the little hen up tho
insists
the time for the annual March editorial on nothing whatever to do with it except For the tender warming breezes.
way has backed the war off the front
the beauties of Nature has arrived. So be it. Fain to copy-reait and wish it were his Then once more begin to blow.
page with 83 eggs.
would we write of babbling brooks and little birds aflit-te- r The editor also wishes to thank those
As of old.
in the boughs but newly sprung into who contributed so generously and
and
Joy Thought For the Week.
bud. Fain would we describe the first pangs of the so promptly.
WORST THAN WORST WORSE.
We will not have to donate to
young man, whose fancy lightly turns and twists until
And beneath their fond caresses,
Keller for the Freshman dance. We
off
his neck is all awry and his brain is dizzy as if
Lykelle Pomes No. 25.
Greater love for you I know.
can gather a lew Easter lilies. Freshmerry-go-roun- d.
these "I'll take you to the Opera House,"
Yes, we must admit
Am I bold, to have told?
the
men just adore wild howers; they're
days of March wind and bright, clear sunshine are conSaid Mr. Johnnie Jones.
iC. R. H., '16.
so wild themselves.
ducive to many turnings of youth's dai