xt7ghx15n565_115 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ghx15n565/data/mets.xml https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ghx15n565/data/0000ua001.dao.xml unknown 18561957 9.56 Cubic feet 33 boxes archival material 0000ua001 English University of Kentucky The intellectual rights to the materials in this collection are held by the University of Kentucky Special Collections and Digital Programs.  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. James K. Patterson presidential papers Group portraits. Political letter writing Kentucky--Lexington. Universities and colleges--Finance. Women's colleges--Kentucky--North Middletown. State University of Kentucky Commemorative Exercises of the Fortieth Anniversary of the Presidency of James K. Patterson text State University of Kentucky Commemorative Exercises of the Fortieth Anniversary of the Presidency of James K. Patterson 2016 1909 June 1, 1909 section false xt7ghx15n565_115 xt7ghx15n565 I
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1 State Un‘versity of Kentucky 2
j Commemorative Exercises
F[ of the Fortieth Anniversary
’ of the Presidency of -———--
, JAMES K. PATTERSON
9 Friday, June lst, 1909
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 . / EXERCISES IN COMMEMORAITION ._ ,
. OF THE FORTX YEARS' SERVICE OF
PRESIDENT JAMES KENNEDY PATTERSON
- AS PRESIDENT OF THE STATE UNIVERSITY
OF KENTUCKY
" ACT-fa
ALUMNI HALL, TUESDAY, JUNE l, I909
‘ ' 4 P. M.

 iamgrammz - . DR. ARTIII'R YEAHICI}. -
. ' I’rcxfr/cn/ of Crow/churn Cottcgc. 5
5 Georgetown. Ky.
JUDGE JAMES H. MI‘I.LmAN, Presiding. .
PROFESSOR HENRY Ii. CHERRY.
I'NIVERSAI. (.‘LEE (,‘I.I'I:. I’rcsidwzt of HH’ il'rw/crn Ky. Normal School.
SPEAKERS . Bowling Green, Ky.
PROFESSOR WILLIAM B. SMITH. P11. D..
GOVERNOR .\I't:l'.<.'rI'S E. WILLSON. Frankfort, Ky. 0f yin/,,,”, [,7,,,-,.(.,.,.,3. BARKER, . $ New Orleans. Ln.
of H1" [‘,"'1515“7".’/ 001‘” 0f APPWS» REV. RICHARD HENRY OIIOSSEIELD, D. D.,
‘ Louisville, K3" President of Transytztmzia UniqzmzvitII/,
Lexington, Ky.
HON. (‘ASSIES M. CLAY. . . ., -
0/ {hp [2mm] of TI'letccS, . REV. ISAAC .,T. SPENCER, D. D..
' Paris, Ky. Pastor of Central Christian Chm'ch.
REV. JOHN \\'.II. POR'I'ER. D. D., . Leungton, 1“.
Pastor First Baptist Church, DR. F. W. HINI'M‘. 5
Lexington, Ky. ‘ Prcstctcnt‘ 0f Ccntr/It Unilmrm'ty. ‘
- 7 , Danville, Ky. 1
”EV. DAVID \\’II. MOEEE'I', I). D., ‘
Pastor ly’nurttux [Wins-t Prmhytcrian Ch urch. ‘ REV. EDWIN MULLER, D. D.,
Fort Wayne, Ind. ' Pastor First Presbyterian Church,
. Lexington, KY.
~ HON. JERRY SULLIVAN, ' "
111cm hcr of 11mm] of chcnts of Eastcrn Ky. Normal School, PROFESSOR JOHN T FATG) ‘
Richmond, Ky. Unizscrsitj/ of Cincimmti,
Cincinnati, Ohio.
REV. CHARLES LEE REYNOLDS. D. D., . .
Pastor Ncrmn’t Prcshytm'frm Church, VIRGIL Y- B‘IOORE: UWWTS'Ltt/ Student.
Lexington, KY- ALPHA HUBBARD, University Student.
REV. JOSHUA B. GARRETT, . PROFESSOR JAMES G. WHITE,
Profcssm' of Grcc/it, Hanover Collage, State University,
Hanover, Ind. Lexington, Ky.
DEAN WILLIAM T. CAPERS, RESPONSE
Christ Church Cathmlrat, - 5 , .
. PRESIDENT JAMES KENNEDY PATTERSON.
LOX1ngt0n, Ky. _ 5

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CHARLES B. NICHOLS, ESQ., f
of Board of Trustees, ? ,,
Chairman of the Committee on Arrangements :
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I, »- Addresses delivered at exercises in commemora- ~ i
E ’ tion of the forty years’ service of President James 1
I , Kennedy Patterson, as President of the State
University of Kentucky, held on the University .
campus, on June 1st, 1909, from 4 p. m. to '7 p m. '
1) o’clock.
. . ' Judge James H. Mulligan presided at the exer— 1
~ cises. ;
‘ ' Rev. David W. Mofiatt, D. D., pastor Emeritus :
' . First Presbyterian Church, of Fort Wayne, Ind, _
opened the exercises by prayer. ‘ E
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5 JUDGE JAMES H. MULLIGAN, Presiding. ‘3‘
UNIVERSITY GLEE CLUB. 5
SPEAKERS ,Tf
_ GOVERNOR AUGUSTUS E. WILLSON, Frankfort, Ky. 5
5 _ JUDGE HENRY S. BARKER,
5 . , Of the Kentucky Court of Appeals, ;
Louisville, Ky.
, 5 HON. CASSIUS M. CLAY, g, i
- , Of the Board of Trustees, : “‘5‘
5 Paris, Ky. ' '
‘5 REV. DAVID \VM. MOFFATT, D. D., 5?
5 Pastor Emeritus First Presbyterian Church, 5: '
Fort Wayne, Ind. 3'5
HON. JERRY SULLIVAN, ‘5
Member of Board of Regents. of Eastern Ky. Normal 5‘
5 . School, Richmond, Ky. g
REV. CHARLES LEE REYNOLDS, D. D., 5 s"
5 Pastor Second Presbyterian Church, . 5
5 Legsington, Ky. 5
5} REV. JOSHUA B. GARRETT, _ ’
L Professor of Greek, Hanover College, ' ,-
5 . ’. Hanover, Ind. - -‘
-5955 5 DEAN WILLIAM T. CAPERS,
5 Christ Church Cathedral, '_
5". Lexington, Ky. 5
5 DR. ARTHUR YEAGER, .
5 . President of Georgetown College,
= Georgetown, Ky. .5 .
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gr: PROFESSOR HENRY H. CHERRY,

3? President of the Western Ky. Normal School, ' i
t Bowling Green, Ky. :
r‘; REV. RICHARD HENRY CROSSFIELD, D., D., ‘
g, President of Transylvania University,

' Lexington, Ky. » I
» REV. ISAAC J. SPENCER, D. D.,

Pastor of Central Christian Church, _ i
1 Lexington, Ky. -
.3‘ DR. F. W. HINETT,

_ President of Central University,

I, Danville, Ky. i
1:_? REV. EDWIN MULLER, D. D.,

F ' Pastor First Presbyterian Church,

.5 Lexington, Ky. i

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"_ PROFESSOR JOHN T. FAIG, .
i Uniziersity of Cincinnati, ‘
g Cincinnati, Ohio. '
.,‘ VIRGiL Y. MOORE, University Student. _ .
17 . . t
2 ALPHA HUBBARD, Unwcrszty Student. ;
t !
g PROFESSOR J’AMES G. \VHITE, ‘3

_ ’, . . State University,

4' Lexington, Ky.

RESPONSE i
_ PRESIDENT JAMES KENNEDY PATTERSON. ;
' PROFESSOR WILLIAM B. SMITH, PH. D., -
. Of Tulane University, .

'p. ’ New Orleans, La. 3
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 ; 5 ‘42 V
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@ontmts _ f2?“ '
if 1 Address of Judge Mulligan. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 9 ‘j.
p 1 Address of Governor Willson. . .. 141 '
1 Address of Judge Barker ....... . . . . .. . . . .. 17 1,". '
~ ‘ Address of Hon. 0. M. Clay. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. 23 .
1 Address of Rev. D. W. Moffatt. . . . . .. . . . . . . 27 I 2
1, 1 Address of Hon. Jerry Sullivan.. . . . . . . . . .. . 32 , ' I 2
'2 1 Address of Rev. C. L. Reynolds. . . . . . . . . .. .. 35 11: p
,', 3 Address of Rev. J. B. Garrett . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 ‘4};
'1 Q Address of Dean W. T. Capers . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 ‘
1 Address of Dr. Arthur Yager. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . e13 . ' 2x
1 Address of Prof. H, H. Cherry . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 4 :3 f
If Address of'Prof. J. T. Faig. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2.. 53 - {2.
1 AddressofDr.Hinett..................... 57 4
1 ' Address of Rev. Edwin Muller. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 . I _; V ’
2 Address of Rev. 1. J. Spencer . . . . . . . .. . . . .. 63 4 1'23," '
1,1 Remarks of Mr. V. P. Moore. . . . . . . . .. . . . .. 67 4 ' .. . '1' 4‘ s
1‘ Address of Mr. Alpha Hubbard. . . . . . . . . . . . . ’70 .4
1 Remarks of Prof. Jas. G. White . . . . . . . . . . ’73 ' ' 2;:
President Patterson’s Reply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76
1: An Appreciation—W. B. Smith, LL. D.. . . . . . 83 . g ,
2:221 4.
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21:«4.'.”'s2:‘»_':"‘:~24. . . _ , . . 7 . p .. 2

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_ _ . more“ of 311mg» mulligau in QBpem’ng
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Our Honored Guest, Ladies and Gentlemen :— g
‘ I . ‘ 7 N the course of a life time which is beginning !
7' '. 3‘ to touch where the shadows fall, I have
, ‘ by chance unworthily been the recipient at s
” i 7 " times of honors far beyond my merit; but I wish 1.‘
, ' ' . to say as briefly as possible that never in my
' it: " ‘ career have I been so keenly and sensibly touched ;
j} as has been done in giving me the honor of pre- ‘
g1: siding on this momentous occasion.
if; Forty years is a long span in one’s affairs. Forty
5% years of continuous endeavor, of ceaseless labor I
. ' g? ‘ and travail, forty years crowned at every step by 3
p ' the triumph of great things accomplished, is some— t
' § ' thing very unusual. ‘
, .7 7 At the outset I might say that when I secured
7'}; by close competition the honor of presiding over i
- ‘ V- '_ ' - this meeting it was with the distinct understanding
’ ,. ’1., 5 ‘v ~ that I should make no speech. Therefore, in view
.. .- of the shortness of the time, while you will be
, ' ' : ~ ' beautifully and eloquently entertained—touchingly l
‘ entertained, if you fail to hear what you consider 3
. .- a really great oration, lay it to the door of those ,
g: , who so restricted me on this occasion.
if: , ‘ This IS a unlque occasron, such an one,Idare say,
53' " as none present ever attended before—celebrating ‘,
53' _ - forty years of continuous service in a great and a I .
"a ‘ noble work. Forty years marked at every step by
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E FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY. '
E E willing sacrifice, marvelous ability, and what is E
'E greater, forty years almost Without friction, or E
E without friction worthy of mention, and crowned |
'2 at last by the great success which rests on the head E
of the guest of to-day. (Applause) L
. . Surely a man must not only be a great man, E
., but he must be better than that—he must have s?
' ‘ been a good man who could so follow the even E
. tenor of his way, continually rising higher and 1
‘ higher with every step—and yet think of it! this Ev 4
E man came from Indiana. He must be a very good E
man. He is unquestionably that, and it needs no ;
.- :— Words of mine to say that he is a very great man, to E _
have accomplished that which President Patterson
E has accomplished. President Patterson did not of ' ' E ’
E himself alone build the State University, but I
speak the simple truth when I say that had it not
been for President Patterson there would have been L
no State University. President Patterson is as much ., i
I V the maker of this college as is Mr. Carnegie of any .
’ of the great institutions which he ever endowed.
‘ During the forty years that he has been the in— ,
cumbent of this office, I have watched its growth. :
E I well remember when Governor Blackburn laid E
i the corner-stone, and when two years later .
E the brilliant Watterson made the dedicatory ad— ‘
dress, and so I have seen it under his fostering
1E; care, under the influence of his great common
“E sense and his powerful intellect grow up to what
i it is now, and yet he is but looking forward to E V
IE what it will be in the years to come. (Applause) E
3' If there was ever a man who erected a noble .;E
1 ' monument by his life’s work which entitles him I
» to a lasting place in the hearts of his fellows, 1
‘y 10 , E
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 t - PRES. Ms. K. PATTERSON.
? surely it is the loyal man who has accomplished
1' this great work. Great for you ; great for the
l generation to come, and great for your children
L after you.

5 ' For twenty-five long years of that forty he and
‘5 I have been the closest neighbors. We have lived
‘5 all through that span of life nearer to each other
[ than either was to any other person.
, Here comes not only good men, but great men;
1' , here come men from Indiana, his boyhood friends, ‘
l after the span of a life time—coming here to
i clasp his hand and to congratulate and to
' ‘ take part in honoring him here to-day. Surely a
‘ man must be a good man who can have his boy-
' ' ’ hood friends to come such a distance at such a
time to do honor to his theme.
There was once a Kentuckian traveling in Indi-
L ana, and he fell into conversation with a gentleman
-' who seemed to be in very sad health, and the Ken-
- tuckian let it be known, as Kentuckians are prone
to do, that he was from Kentucky, and after a time
t he turned to his chance acquaintance and re-
; marked: “I suppose of course that you’re an
3 Indianian ?” “No,” said the man, “I, too, am a
. Kentuckian, but then I have been sick for a long
' time.” And so the tried friends of his youth,
like him grown in strength and character and
reputation—in everything showing ability, show-
. ing virtues, and showing all those marked quali-
: . ties that make men conspicuous and great, they
} come from their distant homes to take their places
.g‘ by his side to give contradiction to those who say
" the friendships of our youth are but fleeting; and
i so we have with us to-day the friends of the morn-
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 a.» Aflv”, . ' -‘ ‘1 1' “~I
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,i‘ FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY.
5 ing of his life; and what stronger proof could ,
2; be asked that he is a genuinely good man, as well
cl as a very great one when these hale, learned and
‘ distinguished men—though Indianians they be—
gather around him to join those prominent in the ‘
life of our own immediate community and its citi— :
i ‘ zenship to do honor to the guest of this occasion.
- " Surely it is well worth a life-time of labor and sac- ‘
1 rifice to receive such an honor and distinction as ,I
this. (Applause) ‘
‘ (At'this point the Glee Club of the College . ' .
: rendered a selection.) ,
By reference to the programme it will be seen i
that it is extremely lengthy; there are twenty-two
' addresses to be made. Having myself taken up a I l
'i good proportion of the time, I regard it as only ‘
modest that I should say to those who are to ad— ‘
dress you, that when there is so much they
: know how to say so well, that we will take the ?
.1 . will for the deed; we ask the gentlemen to remem— ‘
‘ her that we know how beautifully and how well 2,
i , they all speak—and so a little of it for this occa- i
‘ sion will suffice. This is said with a sense of jus- t
i . tice that all may to our advantage be heard— l
it because this great audience is anxious to hear every i
,, l gentleman whose name appears on the programme, g
and hence I venture to ask that you favor us with } ‘
ii your shortest address. My remarks are directed
3,?) mainly towards the first speaker—Governor Will- a
Li; son—because he is apt to be— well, just a little I
3533: long, sometimes. As we are unprovided with ’ ’
if,” lighting facilities and cots, we greatly desire to ~-
i ‘ conclude during the lingering day-light, and so I I
" again renew the request. i
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PRES. Ms. K. PATTERSON.
The distinguished gentleman I have the honor
‘ first to present to you, needs no introduction—he l
is the first officer of the Commonwealth, and surely ‘
* it is a proud day when the young man who came
in the unaided days of his youth from our sister
4 state of Indiana, and whose growth was by little .
i and little through such arduous toil and endeavor,
5? now comes at last in his mature manhood and " p i
3 fullness of reputation, to receive this ovation, l
1 as a fitting acknowledgment of his worth, that .
. the best and greatest in position in the State
' ' gather to do him honor; the honored of the
,’- land are glad to honor him. I have the pleas-
i ure to present to you His Excellency, Augustus E. -
: Willson, Governor of Kentucky.
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 FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY.

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‘3 I thress of fichernnr William _

Ladies and Gentlemen, and our Honored Guest— 1

' i ' HAT would you do about it, if you were '_

_ m in my place? Judge Mulligan an- i
v E 7 nounced that he had accepted this nomi-
-‘ nation as Chairman of this meeting with the un-
i derstanding that he would leave all the speaking ‘
_‘ : to somebody else. Well, of course, people make
} promises of that kind to get ofiice. (Laughter.) I
i. He has put more ginger and more fun and t
more eloquence and .more picturesqueness into ‘
I _: his talk than all the rest of us can do in the after-
‘ t noon, and so I am not going to try. When the
;' boys were singing that humming song I thought
-I of what Mulligan said, that I must not speak 3
; more than two minutes. '
g 2 Now there was a little thing came to my mind; [
i it is curious how a real flashy, brilliant orator
; " sometimes puts his foot in it. There was just a I}
i 1 little jealousy in Mulliga'n’s talk about Indiana.

, l { The Governor of Kentucky was a resident of the {
L ' State of Indiana from 1857 to 1878, but I never .
l i let it out before. It was a mean, unneighborly

' thing for Mulligan to say he was not going to _ {

M speak, and then talk for a half hour and shut the 3

J} rest of us out.

{glib My neighbors and friends, it is an honor to ‘

i} anybody to have an opportunity to pay this neigh- 4 -

.‘E borly tribute and this human tribute of respect t
l i to a man whose noble life has been given to use- '
u i 14 l ”

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"' = 1 x T ,.

 PRES. Ms. K. PATTERSON.
fulness and to good works. I feel very deeply
what Judge Mulligan said about the character of »'
a man who to a ripe old age holds the friends of
_ his boyhood, as this our friend has held his friends
I here. They honor us by showing their love to
1 him by their presence here. I do not know in the .7
'_ history of the Commonwealth, and certainly I
i do not remember in my reading of the history of '
1 men, a single case that I could think of now as ‘
more striking in its record of a long tremendously ‘
‘ hard-working life of usefulness than the life of
our friend. I do not wish what'I say to take on 1
1 anything of the tone of a good-bye or a funeral. ,
l He is cheerful; he is bright; he is earnest 3, his i
‘ eyes shine as clearly as they ever did; and if you i
think he has lost the facility for saying in a real 1
strong way, with a strong clear head, you have :
not talked with him lately. I believe, to put it
‘6 stronger, I am dead sure, that his determination
' was never so stout. It may be improper to use ,1
l. the word “stout” with reference to his determi- J ‘
nation, but I do not know of any other word that g I
' will fit it so well. I say, he never was more 3
i earnest; he never was more useful; he never was 3
' more greatly beloved and admired and highly
, regarded in every way than he is today; and in
the full strength of wisdom, great-hearted kind- 1
. ness, tremendous industry, his canny Scotch com-
'3 mon sense, and American common sense, he is V
at his greatest today. But it is not what we say
‘ today ; of course, I cannot say it ; but it is what is
, . shown here, what each one feels today. I am only
g a short acquaintance of President Patterson’s.
. Many of you are his old acquaintances; many of
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if E FORrIErH ANNIVERSARY. E
' 3? you his students; but there is not asoul here 3
L E today who does not have this feeling about this E
E man that he is worthy of the love of his fellows; E
f E that he is worthy the distinction of having a E
EE E great multitude of honest, thoughtful, earnest, J
E sensible people feel in their very heart the way 'E
'1 E ' you feel, and I feel, and everybody knows, of the E
E usefulness of President Patterson, and you cannot E
if say anything that adds to that; you cannot think 3
' of anything that adds to it. E
. .( ' The greatest question in all life is, what shall E
E be thought of us hereafter; what is the record E
. E where the accounts are finally kept? But the l E
i E" next thing dearest to the human heart is, what E’
F E - do the people who know us think about us? Do E
‘ Eli; they think this man is earnest, honest, Wise, faith- E
E ful: his word ringing true every day? They will E
E . forget his little combativeness ; they will look upon E
,( EE it as an evidence of strength and not weakness; 4'5,
(‘1 El sometimes hard-headedness ; but they won’t forget ‘E
(E his constant, sincere, honest effort. They like you - I -
El and like you in every way. We are your friends; E
r E we honor the memory of your past work, and we E
E honor you still while you are with us.
EEFEE [
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t PRES. Ms. K. PATTERSON.
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)5 311mg: flutters gamma
"I COULD well have wished that both the <
I 3 duty and the responsibility of speaking for
‘3 the Trustees on this occasion had 'been com- f
t mitted to abler hands than mine. But while not 5
‘- feeling at liberty to decline the compliment which
i the imposed duty brings, I find myself em‘bar- ,:
,1 rassed at the very threshold by my personal rela- :
t tions to the distinguished subject of the honors
t we wish to bestow. My affection for President 1'
f Patterson has been of such long standing and of ' ‘
’ so sincere a character that any eulogy I may be- ;
t stow upon him will almost assume the complexion f
t of a compliment to myself.
[5 I met the President for the first time when I
vi matriculated as a student in the A. & M. College :1
, l' in 1870. From that time to this we have been i
l friends. In looking back over this long period l
t and fully realizing all that I owe to him, it is a .
t great honor to me that during all this time I J
i have had the right to call him friend. In 1870,
. the A. & M. College occupied and owned that .
‘ magnificent estate known as Ashland and Wood-
- land, on the opposite side of the city. The great ,
p ‘ Civil War had been closed but a few years, and .
. the South was still prostrate from its ravages. In
‘ the general wreck of the great struggle there had '
" gone down all, or nearly all, of her educational
g institutions. The result was that many of her
’= young men had come up to the College, allured by
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333 33 FORTIETH ANNIVERSARY.
' 1‘3 3 the hope of being able to labor during a part of '1,
3 3 each day at such remuneration as would enable ‘2"
3 3 . them to maintain themselves at school during the ‘
, :33 remainder. There was a very large part of the 3
'. 33! student body composed of these young men from R
3 - 3 the South. They hailed from the Carolinas to 3‘7 ,
33 Texas; they were as fine and manly a set of young 2;
3 men as one could wish to meet. I mention this
3‘ fact as introductory to a statement I wish to make .-
f 3 . concerning the relations between the students and l
33 the President. In all the time I was at the A. & - 3 =3
3,3 M. College I never. heard a student speak disre- ,
33 spectfully of the President; they all loved and ,
,.'3 admired him; and as'I now remember the situa- f‘.’
133 tion, I do not believe they would have submitted 3 .
,3" to anything which savored of disrespect to him I Q
333 whom they loved so well and in whom they had . 3,.
i, such implicit confidence. The boys I knew here 3
333 from ’70 to ’73 are now, if living, long past the 2‘3
333 heyday of life. They are scattered to the feur ' 3
!333 ' " winds of heaven. Occasionally it is my good for- ~ 5
:3;-i tune to meet one of them, and always the first 3 ‘ 3‘
‘.3 333 inquiry is for news of the President. 7
3 During the period I was here, the A. & M.
‘. College, although a State institution, was a part