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SPONSORED BY TH'IC UNIVERSITY OF KICN'I‘I‘CKY ‘
ALUMNI ASSOCIA'I'ION
LAFAYETTE HOTEL
I LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY
‘ ‘ MARCH 23'). 193?:

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T O A S T M A S 'I‘ E R
Du. FRANK LlaRoNn MCVI-zx‘
I'RI-ZS’IIII’V'I' on: 'llll' l,'\'I\'IiI{SI‘I'\' (n: KENTUCKY
THE SPIRIT OF
_IAMES KENNEDY PATTERSON
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AS I KNEW HIM
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THE FATHER OF A UNIVERSITY
PROFESSOR (;I-ZORUF ROBERTS -

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5 5 JAMES KENNEDY PATTERSON

i MEMORIAL STATUE .

5‘ ' UNIVERSITY CAMPUS i
‘ .' ' FRIDAY, JUNE 1, 1934 ‘

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l DEDICA'I'ION 3,,
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JAMES KENNEDY l’.—\'l"l‘liRS()N ;
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l‘ THE PATTERSON MEMORIAL COMMI’PI‘EE
{ _
S ALEXANDER BONNYMAN, Chairman
- CHARLES N. MANNING, Secretary-Treasurer
i PRESIDENT FRANK L. l\’l(IVliY, Chairman of Exet‘ulive (lonnnittee
.
i MRS. FRANK I..;\1)AMS (Mabel H. Pollitt)
_" MISS MARGARET 1. KING
RODMAN \VILEY
‘ DEAN T. T. JONES ‘
PROFESSOR E. W. RANNELI s l
:3 CHARLES R. BROCK was Chairman until his death in 1928 i
: PROFESSOR VVAIJI‘IZR K. PA'rrERSON mm a member until hiS i
' death in 1932 l
; CAlHJ-JGRAM 'ro PRESIDENT MeVEY: l
it“ “Paris, France, May 3], l934. Regret not with you for i
unveiling Of monument to my beloved l'riend, President l’at- g
' terson. CongratulationS and greetings to you and Committee. 3
- “:\I.l€x;\Nl)liR BoNNrMAN.” .
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PROGRAM (l()l\llV[l'l"l‘l“.li j
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i PROFESSOR R. l). McIN'rYRE, Chairman :i
PROFESSOR E. A. BUREAU l
._ DOCTOR H. H. DOWNINO i
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‘ Professor of ('.hl'isliun Maurine, 'l'runsylulnizl (2011ch
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3:“ THE INVOCATION 3

‘33 1
DR. ELMICR Euswokm SMnnn’ 1' 1’

‘ UR Heavenly Father, amidst the beauty and quiet of this

_- 0 open sanctuary of thine, we invoke Thy blessing upon our i
service. We thank Thee for our national heritage, wrought ’ l
out through the faith and sacrifice of the leaders whom Thou '

g raised up to guide our nation in the days that are past. We

? bless Thee for the pioneers who in courage and devotion laid ’

} the foundations of our own commonwealth and into the fruits ,

'_ of whose labors we today enter. Above all, we thank Thee I
for men and women of the past into Whose hearts thou didst ‘
put the great ideal of education for all the people. May we

I conserve our noble heritage that comes to us from so many 1

l sources and pass it on to coming generations, enriched by our

‘ own contribution. Especially do we thank Thee for this J
University and for him whose name we memorialize today. if, ‘
We are pleased to acknowledge our everlasting obligation to (

l him for the courage, devotion, administrative skill and high 1

i ideals of education that marked his whole life. We speak not t

i only for ourselves, but for the great host which no man can i ‘1

I number, whose lives have been influenced for good by this l

i great man.

% Prosper this University today, we pray Thee, in the whole ' ‘

3 round of its varied and useful enterprises. May he who j ‘

? administers its affairs, and they who serve under his leader- ’ i

1 ship, enjoy thy guidance and support in the heavy burdens ‘ l

i that fall to their lot in these difficult times. Awaken our '- l

i citizenship to the incomparable value of education—the life _ 3

i of our commonwealth. i

Bless all who have had a part in this memorial—the artist l.
who by his genius has embodied so beautifully in bronze the

; personality whom we honor today, the contributors who by J 3

1 their means have made this memorial possible, and all on this 3

1 program who by their contributions are to bring this enter— ‘
prise to a happy close. ‘

L We face the future with confidence, our Heavenly Father. _ (

‘ thoroughly persuaded that what Thou hast begun in those .-

i who lived before us Thou wilt bring to successful completion 1

l '2

(

W35. - . . , . Mmm..‘a_u-V..v-a-~w_____.._W_____f, 1‘

 I j
(I through us and those who are to live after us. Accept, we
I," pray Thee, this afternoon our devotion and our service in the
I' name of Christ our Lord, Amen.
f INTRODUCTORY REMARKS BY THE CHAIRMAN I
We have met to honor and to perpetuate the memory of a l
‘2, > man who is dear to those of us gathered here and who is '-
k honored by a host of citizens of Kentucky. Many who know I
~‘ somewhat intimately the early history of the University like I
V to think of him as its father. After the loss of his son, he .
4‘ said that the University had since been to him a son, and l
-. upon it he lavished his affections and worked for it with all '
i. of his energy and great ability. Between him and many a _
student there developed a relationship that was like unto that
, of a beneficent father and an affectionate son, a relationship
that greatly enriched the lives of those students.
, He dreamed of a state university conceived in the fullest *
i meaning of the term. He longed to see its full fruition, but ’
it was not to be, for he was compelled to spend his time in
f laying the foundations, which time and again had to be
I; defended against attacks of bitter enemies, and once had
‘1- to be rebuilt after being almost demolished. His was an un-
conquerable spirit that would fight alone for what he thought
was right, and against odds that would have driven lesser
i, , ' souls to surrender.
At the end of forty-one years of service he left not only a
solid foundation, but he saw growth that must have cheered j
“ his soul in his last days in his home upon the campus which L
j he had occupied for forty years.
I, Alumni and faculty members of the days of President
Patterson have a feeling of great gratification that this en-
during memorial is being dedicated to him, and I am sure
all others present join with us in this expression of admiration
: and affection.
I Mr. Charles N. Manning, Secretary and Treasurer of the
t Patterson Memorial Statue Committee and President of the
" Security Trust Company, the Executor and Trustee under
; the will of President Patterson, was one of those students
j' whose lives were touched and inspired by the life of President
‘E' Patterson. He has a large part in this work of love that is
i
I? _.. . .

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. being consummated today and it is highly fitting that he ‘
, should have been chosen to present the statue. I take pleasure ;
_ in presenting Mr. Manning, who will present the James ;
- Kennedy Patterson Memorial Statue to the University of ‘
Kentucky, after which it will be unveiled by Mr. Manning’s
i granddaughter, little Miss Elinor Manning Isaacs. i
l
I PRESENTATION OF THE STATUE
i Mk. CHARLES N. MANMM; ,
: Mr. Chairman, President McVey, Dr. Lukeman, Members ‘
of the Faculty, Officers and Friends of the University of l
Q Kentucky: 1 bring you greeting and felicitation from the :
‘ Patterson Memorial Committee.
. Ten years ago, almost to the minute, a group of men and
women who were connected with or friends of this University , "
’ assembled near this spot and with words of admiration, appre—
’ ciation and affection dedicated the residence in which James ,I ‘
Kennedy Patterson had lived for many years, and in which ';
, he had died, as a shrine to his memory. The tablet affixed to '
, its wall recites that from 1869 to 1910 he was the President ‘ i
i of this institution and bears the quotation from Virgil: 1 ‘
“Haec olim meminisse juvabit"—hereafter it will be a delight ’ i
, to remember these things. i i
‘ And indeed it is a delight, Mr. Chairman, to realize that ,
‘ the fame of this great man has increased with the flight of ‘ 3
’ years and with the growth of this University, of which it may ~ (
‘ be truly said he was the father, for which he labored so long j i
and so zealously, upon which he bestowed his pride and affec—
tion while living, and to which he gave virtually his entire (
estate at his death. l
The foundations which he laid were so broad and strong :
that his successors have been able to build upon them a greater 2
institution than the means at his command permitted him ' A."
to erect; and the greatness of him upon whom his mantle i
has fallen is attested not alone by the additions which he has .
made to the achievements of his distinguished predecessor,
important as they are, but likewise by his earnest and con— {
stant efforts to honor his memory and to preserve and make - «-
vital the traditions which he has bequeathed. And doubtless

 3 l
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(..’ other friends and defenders of popular education throughout 2
il‘ Kentucky, in this moment of its distress and peril, remember— '1
ing the battles fought and won in its behalf by this indomit— '
li- . able Scotsman in earlier days, would join with the head of .
F: this institution in a paraphrase of Wordsworth’s apostrophe
to Milton and exclaim: “Patterson, thou shouldst be living at
:1 this hour; Kentucky has need of thee!” ‘
E For many years it has been the dream and aspiration of
many of the alumni of the University of Kentucky, the
}' former pupils and steadfast friends and admirers of James
l- Kennedy Patterson, that a statue to his memory might be
p erected on this campus. The subject had been discussed prior
l7 to the death of Dr. Patterson, and in his will he bequeathed
" one thousand dollars to aid in the project. When the “Greater j
‘ Kentucky” campaign was inaugurated, it was stipulated that 3
5 per cent of the subscriptions should be allocated to that
purpose, and shortly after the death of Dr. Patterson, chielly .
E due to the initiative and persistence of Walter K. Patterson,
l“ whose admiration and affection for his distinguished elder
brother knew no bounds, the Patterson Memorial Committee
'33 was formed to solicit, collect, conserve and apply funds in
5' the consummation “so devoutly wished.” The Honorable
" Charles R. Brock, a native of Laurel County, Kentucky, a
'1 pupil and devoted friend of Dr. Patterson and an alumnus
of this institution, then a distinguished lawyer of Denver,
Colorado, who had conceived and first publicly mentioned a
\ memorial statue to James Kennedy Patterson on the campus
’J. of the University of Kentucky, was the first chairman of the
committee and rendered untiring service to it until his death.
3'- besides making a generous cash contribution. Associated
‘V with him on the committee were Miss Mabel H. Pollitt (now
Mrs. Frank L. Adams), Professor Walter K. Patterson, Dr.
' Frank L. McVey, Dean T. T. Jones, Honorable Rodman Wiley,
‘ and this speaker. After the death of. Mr. Brock, Mr. Alexan-
1 der Bonnyman, of Knoxville, Tennessee, who had been one A
I of the earliest pupils and a life-long friend of the former ‘
- President, was induced to accept the chairmanship of the
', committee. His energy and business talents, as well as his .
: personal generosity, greatly facilitated and expedited the
5’. work of the committee, and it is deeply regretted that one of
i: his frequent European trips has prevented his presence here
l - ,
n w . , . ,_

 E today and his participation in these exercises. After the ' t
death of Walter K. Patterson, Miss Margaret I. King and f ‘
‘ Professor E. W. Rannells were added to the committee, and V, 5
> they have by their wise counsel and cheerful cooperation i
,_ greatly aided in the completion of its labors. Dr. Frank L. <1
' McVey, President of the University, was chairman of the _ j
' Executive Committee, and his sympathy, his taste, and his [
wisdom informed and guided the committee in all its tasks.
It is no less a pleasure than a duty to express our grateful ;
acknowledgment of his unfailing patience, tact and interest. ,

The will of Professor Walter K. Patterson, whose opinions '
and wishes during his life were naturally very influential with ;
‘ the committee, directed his executor to add five thousand l
dollars to the fund for the monument whenever it should i ;
amount to fifteen thousand dollars.
After his death, in correspondence and personal interviews ‘ l
with Dr. Augustus Lukeman, one of the most gifted and most ‘ :
famous of living sculptors, the committee ascertained that, 4 1'
through the generosity of certain friends of his, it would be -
possible, without further delay, to augment the funds in the ‘ 1

hands of the committee to the required sum of fifteen thOu—
sand dollars, whereby the bequest of Professor Walter K. i; ,
Patterson would become immediately available and the statue ji ‘5
might be promptly erected. And so, on June 21, 1933 a con— i
tract was made by the committee with Dr. Lukeman for the i
statue. Mr. Maury J. Crutcher was appointed supervisor of 1
construction. 2 ;
How well the committee and those associated with them i
and the sculptor have performed their task, you may shortly j l
judge; for it is neither my province nor my purpose to :
attempt to express the significance or the inspiration, nor yet i
an appreciation, of the life of him whom this statue com- l
memorates. That privilege has been given, that duty assigned
to one who is, of all men living, perhaps best qualified by . l
‘ acquaintance, by learning, by association and cooperation,
as well as by feeling and eloquence, to discharge it. None I.
. better than he, few so well as he, can .
“Hammer the golden day until it lies l
A glimmering plate, to fill with memories.” 1
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(1 It is my part and my great privilege and pleasure, Mr.
(L, President, on behalf of the Patterson Memorial Committee
and of all who have contributed of their time, their labor or
. their means to the fruition of this day, to present to the Uni—
versity of Kentucky, as a token of their admiration, appre—
g“ ciation, affection, gratitude and pride, and as a symbol of
those unseen things which are eternal, this statue of that
E ' great scholar, great teacher, great statesman, great man,
. President for more than forty years of this great institution,
" which we hope will ever stand as a memorial to the useful
: and consecrated life of James Kennedy Patterson.
; (The audience standing, the American [lugs veiling llie statue
,2 were withdrawn.)
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' 'l‘m: CHAIRMAN: The University of Kentucky is indeed for—
~, tunate to have a man to continue the work of President .
I. Patterson who has the highest conception of the functions of ;'
,f a university in the State, and whose high scholarship and ‘
K‘ rare gift of executive ability have inspired the confidence of l
. his faculty and constituency and have enabled him to guide {
' the Un1vers1ty in a remarkable development during his in- l
cumbency. We trust him in these troublous times to lead in
a] ._ . , , ""P“—‘“WA.N ~ :~ -

 the struggle through which the institution is passing as did 1'
President Patterson in the days that tried his spirit. ' '
I have the honor to present President McVey, who will é
accept the Memorial Statue on behalf of the University. ' f
ACCEPTANCE OF THE PATTERSON STATUE FOR 3
THE UNIVERSITY OF KENTUKY !
BY l’kliSlm-ZN'I' FRANK 1.. i\'l(.‘VICY
It has been a good many years since the proposal to erect
the memorial to President Patterson was first made. Through
the interest of many alumni and friends, together with the
gift made by Professor Walter Patterson, and the work of i
the chairman of the committee, Mr. Alexander Bonnyman,
this beautiful statue has become an actuality. It is with '
' pleasure that I accept it on behalf of the University of Ken-
tucky. There are three reasons to be given to those who made
‘ this beautiful gift possible: first, because it is an expression .
of appreciation, generosity and love of a large number of , ‘1
, men and women; second, because it is a beautiful expression ‘ l
of the sculptor’s art; and third, because it carries the spirit of ‘
James Kennedy Patterson to all beholding it, and will serve E
as a constant reminder of what he did for the University, and ~;
in consequence will bring to the University staff, student 1
body, and alumni a new understanding of what the University }
is and of the service he rendered. ,
I INTRODUCTION OF THE SCULPTOR OF (
THE MEMORIAL STATUE
'I‘IH‘: CHAIRMAN: The man who can put into enduring form (
not only the physical outline of a human being but can make f
it seem as though the spirit were inhabiting and shining 1
through the form, possesses genius that contributes to the
l' perpetuation of the noblest qualities of man. 3
l The sculptor of the memorial statue of President Patterson (
l has a long list of notable creations to his credit which I shall i
l not attempt to enumerate. He is known to Kentuckians
( through two other pieces of work—a bas—relief of Daniel l
Boone at Paris and a portrait bust of Jefferson Davis at ,
l
Was. ,.. ,~ V, .. w . » , —————-_———w——————~M—_——a—————,~_——We

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Transylvania College. I have the pleasure of presenting Dr.
‘ Augustus Lukeman, whom we are delighted to have with us.
'5' (Dr. Lukcman rose and acknowledged the introduction with
i} a modest bow; then, extending his right arm toward the slaluc.
2 said: ”This is my speech")
THE CHAIRMAN: Among the friends of the University there i
t has been none more constant and loyal than he who will i
i! deliver the dedicatory address. He has manifested his friend- i,
ship both as a private citizen and as Governor of the
’ Commonwealth.
. Senator Stanley was a student in the University and was
.f another of those upon whom a lasting and beneficent influence
‘E was exerted by President Patterson that left in him a life-long
. admiration and affection for the President. Very fittingly
V did the University bestow upon Senator Stanley the Honorary
Degree of Doctor of Laws in recognition of his attainments
,3 and of his public services to the State. No more appropriate f
i selection could have been made of a speaker to deliver the -
“I dedicatory address. l
I take great pleasure in presenting Honorable A. 0. Stanley.
L DEDICATORY ADDRESS
'l'ur. HONORAHLl-Z A. O. S'I'ANIJ-zv
‘- ’ Former Governor and United States Senator
. of the Commonwealth of Kentucky
,‘1- Mr. Chairman, Mr. President, Ladies and Gentlemen: An
honor it is and a coveted privilege to be permitted today by
' your gracious leave to pay a deserved tribute to the great
f. President of this University.
Monuments—monuments after all are for the living, not
' the dead, and he whose semblance is cunningly wrought .
_ before you by the sculptor’s art needs no such assurance of
1' an enduring fame. Twice ten thousand aspiring youths, of {l
'. whose plastic lives he was at once the architect and the I
-‘ inspiration, have eternally inscribed upon throbbing hearts l,
l; and upon the tablets of love and memory the inefl‘aceable
‘ story of his nobility and his worth, and that proud and tender _
I tradition, handed down from father to son, shall endure so
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i
long as yonder bronze shall defy the wasting tooth of time. i
For him there is no need of “storied urn or animated bust.” '
The appropriate and eternal monument to the memory of 3
James K. Patterson is this University. Its green and undu- I ‘
lating campus was acquired by his keen foresight. Its um- -
brageous trees were planted by his tender hands and watered :
1‘ by his loving care. The foundations of these imposing walls ’
i] were set by his skill, and by his untiring energy, his transcen- i
y» dent genius and his indomitable will were laid, one stone
upon another. :
Were I asked “Where is the monument to James K. Patter-
son ?”, with one hand I would point to this University and with ,
the other to the accomplished manhood of the Commonwealth l
of Kentucky.
On the 19th of June, 1842, a penniless emigrant, Andrew E
Patterson, with his good wife, Janet, and a family of small 3
children—the eldest, James, hopelessly crippled—landed in I
‘ the harbor of New York. For long weary months in the mills '
i. of New England and New York in vain he sought for employ— }
l ment in the only trade he knew, that of “block cutter.” Then 1
i" the poor family are swept westward toward the thinly peopled i
frontiers of the new world. i
President Patterson himself has given us a graphic and l
pathetic picture of the hard, hard life of Andrew Patterson i
and his family out there in an Indiana clearing. Says Presi- 3
dent Patterson: i
' “My father, whose health was never robust, knew little ‘
or nothing about farming. Scottish villages and calico l
printing establishments do not furnish the best training ‘
for a man who at forty-two years of age is expected to 1
take up a remote uncleared farm and make a living _=
thereon. * * * l.
, “Hence it was that more and more upon the energy, l
untiring industry and practical economy of my mother _
{3‘ depended the upbringing of the family. * * *
1 “My mother was anxious not simply to keep her family i
i,‘ respectable but to keep them just a little better than her I
neighbors. The making and the mending, the cooking (
. and the dairy work, the washing and the ironing, the 1
direction of much of the farm work, all fell to her lot. .
l

 l .;' 2 ‘1

iv ,

HY ‘

For weeks at a time during busy seasons of the year she

if was up until midnight, snatching a few hours of sleep

i‘ when she could. She rarely expressed the regret that I

, knew she must often feel at having left ‘her ain bonnie

1. hoose in Alexandria.’ The majority of the inhabitants

i were quite illiterate. * * * My father could go and enjoy

them and laugh with them and at them. But not she. '

E . Even had she felt the inclination, which she did not, the

_ round of household duties would have prevented her.

She missed the companionship of Scottish folk, she miss-

;_ ed the village Kirk, but she never complained.”

_ And so in the desolation of a western wilderness, her infirm

spouse, her children and her God “became the ocean to the

: river of her thought.” Ah! my countrymen, that picture

' recalls the Corsican mother bearing her martial son upon a :
couch emblazoned with the story of Aeneas and breathing I

into his aspiring soul an ambition that in after years did

1; shake the world; the noble Virginia mother with her manly

-: son at her knee, imbuing his plastic youth with that invincible

‘1' love of truth and duty that afterwards made him the beloved

E5 and revered Father of his Country. Did you ever stop to think ‘

i" that behind all this world’s immortals there stands such a

i. mother? ‘

I remember thirty long years ago and more, when a young

,2 congressman, I used to wander at night through the long

' avenues of the most beautiful capital in the world and to stand -

. in the great circles where the wealth and genius of the nation

has been devoted to the perpetuation of the memory of her

deathless dead. There sits the jurist in his robes, and yonder

' stands a statesman in the pose in which, in an elder and better

j.. day, he was wont “the applause of listening senate to com-

. mand;” and here the warrior and his horse instinct with fire,

N catching the scent of battle from afar. And then I thought

_ that I could descry in the misty moonlight in the silence of the

1" night the shy, shrinking figure, modest as a nun, of some

1 grand and forgotten mother whose agony, whose labor and

.- whose sacrificial love had given her darling boy to his country

i and to immortality. ‘

i, As a senator I gave my support to the right of woman to a

X full participation in the political activities of this country