xt7ghx15n565_227 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ghx15n565/data/mets.xml https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ghx15n565/data/0000ua001.dao.xml unknown 18561957 9.56 Cubic feet 33 boxes archival material 0000ua001 English University of Kentucky The intellectual rights to the materials in this collection are held by the University of Kentucky Special Collections and Digital Programs.  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. James K. Patterson presidential papers Group portraits. Political letter writing Kentucky--Lexington. Universities and colleges--Finance. Women's colleges--Kentucky--North Middletown. Newspaper Clippings text Newspaper Clippings 2016 1874 1874, undated section false xt7ghx15n565_227 xt7ghx15n565 : HABEAS CORPUS AND CIVIL LIBERTY. ‘ can citizens, inherited from Englishmen.

Hubcas Corpus is justly regarded as the bul— But it is only inherited. They have never

/ wark of freedom by Englishmen and Ameri- , yct fought, to establish it. “hell they do

A cans. It is peculiar to the .\nglo Saxon 1 they will prize it more, and guard more seru-

race, and no people are justly entitled to be I pulonsly against its violation. Once, indeed,
called free who do not possess it, or possess- " while yet colonies, they fought to secure the
ing it, fail to guard it as the foundation of benefits of its provisions. Among the griev- ‘
all their liberties. The liarons of Runny- ances enumerated in the Declaration of In—

mede rebelled against King Jonx because dependence, this occurs, am] it touched a

t its implied provisions were disregarded. So ! chord that vibrated to the heart of every

i sacred did the English people eonsidciulfag— . freeman. The. fathers of the Republic took I
no Charla, in which Ila/nus Corpus was vir— earc'to incorporate it in the (.‘onstitution,
tually contained in all its essential provi- and to provide for its suspension only by
SIDES, 11$ lllC ground \\‘tll‘k (if their lltllitnltll Congress in 501150115 of grout national lim'il’
existence, that between the date of its orig— J and forthe shortest possible time. No nation
inal promulgation and the accession of the i that has it not is free. X9 nation that looks
Tudors, no fewer than thirty-eight solemn , upon its suspension with unconcern, or the
confirmations by successive sovereigns, are i refusal of its provisions to the humblest of
recorded. These ratilications were not al— 3 the oppressed, deserves to be free. In our
ways extorted from weak and pusillanimous l haste to be. rich, in our cngrossmcnt
monarchs, like .loitx, llt-zxnv Ill, and i in the material pursuits of life, we are in
llnxnv VI. The greater number are from i danger of bartering the noblest heritage ever
their ablest and most self-willed kings. .l‘ln- , bequeathed to man for a miserable mess of
WARD Ill ratitied it no less than fifteen i pottage. .-\cquicsceucc in wrong becomes :1
times, and Iltcxttv IV, founder of the Lan- crime. The refusal to see the consequences
eastrians, six times. This shows how jeal- 1, which must inevitably arise from deliberate
ously they guarded the great charter of their i and persistent violations of inherited rights
freedom. The danger lay not so much in i in the interests of political parties when the
attempts at subversion on the part of her , Republic is menaccd by no danger, save from
weak monarchs as of her able and imperious | those who, for their own hehoof, lay their
ones—men like the conquerors of t‘recy i hands on it vitals, argues an indifference
and Agincourt. Ilut military fame and great [ which is criminal and sucidal.
executive ability only made them guard with I From the bill lately passed by Congress

, greater \\‘atehfulncss the actual and possible i we quote: “It shall be lawful for the l’resi—

l aggressions of their possessor upon JIagna l dent of the l'nited States, when in his judg—

l C'harta. Holding. as they did, the purse- : ment the public safety shall require it, to
strings of the nation. every infraction of the Suspend the writ of IIabcas (i'orpusf’ \Vhat
charter of freedom was resisted, and a vote | does the Constitution say? “The writ of
of supplies conditioned only by a substan- t Ifabeas (brptts shall not be suspended unless
tial redress of grievances. j when, in cases of rebellion or invasion, the

It has been supposed by many that IIabcas i pttblie safety may require it." \thre exists 1

i Corpus had no existence until its provisions i rebellion or inrasion? Certainly not within
were formulated by Lord Snarrnsnt’nv, and I the limits of these United States, unless it be i

I passed by Parliament in 1679, in the l the invasion of the rights of the people, i

i31st year of CHARLES II. This is a mis- ; guaranteed by the Constitution, by an tin-l,

Hake. In the Cllill‘tcl‘ L‘Stol‘ted from Kingrscrupulous Executive, backed bya servilc

| Jon}: occurs the following language: “No i Legislature, whose sole object is to perpetu-

ifreemun shall be taken or imprisoned, or bt‘ tlis- , mg 1110 rule of a minority, though at the ex-

i seizztl of hisfreehohl, 0r liberties, or free customs, ; Penge of all that the fathers 0f the Republic
l orbs out/aired, or exiled, oranyotherzrise destroyed, ‘ thought worth fighting for, and worthy of
1, nor will ll'L' pass upon him, nor-send upon him but ' freemen to live for.

l by laugr‘ul judpmmzt rfhis pews, or by tin: lat/10f Contrast with this the late pro Vision for
i the hunt. Il'e trill evil to NU mun. lt't‘ trill nottlrlay j suspension of Ifabcus (,ln'pus by the British
to any nuznjustiec or right." t Parliament in disaffected Ireland. There
l NUhh’ “'OI'dS [11050; and “Oi “WW “'t‘l'dS hC‘ ' agrarian outrages had madelife and property
cause they were intended to be Olil‘OI'COd. i insecure. and the ordinary constabulary was
i 'I‘wenty-tive of the great Durcnsoflht‘ l'Oillm l, unable to maintain order. Provision was
i were appointed 10 Sc: lhx‘c 11l'<}‘v‘i-\'l”ll" 91“" made for its suspension for a limited time,
,ried out, and the repeated emitirmations in but “my under the greatest Poggiblc 511th-
this and subsequent reigns 5110“ 110“ “"‘” l guards. The Lord Lieutenant found it nec-
they and their successors fulfilled tlieirtrust. 2 csqtry to suspend it, but confined the sus-
X0 0119 can dOUhi lh‘h 11"me CUFF“ hl “11 I pension to a single district in a single county,
‘; its essentials is contained in the llilrflgl'fll’h . and then innntalia‘cly reported to the Home
3 we have quoted. .\Ir. IIALLAM. in his “311th , ()tlice in full the reasons why. IlutC'ongrt-ss
dle Agefizn observes thht “from the era ofKing I makes provision for its suspension at the dis—
JUHNIS charter, h hlh-‘t hh‘h been 1‘ clear ', cretion of the President, in a time of pro-
principle of the English Constitution that no ‘ found peace. in all the States and
; man can be detained in prison without trial. l among 111e:;S,1)OO,OU() of people who Compose
l “'hether com“ or .lhi‘th‘fl‘ framed the “Th Ofl this l'nion. Is not this such an occasion as
{Ilabeas CW1)“ i” 6“"thth ‘0 the i the possible one to which IIALLEM referred
spirit Of this Chhlr‘hy 01' h’hhd h already ih when he said: “Ifmeretemporary circumstnzces
. their Register, it became from that “h the i or the doubtful plea of politiml necessity shall
i right 0f every subject to demand it- That 1 lead mm to tool: on its denial with apathy, the most

writ, rendered more adirely remedial by the t dis(in_r/uishiny character of our Constitution will
SWING 0f CHARLIE II, bl" Jhml‘h’d '1” the i be qfacrtl.” Lord ('IIATIIAM, when referring
broad basis of JIagna Charm, is the principal , to this great bulwark ,,,~ Civil liberty. once
bulwark 0f EhghSh liberty.” Again: “1‘ is said: “Iz'rcry man's house: is his t‘AsTLIL It
’ obvious lhht these word-"i interpreted h." “h." 3 may not be protected by moat or cll‘(llt'l))‘i(l_(/t',' it
110ml“ 00”” 0" 141‘": COhVCY 1‘“ ample secur— i may be no more than a straw-thatched shell which
it)’ fUI‘ the tWO main rights 01. Ch“ societyfl i tit»: zrintls of hcaren may pierce and the ruins of
i- 6') rights 0f property hh‘l l’hh‘”hill liberty l hearrn (ln‘nch, but thc It’inf/ of England may not
0f the citizen. i entrr it—hc dare not:y I
I Bl“ Englishmen “‘01'0 not ”“"‘“ lhi” 1- \Vc do not look so much to the population
any new immunity or right had INCH of our great cities for the just indignation
granted them by the promulgation of fling/11a l which shall rebuke the servility of the
Chart”. It was not l00k0d upon 35 11 l National Legislature and the grasping am-
concession, and to that extent a curtailment, l 111th," of the Executive, th- to the sturdy
0f the I‘UY‘JI prerogative- JMIIW (WU/i“ “hr“ 1 _veomanry of the country—the inhabitants of
only a recognition of the sometime dormant the rural districtg_ T1”, large citicg are ab—
provisions embodied in the charter produced l sorbed in manufactures, commerce, and the
by STEPHEN LANGTOX, Archbishop ot‘t‘anter- { accuunnulation of wealth from these sources,
bury, ""hh'h had 1’00” granted h." ”15th I l most of which consists in stocks and per-
on his accession to the crown in 1100, one t, Sonal 1’1'0}‘01‘t."- These, from the insecure
hhhdl'Cd hhd fifteen years before HUN-V"- ,' nature ofsuch investments, and there liabili—
.\IEDIC. Nor was it new in thctime 01' HENRY l ty to tluctuation in value, thereby endanger-
1. His charter promised that he would i ing the ragularity and uniformity of their
110K seize the I'CVL‘XIUCH 01‘ 1h” Chhl‘Ch; l dividends, are more ready to acquiesce in
that he “"1”“ “01 ”Mlle“ the “11W!“ : violations of fundamental law which do not

V by feudal OXZIOIiUH-s. Illltl that in I'OHPL‘UI ‘0 1 innnediately threaten their investments.
thc masses of the people—the Saxons—he , (Jivil commotion is their abhorrenec.
““th regard ‘hl‘l Uth'W the thS (If ED- ‘ They will endure anything rather than risk
\vAno 'rnn (‘oxtrussoic pron this charter, l civil war in which they may be ruined.
found by LAxo'rox in a monastery, and l Ilcnce great capitalists and monopolists are
shown by him to the Ilarons of King .Joltx, I always found to he the strongest sup—
was founded dirty/nu Charla. Ihtt neither ' porters of do jitcio Hovcrnmcnts, whether

ldid its provisions originate with EDWARD founded on usurpation or not. Iiut the ag-

‘ Tut: (,‘oNIv‘Iissolt. Ile based his laws on the L rieultural community, and this, fortunately

l laws of lC'ritEmmm‘, ALFRED 'run ”HEAT, 5 constitutes the large majority of our popu~
and King INA. Indeed they were rather E lations, are most jealous of the liberties they

1 a digest, a sort of Justinian l’andccts, cm— i enjoy. Their easy competence, removed
bodying and adapting previous laws to ; equally from penury and luxury, fosters a
the usage and spirit of his time. We think t healthy habit of independence. Their l
we could even show that the spirit of [Iabcas l wealth is not colossal, while it is securely 3
Corpus and the (treat ('hartcr existed ‘, invested in real estate. This constitutes ;
at a more remote period than this. So acute 1 them the bone and sinew, and the mainstay ‘
a writer as .\IoN'I‘I-zstnt-u.’ says that a fair in- i of the land. They are the natural break»

- tcrprctation of the Ilth chapter in thc (,ler- I water against the seas of innovation, which

mania of 'I‘Aci'rt's will show the gcniusof,‘ ever and anon threaten every free people.
the English Constitution, and an cxamina-I If thcy become careless and iuditlbrent, the .
tion of the lslandic Sagas proves un- l liberties of the country may be given up for
questionably that in legislation, and the i lost. ()ur trust is in them. The freemcn
criminal jurisprtulcnce of that remote I of America have not yet, we believe, l‘tlt‘got‘ i
Wiltirllllffiirll‘ll of the ggrt-at 4‘ll:|l‘lt'l' n-vistmf ton their liirlltriglil; and if \:\'L'l‘ [lie day I
“'c have shownthatllabt’as Corpusisimplicit- i shall come—~which may (Rod avert-«when
ly contained in the Magna Chat-ta of King i it shall be necessary to do battle for our
JOHN; that Magna (lharta was based on the l [Ia/was (hn‘pns and Mug/nu (,Viarta, as did the
charter ofIIL‘xItvI',tliattheehartcrofllrINItv t bravo old ltoundheads of ICugland, we be—
I only formulated and summarised the lawsuit licvc that another (‘tttnlWl-ILI. and another
I‘lmvann 'I'nn (,‘ox‘lr‘lcsson, and that the laws i ll..\.ucm-:.\' will find such compatriots to fol—

! of the (.‘onfcssor were a digest of the laws of} low them as taught to despots the salutary

‘ lC'rnumu-at‘r, Amutrzn and INA. l\'o law ; lesson that the many were not made for the

‘ outside of Itoman jurispudcnce has such an i few, and that the inalienable rights of a free
honorable and remote anccstry. No law like i pcoph- can not be violated with impunity.
it has ovcr existed in the legislation of all i .\lay it not be our fate to realize the truth bf
time. ()1in one analogous instance \'i'/.: the l (loldsmith's lilies,
right. of “appcal” among the llomansj “1H Fart-s the land to Iiautcnhn; ulsa pit-3,
This was the bulwah of lhnnan civil liberty I “""‘r“ ""“'”l' “""'”“l'h‘h‘” ““‘l "”'” th‘t‘fl)’;
till the, extinction of tho llcpublic, when it Jiliml'mum [“"“lm'my ”“l'rifll‘ "r "”'y “"1“

, . . A breath can make them as a breath has made‘
lllfl‘lrllltftl,l!t'lltf_: swallowed up Ill themrrcndcl' “I” n bold ,,,,ummlry’ ,I,,,1,.,.,,”,m.\.a,, l'l'hh‘, '
of all lt'gialitlivu :Intl l'Vl‘t'llllYt' power in the \\‘hcn once destroyed, can never bi‘ullppllcd."
linipcror. —-E'-E——'

It provided that no ltoman citizen con
I(lt-tnncd to death by the (‘I'ilninal (‘ouit
i should he cxccntcd until he should have lirsl,

 ' \\'\I;ti lll ratified it no l\'~i.\‘ than fifteen 5 pottage. .\equleseenee in wrong becomes a .
times, and lll'xu'.‘ l\', founder of the Lan— ' crime. The I‘eflh‘fll to see the t'otlseqlleilees‘
eahowa how _ieal— 5 which must inevitably arise from deliberate ’
othly they guarded the great eharter of their 5 and persistent violations of inherited rights .
fret‘donL The dang-,er lay not so much in 5 in the interests of politieal parties when the
attempts at .\‘lllH't‘l‘rlnll on the part of her 5 lit-public lHlllt‘lltlt't‘tl hy I11Hl:ln,'_{er,save from
weak monarchs as of her able and imperious 5 those who, for their own hehool', lay their
onesfirmeu like the eonquerors of (,‘reey 5 hands on it. vitals, argues an inditli-rencc
and Ap’iueourt. lhxt military fame and great 5 which is criminal and sueidal.
executive abilityonly made them guard with 5 l“rom the hill later passed by t‘ongrcss

5 greater watehfulness the aetual and possible 5 we quote: “It shall he lawful for the l’rcsi-

5 aggresflous of their possessor upou [Ilia/no 5 dent of the, llnitcd States, when in his judg-
Clzar/a. lloldinp‘. as they did, the purse- mont the public safety shall rcquirc it, to
strings of thcnatiou, every infraction of the suspend the writ of Jlalwas (.'urpzm." What
charter of freedom was resisted, and a vote docs the Constitution say? “The writ of
of supplies couditioucd only hy a SUlHttlll- t Ila/was (,'orpas shall not be suspended unless
tial redress of grievances. 5whcn, in cases of relnrllion or inraaion, the

It has been supposed by many that Ila/urns 5 public safety may rcquirc it." \thrc exists
(ibrpas had no existence until its provisions 5 rebellion or inrasionl Certainly not within
were formulated by Lord Sil.\l~"rrr:~‘1n'uv, and the limits of these United States, unless it he

passed by Parliament in 1679, in the the, invasion of the rights of the people,
31st year of CHARLES ll. This is a mis- 5 guaranteed by the (.‘onstitution, by an on»
take. in the, charter extortcd from King 5 scrupulous l'lxccutivc, backed by a scrvilc
JOHN occurs the. followng language: ”N0 5 Legislature, whose solc object is to pcrpctu-
fl‘t'<")/l(Ul shall [)6 lalwn or imprisoiml, or be tlls- 5 ale the rule, of a minority, though at the ox- 5
soiml of lzisjl're/told, or liberties, or free, Clix/01125, 5 pcnse of all that the fathers of thc licpublic
orbc Ullllttlt'Ctl, orrrilcd, oranyotlwrzriscdestroyed, t thought worth fighting for, and worthy of
nor will or. pass 111nm ltinz, norsrtal upon ltinz but 5 frccmcn to live for,
liyliiajlul judgment (if/11's peers, or in] the law of5 Contrast with [his the 55555. provision 5551.
(la: land. ll'c will sell to no man, W trill 'nolLlrlay suspension of Ila/mas Corpus hy the. British
to any lllttit‘jllslfcc or rig/lit." 5 Parliament in disatl'cctcd Ireland. There.

Noble words those, and not more Words hc- agrarian outrages had madclil‘c and property
cause they were intended to be enforced. l insecure, and the ordinary eonstalmlary was

5 'l‘wcnty—tivc “f 1h” SW91“ llarono “f 1h“ I't‘filhtl l unable to maintain order. Provision was

i were appointed to sue them: provisions car— 5 “55,515. 55,5. 55,5. suspension for 55 1155515051 55,555.,

51-icd out, and the repeated confirmations in 5 but only under the 5559515035 hofisihh; safc-
lhh‘ and Shhsetlheht reigns “hO‘V 110‘" “Oh I guards. The Lord Lieutenant found it noc-
thcy and their successors fulfilled lllL‘lI‘ll‘llSl. 5 05,11” to sup-pond 355 hm confined the 5115.4.
NO one can doubt that Ihlht‘t’lh‘ (.10/'1)"s ill 1‘11 5 pension to a sing/lo district in a single county,
its. essentials is contained in thC paragraph 5 and thcu immedia‘cly reported to the Home
“'0 have ‘lhhm‘l- M“ “ALL-Uh hl hi5 “Milt-h 5 ()llicc in full the reasons why. IlutCongrcss
dlc Ages,” observes ihhl “from the 01'“ Uth‘S 5 I]1tll{(‘,.-\ provision for its suspension at the dis—
JUIINKS’ charter, it hm“ have hCCh a 010‘” crction of the. President, in a time of pro—
principle of the English Constitution that no 5 found 1555;5(505 in all the States and
man can be detained in prison without trial. 5 “1110115.,- 51503850005000 0555901510 who compose
“VhEthCl' 0011115 of .lUSlh‘C framed the “'1‘“ 01‘5 this Union. Is not this such an occasion as
110115615 00’7”” h‘ 9"“1'01'lhhfi' ‘0 the , the possible one to which lIxLLmr referred
fil’h'it Of this clause, 01' found it already in 5 when he said: “Ifnwrrlcmporru'J/ circzunslmzces
their llcgister, it. bccznnc from that “1'11 the 5 or {lac a’oubZ/‘ul plea of political necessity shall

5 right 0f 9"“? ShthCt 10 demand h- Thht 5 local men to loo/coitus denial will: 4(1)(Lflt1/,lll€ most
“Tit: rcndcrcd “WW (IC’I-Z'L’lll remedial h." the distinguishing character of our Consiilulimt will
statute 0f CHARLES ll, bl“ .lhlm‘h‘d on ”‘5 beqflltccd!” Lord (JIIATIIAM, when referring
broad basis of ili'agna Charta, is the principal 5 to this great bulwark 5,5“ civil liberty, Once
bulwark 0f Englishlibcrty." Again: ”It is 5 said: “Every man's liousc is his CASTLE. It
UhViOh-‘l that those words, interpreted b." any l may not lie pro/cclcd by moat or draa‘ln'idgr; il
hOIIGSL COUN- or law, (30'1"0." 3“ ample sccur- 5 may be no more tlauz a straw-llzalclzal .slzcd 'Il‘ltl'clt
ity for the two main rights 01‘ ("Nil 500101."? i 1ch winds of lava-on may pierce (171(11ch ruins of
'i- E’u rights or property hhd l’hh‘hhi11 libcrty 5 lzcarcn drcncll, but [ch Ifing of England may not ‘
of the citizen. 5 enter (it—la: (taro not."

Bl” Englishmen “'01"? “ht ““7”"? that t- “'0 do not look so much to the population
an." new immunity or right had been i of our great cities forthc just; indignation
granted them by the promulgation of Jfayna 5 which 5.155511 5‘05,“th the 5,3“,th of the
Clairla. It “'33 “0t 1%th “P011 as 115 National Legislature and thc grasping am-
concession, and to that extent a curtailment, 5 bition 05‘ the, Executive, 4.5 to the sturdy
ofthe royal prerogative, Magma (‘ltarla was 5‘ ycomanry of tho country—the inhabitants of
only a rccognition of the sometime dormant '5 the rural digtricm The large cities are ab-
provisions cmbodicd in the charter produced 5 sorbed in manufactures, commerce, and the
h." STEPHEN LANGTON, AYChhiShOl) ofCantcr- 5 accunnnulation of wealth from these sources,
bury, “'hh‘h had been granted h." HENRY I 5 most of which consists in stocks and per-
on his accession to the crown in 1100, one 5 5:011:51 prayerty. T110595 from the insecure
hundred and MW?“ ."0111'5 before RUNNY- ‘ nature ofsuch in\'cstxncnts,aml thcrc liabili-

1 .‘IEDE- NOI‘ “'35 it 110W hHhC time Of HENRY , ty to fluctuation in value, thereby endanger:
5 1- “is (”h-"Wt” promised 1h?“ be “’Ohhl 5 ing the ragularity and uniformity of their
' not seize the. revenues of the ChllI‘Ch; i dividends, are more ready to acquiesce in
lthat he would not oppress IhC' Barons violations of fundamental law which do not
5 by feudal exactiona and that in I'Cw‘iX‘Ct 10 5 immediately threaten their investments.
tthc masses of the people—the Saxons—he 5 Civil commotion is their abhorrcnce.
5 would regard and observe the laws of ED- 5‘ They will endure anything rather than risk 5
5 WARD THE CONFESSOR. l'pou this charter, 5 civil war in which they may be ruined.
5 found by LAXHTOX in a monastery, and 5 llencc great capitalists and mouopolists are
l shown by him to the Baron; of King JouS, ‘ always found to be the strongest sup- _
5 was founded Jlayna Charla. But neither ' porters of dc faclo Governments, whether
5did its provisions originate with 1‘:D\\'.\R1)t founded on usurpation or not. But the ag-
i THE CONFESSOR. He based his law: on the 5 ricultural community, and this, fortunately
5luws of ETHELBERT, ALFRED THE GREAT, ’ constitutes the large majority of our popu-
5 and King INA. Indeed they were rather ‘ lations', are most jealous of the liberties they '
la digest, a sort of Justinian Pandccts, cm» enjoy. Their easy competence, removed
5b0dying and adapting previous laws to 5 equally frqu pcnury and luxury, fosters a
t the usage and spirit of his time. “'6 think 5 healthy habit of independence. Their
5 we Could even Show that the spirit of Ifubras t wealth is not colossal, while it is securely 5
5 Corpst and the Great Charter cxistcd invested in real estate. This constitutes 5
5 at a more remote period than this. So acute them the bone and sincw, and the mainstay
l a writer as )IoNTESQIEr says that a fair in- i of the land. They are the natural break—
5 tcrprctation of the llth chapter in the Gcr- water against the seas of innovation, which
linania of TACITI'S will show the gcniusof5 ever and anon threaten cvcry free people.
5 the English Constitution, and an examina- If they become careless and indifferent, the
tion of thc lslandic Sagas proves 11n- , liberties of the country may be given up for
l questionably that in legislation. and the. lost. Our trust is in them. The frecmeu _
l criminal jurisprudence of that remote 5, of America have not yet, we believe, forgot- t
5 WEE-spirit of the or. :a t-hurem- ovi”1+9i 51‘9“.“10” .t Co., of Louisville, 3,000 acres of wild latld in Bullitt
75.,‘0. littlk meats dull and nominal. l~lour tIiIiI_iiII_atI. I int 7 . t €10 01"lcr0—Ollell‘lll. cash the balance in
85mg) for low to fancy. .\ew potatoes scarce at to ..v,)@} (.Ol y, .t t. p . I.I .. , I
5 50; old peach—blows firm at $3 :20. one, two, and three years. llic latid lies between

CHIC-NW. Mlll' l7-—l"10“1'l5 ““”‘"0' f5” 9X\l““‘tva“lI‘l Belmont atid Pitts' Point. The firm which madc the
a 51mm" tirincr.I\\'beatIi.~I shrill; INN “t :11 5: fixing: purchase is composed of .l. A. Caldwell, W. IE. lil-
CIsli and closet atSl ‘.'.l, 01' . ttiicIatit :_s ', ~. . . .
libs gold at 51i‘,@.3l”.,e for .No. 2, closttig at -U-lLéC cash stone, Louisa Freedman, and William Cox. Some of
and seller June. Oats are higher at AIOI‘Ittlfli‘OC _‘Ul‘ “3%; these lands are connected With the Belmont and Lol-
“lllT- “"0 is “"“‘k ““5“,“ “”' N" 2‘ “1' 0y. ‘5 (ll-”o i‘ t s and were lurehascd b \lexander
at 51172820. Pork is lower at $.15 7.3 cash. lllghwiiies 50“ “1}" I “"I‘II‘CI: ‘ . n t (I0 1 y ’
are higher at SSe. . from . oorc, .1 crxo t . .

Later—5 l’. .\t.—l\‘hcat has been a shade higher _._“.—_I If
Illisllm'l‘nomb Cl‘lb‘il'g 5‘ 31 we” 3') ”115‘“ (”“‘ 1" The Knights Templar of this city, who had
unchanged. )tel an invitation to visit Nashville to-dav in

r . . ’._ n is weak; middlin nccc} “ ‘ ‘ "
lllfillltld‘lQ‘thl19a?ltlllV nicitltdling lll/‘.Ic. l“l<)lll‘#'l‘llfi Consequence of the death, and as a mark of respect for
market is (firmer itiid fairly active. “:lle:lt—l“ll‘lll; their dcccnscd brother, 1!. Cr. Hawkins, Past Eminent
Ohio and Indiana 81‘s??? 2”“? 01101.38 1;” ,é’ri-rfif}. Commander of Do Molay Contmnndry, of this city,
sold at 3'1 10. Coru— ti o ton tom 5 cat y: Ir 5,; _ , . ,
75c; \‘cllow Southern weak at T:ly(7.‘m; mixed \\ 951- Will remain and assuit tn tllo funeral obsequics on
em ’f-bgfific. Oats dull at lilihlllllt‘. lI’X‘OYISlgns—i‘lei; ppm“):
lot]: is quiet at SlSutlS 50. lacon is stea y. an W V .
hutch Whisky is dull at E'ZQ‘JL’P-lu New Music—“c are indebted to D. 1’.

BUFFALO. Mil." 11'4“?1"1\‘2“1'}“1."k‘1’t1§ “infill-III? Faulds, Esq., for two pieces of music, one entitled

57. \\'heat is neg ccte ' l o. L is ie a e . I , . II , . .
Corn is quiet: sales of‘ 203000 bush \\'cstcrnvat tinge. :‘l-OWSI Plendlnbsi b) II“. L. Johnson, the :tIhor
Oats active and firm; sales oflt)l),0Ull bush l\ estcrn at ‘Bemmes for the 1 man, by Joseph Aschel‘. icy
5559570? 01110 ““11 llldiim“ 593' I‘nghts “m "”‘ are just published, and will doubtless have a large
changed. we

DETROIT, May lT.~Wheat is lfli‘lc better; cxtrnIat ‘ '. ___...“—

Sl Sti‘No. 1 31 wall :31); amber S1 -l-'i{d.1 46:1:cgti ur . , I I ‘b ‘tcrian
Si 38.Y Oats Sictorrniixed. Corn quiet, but lirtn at The ladies 0f the IOIU‘UI‘d Pres 3
(Bigdic. Church will give a strawberry festival on tlleevcnings
. *_ t of the 25th and 26th inst, at the St. Charles Hotel, in
Ikoroigigoflll‘rk‘: 7'” l f 1‘0" Portland. Tito proceeds are to liojapplicd to the

Loxpox 3 fly 17~l 2. l'. .\l,—:>-'_1 Null 5 o .\-, I , . .
no sat-Md 7—10; do of 1&07. arousing; Eric 22 Hog. 0mm“ or»! Immuno-

2‘.’ 11-10. Consols anti bonds easier. __.... f. ,

Loxoox, May 17—5 r. .\i.—Consols 93 S—lfifli Personal—.\lanr M. J. \\ icks, Prestdent
91‘) '.'-lo. 5-"20 bonds of 150;, 90",!.i‘.)0‘._./; 0-30 bonds of the Memphis and Charleston Railroad, was ill the
of 1507,92 mogul T-ld. lzrle 23133332- city vesicular:

LtvnRPoon, May l7—l :30 r. t~t.—-'l‘lie cotton mIar- ' ' ———oo.———w
ket is (inlet- 5310-“ 1““ ”'0 ‘13-" 12,000 1"“05- “f. “““’" Colonel T. T. Crittenden is in the clti', tltc
3,000nro for spcetilitioti and export. ~3lldtlllllg ttp- . -
lands, 7 9-lGd; middling Orleans 0 lil-lud. guest of Logan C. Murray, Esq.

_._-__-
w ' ___—.._,fl
“ ‘" nuimmso BERTIE.
BOARD {1F TRADE MEETING. I
The Wonderful Colt Sold by Dr. llorr to Bonner. i
Report of the Committee on Merchants‘ I ___ I
Exchange Building Received I [From the Lexington ObsIerIvc-r aiidI Reporter] .
and Approved , .\Iambrtno Bertie exhibited lits potilts in
l front of the Obscrrer office on Monday morti-
_. __l_._._. ing to quite a number of critical and admir-
Important Action on the Wharf Tax. I ing eyes. Mambrino Bertie is the three- I
I year—old colt recently sold for $10,000 to
. , _ I Robert Donner by Dr. Herr, and in the esti-

The meeting of the Louisrtllc lloard of Trade, called motion of the purchaser is tithe most 0X-
for12z30 l". )1. yesterday, was well attended. At the traordinarv COlt tlle \\'Ol‘ltl has produced.”
appointed liourtlic President, A. O. Brannin, took the It is Silltl l)\‘ competent authority that his
chair, and briefly explained the object of the meeting. ”in (in tlle' Buckeye CODING hét year