xt7ghx15nj8d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ghx15nj8d/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19591105  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November  5, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, November  5, 1959 1959 2013 true xt7ghx15nj8d section xt7ghx15nj8d 'WinterseV Performance Is Outstanding
By CAROLE MARTIN .

Assistant Managing Editor
Experienced performers proved the determining factor
in Guignol'i successful production of Maxwell Anderson's
"Wlnterset" last night.
Stellar performances were delivered by Jim Slone, Bu&h
Hunter, and Charles Dickens. Hunter Is the only actor-stude- nt
of the three.
Mlo, the young Hamlet-lik- e
lead, wan excellently handled by veteran actor Slone. His treatment of character
and dialogue brought him close to a comparison with
Burgre Meredith, who was Mio In the film version of
this brilliant verse play.
Hunter portrayed the consumptive Trock with
feeling and conviction. He was exactly the type
of undesirable character you would expect to find Involved In so dastardly a crime.
In the action of the play, a poorly played Esdras would
be nearly overlooked. But Charles Dickens made the
character the Integral part Anderson meant It to be.
Fhjllls Haddlx survived a very difficult role due to her

Immense knowledge of characterization and technique.
Though usually the laurel winner, Miss Haddlx had a
little trouble being a convincing Mlrlamne In the first part
of the thrceacter.
However, her second part performance was nearly flawless, and rightfully so, for this was Mirlamne's meatiest
hour.
John Prlchard, usually a quite competent actor, had a
little trouble making himself understood and some of
his best lines went unnoticed. He played Garth Esdras.
Somehow Russ Mobley did not seem to play the part of
the demented Judge Gaunt as well as we had hoped. He
did have a few brilliant moments though.
Doug Roberts stole quite a few scenes in his role of the
mentally deficient hobo. Especially noteworthy was his
skillful pantomiming.
Tom Marston gave perhaps the most outstanding minor
role performance of the evening. As Trock's henchman,
Shadow, Marston played his death, (or
--

scene superbly.

Death scenes have a strange habit of slipping Into the

"hackneyed" classification, but the very bloody r Shadow
saved the whole scene from being labeled trite.' He conveyed his suffering remarkably well.
Linda Crouch, a New York floozy; Don Galloway, Carr,

the drifter; and Joe Florence, the organ prindrr Herman,
deserve recognition for their realistic performances. .
And Joseph Marks proved to be the finest of New
York's -- finest."
Special plaudit is warranted by the backstage crew.
The set decorations were some of the most forceful and
skillfully designed ever to grace the Guignol.
Several scenes In the production came off exceptionally
well, and from my side of the footlights the reason was
the fine directing of Wallace Briggs.
Particularly worthy of mention was the street scene
with no less than 13 people congregated on about
of the stage. Anyone acquainted with the theatre
Is aware of the difficulty Incurred In such a situation.
Without proper direction, this scene could have proved
lrritatlngly gauche. In last night's production, It seemed
as if no such difficulty ever existed.
one-fou- rth

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2

University of Kentucky

(7

Vol. LI

LEXINGTON, KY., THURSDAY, NOV. 5,

1959

No. 27

Med Center Bmildiii
To Be Completed Soon
195 spaces are ready now.
Service in the hospital have also
Department chairmen have been been named and an early appointThe Medical Sciences Building
of ihe UK Albert B. Chandler appointed for the following College ment of the Dean of the College of
Medical Center may be completed of Medicine departments: Anato- Dentistry is expected.
Biochemistry,
Behavlodal
Wittrup said the chairmen of the
by the end of this month, accord- my,
ing to Richard D. Wittrup, ad- Science, Medicine, and Psychiatry. departments of Microbiology, PathThe Dean of the College of Nurs- ology, Pharmacology, and Physlo-- ministrator of the University Hosing and the Director of Nursing
,
Continued on Page 2
pital.
He said the five million dollar
w,M"""MMM'"M"''''ir''i
wimjiimi
j...
building would definitely be finish,.;.Jy
ed by the end of the year.
The staff of the Medical Center
Library wil begin moving Its books
Into their permanent quarters In
the building about Dec. 1.
"The administrative offices of
the College of Medicine and the
College of Nursing will be on the
first floor of the Medical Sciences
if I
Building." Wittrup said.
.Bids for construction of the
dental wing of the building will be
opened Nov. 17. A contract will be
let about Dec. 1 and. construction
of the wing will begin shortly
'
thereafter.
"It will take about a year and a
it
half to build the wing." Wittrup
noted.
The dental wing, which will cost
over two millionn dollars, will have
six floors and about 70,000 square
feet of usable space.
The College of Dentistry Is expected to open in the fall of 1961..
A heating and cooling plant for
the center has been completed and
construction of . the nine million
dollar, hospital has begun.
"The only remaining building
being contemplated Is a laundry to
be built beside the heating 'and
cooling plant,- - said Wittrup. "By
the end of 1961, all phases of construction should be completed."
This view of the rear of the Medical Sciences Building was taken
About 1,000 parking spaces will
from a water tower on the Agricui' i. A Experiment Station Farm.
be available to faculty and staff
members,
students, and vistors
when the center is finished. A total

By MIKE WENNINGER

's

,.

-- '

,mii

llupp Receives Plaque

Adoph F. Rupp Jr. presents a plaque to his father on. behalf of the
Air Force. The plaque was In recognition of a tour of the Pacific
area Mr. Rupp made recently for the Air Forcei The presentation
was made during Wednesday's AFROTC drill session.

'i

all-camp-

all-me-

n's

men's standing, which was dropped
in favor of the
standing for fraternities.
Charles Schlmpeler, president
of IFC, said the dropping of pledges
who fail to make their
grades was a good thing.
He said when a man Is pledged It
is Impossible to know whether he
Is college material.
According to Schlmpeler, the
pledging would be on a trial basis
until a pledge had proven himself
by making his
all-camp-

us

committee.
IFC set up the committee Tuesday night to investigate the grades
of fraternity pledges and to make
recommendations to help fraternities to avoid . being placed on
probation. Members of IFC expressed the
opinion that low fraternity grades
were due largely to pledges who grades.
Schlmpeler said fraternities
failed to make a standing.
Continued on Page 2
Ken Harper, assistant dean of
men, said the committee should be
directive and should act on the
possibility that one of the two
Student Directory
pluzs be enacted. He added the
Today Is the last day men stucheck
the dents may change their address
committee should
pledges grades and also the curor phone number for the Sturiculum.
dent Directory. This can be done
This he said, could be used as In the Dean of Men's office.
a basis for reinstalling the all- mid-semes-

"mid-semest- er

4:

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i

Winterset, 8:30 pjn
Theatre.

Guignol

Kappa Sig Trophies
RecoveredAfter Call

Fourteen trophies stolen from
the Kappa Sigma house early SunU.S. Naval Officers Program, day morning have been recovered.
Kappa Sig president Mikey Conner
9 a.m.-- 4 p.m.
U.S. Naval Aviation Info. said yesterday..
Although several of the trophies-haTeam, 9 am.-- 4 pja.
been damaged, Conner said,
Lamp and Cross, 5 pjau. Room
"We are glad to have them back."
128.
He gave this account of tho reMortar Board, 8:30 pja Room
covery. "At about 11:45 Tuesday
College of Education Meeting, night m call was received at the
house b Johnny Fits water and a
9 aJ,-3:pjn Room 294.
male voice told him. If we wanted
College Chamber of Comour trophies back we could find
merce, 8:30 pan Room 2C5.
Dutch Lunch lab, noon. thta ander a tree across from the
Administration Building."
Football Room.
Four 'pledges left immediately
District Fat Cattle Banquet,
for the campus and found all of
6:39 pjn Ballroom.
the trophies piled in a cardboard
SUB ACTIVITIES

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-

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Kernel Copy Cat
The latest addition to the Kernel staff Is Copy, who complacently
sits In his box on the news desk, watching the copy cme In. Copy
waLJcred Into the news room recently and has since mado It his
home with the staff as his family.

hju

I)

Activities Today

:

Mniniriim-rrii-

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.

IFC Will Investigate
Dropping Of Pledges
The possibility of dropping
pledges with low grades or getting
academic" standing
the
lowered to the
standing
will be investigated by an IFC

of

box. Some were scratched, others
broken, and one was bent The top
of the 19S7 Homecoming display
award had been removed.
Bill Kaufman, who found the
box. said he and the other boys

checked the area around the Administration Building In hopes of
finding cxneone watching to see
If th h a ,pa Sigs came for their
trophic. Ha said there was no
sign of anyone.
A large cnetal greek letter, ripped
from the front of the house the
same time the trophies were taken,
was also recovered. The damage to
the letter-wa- s
estimated at $23 to
839.

* KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Nov. 5, 1939

2-- TIIE

..

....

Existentialism Called
Important Philosophy

')
t

V"

With an emphasis on Kierkega-porta- nt
"Existentialism Is the most im- philosophy that can be ard's reaction against Hegel's tech-callcontemporary," Dr. Roger nologlcal mass culture and pseudo-Chaco- n,
UK philosophy professor Christianity, Chacon defined some
of the philosopher's basic theories.
said Tuesday night.
to a phlloso- Dr. Chacon spoke
one upon
only trutn
phy lecture series audience on whch we can tVy act. The dls- -Ethlcal Norms In Existentialism tlnctIon between essence and exlst- and Philosophical Analyses."
ent nature can be defined, but
Summarising the main themes Mtut existence cannot be con- of existentialism, a European phi- - ceptuaU2ed
.
losophlcal movement of the 20th
ed

Joyre Malcomb

Tanl Djkes

Alton Spear

Marie Creech

UK Students Voice Opinions
On Privileges For B.M.O.C.'s
By CAROLE MARTIN

Assistant Managing Editor
Do you feel that a student should
be granted special pririleges when
he breaks a campus rule or fails to
live up to campus standards because he Is a "big man on campus?
The four students interviewed
this week had this to say about

IFC

Continued From Page 1
should not be required to meet
standing. He said
the
this was so because it is partly
determined by women students,
who are majoring in ' an easier
subject than are most male students.
"
Phil Austin, IFC vice president,
expressed the opinion that since
a student need only make a 2.0
standing to stay off probation,
fraternities should be placed on
all-camp- us

the same system.
.

A

proposal to reconsider frater-

nity Homecoming

displays

was

voted down by IFC.

Although IFC had previously
gone on record as not favoring
displays, three fraternities were
In favor of building Homecoming
displays.
First,, and second place trophies will be awarded to fraternities, 'Judged as having the best
displays, during half time activities
of the

game.

UK-Tennes- see

.

.

a recent incident on campus which
led to this line of inquiry:
Joyce Malcomb, Junior from
Louisville :
"I feel that any such Incident
should be settled as quickly and
quietly as possible.
"If a rule has been violated, I
don't think special privileges
should be given to a B.M.O.C. His
punishment should be the same as
it would be for any other student
who had done the same thing.
"If we are to have equality under the law in - our democratic
system, this Is the only way he
can be treated."
Paul Dykes, Lexington, junior:

"If an individual has attained

such status by virtue of some outstanding service which is conducive
to the common good of his school

or community, then I think recognition of such action in the form
privileges
would be
of certain
proper.
"However, as to any right or
privileges extended an Individual
'
by virtue of his social status or
financial position, which are advantages not open to others, I
would say no."
Marie Creech, .freshman from
.
Cumberland; .
"I feel that a BJLI.O.C. is supposed to set an example for the
rest of the students who look up to
him.
r
"Definitely, any disciplinary actios taken fas a particular ease

Campus Organization s
Are you saving PHILIP MORRIS, ALPINE,
MARLBORO and PARLIMENT PACKAGES?
If So, You Con Win
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should be same for every student
enrolled In the University."
Alton Spear, Kettle, junior:
"The stock answer of course is
'no' and that is what I would say,
too.
"I would like to qualify that,
however, by saying that when
ILM.O.C.'s are given separate living
accomodations, extensive newspaper space for their exploits, and
membership In exclusive prestige
organisations, they have a right to
expect liberal treatment In academic matters."

Xloper, Thomas
Huffman, Delia King. Gwyn
Jane Neff, Ellsworth Taylor. Charles Wade, Rebecca Bishop, Raymond Burklow, Carolyn
Kelley, and Pasty Mayhew.
Mc-Gow-

Jeweler-Silversmit-

an.

Gov. Bert Combs
Is UK Graduate

.-

...

1

....

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sMHtv

semester.
"Construction troubles, the difficulty of deciding upon a proper
curriculm, and the recruiting of a
faculty are the main reasons why
the college had to reschedule Its
opening," said Wittrup. "The target
date Is now the fall of I960."

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Kentucky's hew governor is a
UK graduate.
Bert Combs, newly elected governor, received his LX..B. from UK
in 1937. WhUe at UK Mr. Combs
was a member of Phi Delta Phi,
law honorary.
John B. Breckinridge, the new
attorney general. Is also a UK
graduate. Mr. Breckinridge, who
was a member of the KA Order,
received his A.B. In 1937 and his
L.L.B. In 1939.
ELECTRIC 'IN-CAAND INDOOR

,

;

Ity'
"Existentialist thinking differs
from scientific thinking . . . exls- tentlalist thinking li concerned
with the process of thinking and
disregards the results
It is a
method of philosophy."
Listing the weaknesses in the
tthlcg 0f existentialism, Chacon
said, according to Sartre, the in
dividual can commit anything as
long as he commits himself. Buch
fantastic lengths could produce
devastating results.
A weakness In the social ethics
of existentialism, according to
Chacon, stress both the category
of the Individual and distrusts
reason too much,
"Existential psychonana lysis
themes go back to Socrates
some claim that Socrates was an
existentialist." he added. -

Bled Center
Continued From Page

continuous

tm on

ra

h

The UK Art Department will logy will be appointed soon. He
show some of Its students work added that the department chair- men remaining to be appointed are
at the Arts in Louisville House.
Pediatrics,
About 28 works, consisting of those In Obsterics.
paintings and sculptures, will be Radiology, and Surgery.
The Medical Center is a federal
shown starting Nov. 6.
This Is the second time UK's and state project costing about Z7
Art Department has been Invited million dollars. The College of.
Medicine was originally scheduled
to show Its works there.
showing their works are to be completed this past summer
Students
Ju-H- si
Chou. Phillip Harris. Rob- and to accept its first class this

CONSOLATION PRIZE
ONE REED & CARTON SILVER SERVING TRAY.
Frists are on display at Villominot
105 West Maia Street.

existentialist work to Jean Paul
Sartre, he is the only one who ac- cepts the title."
Taking an ethical view of the
existentialist literary movement in
the early 1930's and 40's. Chacon
said that there were other phi- losophers besides Sartre to whom
the movement could attribute
more importance such as. Husserl,
Heidegger, and Kierkegaard, who
actually started the movement.
Sartre was an avowed atheist
Kierkeraard only wanted to be a
Christian."

Art Students
To Show Works

ert Herndon. Sally

...

man existence

V

lJ--l

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Nov. 5,

Foreign Student Advisers
To Hold UK Conference
Foreign

student advisers from
throughout the state will
meet here Saturday to discuss Joint
mutual problems.
.
.
.
..
uases. and foreitm nturirat. .tvi..r
here, said the theme of the meet- will be "Problems Plus Study
qual Solutions."

Tne meeting will open at 19 a.m.
Saturday In the Music Room of the
Stodent Union

welcome by Dr. Leo M. ChTmber!
lain, UK vice president An ad- dress will be given by Mrs. Kath- erlne Bangs, president of the Na- -

UK Instructor Honored
With One-Ma- n
Art Show

Frederic Thurra, Instructor in
the Art Department, has been hontional Association of Foreign
ored with a one man showing of
dent Adviser,
his work at the Jefferson Place
Nelson Bown, a UJ3. Immigration Gallery In Washington, D. C,
12.
and Naturalization Service official No?. c.
The show consists of 22 can- regulations concerning students vases and 33 drawings in different
from other countr,es-Ir.media, which he has done over
a period of two years.
Foreign
tn
Stu-colJeg-

es

24-De-

6--

Jim Wilds, agriculture senior and

state BSU president, will preside

presents

Wintersct tt

In Mr. Thursz's own words the
Nov. 4-- 7
series signifies, "The relationship
utiuimt.
notiv.
Curtain 8:30 p.m..
of the circular image to atmostumea wlll Mnre Um and coffce at
Mr
paintings are dl- - pheric, psychological,
and heraldic
the mornln csslon.
Tided Into a series of three parts.
manifestations in our times."
'
Th tlnt w
re ent,t,'d
For Rtsenetions Phoni
Dean r,rl,tr,r M
Cathedral Window, and Heraldic
A poem by Robert Hazel, assistEnttnsion 2396
CMttt' Wl" mod"
Cycle. The third part Is a large ant professor of English has been
noon PB! discussion among fore- - painting combining the complete published in the catlogue to be
presented with the exhibit.
'f" tndenta on 'What Are Tour
Problems?
Richard B. Freeman, head of the
Art Department says about Mr.
Thursz's works, . "The colors,
shapes, moods, tensions, and the
evocations of these paintings apparently achieved so easily, almost
6-- 8
casually, are the result of heavy
physical labor to which the author,
Outside speakers for the con- - who has seen these paintings devention Include Dr. William Walter velop in the course of the past
Adams, Mr. William J. Reynolds, year, can testify "
Dr. Oeorge K. Schweitzer, and Dr.
HAPPY HIKER
VELVET STEP SHOES
William Hall Preston.
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SOUTHLAND SHOPPING CENTER

Transportation to the convention
will be provided by the BSU. The
Larry Baldridge, education sen- Rev. Calvin Zongker, BSU director,
ior, will speak on "The BSU on the said persons interested in transUK campus." A girFs trio from portation to the convention should
UK will participate In the music be at the BSU center at 6 p.m. Friprogram at the convention.
day, 8 ajn. and 6 p.m. Saturday,
and 8 a.m. Sunday.
Patricia Oreene, education Junior from Corbin, is the local BSU's i
candidate for summer missionary.
Each year the state BSU chooses
f everal students to send as summer
missionaries to various places.
Last year the UK BSU sent a
representative to California, and
two years ago. a representative was
rent to Hawaii.
The theme of the convention Is
"Towards Maturity In Christ"
at the convention.

ff

Luncheon Talk

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Dr. Max Wasserman will speak
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Donovan Hall Cafeteria. His
topic will be "European Common

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PERSONALIZED STYLING
PLEASE CALL

Guignol Thcjatre

Mr. Thursz had no intention of
a scries when he started these
canvases, but one finished canvas
led to more new ideas and possibilities along the same line, so
that the finished product Is a
series dealing with a central circular image.

BSU Meeting Scheduled
At Georgetown Nov.
About 90 UK students will attend the Baptist Student Union
convention in Georgetown Nov. 8.

1959

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* Honor And Cheating
The nationwide furor being raised
over TV quiz shows has touched off
an explosion of discussion on college
campuses as to whether producers
were morally justified in giving contestants answers and then deceiving
the public by the presentation of
"fixed" shows.

fellow students and therefore condone cheating.
This is the paradox present in the
University today. Students scak in
idealistic and magnanimous tones of
the virtues of honesty and integrity
and revolt vehemently when someone
else is caught in the act of cheating.
Yet, they go right on cheating them-

'..'.

some sort of warped loyalty for their

The crux of the controversy

ac-

tually boils down to whether entertainment (at the cost of cheating)
should be placed above honesty (at
the cost of less dramatic shows). The
argument has been made that the
American people are gullible anyway,
so why not practice duplicity on
them? After all, isn't it good entertainment they are seeking?- -

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5..

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r

selves.
We, being adherents of Abe and

George, would like to believe that
honesty and integrity are more than
words to use in philosophy class. We
would like to believe there is such a
thing as personal honor and that
cheating is a breach and a downright
insult of that honor.

But many other Americans, adherents of Abraham Lincoln and
George Washington, have taken the
right stand.
The paradox of the situation comes
when college students are confronted
with a similar cheating incident on
their own campus. Many of them
stoutly defend the cheater for various
reasons. They sympathize, asking
that people investigate why he needed
to cheat; they rationalize, saying "it's
a required course, anyway"; and,
worst of all, they do it themselves.
But, other students, adherents of
Abraham Lincoln and George Washington, have taken the opposite
stand.
However, refusing to cheat themselves, they allow cheating to go on
around them and fail to report,
despite their love for Abe and George,
what they see. They evidently feel

.

r

I

ar

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contention
becoming more widespread that required 'courses have caused more
cheating. This is probably true, but
required courses certainly do riot
There

is a

long-standin- g

justify cheating.
Students are not the only campus
group to cheat. Members of the
faculty have standardized their tests
to the point where cheating is about
the only practical way "to study. The
administration has refused to even
release a decision of a football player
caught trying to steal a test.
No matter how much you rationalize, cheating is cheating anyway you
look at it fraternity files, standardized tests, and spoken word. If it is
condoned in any small way, it may as
basis.
well be condoned on a
We are indeed in the midst of sorry
times.
Honor, where art thou?
full-scal- e

This new overpass sure saves time. 99

Why Not Sign It?
An increasing
volume of letters
with requests of "Please withhold
frames" on them have oured into the
office during the past two weeks.
However, many of our writers have
used the "Name Withheld" tag to hide
behind in making personal attacks.
We believe that if you have anything
to say about anyone, you should not
be afraid to reveal your name.

One of Kentucky's early and famous
editors, Marse Henry Wattcrson, had
the same soit of conviction. He said
he would not piint anything against
anyone unless he were willing to say
the same thing to the person' face.
We will tun your letter with ifame
withheld if you do not nuke personal
attacks. If you do, your Hctter will
find the nearest wastebasket.

Readers9 Anger Is Raised By Test Stealings
Need To Steal?

To The Editor:

Considering the football player who
stole an examination paper, aren't we
making a federal case out of it?
If it had been anyone other than
an athlete, there would probably have
been little or nothing said about the
incident, and the same disciplinary
action taken.
Isn't it enough to get an "E" in
the course, especially a required
course? Everyone in the Social Sciences and Political Science Departments, of course, knows who it is,
and if he tries to take another course
in those areas, will probably have a
rough time. Since a number of credits
must be gotten in the social studies
area in order to graduate and everyone in those departments will be'
gunning for him, need there be any
more said?
The Lexington papers and the
Courier-JournaI am sure, have
given it state wide coverage. We must
congratulate them; they have not implied to their readers "football players steal exams."
What should also be considered is
what made the individual need to
steal the exam? Whether to be a football player or anyone else. The administration is trying to keep it as
quiet as possible. Why can't the
papers?
l,

Discusted Student

Architectural Fake

To The. Editor:

After seeing the design of the University of Kentucky's new northwest
center at Henderson, I wonder how
the University ever hopes to get an
outstanding, accredited architectural
school as now planned. No wonder
the architecture of Kentucky is so bad

when an institution such as the University, which has, or should have,
great influential powers, will accept
a design such as this.
It is little, wonder that they waited
until the building was started to put
the rendering in the paper. The design of this building ignores every
engineering advance of the last two
centuries, or else it is an architectural fake. If this is so, then we should
require the students to wear the
proper costumes, light it by candle
light, and take a few pot shots at it
with muskets. Better yet, use a cannon.
I think it would be interesting to
hear the justifications for this design.
-

Architectural Engineering Student

Much More To Be Said
To The Editor:

been publicly caught and revealed in
embarrassing nakedness.
Incidentally, one feels a little ill
when he recalls the case of the janitor
who sold a few unauthorized football
tickets a few weeks ago. His being
summarily fired contrasts strangely
with the treatment accorded the foot-baplayer. Mr. Editor, there is much
more you could have said in your
ll

editorial.
A

Faculty Member

Test Stealing

To The Editor:

Since the main reason for this
column is for blowing off steam, that
is what I intend to use it for. The
Sociology Department isn't alone in
being '.'burned up", about stealing
and cheating on the campus.
Two years ago a student was caught
stealing a sociology test on the University of South Dakota campus. The
administration there took the same
stand that this one has taken. The
only thing ever learned for sure was
that the student was not- expelled.
For therest of the year' there was a
rash --of test pilferage. During this
time the stealing branched out into

books and then coats and hats and
finally everything that was not nailed
down. Alter expelling one student
and putting several more on prcK
bation lor the rest of their stay
the university, the situation eased offv

aj,

have heard on several occasions
during the last couple of days a rc
mark to the effect, "If it had been
a peon like me, instead of a football
player, I would have been exelled."
One might ask in this connection,
how imjortant is our athletic program? Is intellectual growth to be
shoved aside in favor of sports? Or
could it be a matter of prudently not
biting the hand that feeds us? Another remark heard was, "Why steal
the answers? He could have become a
Creek and used the test files."
I

Let me ask you, who are supposed
to be shaping us for our roles as
pillars of society, don't you have
qualms of conscience about accepting
our money and then,' if not by commission, by omission, stacking the
deck against us? What incentive do
we have to refrain from following
suit from sheer self protection?
Joe p. Lewki.lym

Congratulations on your uncovering
the story of the athlete who broke,
into a professor's office to steal examination questions. Your editorial
today, however, sounds a little apologetic for having broken the story.
The only place where apology is in
order is from those athletic and administrative officials who apparently
feel that breaking and entering for
the purpose of stealing and then
cheating on an examination does not
University
Kentucky
impair a person's right to represent Entered at the Port Office at Uiingtoa. Kentucky uof
cUm Matter ndr th Ad of Man t. im.
Published four time a weak d'iring the regular
yr emcept hobdaya mmi eawaa.
his university in football.
A tAUJUU M SV41UUb J LAil
And as one might guess, the abanBox Neitmjc, Editor
donment of moral principle involved Bon Andebson, Manatfng Editor
Stewart Hedckr, Sportt Editor
Paul Zimmerman and Carols Martin, Assistant Managing Editors
here (plus, alas, the amazing handlDick Ware and John Mitchell, Photographer
ing of the whole situation) has led Al