xt7ghx15qb11 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ghx15qb11/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690829  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, August 29, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, August 29, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7ghx15qb11 section xt7ghx15qb11 Friday Evening, August 29,

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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

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Vol. LXI, No.

Futrell P roposes Reforms
Of Student Conduct Policy
amendment to the bill of rights.
The Student Bill of Rights
Student Government presi- outlines such areas as academic
dent Tim Futrell announced rights in the classroom, provides
Thursday night plans for an "in- for an ombudsman and outlines
tegration" of the Student Bill of rights of admission to the UniRights (proposed in spring 1968) versity.
Futrell said he will soon mail
and the present Student Code.
The Student Bill of Rights to the Senate the proposed docuhas not been approved and is ment detailing in full the pronow before the University Sen- posed integration.
ate. Futrell's "integration" plan
Snyder, McKinstry Help
will be introduced at the Sept. 8
The integration was done
meeting of the Senate as an
By JAMES W.MILLER
Editor-in-Chi-

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i?st Time Again!

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Draft Appeals Cases
Remain Stalemated
WASHINGTON

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aft

director Lewis B. Hershey has
given his personal aide command
over the staff of a theoretically
independent presidential appeals
1;.. ,s
board and has blocked the mailing of case files to the board's
chairman, a draft spokesman said
Thursday.
Processing of draft appeals to
the President has been at a virtual standstill since President
Nixon requested last July 9 the
resignations of two of the three
members of the National Selective Service Appeals Board.
The two, Dr. Kenneth W. Clement of Cleveland and Judge
Henry J. Gwiazda of New Britv..f
ain, Conn., submitted their resThese students are only a small group of the many who are particiignations and Clement's has been
pating in fall rush. In two weeks, these and other rushees will have accepted.
But the White House has not
become Creeks, or will have remained independents.
yet announced acceptance of
Gwiazda's, and he remains board
chairman.
No resignation was asked of
the third member, Charles N.
Collatos of Lynnfield, Mass.
The GSA was formed in the
Gwiazda said Thursday in a
By TOM BOWDEN
Kernel Staff Writer
spring of 1969 when a group telephone interview that Herof "concerned graduate stuA pamphlet outlining the pitshey was trying to take advan- falls and advantages of graduate dents" organized to protest parkstudent life at UK has been issued ing assignments. The formation of
GSA broke "the tradition of stuby the CrauateStudent Associadent apathy" at UK, according
tion (CSA).
to the booklet.
The booklet discusses employThree sections of Western
ment prospects for graduate stuThe booklet is available to all World Literature have been
dents and their wives, insurance graduate students free of charge. opened due to the
popularity of
and health care, housing, eating
the course which caused exist"Because of the editorial comfacilities, transportation and mittee's refusal to
ing sections to fill so rapidly,
compromise
methods of obtaining loans.
of this booklet, the a spokesman for the English deThe pamphlet states that a any part
partment said Friday.
Association
book store discount for graduate Craduate Student
The sections include: ENG
"found it expedient to seek funds
students "has bogged down
261- - 15, MWF at 8 a.m. in Comfrom graduate students themsomewhere in the University's
merce 307; ENG
MWF at
selves, instead of from the Unibusiness complex."
3 p.m. in McVey 210; and ENG
versity," the booklet stated.
In addition, bus service to the
262- - 30, TTh from
in KasUe
President Otis Singletary will Hall 206.
Shawneetown apartment complex, which is about a mile south be the featured speaker at a gradThe course must be added
of the campus, is a sore spot uate student reception to be held before Wednesday, which Is the
with the GSA, The pamphlet Sept. 13 at Maine Chance Farm. last day to add a class under
notes that this "long walk" is A Sept. 10 general CSA meeting
the drop-adsystem.
is tentatively scheduled.
a "major disadvantage."
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Guide To City Issued

Lit Additions

262-2-

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tage of the board's transition to
seize control of it.
"Until 1948," said Cwiazda,
"the President had a staff of officers briefing the appeals for his
decision. But then the President
decided civilians ought to be
handling it, and he created a
civilian appeals board.
"It's common talk around here
that the General Hershey has
never swallowed this and never
will."
By law and regulations, the
National Appeals Board is independent of the Selective Service
System, headed by Hershey since
its inception in 1940. But it depends on Selective Service for
its office space here, its operating funds and its essential services.

Gwiazda, a board member
since 1961 and chairman since
1965,

said he thought the board

was running its own affairs until
it asked Hershey last year for additional office help.
Hershey, he said, ignored the

board and began interviewing
its staff on the need for the new
positions.
Gwiazda said he objected.
"I told him I thought they
were our staff, not his," he said,
"and he said, 'You'll learn different'. And we did."
Gwiazda said he wrote Nixon
last June 24 asking for assurance
the presidential board could appoint its own personnel.
On July 9, presidential aide
Peter Flanigan relayed a request for his and Clement's, resignations, he said.
Also on July 9, said Capt.
William S. Pascoe, information
officer for Selective Service, Hershey appointed his aide, Col.
George J. Wendel, as "liaison
officer" with the appeals board,
and assigned command of the
n
staff to Wenboard's
dell.
four-perso-

largely through the efforts of
Sheryl Snyder, a Student Government appointee to the University
Senate, and Taft McKinstry, an
SG appointee to the Senate's
advisory council for student affairs.
The amendment will be more

than integration and includes
seven major policy changes:

Appellate jurisdiction over
residence judicial boards would
be changed from the University
to the appeals board.
Jurisdiction over academic
offenses would be changed from
the appeals board to the students rights board, which would
be created by the document.
Will Apply To Academic Offenses

The student rights board's

power to change grades would
apply to cases of academic offenses.

The student rights board
would be created immediately
as a seperate board.
Authority of the proposed
student rights board would be
retroactive to last spring for the
purpose of changing grades.
The search and seizure protection would be administered
inby the disciplinary
stead of by the student rights
board.
All rights under the bill of
rights would apply to disciplinary proceedings which were first
created in the current student
code.

The plan will be presented
by Futrell, Snyder and Winston
Miller, the three student members of the Senate.

Black Studies
Reviewed
At Louisville
Hanford Stafford, black affairs
coordinator at the University cf
Louisville, and U of L President
Woodrow Strickle: were to meet
this morning to make announcements concerning the future of
the black studies program at that
university.

The meeting was to be held
in the Library Lecture Lounge
at U of L at 10 a.m.
Stafford is presently working
on his doctoral dissertation at

UofL.

The announcements result
from an incident in the spring
in which a committee of black
students made public their demands for a black affairs

Williamson Named Fayette Circuit Judge

Charles Curley Williamson
Jr., an assistant professor of law
at the University, was appointed
interim' Fayette circuit judge
Thursday.
Williamson was named by
Cov. Louie B. Nunn to replace
the recently deceased Nolan Carter.
Cov. Louie B. Nunn announced his selection of Williamson at the governor's regularly scheduled monthly press

conference.

Williamson will fill the seat
left vacant by the recent death
of Judge Nolan Carter, whose
term was to run until November.
While usual procedure would
call for Williamson to seek a
leave of absence from his teaching duties at the University, William L. Mathews, dean of the
College of Law, indicated that
Williamson might not follow this
procedure.
He has not yet done so and

Mathews said that "it might
not be the procedure in this
case.

Williamson came to UK in
1964 as an adjunct professor and
has been an assistant professor
of law since 1966.
He was a member of the graduating class of 1946 of the U.S.
Military Academy at West Point
and served in the Army from that
time until 1954.
He earned his J.D. (Juris Doctor) degree in 1956 from the Uni

versity of Michigan and received
his LL.M. (Master of Laws) from
Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., in 1961.

Before coming to UK, Williamson practiced law in Washington, D.C. He is eligible to
practice before the Washington,
D.C, Maryland, Kentucky and
federal courts.

Speculation would be that the
interim judge would be the Republican candidate in the No

vember election for the
term.

six-ye-

Williamson had been one of
four persons considered as a replacement for Scott Reed when
Reed vacated the Circuit Court
in January to join the state Court
of Appeals. That seat was later
filled by James Park Jr.
Willia mson's first task will be
to preside over the
term
of the civil division which begins
Sept. 15.
six-we-

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, August 29,

I9G9

Cleans Up
While Critics Blush

Band To Get
Slot On TV

'Hee-Ha- w'

By BILL MATTHEWS
Assistant Managing Editor
Using trite puns, well-wor- n
jokes, and blatantly plagiarized
style, how could any summer-seaso- n
show do
replacement
well? Certainly the critics can't
tell you.
"IIcc Haw," a poor imita-

tion of the popular "Laugh-In- "
in a hillbilly setting, seemed to
do all the wrong things that
ordinarily would doom a show
to a short life. Yet, in the Nielsen audience figures published
recently "Hce Haw" was in the
number one spot with a Sunday
night average of 27 .3 million viewers.

In a fiasco reminiscent of the
"Beverly Hillbillies" the newspaper critics lashed "Hee Haw"
unmercifully while the viewers
welcomed it with open arms.
With ironic humor CBS has
run promotion spots of the show
playing some of the most ridiculous episodes with the aside:
"The critics are unanimous about
"Hee Haw," -- but watch it anyway."
What attracts the hordes of
watchers each week is painfully
old material put together with
the new production techniques
introduced by "Laugh-In.- "
On "Hee Haw" only the setting is different from the Laugh-Iformat. Crafitti is writtin on Burma Shave signs along a rural
highway. Dialogues take place
in cornfields, farm houses, and
barns.
The symbolism between the
cornfield setting and the quality
of the material is not unwarranted. One of the characters
announces, "I'm a farmer in a
candy factory." A group of rural
voices responds:
"Whaddaya
do?" "I milk chocolate."
In another classic a straight
man wonders, "Hey, Junior, how
come I saw you eating with a
knife at supper?" Reply: "My
fork leaked." Such gems of wit
n

Pierce Gets
Art Chair
The executive committee of
the Board of Trustees has named
Dr. James Pierce to be Chairman
of the Department of Art effective August 15.
A native of Brooklyn, N.Y.,
Dr. Pierce has studied at Columbia University, Oberlin College
and Harvard University where he
received the Ph.D. Degree in fine
arts in 1962. He has been the Harvard Bacon Art Fellow for study
in Europe of the works of Paul

He was

the national banjo champion.
Composer and guitarist Buck
Owens is a leading veteran of
the Country and Western circuit.
The exceptionally high ratings
may give "Ilec Haw" a chance
to return to the air as a replacement for one of the new season
shows which fall short. "Hee
Haw" is scheduled to go off the
air September 7.

Clapton-Bake-

By BLANE RAMEY
Kernel Music Critic
Blind Faith, Atco SD
4
A&B
It came as a welcome surprise to many rock fans to learn
that four of the most innovative
musicians in rock, Eric Clapton
and Ginger Baker from Cream
and Steve Winwood from Traffic, plus Rick Grech of Family,
had joined forces in a new group
called Blind Faith. This, their
first album, consists of six selections, all of which have vocal

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The Wildcat Marching Band tramps and toots as the members
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show for the Indiana game. The theme
prepare for their
of the show will be "Love-In"- .
Opening the season for both teams,
the game will be broadcast on nationwide television.
half-tim-

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Hours: 6:00 a.m..9;30 p.m., Mon. thru Sat.

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production planned,
1969-'7- 0
promises to be an exciting year for Guignol Theatre.
The group's first performance
will be "Playboy of the Western
World," a comedy by J. M. Synge.
This play concerns a young man
who murders his father and is
hailec a hero for the act.
Charles Dickens, Prof, of
Theatre Arts, will direct the play.
Tryouts will be held Sunday,
August 31, at 2 p.m. and Tuesday, September 2, at 7:30.

94 OCTANE Regular

.r

tion and skill, particularly in which are inconsitent with the
use of climax. The bass solo by organization evident elsewhere.
accompaniment, and "Sea of Joy," in which Grech never leaves the ground.
Good Rapport
Crech plays some rather clumsy It is completely uninspired,' as
The words of the songs are of
electric violin.
is most of his playing on this
little literary significance. PerThe most musically unimagrecord.
haps this is unimportant, for,
inative cuts on the record are
The last solo is by Baker on even in the vocals, it is the mu"Well All Right," in which even
drums. His accompaniment sic which is spotlighted.
Winwood's improvisations on piBlind Faith borrows much
ano are cliche-riddeand "Pres- throughout the album is superb,
ence of the Lord," a rock hymn unobtrusive and inventive, but from Cream and Traffic, and in
that features a guitar solo which this solo, like most drum solos so doing is more eclectic but less
sounds as if it were lifted from more than two or three minutes innovative than either of the original groups. This is not to say
Hendrix. These songs are struc- induration, approaches boredom
because of tonal monotony. Fur-- , that. Blind. Faith is .entirely deturally inhibited and rhythmicalthermore, it air sounds as if it rivative; there is a great deal of
and instrumental sections but ly dull.
were done in "Toad". After two rapport among the musicians and
vary in style. The vocal leads
Inventive
more vocal choruses the work
in the music that is
are all done by Winwood, one
"Do What You Like" lasts ends in some Cagian experiments forethought in rock.
seldom found
of the best rock singers around.
over fifteen minutes and allows
Through his skillful use of em- each musician an extended solo.
bellishment and a wide range of
The basic theme is in quintuple
SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS WHO
intensity and timbre, he can add meter and it moves
along smoothPATRONIZE THE KERNEL
tension, verve and genuine feel- ly. Winwood's
organ solo and
ing to the simplest melodic line.
guitar solo are fairly
"Had to Cry Today" has a Clapton's their
other work. They
typical of
four-ba- r
figure in the guitars and
'
display a good deal of imagina
bass which is repeated throughif
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4
Besides holding things toout.
gether, it is used as a motive for
the duo guitar improvisations by
Clapton and Winwood. Sounding

With four plays and an

ing cliairman of the Department
of Art at Western Reserve during
the spring semester 1966.
A distinguished art historian
and critic. Dr. Pierce has published widely in the field of
modern art, art theory and criticism. Christian iconography, and
the history of architecture and
landscape design.

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coast-to-coa-

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Synge Comedy

act-

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By TOM BOWDEN

"We're ready for it," says
W. Harry Clarke, Director of
Binds. But will the nation be
ready when the marching WildTV
cats appear on
during halftime of the
game Sept. 20?
Clarke thinks that everyone
will be pleasantly surprised at the
improvements in this year's
squad. The marchers will number almost 200 this season and
consequently will be abletocom-pet- e
with the big bands such as
Tennessee's.
"Constant motion" makes the
UK band exciting to watch,
Clarke believes. "We're always
fluid it's a sort of kaleidoscope
effect."
The theme for the IU match
will be "Love-In.-"
With this year's improvements, which include all new
uniforms of blue and white,
Clarke would like to see increased
enthusiasm on the part of the stu-

Album Reunites 'Cream' Stars

Guignol Presents

of chairman of the Department
of Art, Dr. Pierce taught at both
Harvard University and Western
Reserve University.

are usually followed by an actor
"socking it to" the Jokester with
a rubber chicken, or an animated
donkey commenting, "Wouldn't
that sop your gravy?"
The best lines never rise above
mediocrity and never get more
controversial than mild puns
about unknown politicians. CBS
should feel pretty safe with "Hee
Haw" replacing the often colorful Smothers Brothers Show.
If Hee Haw has any commendable points it would be
the Country and Western music
that fills much of the show's
time. Host Roy Clark was twice

similar to Cream's Clapton-Bruc- e
duets, the BF breaks are more
integrated.
Violin Fails
More fine duo guitar work
is in "Can't Find My Way

Klee.
Before accepting the position

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* 19G- 0-

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, August 29,

Ncw Courses Offered

Medical Center Training 'Country Doctors9

By CHUCK KOE1ILER
UK Public Relations

Tradition has it the country
doctor not only diagnoses and
treats an ailment, but also tells
you where you got it, who will
get it next and why you shouldn't
have gotten it in the first place.
UK medical students are being trained to be country doctors in the sense that their course
of studies involves the treatment
of the whole patient.
The whole patient concept
involves making the student
aware of both social and psychological factors in the treatment
and prevention of illness. Both
of these, considerations are the
tasks of the Department of Behavioral Science, which was incorporated into initial planning
of the Medical Center 14 years
ago. The department serves the
students in the Colleges of Dentistry and Nursing as well as medical college students.
Behavioral scientists include
individuals trained basically in

anthropology, sociology, psychotions, according to Dr. Marion
Pearsall.
logy, political science and statistics. They are further trained in
According to Dr. Pearsall, for
the relationship of their specific example, there is Communication
discipline to patient treatment and Interviewing, a second-yea- r
and preventive medicine.
course which "best communiThe basic course offered by the cates our message." In it medidepartment is Health and Society cal students are taught to interview patients to discern their
and is designed for the
medical student. Until now ailments in terms of communicait has been taught by a panel tion theory via actual situations.
Another course cited as repreof instructors, each lecturing
sentative of this trend is the
about his own discipline.
conjoint sesThis year Health and Society Saturday morning several basic
sions in which
will be broken into 14 topical science and clinical
departments
seminars.
participate.
Students will interview paLike clinical rounds, students
tients, families, physicians, com- in conjoint are exposed to case
munity leaders and social action histories of patients in the Unigroups, conducting their own versity Hospital.
studies and choosing their own
As behavioral science's reprecourse topics. Discussion, as opsentative last year, Dr. Pearsall
posed to lectures, will be the rule noted, "The dozen students in
in class.
my discussion group each ThursThis radical reorganization of day tended to raise questions
Health and Society represents about the previous Saturday's
a trend toward teaching be- patient."
Both of these courses represent
havioral science in action situa
first-ye-

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mm ml pay

hmu pay

Cr

the action situation concept
adopted for Health and Society:
be it viewing a
y
mirinterview through a
ror or relating alcoholism to ecology (the relationship of organisms to their environment).
Why this reorganization of
Health and Society?
Dr. John Stephenson, a medical sociologist who teaches on
the course's panel, says, "The
behavioral scientist doesn't know
the social science background of
his students. Some may have had
only one undergraduate course in
doctor-patieone-wa-

sociology, and now, as first-yea- r
medical students, they're expected to absorb sociology while

struggling with biochemistry and
the like."
A student evaluation of Health
and Society, done early in the past
semester, showed it to be not
relevant even though other
courses evaluated like Communication and Interviewing and
conjoint fared better.
"These new courses within
courses will make our message
more relevant to the doctor's
work," says Dr. Pearsall.

Solomon Made Member
Of Executive Board
Dr. Martin B. Solomon Jr., particular problems of computer
director of the Computing Cen- programming for academic needs.
Dr. Solomon is associate proter, has been elected to the execfessor in the Department of Busutive board of SHARE organiiness Administration at UK, as
zation.
SHARE, chartered in 1955, well as being the Computing
is the oldest and largest group Center director. He was recently
of computer users in the world acting chairman of the Computer
with a membership of over 700 Science Department.
e
He is also a member of the
computing installaAmerican
Economics Associations.
The organization's purposes
tion, the American Statistical Asare to share knowledge of what sociation, the Association for
other computing installations are Computing Machinery, the Sodoing, to exchange and develop ciety for Management Informanew ideas and techniques in the tion Systems, and the Institute
world of computer programming for Management Sciences.
Dr. Solomon has published
and to try to reduce the number
of cases where computer comnumerous books and articles, the
panies are unnecessarily carrying most recent titled "Economics
of Scale and the IBM System
on the same research.
Also, SHARE provides IBM 360."
Dr. Solomon received his B.S.,
and other similar manufacturers
with advice and specifications M.B.A. and Ph.D. degrees at
on computer products, and helps UK where he has been associated
to establish worldwide standards with the Computing Center for
the past ten years.
for computer systems.'
As an executive. board member, Dr. Solomon will join in
the control of SHARE policy
and annual budgets. His duties
will also include the setting of
fees and the evaluation of new
!
if
ft L.
membership requests.
Before his election to the por' y
it ft
sition, he was UK's representative in the special "University
Group" of SHARE. This organizational unit includes representa1
tives from universities all over the
nation and is concerned with the
large-scal-

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Sunday, Augufct 3 1

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Gulgnol Theatre

Store

This includes all New Fall Merchandise
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Sett,!; 7:30

Charles Dickens,

The Kentucky

p.m.
p.m.

Director

Iernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five timet weekly during the
school year except holiday! and exam
periods, and one during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4;JtJ.
Begun as the Cadet In 181)4. and
published continuously as th Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein Is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
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Per copy, from files
KERNEL TELEPHONES
Editor. Managing Editor
2321
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Assoc UU Editors. Sports
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News Desk
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Advertising. Business. Circulation 2319

* The Kentucky

Kernel

University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

FRIDAY, AUOUST

1834

29, 1969

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
J an ics W. Miller,
George H. Jopson, Managing Editor

Editor-in-Chi-

Bob Brown, EditorUd rage Editor
Bobert Duncan, Advertising Manager
Dottie Bean, Associate Editor
Dan Gossett, Arts Editor
Chip Hutcheson, Sports Editor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Carolyn Dunnavan, Women's rage Editor
Frank Coots, Mike llerndon, Jeannie Lccdom, Bill Mathews, Jean Bcnaker
Assistant Managing Editors

A Need For Change
because

The recent appointment of a
special student government committee to study the housing situation at the University is a long
overdue step. Serious complaints
have been lodged annually against
those in charge of Housing Operations; each year these complaints

have been ignored completely.
Student opinion has seldom
been as unified as in the area of
forced housing for sophomores. A
referendum held in the spring of
1969 revealed ninety-seve- n
percent
of the voting students were opposed to such a' requirement. The
issue of overly crowded dormitories has often been a pet gripe of
those who live in University housing. The poor system of supervising has also been under strong
attack. This issue was instrumental in sparking the mini-revo- lt
in
Hall last spring.
Haggin

brief study of the University's
handling of the numerous complaints is in order at this time.
First in regard to forced housing
for sophomores. The referendum
was a complete failure. Perhaps
at no other time in the history of
a University was student opinion
so obviously ignored. The president of the University wasn't even
aware of the vote until it was
much too late. The president of
Student Government stated that
the students didn't know what
they were voting about. To 'complete the trinity of treason the
Board of Trustees decided to compel freshmen and sophomores to
live in University housing regardless of their wishes.
At that time the Housing Operations office insisted that everyone
A

would be made happy
they
wouldn't have to use the provision
and students would be able to
choose, for the most part, where
they wanted to live. It was emphasized that this was all in the
best interest of the student.
This isn't exactly what happened. Today the dormitories are
disgustingly crowded. The rooms
in some men's dorms have been
changed from the dual occupancy
for which they were designed to
three man rooms. Perhaps one of
the administrators involved in this
decision should try existing in such
an atmosphere. At best it is an
unpleasant situation, as this writer
was shown three years ago.
If this were the first time the
same administrators had made the
same mistake, perhaps it could be
excused. However, it is not the first,
nor the second, nor probably the

lll

r

God Save The Wall

In the near future, a campus
landmark is slated for destruction.
The snakelike structure, which
hides the new Office and Classlast.
room Building, is scheduled to unWhat makes the situation even dergo the assassin's hatchet unless
more intolerable is the fact that something can be done to preserve
many students didn't know as late this hallowed spokesman of stuas a week before the school year dent opinion.
The Great Wall surrounding the
began whether there would be space
for them in the dorms. When they
construction area in the heart of
tried frantically to find some inforcampus has been a melting pot of
some say they were told dance announcements, beer blast
mation,
to "come on up and we'll see if directions (remember the Brown
there's room when you get here." Avenue Party?), student opinion
and general grafitti.
Obviously this put many students in a terrible position. It was
To destroy The Wall will detoo late to reserve an apartment prive students of a legitimate way
close enough to campus to walk to vent frustrations and may proto class, and there was often no voke a wave of property defacealternative but to agree to pay the ment. Its destruction will be felt
exorbitant prices charged for the only slightly less strongly than
third rate room-hole- s
surrounding should Stoll Field be leveled.
Gone will be such monumencampus.
The advising system has been tal information as "Due to lack
similarly "improved." In the past of interest, tomorrow will be cantwo years the number of advisors celed," and "Charlie Bradshaw is
per hundred students has been a UT plant."
halved while their salary was also
But providing support for the
cut in half. Many dorm residents cause can influence the hatchet-me- n
to spare The Wall, what then?
say the quality of the advisors was
cut in proportion with their pay. Where is the proper place to preIf the Housing Office continues serve its sanctity? An obvious place
its "improvements" perhaps we would be the University Archives
should consider converting the deep in the doldrums of King Lidorms to parking structures.
brary. But then the question arises,

"How do you microfilm a Great
Wall?"
Another possible site where
everyone could continue to enjoy
the intellectual atmosphere offered
by The Wall would be the former
Splinter Hall site, in front of the
King Library. This site should be
acceptable to any wall aficionado
and it is by far more meaningful
than Splinter Hall ever hoped to be.

The development being conducted on the field facing the Administration Building could use its
n
own wall. And it would give
visitors to campus an opportunity to see the free and open
opinion offered by University students.
When ideas of destroying a campus institution such as The Wall
run through one's head, we hope
those thoughts will be followed by
ones of The Wall's metamorphosis.
From its birth as a spotless green
structure protecting the new Office
and Classroom Building through
its development into a sounding
board for campus politicians to a
legitimate j outlet for natural
of University property down
to its present role as premier spokesman on campus.
upper-echelo-

de-face-

Rally to the causel God Save
The Wall.

Destruction?
PI II

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, August 29,

CLASSIFIED
will be utiyj

CUmID
afverttslng
If. A4o mr
U4 on a roal4 baolo
bo alaco4 la aorton Monday threats
frtioy er by mall, aaymoat Iaoloso4,
to THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Rooaa
III, JaernalUm B14g.
The 4ta41tne li 11 a.m. the 4ay
prior ta aabileatlon. Ne a4vortUoraont
may alto raae, rollrlen er national
arista M
qaallaeaUoB ferrontlag
ihdii ar far employment.

r7
sbare

ST,X TODAY
IT- -

apartment.
Phone

to

Fema

6.

TOMORROW
Tha 4ea41lne
7:30 p.m. two

for anneancemtnto U
dart prior to tha flrtt
af Itcmo In this eelama.
pabllcatlon

Today
efficiency
month.

e$35 per
V

Z7A5t

WANTEDHave newer
apt.; share; $110 month rent;