xt7gms3jxr94 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7gms3jxr94/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19561026  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 26, 1956 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 26, 1956 1956 2013 true xt7gms3jxr94 section xt7gms3jxr94 1
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Vol.XLVIII

Uimnsity of Kentucky. Lexington,

Ky., Tt'hU), Oct. 2f,

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Annual Lances Carnival
Festivities Start Tonight
A new method of judging the
concessions at the 14th annual
Lances Carnival will be used this
year. Gentry Davis, Lances president, has announced.
Judging will be based about one-thion the money turned in and
on the skit, he said. In
the past, judging has been based
about 50 per cent on the money
earned by the concession, Davis
said.

The carnival will open tonight on

King;, Lances publicity chairman,
said.
The carnival will begin at 7:30
p.m. Admission to the carnival is
free, but 15 cents will be charged
to enter the concessions.
The funds raised will be used to
provide scholarships for junior
men. Lances is a junior men's
honorary society.

ds

.....

y

10:30 p.m.

The organizations, their skits,
and sponsor follow:
Sigma Alpha Epsilon, The Lawrence Smelk Show, Lynne Bryant:
Zeta Tau Alpha, Lights Out, Mona
Turner; Phi Delta Theta, Bums
and Broads, Scharme Wigginton;
Kappa Alpha, Broad, Broad World,
Jane Harris.
Delta Zeta, Anything Goes,
Jacque Westerfield; Kappa Kappa
Gamma, The Future Queens, Jo
Ann Brown; Delta Tau Delta,
DTD-TJane Thornburg; Chi
Omega, King and Me, Beverly Hill
Delta Delta Delta, Deltarama
Presents Mr. Magoo Stranded in
the Jungle, Madelyn Gordon; Farm
House, This is Your Laugh, Loretta
Seithers; Pi Kappa Alpha, From
Behind the Green Door, Dukie
Campbell.
Phi Sigma Kappa, Gay Nineties
Review, Martha Richardson; Phi
Sigma Sigma, Candy Apples, Elaine
Tatrick; Alpha Xi Delta, Les
Jambes De Paris, Betty Bernard.
Alpha Gamma Delta, Rockin'
Cinderolla , Vicki Arrington ;
Lambda Chi Alpha, Rockin' With
Red, Barbara Rogers; Tau Kappa
Epsilon, Running Wild, Mary
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Queen Candidates
These lovely looking: young: women are candidates for Lances queen.
They are: (L to r., front row) Bettie Bernard, Dukie Campbell, Martha
Richardson, Mary Ellen Barbar, Jane Eleanor Harris, and Beverly
Jlill. (Middle row) Gay Evans, Mona Faye Turner, Loretta Seithers,
Joanne Brown, Madolyn Gordon, Scharme Wigginton, Becky Bevens,
Bobbye Tice, and Jacque Westerfield. (Last row) Barbara Rogers,
Neida- Vick, Jane Thornburg, Pat McDevitt, Lynn Graham, Barbara
Finnie, Jan Long:, Lynne Bryant, and Melva Hemlepp.
-

Mock Vote
To Be Held
On Monday

'

!

The Lances Dance Is scheduled
8 p.m. Saturday in the
Student Union Ballroom. Clyde!
irasK and his orchestra will furnish the music.
""The dance wilfbe over atmid-nigh- t.
Dormitory girls wishing to
attend, have late permission until
1 a.m., King said.
Final plans for the carnival were
completed Tuesday night at a
meeting of all participating organizations, King said.
There will be 28 concessions
operated by various campus organizations. At each concession there
will be a candidate for Carnival
Queen. The Queen will be crowned

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Concert Series Brings
Swedish Chorus Here
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Derby Queen
Charlcne Schiebel, center, was crowned quern of the Sigma Chi Derby
last Saturday at the intramural field. Becky Bevens, right, Aia runner-up
to Charlcne and Holly Stevenson, left, placed third.

KappaDeltaPledge
Is Sigma Chi Queen
arlene Schlfbelr ft Kappa DelNflnry-rfrkinon- .
Sue Carol-Hol- lo
pledge, was crowned queen of way. and Jane Walsh. KD and
ta
the seventh annual Sigma Chi ADPI followed.
Derby last Saturday. Second was
In the Egg Toss. Delta Delta
Becky Jo Bevens, Alpha Delta Pi. Delta's Ann Hoffman and Charand third was Holly Stevenson, lotte Lasky held out the longest
of Alpha Gamma Delta.
without breaking their egg. AXID
AGD and Kb shared the
and Kappa Alpha Theta were alTrophy for accumu- most as
lating the most points In the variZeta Tau Alpha's Joyce Huber
ous events. ADPi was second, and was the fastest pie eater. AXID
Alpha Xi Delta and Kappa Kappa and KKG were second and third.
sure-fingere- d.

Gamma tied for third.
Over 900 students saw the seven
events in the Derby. The first and
most strenuous, the Obstacle
Course, was run under an Indian
Summer sun. AGD won, with

Mills Named To New Post

Dr. Robert L. Mills, registrar,
The newly created post of dean
has been appointed dean of ad- of admissions and registrar was
missions and registrar by trustees recommended by President Frank
of UK. Dr. Mills has been registrar 3. Dickey. President Dickey statfor the past two and one-ha- lf
ed: "During the past several years
the responsibilities attached to the
by years.
A mock election, sponsored
campus,, political groups, will
four
be held here Monday.
Polh will be open from 8 a.m.
until 4:30 pan. In Room 127 of the
Student Union Building.
Listed on the student ballots will
me the names of the opposing canftp 1
V
didates for president and vice presDwight D. Eiident: Republicans
senhower and Richard M. Nixon,
and Democrats Adlai Stevenson
and Estes Kefauver.
Also listed will be the four candidates vying for the two US Senate seats from Kentucky; Republicans Thruston B. Morton and
T
John Sherman Cooper, and Democratic incumbent Sen. Earle C.
Clements and former Governor
Lawrence W. Wetherby.
Clements and Morton are canditerm.
dates for the full
Cooper and Wetherby are competunexpired
ing for the four-ye7-term of the late Senator Alben W.
.niHTlliHWll1 .
Barkley.
The mock election will be
National Swedish Chorus
watched with much interest by
persons throughout the state, since
Kentucky recently became the second state to accord
the voting privilege, and many
participating in the Monday election will also vote in the Nov. 6
general election.
The election is sponsored by the
Young Democrats, Young RepubThe National Swedish Chorus Schubert, Haydn, Grieg, and
licans, Youth for Eisenhower, and
League cl Women Voters.
will perform Friday, Nov. 2, in Brahms through such contemporary masters as Sibelius and
Mitchell Meade, Young Repub- Memorial Coliseum.
The chorus, which Is directed by Vaughan Williams to the folk
lican president, said one of the
main purposes of the mock elec- Martin Lidstam, first visited the songs of the Scandinavian countries.
tion is to get young voters familiar United States in 1906. The
with the operation of voting ma- male group is not only the outThis
standing choral group in its native year. is the third concert for the
chines.
are sponsored
must show land but is one of the finest in by theThe concerts Concert
Meade taid students
Community
Series
their ID cards before they can Western Europe.
of Lexington.
The chorus will feature, for its
vote. He said these ID cards would
Students will be admitted by ID
be checked closely by ultraviolet North American tour, programs
ranging from such masters as cards.
light, to assure their validity.

..

-

office of the Registrar have increased sharply. As an example,
last year in the reorganization of

In the Tomato Throw, AGD's
team of Nora Ewing and Jacqule
Lyne drew the surest bead on Sigma Chi pledge Julian Beard's
head. KD and KAT placed and

showed.

Chi Omega's Jane Crace combined speed and a strong stomach
to win the Apple Bob. KKG and
AXID were close behind.
The short but sloppy flag chase
"Was taken by ADPi's Clara Finch.
KKG and ZTA took what was left.

Increase Reported
In Night Classes

the counseling service of the University the counseling and testing
offices, with their varied programs,
were placed under the direction of
the registrar. As the number of
Dr. Lyman Ginger, acting dean
students enrolling at the Univerof Kentucky increases, the of the College of Adult and Extensity
work of the registrar and the ad- sion Education, announced that
missions office will become in this year's night class enrollment is
creasingly complex and important. the largest in the history of the
of 743
"The chief admissions officer's Untversity. A total numbercourses.
for
position in the University is most people haveIsregistered cent
Increase
important. He comes in contact This figure a 20 per
campus over the enrollment for the fall
with more persons off the
and on the campus than practical- semester of 1955.
e
Enrollment includes
ly any other person "in the Unihigh schools, students who have regular classes
versity. lie contacts
other colleges and universities, ed- scheduled at night, citizens who are
full-tim-

ucational associations, and he reports to a number of outside accrediting and professional agencies. His contacts on campus include those with administrative officers, members of the faculty, students, and parents. In all of these
contacts, he must be in a position
to speak with authority and must
command the respect of all.
"The registrar and admissions
officer cannot be held in a lesser
position to that occupied by the
deans. He must work with them at
their level. For all of these reasons,
it seems wise to recommend that
the position of registrar be expanded in title and responsibility.
I am, therefore, recommending
that, effective Oct. 19, the position
of dean of admissions unci registrar be established. The person
who is currently so capably and
eminently filling the position of
registrar would become the person
to hold the title of dean of admissions and registrar. Dr. Robert
L. Mills is a man of great ability
and is one that we wish to hold. In
my opinion no other individual
could be found who would be able
to serve so well in this newly recommended position."

taking courses for college credit
and those who are taking non-cre-

dit

courses.

There are 39 night classes in

session this semester. Among the
courses offered for credit are: foreign languages, English, geography,
public health, music, psychology,
sociology, and secretarial work.

it
courses include
The
painting, photography, affective
communication, reading, dance,
real estate, principles of credit and
collection and engineering.
non-cred-

Win $25!
The Kentuckian will pay $?5
for an acceptable color transparency to be used for the cover
of the 1957 yearbook. The transparency ran be of a campus
building or scene or a Bluegrass
scene.

The contest will be open to

students and faculty. All interested persons should bring their
transparencies to the Kentuckian office, Room 210, Journalism
building, on Tuesday or Thursday, Oct. 30 and Nov. 1, between
1

and

5

p m.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Octolxr

26.

19(

Carnival Guignol Players Plan
Eisenhower, Kefauver
(Continued from Tare

okorl

Iii flnmniis Poll

ber.
Rfema Nu. ftkv. Barbara Finney:
Alpha Delta Pi, Rock and Roll
Medicine Snow, Jan iong.
Alpha Sigma Phi, Sigma Downs,

President Dwight Eiscnhow er and Sen. Estcs Kcfauvcr of
Tennessee arc the leaders in a survey of political opinion just
concluded on campus. The 317 students polled seemed to prove
out the national trend.
The overall figures show that per cent of the students polled
per cent prefer Elsenhower,
while 42 per cent want Adlal Stevenson. Listed as undecided or preferring another person were .03
per cent.
Of the students polled. 64.1 per
cent were registered Democrats,
305 per cent were Republicans,
and 5.4 per cent were independent.
The Democrats alone gave Stevenson 53.6 per cent and Eisenhower 43 per cent of the votes,
The Republicans gave the president a big margin 97.9 per cent
to Stevenson's 2.1 per cent.
Stevenson had a slight advantage with the independent voters,
lie polled 52.9 percent of the votes
cast, while Ike got 47.1 per cent.
race, 51.7
In the
vice-president- ial

Nick-Que-Te-

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66

preferred Kefauver to Nixon.
Kefauver got 68.1 per cent of
the Democrats while Nixon had
31.9 per cent.
The Republicans gave Nixon
865 per cent of their voting power,
while Kefauver got only 135 per
rpnt.
IndeDendents favored Kefauver
by 52.9 per cent to Nixon's 47.1
ner cent.
amonsr the students
... Ooinion
varied on the main issue of the
campaign. 36.7 per cent think the
farm Droblem is the most impor
tant. 21.6 per cent place foreign
affairs and peace first.

'

'1

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6-- 9.

11-1- 4;

Dietitians Meet
In Harrodsburg

Among the other important issues listed in the poll were segregation, big and small business,

prosperity, Ike's health, integrity
The annual fall meeting of the
Kentucky State Dietetics Associain government, the draft,
tests, and public vs. private power. tion will be held on Saturday in
Harrodsburg.
Following the luncheon at 1 p.m.
at Beaumont Inn, Mrs. Anne Clem-mon- s,
retiring president, will conduct the business meeting.
Dr. Abby L. Marlatt, director of
the School of Home Economics, is
The annual foreign student tea the speaker of the day. She will
was held yesterday in the Home discuss her research in the field
of nutrition of children.
Economics lounge.
Mrs. Nancy Brooks, Lexington, is
The tea was given in observance
Week.
the new president of the K.S.D.A.
of United Nations
The class of foods for special She is a graduate of UK.
Mrs. Anne Clemmons, member
occasions made cookies which were
typical of the countries repre- - of the staff of dietetics, Miss Annie
Brownlie, member of the staff of
sented.
Ecoinstitution management, Dr. Abby
The members of the Home
acted as hostesses for L. Marlatt. and Miss Deen Lowe,
nomics Club
the group Of foreign students on graduate student in home economics will attend the meeting.
UK campus. "

Foreign Tea Held
By Home Ec. Club

as?

plays this month.
nf the veap
A
will be "Teahouse of the August
n,
u
Moon" to D6 given iviay
play Is released. Wallace
the
Briggs, director, feels confident
that the play will be released by
the May date.

three

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KENTUCKY
TYPEWRITER
SERVICE

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HERE ARE YOUR OLD GOLD
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AUTO & HOME

4 Major Productions

The four major productions
nnhhip Tice: Kanoa Sigma, Kappa be given by the Guignol Theater
Sigma Reveals, Gay Evans; Sigma this season were announced this
Chi, Night Lights, Lynn uranam, week
The Guignoi's first production
Sigma Phi Epsilon,
will be "The Corn Is Green,' a
Den, Becky Jo Bevcns.
Stop the music, comedy in three acts by Emlyn
Kappa Delta,
Melva Hemlepp; Triangle, Swamp Williams.
rr.,.,fo tnr tho nrnnuetlon were
Ceoricla, Nelda Vlck: Thl Kappa
lijiuuw u ...- - r
of Brydy Murphy, held Sept. 30. The results of the
Tau, The Return
yet.
Kathrrine Stafford; Zeta Beta tryouts are not available is schedContest, Jean
Corn Is Green"
"The
Tau, Miss U of K
Serkle; Kappa Alpha Theta, uled for Nov. 7 and
As its second production the
There' Nothing Like A Frat Man,
theater will present Shakespeare's
Tat McDevllt.
Tickets for the dance are $2.50 "Othello," Marchtechnical director,
Ralney,
Arch
in advance or $3 at the door. There
for the
will be a booth at the carnival is already planning designs producearly spring
where tickets may be bought. Any setting of this
member of Lances, .who will be tion. n,,ifrnri Pinvprs will. Dresent.
rru
"
J
111c vmisnui
wearing red arm bands today, will
the
the third major production of give
have tickets.
They wil
season, Dec.
a
.r.,-a- r,
in thp Cathedral,
verse by T. S. Eliot.
drama in
The Players will also present

By DAN MILLOTT

67.7

11

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a. Aajusr orane onoe 10 jctwic wn ww.iiw. ......
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This western university, boasting

a carnpus of 9,000 acres, was named for an
American railroader and U. S. Senator,
who endowed it as a memorial to his son.
Herbert Hoover was a famous graduate.

of an
American
College or
University

OLP

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This midwestern college is named

City
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completed all 24 puzzles

RULES?
Send, five cents for each puzzle; five
cents for a complete set of rujes. Enclose
a self --addressed, stamped envelope. Mail
to Tangle Schools IYOj.JJqx, 9, Grand
Central Annex, New York 17 N. Y.

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GREAT. NEW FILTERS

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nonsectarian college for women is in a residential suburb of one of America's largest
cities. An early president was famed educator and feminist Martha Carey Thomas.

YOU'LL GO FOR
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Here's What We Do

by Quakers in 1885, this

ANSWER

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CLUE: Opened

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, InM.iv. (ktolxr

Cue Expert

Stevenson Addresses
To Appear
On Campus 8,000 At Courthouse

The Democratic party is a party

Charlie Peterson. "Father of Intercollegiate Billiards", will give
demonstrations and personal instruction in the art of billiards
Monday. Oct. 29. 1956 in the Game
Room of the SUB from 10 a m
till 5 p.m. and 7 till 9 p.m.
Peterson, sponsored by the Association of College Unions, sports
the motto "Show me a billiard shot
I can't make." He is on his 27th
annual tour and has held the
world's fancy-shchampionship
at billiards for many years.
At his St. Louis academy, Peterson was the first to interest
women in the game of billiards.
Trick shots are his specialty, one
of which is his "Silver Dollar
Shot". A movie short was made
of this. Peterson even plays on an
oval table.
This cue wizard carries on an informative talk as he performs and
clarifies the complexity of any difficult shot.
Approximately 125 colleges and
more than 25,000 students participate in this program of billiard

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Frcdick llArhtoldl, a Frenchman,
designed the ttue oi Liberty.

Central Kentucky's Largest

USED BOOK STORE
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CUHVK...

STEVENSON

AL

LAUNDRY

lgn

tip at the l'nlvrrity Trrsonnrl
Office for thrlr check ThurvUr,
Nov. 1.
R. V. White, ronnwlor for lb
office, slated thift wetk that the
fclrnint for check will continue
through 5 p.m. Monday, Not. .
Personnel Of rice hour are 8:30
ajn. to 12 noon, and 1:30 p.m. to
5 p.m. Moariay. Saturday.

DENNIS
between Pennsylvania and Marythe plague,"
land which came to be known as
BOOK STORE
Stevenson tow the crowd that
line.
the vice presidency has taken on the Mason-Dixo- n
257 N. Lim
a new importance in this campaign. This, he said, is due. partly,
to the 22nd amendment to the
Constitution which forbids a third
term for any president.
This has a special meaning to
the Republican party, the former
governor of Illinois said. He said
that the present Remiblirjin
(Anther
Bv iru CA,"
'eadership does not reallv want to
lead. He said if "Mr. Elsenhower
is elected on Nov. 6. the Republican
leadership team will take" over, and
I mean really take over."
MARKING ON THE
"A vote for Eisenhower is a vote
for Richard Nixon, because if the
Republican president doesn't want
AND WHAT TO DO ABOUT IT
or can't be a real leader of the
Republican party after the election, his vice president can and
Twonkcy Crimscott was a professor. Choate Sigafoos
does want to be the leader," he
was a sophomore. Twonkey Crimscott was keen, cold,
told the crowd which, had been
gathering since 11 a.m. in spite of
brilliant. Choate Sigafoos was loose, vague, adenoidal.
the rain.
Twonkey Crimscott believed in diligence, discipline, and
Secretary of Agriculture Ezra
marking on the curve. Choate Sigafoos Wlieved in elves,
Taft Benson also fell "under the
Jayne Mansfield, and thirteen hours sleep each night.
guns" of the Democratic candidate,
who stated that "a vote for ElsenYet there came a time when Twonkey Crimscott
hower is a vote for Ezra Benson,
mentor, r sace. and savant was thoroutrhlv
"
''
that gentleman whose friendship
f
d
and
for the farmer depends on the
.
proximity of an election. He
by Choate Sigafoos, sophomore.
stressed Benson's efforts to brine
about a cut in the burley tobacco
It happened one day when Choate was at the library
allotment last year.
studying for one of Mr. Crimscott's exams in sociology.
The 30 minute address was in
terrupted occasionally by applause
Mr. Crimscott's exams were murder plain, Hat murder.
and a few boos, but it was imThey consisted of one hundred questions, each question
possible to determine whether the
having four possible answers A, 13, C, and D. The trouble
boos were aimed at the candidate
or his targets.
was that the four choices weve so subtly shaded, so inStevenson also struck out at Wiltricately worded, that students more clever by far than
liam Jenner, Joseph McCarthy,
Choate Sigafoos were often set to gibberingr- Styles Bridges, John Bricker, WilSo on this day Choate sat in the library poring over
liam Knowland, and Joe Martin,
"who threw Joe Smith out of the
his sociology text, his tiny brow furrowed with concenRepublican Convention." .
tration, while all around him sat the other members of
Following the speech at the
the sociology class, every one studying like crazy. "What
Courthouse, Stevenson attended a
luncheon at the Phoenix Hotel.
a waste!" he thought. "All this youth, this verve, thia
During the luncheon, he limited
bounce, chained to musty books in a musty library! Wo
his talk primarily to anecdotes.
should be out singing and dancing and smooching and
In reference to the Pulitzer
cutting didoes on the greensward !"
prize photograph of the hole in
his shoe, taken during the 1952
Then, suddenly, an absolute gasser of an idea hit
campaign. Stevenson remarked that
Choate. "Listen !" he shouted to his classmates. "Tomorhe had rejected the slogan "I gave
row when we take the exam, let's all every one of us
my sole to the Democratic Party,"
for this campaign.
check Choice 4A' on every question every one of them."

ot

LA

nmhrrl npxrtmrnt In new ("oorTr n.
M.irriri lurfrnU only. Writ Apt. IB,
im Kwmf Court. Frankfort. Kr.

of youth, presidential candidate
Adlal Stevenson told n crowd of
About 8.000 in front of the Fayette
County Courthouse last Friday.
l
Stevenson
that one of the
hirf requirements of a political
party is the "willingness to accept
new ideas." He hopes to find the
new ideas in the youth of America.
Charles Mason, and Jeremiah
He added that the Republican
party "has shunned new ideas like Dixon surveyed the boundary line

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CLASSIFIED ADS
row t rAK
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Korean Vets
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FROM
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FROM
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Walter Camp is regarded as the
father of American football.
.

nsx.

Made this
discovory yot?
You combine iomc very basic element! when
you slip into this Arrow Par White shirt.
collar and handsome
Its medium-sprea- d
broadcloth fabric give you an extra measure
of style. And because it's a soft collar (with
stays), you're assured of comfort
Add the English block print tie for perfect
final touch.

w

out-wittc-

"Huh?" said his classmates.
"Mr. Crimscott marks on the curve. If we all check
the same answers, then we all get the, same score, and
everybody in the class gets a 'C'."
"llmm," said his classmates.
"Let's get out of here and have a ball!" said Choate.
So they all ran out and lit Philip Morrises and had
a ball, as, indeed, you will too when you light a Philip
Morris, for if there ever was a cigarette to lift the spirit
and gladden the heart, it is today's new Philip Morris.
firm and pure and fragrant and filled with true, natural,
golden tobacco, lip end to tip end.

1

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Shirt, $3.95; tie, $2.50.

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Well sir, the next morning the whole class did what
Choate said and, sure enough, thfy all got "C's," and they
picked Choate up and carried him on their shoulders and
sang "For He's a Jolly Good Fellow" and plied him with
sweetmeats and Philip Morris and girls and put on
buttons which said "I DOTE OS CHOATK."
Put they were celebrating too soon. Uccauae the next
time shrewd old Mr. Crimscott gave them a test, he gave
wit: write a M.OOO word
them only one question-- to
essay on "Crime Does Not Pay."
"You and your ideas," they said to Choate and tore
off hi epaulets and broke hi sword and drummed him
out of the school. Today, a broken man, he earns a meager
living as a camshaft in Toledo.
,

1888

.

tM

SLulmau. I'Ji4

! today'
At the top of the curie of tmoking ilfttture, you'll
arte I'hilip Morrit. So, cttnjuleutly, my I in mukert of Philip
Marrli, uho bring you thi$ column each Kerb.

* 4 --

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Friday, October 2f, 195f

Too Much Noise
Is Just As Bad

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letter on another part of this page from
Charles V. Kurtz voices a rather strong objection
to a situation that appears to be rapidly becoming
a sore spot to many persons attending UK football
A

.
games.
This refers, of course, to the almost deafening
barrage of sound that fans who are seated in the
effective range of the loudspeaker connected to the
cheerleaders' microphone are subjected to.
Many students are completely unaware of this
situation, since they never are lucky (or should it
be unlucky) enough to have a seat which can be
reached effectively by the loudspeaker. But among
those persons who sit in the general area encompassed by the 30 yard lines, there must be a great
rush on ear plugs these clays.
A microphone, used effectively and with discretion, can be a great boon both to cheerleaders and
to a cheering section (and heaven knows, the UK
cheering section could use something).
For instance, the microphone can be (and is)
used to announce yells. This is fine. It can even be
used, when placed at a respectable distance, to
magnify these yells. This, too, is fine.
But it is not an instrument by which hundreds of
fans (or possibly thousands) should be subjected
to approximately two hours of almost unrelenting
screams, chants, and gibberish.
A popular topic for years at the University of
Kentucky has been the lack of school spirit. This
subject has been so thoroughly exploited that nothing more could be said that is not repetitious.
But one thing for sure. School spirit, in its truest
sense, results from spontaneity. And one of the
quickest ways to kill what spirit fans have is to
make them think they have to yell.
And nobody likes to be hollered at.
So, some suggestions. Announce the yells on the
mike. When the situation calls for it (as a goal
line stand, or a touchdown drive), and the fans are
on their feet yelling (as occasionally' happens, even
at UK), then augment the vocal power of the customers by using the microphone. But don't use it
as an instrument of torture.
Maybe it's not entirely the fault of the person
wielding the mike. Maybe the instrument itself is
tuned too high, or the loudspeaker may be facing
the wrong way.
Maybe a lot of things. But until the technical
difficulties (if there are any) are ironed out, give
the fans a break. If they want to yell, lead them.

Get individual megaphones, and enthuse and inspire these fans.
But don't use the microphone as a crutch. And
don't alienate the folks who come to the game to
enjoy themselves, but who, too often, leave the
stadium thoroughly convinced they are permanently deaf as the result of listening to two hours of
intensely magnified screechings.

If about two more students get cars, some

resi-

dent of Nicholasville can make a mint with a
parking lot that's about as close as you can get
to the campus nowadays.
Come to the University and learn how to spell-- as
the sign at the tennis court says, "no street
excuses EXCEPTED." Oh, well.
shoes alio wed-- no

The Kentucky Kernel
Eatrred at the Post Office at Lexington. Kentucky, as lecond class
matter under the Act oil March 3, 1879.
Published weekly during school except holidays and exams.
$1.00 per semester
SUBSCRIPTION RATES

-

:

Editor
Associate Editor
Managing Editor
News Editor
Sports Editor
Feature Editor
Society Editor
Business Manager
Advertising Manager
Cartoonist
Photographer

Reporters
David G. Altemuehle. Joy Hell. Fred Burch. Mary
Crutcher. Laura Sue Glenn. John Heikin. Walter Lee Hensley,
Margaret Howard, Mary Holmes Kauffman. polo res Ann
Mary Lanter. Robert E. Milne. Dons Robertson. Norma
Shelton, Fredda Short. Ann Smith. Frank G. Strunk, Bob White-ke- r,
Tom Young. Robert Amato. James B. Bland, Brent A. Clay,
Carl E. Ford, Joseph R. Goodman. James F. Hatchel. Kenny B.
Hill. James E. Horner. Donald R. Mills, Robert Saxton, William
B. Tuily, and Ellen Tracy Waldon.
Lan-dru-

S

oaws

fly

The Tumult and the Shouting

Letters From The Readers
'Wired For Sound9
To the Editor:
Since when has regimentation become a part of
the so called fighting "school spirit?' The exhibicheerleader
tion Saturday night of a
wired for sound was more than even a
football fan can stomach.
Nine cheerleaders to lead the students in organized confusion is fine. But someone has the idea
of letting eight enjoy the game while the ninth inflicts as much punishment on the crowd as his voice,
aided by an overloud public address system, can.
The regimented chant of "Ga Ga Ga Ga Ga"
every time the home team has the ball is asking too
much. Even bringing the boys out of the huddle
every time is forcing the enthusiasm. From where
I was Saturday night there was not much enjoyment in being asked, may I say told, to yell at a
certain point and then shut up at the right time.
Back in the old days a fellow could enjoy a game
and, if he felt like it, yell, stomp, and maybe even
boo a little if he thought it was right. But now two
loud speakers placed over your head with the conchartrolling end in the hands of that
acter makes you wonder what happened to the free'
dom of being silent if you wish.
Charles W. Kurtz
red-heade-

d

die-har- d

over-zealo-

Korean Thanks

us

US

Dear Editor:
Being almost on the 3Sth parallel in the United
States and having the eleventh birthday of the
United Nations, I, a Korean student on campus,
would like to have the honor of expressing the sincere appreciation of the Korean people to you, the
American people, and presenting our feeling
through your paper. Let me state briefly the story
n
cooperation. The story can go
of
back all the way to 1SS2, when your nation and
mine first signed a treaty of mutual friendship and
support. And the story had a climax with which
you are familiar when American arms destroyed
the power of Japanese militarism and set Korea
free. Then, the second and even more dramatic
climax occurred when American fighting men, maybe some of my fellow students on