xt7gms3k0h86 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7gms3k0h86/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19701204  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, December  4, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, December  4, 1970 1970 2015 true xt7gms3k0h86 section xt7gms3k0h86 Tee Kemtocecy Kernel
Friday, Dec.

A,

1970

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

SG Group to Study

RabinRaps
R ussians
In Mideast

UK 'Environment'
X

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Kernel Staff Writer
Itzak Rabin, Israeli Ambassador to the U.S. and a former
soldier in the Israeli army,
denounced last night the intervention of the "big powers" in
the affairs of the Middle East,
in an address to a standing-room-onl- y
crowd in the Student
Center Ballroom. "The intervention of the 'big powers'," he
said, "only delayed peace in the
Middle East."
Rabin said that peace could
be maintained only when the
li
parties involved in the
conflict recognized each
other and established relations of
peace. He listed open boundaries
and the exchange of information
as some of the goals of Israel.
Rabin called himself an
observer" of the Mideast crisis and said that the
main obstacle to peace was the
lack of readiness of the Arab Israel's ambassador to the U.S., Itzak Rabin, told a standing-room-onl- y
crowd in the Student Center Ballroom that "intercountries to recognize that Israel is here to stay, as a Jewish vention" and "exploitation" by major world powers has inflamed
li
the
conflict His appearance was sponsored by the
country.
Continued on Pare 8, Col. 1 Student Center Board.
Kernel Photo By Bob Brewer
Arab-Israe-

"un-objecti- ve

Arab-Israe-

Attacks 'Human Pollution' at Louisville Seminar

Nunn Offers
JOHN

M. GRAY

Kernel Staff Writer
Cov. Louie B. Nunn announced yesterday a
program designed "to stop the
pollution of our human resources by drugs." Nunn made
the announcement before a crowd
of 7,000 people at a day-lon- g
"Special Session on Drug Abuse"
held at Convention Center in
Louisville.
Major points in Nunn's program include a $100,000 grant for
a proposed narcotics division of
the State Police Department and
a study of the feasibility of granting immunity to drug addicts
who give information about other
drug users to police.
Nunn also pledged that the
government of Kentucky "will
do its part" in combatting the
drug problem, but that "the final
responsibility must rest with each
community."
A panel discussion about the
drug abuse problem preceded
Nunn's speech.
Drew Standing Ovation
Members of the panel included Art Cook, a reformed heroin addict; William Newman, the
commissioner of the Kentucky
Department of Public Safety; Dr.
Harold Conrad, director of the
Clinical Research Center in Lexington; Mrs. Rhea Carpenter,
whose daughter is a heroin addict; Wendell Butler, the superintendent of public instruction for
six-poi- nt

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Weather
For Lexington and vicinityi
Partly cloudy windy and colder
this afternoon and tonight. High
today, in the low 40'i, low tonight, 30. Precipitation probabilities: near zero this afternoon,
10 percent tonight, and 20 percent tomorrow. Partly cloudy and
warmer on Saturday.

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Kernel Staff Writer
Student Government president Steve Bright announced yesterday that heiscreatinga"Com-missio- n
on University Ecological
Problems" to study ways of cutting down on pollution by the
University.
Calling the establishment of
the commission "one of the more

late-semest-er

War on Drugs

Six-Poi- nt

Kentucky; Dr. Don Herren, pas- and action. Nunn said drug arrests had grown by 600 percent
tor of the Southern Hills Methodist Church in Lexington; and and that these figures "might
just be the tip of the iceberg."
Judge Henry Meigs, of the FrankThe day-lon- g
session began at
lin County Circuit Court.
Each speaker talked generally 10 a.m. with displays and exhibits
about the drug problem and on the main concourse of the
how it related to his particular Center plus discussion groups
area. Mrs. Carpenter drew a with reformed addicts from Matstanding ovation from the crowd rix House, a halfway house for
for relating the story about
drug addicts, in Lexington and
Louisville.
her daughter who became a herThe Louisville and Lexington
oin addict.
Her voice choking with emo- Narcotics Squad sponsored popution, she said, "If I've saved lar displays which showed the
just one family from the agony various paraphernalia of chug
I've gone through with my dau- users. The police exhibited and
ghter, then speaking here today explained the use of needles,
has been worth the trouble." syringes, and pipes of all sorts.
Before the panel discussion, They also displayed amounts of
Nunn spoke briefly about the pur- marijuana, heroin, LSD, and
pose of the drug session. He other stimulants and depressants.
Related Experiences
said the three aims of the session were awareness, education
The former drug addicts told

I

to formulate recommendations
and take appropriate action
"whenever deemed necessary."
Need 'Unquestioned'
"The need for this commission, is unquestioned,"
Bright
said. "I look forward to your
work and eventual results in dealing with these matters."
In other SG action:
Progress is being made on a
used book exchange
important and significant"
actions of the semester, Bright headed by Director of Student
asked that the commission make Services Steve LaBreche.
"a major investigation" of 'ecoThe Book Exchange, which
logical problem? on campus and will be in operation from Dec.
in the surrounding' community. 16 through Dec. 23 and fromjan.
In a memorandum dated Dec. 11 through Jan. 15, is an at2, Bright charged the commission
tempt to reduce the "outrageousto investigate ways in which the ly high prices" of used books, La
University contributes to air polBreche said.
lution, and to determine areas of
As currently proposed, the
waste in various departments and book exchange would work somethe type of undesirable waste at- thing like this:
tributable to students. He also
Students w ould bring their old
ordered it to investigate the debooks to the exchange, where they
would fill out a card listing the
sirability of a collection center
for recycling paper, glass and
price of the book, the number
aluminum, to determine whether
of the course in which it was
there are adequate learning opused, and the student's name.
portunities at the University to One copy of the card would be
prepare students for attacking
placed in the book. Other copies
various ecological problems, and would go to the exchange and
the student.
The book would then be sold,
with a small percentage of the
sale going to the exchange for
expenses. The original owner of
the book could get the remaining
percentage of the sale by bringing
of their experiences with drugs his receipt to the exchange the
and answered questions from the week of Jan. 16, the second week
audience, comprised mostly of of the spring semester. Books that
were not sold would be returned
older people, about drugs.
Doyle, of Matrix House to their owners.
Patty
Under the exchange system,
in Lexington, said her group uses
"peer pressure" on drug addicts book prices should be comto help them "care and trust petitive with or lower than the
other people" as a way of curing prices of major Lexington bookstores. The low operating cost
them.
She said a person is not cured of the exchange may enable it
of the drug habit just because to pay more for used books and
he stops taking drugs. She also sell for less than other bookbelieves that putting an addict stores, said LaBreche.
d
t,
The
in jail for a long time fails to
book exchange will "hopecure him. "Time doesn't make
book
the difference," she said, "the fully lead to a
store on campus run by stureal problem is with the perdents," LaBreche said. '
son."
The exchange has an agreeMrs. Doyle said she felt both
alcohol and marijuana were "cop-out- s. ment with the Free University
I copped out with alcohol to provide workers. Students
before I ever even heard of marwishing to work at the book
on Page 8, CoL 1
ijuana," she said.
By DALE MATTHEWS

-- -7

By VALERIE ELLISON

By

Vol. LXII, No. 63

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Farm life goes on at a relaxed pace, even at UK's experimental
farm on Cooper Drive. Tom Hut duns, an engineering student
who works at the farm, could be mulling over the world's problems or just stifling a yawn as he watches these sheep ambling
back to their pens.
Kernel Photo By Bob Brewer

* TIIE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday,

Dec. 4, 1970

mmmMo
IC

OLOOD.SWEAT& TEARS

SANTANAABRAXAS

3

including:
Black MagtoWMnaaOypey Quean
Hope You re Feeling Better
Incident At Neohabur
Mothera Daughter

including:
Locrefia MacEvilHi-Oe-HSome thin' Com in' On The Battle
40.000 Headmen

QNiooya

INCLUDING:
DOES ANYBODY REALLY KNOW
WHAT TIME II IS?
QUESTIONS 67 AND 68 BEGINNINGS
LISTENLIBERATION
SOMEDAY

including:

Poem For The PeoplelnThe Country The Road
It Better End SoonWhere Do We Go From Here?

IDappying maiden

1

1

The Firesign Theatre

ALKOOPER

Easy Does It

Don't Crush That Dwarf,
Hand MTh Pliers

including:

including:
Riki Tiki Tavi Clara Clairvoyant
Changes Season Of Farewell
Celtic Rock

6

The Dolphms'Soapstone Moimtam'Good Lovin
Do You Ftomember The Sun'', Essence Of Now

including:
Love Theme From "The Landlord'VBuckskin Boy
Brand New Day1 Got A Woman Fasy Does It

o (tn

The Byrds
(Untitled)

including:
Mr Tambourine Man
Eight Milet High Just A Season
lover Of The Bayou Chestnut Mare

"2"

rai
COLO!

deluding:

BooksThemeOver
PkinKA)WfrWnd
ArUryShedeot
Winter
Mrs. Robinson

TOM

WLU.

BOOKENDS
SIMON & G ARFUNKEL

MST

.

MHRM

RUSH

Vntape Voence

including:

Child's SongWild ChildOld Man's Song
Drop Down Mama Colors Of The Sun

including:

CleoFairweather FriendAdelaide
Big White CloudAmsterdam

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Dec 4, 1970

s

TAJ MAHALGIANT STEP

GOT DEM

I

including
Take A Giant Steo

including:

WwowDoy Of 49Lnto Sod
Cocker lEorVMorneVRoiri

A

Of

Complon & Balleau
In California

AGAIN MAMA!

Give Your Woman What She Wants
Yxj'rt Gonna Ned Somebody On Your Bond
Your Hands Off Her Six Days On The Road
Keep

BOD DYLAN
SELF PORTRAIT

t WANT TO TAKE YOU WGHFR
THANK YOU Fctettmm B Mir Elf Altn
DANCE TO THE MUSICSTAND! EVERY DAY PEOPLE

P

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STONE

inS

INCLUDING:
ROCK AND ROLL, HOOCHIE KOO
TIME TO LIVEAIN T THAT A KINDNESS
NO
PRODIGAL SON LOOK UP

INCLUDING:
SIGN ON THE WINDOW
IF NOT FOR YOU THREE ANGELS
WENT TO SEE THE GYPSY IF DOGS RUN FREE

v

SLY & THE FAMILY
GREATEST I

JOHNNY WINTER AND

B03 DYLAN

The flew York
Rock Enscmblo
Roll Over

including:
Laughtw Turns To BluaSilk On SimI
DrrBlor Homnck Kid
Honcyiuckl

NCLUDING

tncaxflng:
Running DownTha NghwayTredKional Order
WaK Too Long

GreveftggarFMda Of JoyDonl

TRYMAYBEONE GOOD MAN
TO LOVE SOMEBODY

WORK ME, LORD.

'In?

Simon

TK2 JERRY H AKM

Water
including:

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HappyP

You've Made Me So Very
Spinning WheelMore and More
God Bless The Child

rH

BY

MILES

DAVIS

MILES DAVIS
AT FILLMORE
INCLUDING:

WEDNESDAY MILESTHURSDAY

INCLUDING:
PHARAOH'S DANCE
SPANISH KEY
JOHN McLAUGHUN
MILES RUNS THE
VOODOO DOWN
SANCTUARY

f

Troubled
The Boxer
Baby Driver
Bye Bye Love
Keep The
Customer
Satisfied
Bridge Over
Troubled
Water

o0t.sWBAr
including:

MUSIC

BITCHES BREW

Bridge
Over

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IN

MILES DAVIS

Garfunkel

One Man WomanCaptain Bobby Stout
Early Bird CafeThuraday Thing RambKn'

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DIRECTIONS

and

BROTHERHOOD
including.

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Bad News Ain't No Newt At All Chant 13

MILES
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Hour

uiaufaadu

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including:
Are You Ready ?When A Man Loves A Woman
Love, Love, Love. Love, LoveStaggotee
Mother, Why Do Ybu Cry?

INCLUDING:
EVIL WAYSJINGO
YOU JUST DON'T CARE
PERSUASIONWAITING

THE CIIAMUEKS URO TIILKS
LOVE, PEACE AMD

HAPPINESS

ptua
(JVC AT BILL GRAHAM'S FILLMORE EAST
Sat Al Spatial Low Prica
A
including:
Vvbke Up Left Do It Bang Bang
Vvbde InThe Water Can't Turn You Loos

40
mi'

Big

including:

BirdlighthousaGraan Slice

Hornschmayar't klandOobf oot

IKCIXDIKG:

INCLUDING:

BETTUt THLK TWICE
KUJ0!M BUJKVIV

YOU

HONK Y TONK UUWNSTAIRS
ANYWAY BYE BYE; DONT LET IT PASS

F)(

-

THE TRAIN KtPTA ROLMN-LITTLGAMESI AINT GOT YOU
DK1NKING MUDDY WATEK
JEFF'S BOOGIE

BY

Mashmahhan

Don Ellis

At Fillmore

QREHTESTIITS

including:
Hey JudePutty Wiggle Stomp

INCLUDING:

The Magic Bui Ate My Doughnut
Rock Odyttey The Blues

1
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fc

SUNSHINE SUPERMAN
WEAR YOUR LOVE LIKE HEAVEN
MELLOW YELLOWHURDY GURDY MAN

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INCLUDING:
AS THE YEARS GO BY LETTER FROM ZAMBIA
DAYS WHEN WE ARE FREE GLADWIN IF I TRIED

* Kernel Forum: j
the readers write I
Some Suggestions
To The

Editor

Rumor has it that the Kernel Is think
ing about devoting an issue of the paper
to the question of academics here on
campus. Fine. If it is not completely
definite yet, I only hope it will soon be.
I would only like to point out two or
three areas that should be concentrated
on. The recent concern over the status
of some professors (whether to reappoint
or not) is a vital issue of immediate
import, more important than whether
the left half of the seats in the classrooms
should be rotated 45 degrees.
Students should know the real procedures reflected in these circumstances.
Talking about reappointment criteria
brings us right away into the tenure
ball park, not to mention publish or
perish. And if one is going to write
about publish or perish, then the best
way would seem to be talk directly to
those people who either establish or
that policy. These people should
at least be made to commit themselves
to their opinions in words. I suggest
that interviews analogous to those conducted by the Kernel in the past be set
up with the appropriate people for the
sake of clarifying the Issues and attitudes
involved. And I suppose that perhaps
some directions be examined innovative
techniques currently being used by professors, implimentations seen in the Free
University, etc.
These are just some of the basic guidelines that may be helpful. Don't just
sit in your office and put down hazy
answers,
opinions and
when every Monday, Wednesday, and
Friday eighteen hundred students march
off to two sections of Biology 100 and
wonder why.
An important step in this direction
will occur next Wednesday, December 9.
The event is a Firing and Hiring Forum.
Included in this program is a talk at
1:00 P.M. featuring professors Cene Mason, Byron Petrakis, and Dean Wimberh
Royster. A seven O'clock panel discussion will include professors Cene Mason,
Pat White, Clayton Reeve, Dr. Lewis
Cochran (Vice President for Academic
Alfairs), Dr. Stephen Manning (Chairman
of the English Department), and Professor Carrett Flickinger (Chairman of
the Privilege and Tenure Committee.
WILLIE GATES III
A&S Senior
.

sr.

Kernel Soapbox

Floridians Appeal for National Ecological Support
By RICHARD SANFILIPPO

President, Responsible
Environmental Act Program
The University of Florida campus sits
along the northwest edge of Escambia
Bay, which empties into the Gulf of
Mexico at Pensacola, Florida. So far
this year, Escambia Bay has suffered
over 60 major fish kills, each one of close
to or more than a million fish food fish,
sport fish, "commercial fish," you name it.
These kills have been traced to industries and municipalities just north of and
on the bay, which have been using the
Escambia River and the bay for a dump.
One such industry is Monsanto Co.,
which, as of January, 1970, was dumping
into the river, and the bay, the following
wastes:

The Kentucky Kernel
of
University

ESTABLISHED

1894

Kentucky

FRIDAY, DEC. 4, 1970

Editorials represent

t)e

opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

Frank S. Coots III, Editor-in-ChiBob Brown, Editorial Page Editor
Jean Renaker, Managing Editor
Mike Tierney, Sports Editor
Dahlia I lays, Copy Editor
David King, Business Manager
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Jane Brown, Ron Hawkins, Bradley Jeffries, Jerry Lewis, Mike Wines.
Assistant Managing Editors

10,000 lbsday 5 day biological oxygen demand
3,900 lbsday total organic carbon
1,875 lbsday TKN
1,331 lbsday nitrite nitrogen
1,104 lbsday ammonia nitrogen and
nitrite
421 lbsday total phosphate
264 lbsday ortho phosphate
One of Monsanto's most advertised
and ecologically deleterious products is
Astro Turf, an artificial grass; some of
its other products are Arochlor (1250)
compounds and herbicides. Because our
public officials have been tragically slow
to respond, and because citizen initiated
"pollution control" legislation is being
successively weakened and stifled, and
will have only moderate "success' if ever
passed, we have concluded that only
economic sanctions can force the industries involved to recycle their wastes and
quit using the Escambia River the public
domain for a dump.
We intend to take sanctions against all
industries, of which there are six locally,
dumping into the Escambia River and
the bay. To establish our effectiveness,
we have decided to begin by calling for
a boycott of Astro Turf, the Monsanto
product that depends most heavily on
the college market. We desperately need
your support. There is nothing less at
stake than the bay itself the bay which

part of our biosphere, is
essential to a balanced environment.
It doesn't take much thought to realize
that Escambia Bay is about as important
to you as it is to us. By supporting our
boycott you not only deny revenue to an
enemy of the bay, you also help assert,
for once, that our waters and our skies
are not dumps, and that even large industries must be held responsible for their
wastes.
We ask that you put up with natural
grass for a good while longer.
We ask that you compel your friends
and local industries not to buy Astro
Turf and other Monsanto products.
We very respectfully and urgently request that you obtain, through your student government and alumni associations,
a binding, official promise not to pur- chase Astro Turf until Monsanto quits
dumping its wastes into Escambia River
and Escambia Bay.
We recommend that before you or
your college administration buy any other sort of artificial grass, you determine
that manufacturer is not, like Monsanto,
using the environment for a dump.
We need your active response to this
appeal, even if you have no need at your
institution for Astro Turf. Your support
is urgently requested. Please send us
notification of your administration's promise not to purchase Astro Turf as soon as
it can be obtained.
is an integral

Kent State Travesty: "Outrageous Insult Added to Mortal Injury

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words"

If there was ever a case of outrageous
insult added to mortal injury, it was the
report of the Ohio Special Crand Jury
that investigated the tragic shootings at
Kent State University last May 4. In
contemptuous disregard of the facts
the facts even as attested by a sweeping
FBI investigation the Crand Jury fully
exonerated the National Cuardsmen who
killed four students and wounded nine
more, and indicated twenty-fiv- e
persons
linked with the campus protest against
the Cambodian invasion.
Among those indicted on rioting and
other criminal charges were a student
wounded by a Cuardsman's bullet, a
professor who formerly served with the
Arms Control and Disarmament Agency
in Washington, and the president of the
Kent State student body-- an UOTC cadet
who was elected last June on a nonviolent platform of "Power to the Peaceful."
The Crand Jury, assisted in its labors
by a special prosecutor who later declared that. the. Cuard rstauldbfLsliQt.

all the troublemakers," found that the
Guardsmen "fired the weapons in the
honest and sincere belief and under circumstances which would have logically
caused them to believe that they would
suffer serious bodily injury had they not
done so. They are not, therefore, subject
to criminal prosecution under the laws of
this state for any death or injury resulting therefrom."
In stark contrast to the Crand Jury's
report was the evidence compiled by the
FBI. As summarized in a Justice Department document and disclosed on the Senate floor by Senator Stephen M. Young,
Ohio Democrat, the FBI investigators
found "reason to believe that the claim
by the National Cuard that their lives
were endangered by the students was
fabricated subsequent to the event." The
summary says six Cuardsmen, including
two sergeants and a captain, "stated
pointedly tliat the lives of the members
of the Cuard were not in danger and
that it was not a shooting situation."
ewThJjy'il. Pjf theFjI mvestigation,

like the factual findings of the President's
Commission on Campus Unrest, were
available to the Special Crand Jury. It
chose to ignore them and perform a
wretched travesty against the judicial
process.
Despite the results of its own investigation, the Justice Department has not
responded, at this writing, to demands
that a Federal grand jury be impaneled
to investigate the Kent State affair. Those
demands and the defense fund being
deorganized in behalf of the twenty-fiv- e
fendants indicted deserve the support of
all Americans who still lielieve it is possible to attain justice within the system.
If the Kent State twenty-fiv- e
are railroaded to jail, if the scandalous report of
the Ohio Crand Jury is permitted to
stand as tike last word, the tragedy of
last May will have been compounded to
a monstrous degree. It will be tlie ultimate affront to the nation's youth-- to
everything, in fact, that is still decent in
America.
The progressive

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Dec. 4,

The Rogers Style
Nixon's
of State Looks 'Like a
Soft-Sellin- g

off-col-

Story-rattlin-

governments frequently feel obliged to
deal with each other because of domestic political considerations.
Thus, he told a recent visitor, a prime
minister or a foreign minister will say to
him: "That would be a good idea, but
let's do it after our election." Or: "Let's
present it another way publicly." Or:
"Here's what I am doing publicly, but
here is really what I hope to do in the
next five years."
A cited example of these charades
across borders is a leftist country which
but now,
has been loudly
because of economic needs, would like to
have diplomatic relations with the US.
However, the political situation within
the country and its area of the world
now make that impossible. So, there are
"conversations" about how "almost" to
have diplomatic relations somewhere beneath the surface.
Into this arena of the polite jab and
the slippery feint, of the public roundhouse swing and the private handshake,
William Rogers brings his own brand of
nimble footwork. He remains,
agree, light on his feet in both
Rogers-Watche-

rs

eccssors. He is a very nice human being
without the intensive
that compels some people to kill other
people."
"He is a man of good heart and good
sense," says Mike Mansfield, who leads
the opposition party in the Senate. "He
would rather find solutions than confrontations."
Until a national administration leaves
office and the flood of memoirs begins, it
is difficult to assess the role of any secretary of state. Few people outside the
inner councils can know who contributes
precisely what to the mosaic of foreign
policy.
In this administration, the question is
doubly complicated by the fact that President Nixon, it is generally agreed, tends
to be his own secretary of state and
there, always at his elbow, is Henry Kissinger.
Both Kissinger and Rogers dismiss
their "rivalry" as newspaper talk. Rogers
particularly finds the speculation distasteful and has grown weary of pointing
out that, as secretary, and old friend and

of recent secretaries. But in appearance,
he is a man imposing dignity and, in his
precisely tailored clothes, he somehow
formality even in
suggests a striped-pant- s
slacks and sports coat.
Radiates Openness
with receding
Tall, trim, blue-eye- d
sandy hair at 57, he radiates a kind of
openness reminiscent of the
matinee idols of a less sullen time. He
is said to be the most handsome man in
the job since Edward Stettinius.
In sum, says a top officer who has
served under five secretaries, "in style,
appearance, form, dignity, in his choice
of office decor and clothes, he looks like
a secretary of state ought to look."
Rogers came to the job with little experience in foreign affairs but broad
experience as a lawyer and negotiator.
No ingenue in a world of tilings not being what they seem, he was still imway national
pressed by the split-lev-

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TOM DUNCAN
at PR luncheon

Duncan Stresses
Media Honesty
Tom Duncan, Frankfort newsman for Louisville' WAVE-Tand author of the syndicated column "Frankfort Watchline,"
spoke on "Understanding the
Media" at a luncheon held Thursday for UK's Community College
Public Relations employees.
Duncan said that "all media
people are trying to be honest,
and usually, all of them think
they are being fair." However,
he characterized Journalists as
often opinionated, picky, or pigheaded-and
sometime i all of
these at once."
He emphasized the value of
a good relationship between the
people and the media, bated on
V

strongly

LOOKING
NEED

This was the process followed
by Miss Coloslmo for the book
store project. "Now we won't
hit the same potholes other
schools did, and we can succeed
more quickly," she said.
NAS files include information
on the handling of free universities, tenants' unions, and course
and teacher evaluations at various schools. Accounts of student demonstrations, ROTC
facts, and ideas on the military-industriestablishment are also
on file.
Since UK has recently become
a member of NSA, any UK student can use these files. The
information is free, and can be
obtained through UK's student
gove nment office.
NSA also offers a legal service, help in obtaining campus
speakers, and a record club and
film service. Travel services and
youth tours are also sponsored

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BELLES

Rogers is known to grow impatient
with detail and long discussions, and
while he has learned much about the
nuts and bolts of foreign policy, he still,
on occasion, has trouble with his homework.
In a complex shifting world in which
it is not at all clear that confrontation has
yielded to negotiation or that nuclear
bombs have been safely locked up in
their owners' closets, the secretary of
state wears his burdens well. Disposition,
digestion, sleep remain good. Golf game
worse by four or five strokes generally
but up 10 in the week of the hijacking
crisis. Diagnosis: not nervousness but
insufficient time to play.
Unlike Rusk, the job has not become
the be-aand end-al- l of his life. Rogers,
in fact, still talks of serving only one
presidential term at State, mindful of the
wear and tear suffered by his

IF YOU . . .
HAVE SOMETHING

4,

FRIDAY

enough?9

e,

Kernel Staff Writer
New groups, programs and
policies spring up constantly on
college campuses. For member
schools interested in the latest
movements, the National Student
Association, with headquarters
in Washington, acts as a central
information center.
UK Student Covernment representative Hazel Col osimo visited NSA headquarters last summer. Besides gathering facts preparatory to setting up a cooperative book store for UK, she reports she also gained an insight
into the working of NSA as an
information clearinghouse.
As Miss Coloslmo explained
it, member schools keep headquarters informed about their latest programs and organizations.
Other schools attempting to set
up similar programs can then
check NSA files for help end
ideas.
by NSA.

ARRIVED

long-rang-

confidante, he has no trouble getting the
President's ear.
At any rate, Rogers is generally credited with having pushed and achieved
the Mideast cease-firand, however tenuous, the shooting stopped.
He got this by hacking down a jungle
of issues and securing from Egypt and
Israel agreement on two hardrock points-ultim- ate
Israeli withdrawal from occupied territory and ultimate Egyptian recognition of Israel's right to endure as a
state.
He is heavily identified with the "Nixon doctrine" of reducing American involvements around the world. He was
an early proponent of American troop
withdrawals from Vietnam. He was, it is
said, a moderating voice in the consideration of American military action in
Jordan this fall. He argued strongly
against American retaliation for the
shooting down of an American plane by

NSA Student Services
Made Available at UK

"mutual respect."
"Don't buj the press with

trivial stories . . .but if you have
some good news, we are glad to
handle 1L" he laid.

put that

the larger international bouts and the
inevitable intramural sparring of the
Washington gym.
Didn't Want Job
He came to the job unburdened by
psychological or ideological baggage. He
did not want the job and took it only on
the insistence of his friend, the President.
After years of public service, including
four in the Cabinet, neither liis ego nor
his civic sense hungered for a return to,
government.
As a millionaire lawyer, he was in the
enviable position of picking and choosing his case. He became secretary of
state with no cosmic plan of how the
world should be run except that the
United States should try to run less of it.
"He is not obsessed with ideology or
the Communist menace," says a dove
member of the Senate Foreign Relations
Committee. "He is not transfixed with
the missionary zeal of some of his pred- -

By MARY ANN BACHMANN

North Korea early in 19C9, only a few
months after candidate Richard Nixon
was pummeling Lyndon Johnson for his
handling of the Pueblo seizure.
In the White House discussions leading to the Cambodia decision, Rogers ap'
pears to have won one and lost one.
He told a recent visitor he had favored
wiping out the enemy sanctuaries across
the border as a military solution to a
military problem, and several plans were
considered. Rogers does not say which
he favored, but others report he urged
the use of South Vietnamese troops only.
In the confusion of the Cambodia uproar, Rogers was accused of having misled two congressional committees in the
days preceding the invasion. The State
Department explanation is that in the
one case the secretary could not tell them
what he did not know because of security imposed by the White House.
In his approach to foreign affairs, Rogers is said by those who work for him
and with him, to rely more on intuition
than detailed analysis, more on pragmae
tism than
world concepts into
which events must fit.

Asks Rogers: 'Do you think you

Nixon calls him 'the best
negotiator in the world.

h

Secretary Ought to Look'

Secretary

By SAUL PETT
AP Special Correspondent
WASHINGTON (AP)-- It can now be
reported on the highest authority that,
in addition to strategic weapons, sophisticated space hardware, gross national
product and consumer goods, the Union
of Soviet Socialist Republics is still bestories.
hind the United States in
"About 15 years behind," says William
Pierce Rogers. "Also, theirs tend to be
less subtle than ours."
g
in the Cold
Jingoism?
War? Hardly. America's 55th secretary
of state is giv