xt7gth8bhh8s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7gth8bhh8s/data/mets.xml The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. 1967 bulletins  English The Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletins Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletin, Vol. 43, No. 2, Autumn 1967 text Frontier Nursing Service Quarterly Bulletin, Vol. 43, No. 2, Autumn 1967 1967 2014 true xt7gth8bhh8s section xt7gth8bhh8s jruntirr 3&urzing érrhirr
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The cover of this Bulletin was drawn by ·  
nurse-midwife Cherry Evans for the Autumn , I
1946 Quarterly Bulletin. We think it is so I `
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charming that we want to print it again this  
year as our Christmas card to all of our . i
readers. I
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FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE QUARTERLY BULLETIN l
Published at the end of each Quarter by the Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. _ I
Lexington, Ky. -
Subscription Price $1.00 a Year  
Edit01·’s Ollice: Wemlover, Kentucky _
VOLUME 43 AUTUMN, 1967 NUMBER 2  · Q
Second class postage paid at Lexington, Ky. 4050f7  I l
Send Form 3579 to Frontier Nursing Service, Wendover, Ky. 41775  I  
Copyright, 1967, Frontier Nursing Service, Inc. ‘  
. i Q

 CONTENTS
ARTICLE AUTHOR PAGE
tl V; A Mother’s Visit to FNS Mrs. Gordon Miller 3
American Association of I
‘ Nurse—Midwives 8
" Beyond the Mountains 25
  Christmas (verse) Mary Louise Cheatham 2
Q ; Field Notes 30
E l Helen Browne, Agnes Lewis,
§ J and Betty Lester A Photograph Inside Back Cover
    In Memoriam 9
E   ". . . It’s Off to Work We Go" Laura Tosi 22
  ` Mary Breckinridge Day (I11us.) 5
  i Mary Breckinridge Hospital:
Progress Report 20
% Old Courier News 12
  X Old Staff News 14
  BRIEF BITS
=   A Fashionable Woman Modern Maturity 21
 t   A New Twist on the Secret of Success The Colonial Crier 34
'   From a Courier’s Letter The Quarterly Bulletin 24
    Sayings of Our Children 4
 j   Tenpenny Nails The Countryman 29
 All White Elephant 19
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2 FRONTIER NURSING srmvxon  
ci-m1smAs  
We Trim noT only This year`s Tree  
WiTh silvered webs oT memory, I
BuT all The Trees we ever had, gl
Through happy ChrisTmases. and sad.  
Each ball suspended quivering brighT Y
ReTlecTs a vanished child's delighT. ·
The gay, glass bird ThaT cannoT sing y
STill hovers on a hopeTul wing. V
Along The gleaming ropes oT beads
Are sTrung old dreams. and loves, and needs. y
Familiar angels hanging There  
Bring back a comTorT and a prayer.  
From sTarry Tip To coTTon snow  l
And worn, loved homemade creche below,  i
All ChrisTmases ThaT ever were  T
Shine Through The boughs oT This year`s Tir!  
—Mary Louise CheaTham  
From "Christmas, An American Annual
of Christmas Literature and Art," _
Vol. 33, edij:ed by Rando1ph_E. Haugen,
1963. Reprinted by permission of  ,
Augsburg Publishing House, Minneapolis,  ~
M1nnesota,copyr1gh owner. g
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1

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it QUARTERLY BULLETIN 3
  A MOT I-IER’S VISIT TO FNS
l\/ERS. GORDON MILLER
A As our car came closer and closer to the Frontier Nursing
5 Service Outpost where our daughter, Mollie, was stationed, we
{ felt we were entering another country and era. We were soon to
f learn that the section of Kentucky which is located in the Appa-
. lachian Mountains has a culture, a society, and a language all
  1ltS OW11.
Y Driving slowly enough to take in the beauty of Kentucky’s
Y hills in early summer, we noted washing machines on front
‘ porches and elderly folks sitting as if watching the world go by.
L Clothes hung on lines or on wire fences., Old cars, long abandoned,
were in strange places, like a river bed, or perhaps near the front
A door where they had been left after their last feeble chug. Every
yard had at least one dog to greet us as we passed. By the
scattered lumps of coal along the roads we knew mining was one
j of the industries of this part of Kentucky.
Suddenly, two jeeps, one green and one yellow, plainly labeled
; I "FNS", seemed to surround us. Our daughter in the yellow jeep
  waved us on as she took the lead in directing us to her outpost.
xy Carolyn, her co-worker, continued on her way to call on her
X patients up the nearby creek.
` I In just a few minutes we came to a mail box bearing those
  same familiar letters--FNS—and Mollie led us through the green
 r gate and up a steep hill to a white house, shaded by lovely tall
 I oaks. How wrong I had been all these years in trying to imagine
¢  what an outpost looked like! We soon learned that the Belle
1 Barrett Hughitt Memorial Nursing Center at Brutus was indeed
  a haven for the weary in more ways than one.
· Mollie proudly introduced us to the Kentucky woman who
helped take care of the center, then showed us their clinic, the
· sitting room with its cozy fireplace, the screened-in porch, and
 g our own guest room. We even met Star, the cow!
  While Mollie was busy with her clinic, I settled down to read
 ' Yesterdays People, a recent book about Appalachia, and soon
 l found myself comparing the author’s conclusions with my own
  observations at the clinics.
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4 FRONTIER NURSING SERVICE  
I enjoyed riding in "Daffy," Mollie’s jeep, and waving to all
the porch sitters on my side of the road while she waved to those ll,
on her side. Somehow news had spread that Miss Mollie’s parents
from Illinois were visiting at Brutus. One day "Daffy" took us
on a longer than usual trip over highway and down a creek bed Yl
to tea at Wendover. Here again, I found my imagination and
reality were miles apart. ,
As a mother, I had naturally been concerned for the safety .
of two young nurses living all alone at an outpost center. How-  
ever, I soon learned that my fears were unnecessary when I saw sl
first hand the love and respect the people had for "Miss Mollie" `
and "Miss Carolyn." The nurses were a part of the community.
I think it was the mountain children, many of whom came
to the outpost clinic, clean and in their Sunday best, who most .
enriched my visit to the FNS. "Handsome" is hardly the word .
for blond, curly-headed, blue-eyed Benjamin. One day I saw
him in the doorway of his home, pointing shyly to his baby ducks.
The next day he was brought to the clinic with a fever. As I saw _
him in his daddy’s strong arms. I reflected that the book had cer-
. tainly been right in saying that mountain parents are devoted
to their little ones. Later I met the other children in this family _.
and each one was a beauty to behold. l
My thoughts have often turned to my stay at Brutus on .,
Bullskin Creek and I realize each time how much richer my own  
life has been made by these experiences at the FNS where the  
cause of health and social welfare of "yesterday’s people" is ful- I _,
filling the dream of its founder. Were I young, able-bodied, and  j
a trained nurse, I, too, would want to make my life richer by shar-  j
ing in the tremendous work at Frontier Nursing Service. l
SAYINGS OF OUR CHILDREN A
One mother overheard this heated comment on socks with
no elasticity: "No, Garry, I’m not going to wear these old socks.  
They slide right down in my feet!" »
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I QUARTERLY BULLETIN 5
, MARY BRECKINRIDGE DAY
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,v  The Sixth A.nnual Mary Breckinridge Day was held in Hyden
`,' on Saturday, October 7, 1967, and was an unqualified success.
“* The FNS had planned its annual Courier Conclave to coincide
IX with Mary Breckinridge Day so that some of our friends beyond
the mountains could enjoy the festivities that the Mary Breck-
‘ inridge Day Committee had worked so hard to provide. Our
courier guest list was headed by the first FNS courier who is now
our National Chairman, Marvin Breckinridge Patterson, who
‘ flew down from Washington with her husband, the Honorable
J efferson Patterson.
, Helen Stone (Pebble) of New York was the first courier to
turn up on Wednesday, October 4. On Thursday, Mrs. Gerald
Tyrrell (Janie Haldeman) of Louisville met Mrs. Edward Arpee
` (Katherine Trowbridge), Lake Forest, Illinois, in Lexington and
drove her up to Wendover. Mr. and Mrs. Samuel E. Neel (Mary
_ Wilson), McLean, Virginia, Jane Leigh Powell, New York City,
- Mrs. Charles S. Cheston, Jr. (Lois Powell), Millis, Massachusetts,
and Mrs. Bruce Putnam (Amy Stevens), Wayland, Massachusetts,
` all arrived in time for dinner. Mr. and Mrs. Patterson, Freddy

 6 momma mmsmo smnvrcn S
Holdship, Sewickley, Pennsylvania, and Heidi Mehring, Cleve-  N
land, arrived on Friday. Those of the couriers who had not been  _’
in the mountains recently visited the hospital and an outpost il
center on Friday and the whole group had an informal meeting {
that evening to discuss plans and policies of the Courier Service. »_;
Wendover was stirring early on the morning of the 7th as  
the couriers scattered to help with preparations for Mary Breck- ‘l
inridge Day. There were horses to ride into town for the parade,
jeeps to be driven, people to be transported. By the time every-
one got to the Leslie County High School the craft show was well
under way. Mrs. Edward N. Farmer was again chairman of the
craft show and she had an interesting and diversified display
of quilts and other needlework, woven mats and spreads, dulci- `
mers, ceramics, cornshuck dolls, and chairs and stools and other `
wood work. Margaret McCracken demonstrated wood carving
and Naomi Powell was back with her pottery wheel. A beautif111
ceramic créche set made by Mr. and Mrs. Chester Cramer
of the Red Bird Mission, a lovely painting by Mrs. Cleveland .
Marcum, a beautiful quilt made by Mrs. Sally Hall in memory
_ of Miss Zilpha Roberts, all the handicrafts made by the Dry- ‘
hill Community, and ceramic pins made by Mrs. Coleman Norris 1,
(ex-staff—Alberta Halpin) were sold for the beneiit of the Mary ij
Breckinridge Hospital Fund. H ‘
Shortly after 10:30 a.m. word came in to the craft show fs
that the parade was in sight and everybody rushed out to see  
the floats on which weeks of planning and work had gone. Lead- .
ing the parade were three FNS horses, closely followed by the r
M. C. Napier High School Band which was a big hit with the .
» audience. Then came the floats—twenty of them—all attractive,
different, and ingenious—interspersed with marching units, the
candidates for the Mary Breckinridge Day Queen, and FNS `
jeeps. Several years ago Mr. Woodrow Sizemore, the parade  
marshall, had said he would put anything—even a billy goat— .
in the parade provided it was ready to march by 10:00 a.m. So ¤
we weren’t terribly surprised to see Jonathan Voltaire, a mule
belonging to the Wolf Creek nurse, ridden by a large teddy bear ]
and "pulling" a Land Rover! The little children were especially ,
enchanted with Smoky Bear who rode on the United States For- 1
estry Service float, and many of the little ones were sure they had ·
shaken hands with a real live bear. The grand prize for the iloats '
I
l

 ’ QUARTERLY BULLETIN 7
went to the Red Bird Community (see photograph) which was
 » excellent but they were all so good that it must have been difficult
F, for the judges to make their decision.
{ Mr. Paul Cook, Chairman of the Mary Breckinridge Day
,, Committee, presided at the program which followed the parade,
x and introduced the honor guests, Mr. and Mrs. Patterson. The
Kd distinguished guest speakers were the Honorable Eugene Siler,
former Congressman from this district, and Mr. Virgil Walton
Napier of Hazard. A delicious lunch was served after the pro-
gram. The craft show continued on into the afternoon and there
was a pony show for the children.
The premiere of THE ROAD was arranged for the evening
· of Mary Breckinridge Day because both the FNS and the pro-
‘ ducer of the iilm, Mr. Lee Bobker of Vision Associates, wanted
` the people whose cooperation had made the film possible to be
the first to see it. Mr. Bobker and his assistant, Miss Ann Eisner,
arrived at the Leslie County High School in mid-afternoon and
, the library was converted from a craft showroom into a theater.
When we got back to Wendover for tea we found a very special
treat in store for us. When THE ROAD was filmed, Mr. Bobker
and his soundman, Don Matthews, went to Winchester, Ken-
  tucky, to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Baker (nee Edna
'> Ritchie) to tape the dulcimer music which is used in the film.
tl We had invited Mr. and Mrs. Baker to come over for tea and
C I to go with us to see the premiere. They honored us by accepting
the invitation and brought with them three of Mrs. Baker’s sis-
E ters, Mrs. Jean Pickow, Mrs. Kitty Singleton, and Mrs. Ollie
Estepp. They also brought three dulcimers and Edna and Jean
played and sang and the others joined in the singing and the
rest of us had one of the most enjoyable hours we have ever
spent at Wendover.
, Over two hundred people came to see THE ROAD that
— evening. Originally, a 28-minute Elm was planned, but the film
l editor said that it was so good he could not possibly cut it under
J forty minutes. The extra footage is a gift to the FNS from
* Vision Associates. When Lee Bobker first visited the FNS, he
was impressed with the rapport between the staff and their
  patients and it was this that he most wanted to capture in his
film. We think he succeeded admirably. The photography—by
» Arthur Fillmore and Robert Bauer——is excellent and the voice
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of the narrator, Roscoe Lee Browne, is well-suited to the script. ’
The film is entirely unrehearsed and the "actors" are the doc- ,
tors, the nurses and their patients. The traditional dulcimer ,