xt7gth8bk03m https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7gth8bk03m/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660303  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March  3, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, March  3, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7gth8bk03m section xt7gth8bk03m Inside Today's Kernel
Four UK coeds hare been selected tor
the Mademoiselle College Board: Pogt
Two.
Liam

Cuichint to giro guitar
cert: Pogt Threo.
Tditor discusses scalping and
General Assembly: Pogt Four.

con-

the

"Black Pajamas" ort major hope of
South Vietnamese: Pog Fivt.
UK swimmers ore ready lor SEC championships: Pogt Six.
UK's Der Baron a page ol pictures
on the nation's winningesi coach: Pogt
Seven.

Vol. LVII, No. 91

University of Kentucky
MARCH 3,
KY.,

LEXINGTON,

1G

THURSDAY,

Eight Pages

Loans Will Continue Official Mopes
By RON IIERRON

Kernel Slaff Writer
Dr. M. Howard Bryant, regional representative of the U.S.
Office of Education at Charlottesville, Va., today said he
was hopeful that National Defense Education loans would be
able to continue as a result of
President Johnson's announcement yesterday that he would
not carry out his earlier plans

to eliminate the loans from his
budget.
The President's original budget did not include funds, and
instead proposed government
subsidizing of private loan companies.
Dr. Bryant said the subsidized, guaranteed loan program
would probably eventually replace National Defense Education loans, "but something

Mullins, Cross
Win Positions
In AWS Voting

should be done in order to include the advantages of the loans.
Some arrangement would have
to be made so the banks would
cancel and wc would subsidize."
He referred to the present
arrangement of cancelling much
of the debt of students who
went into secondary school
teaching of mathematics and sciences.
Dr. Bryant said his office

had been discussing the problem
with government officials for
alxnit u month, and that the
biggest objection to employing
the President's proposal right
now was that universities were
not prepared to work out the
details. There is the chance that
many students would not be
able to get loans for the next
year.
Dr. Bryant is head of the

office that governs student financial aid in 200 universities
and colleges in Kentucky, West
Virginia, Virginia, the District
of Columbia, North Carolina,
Puerto Rico, and the Virgin

Islands.
James E. Ingle, acting administrator of University Student
Financial Aid, yesterday said
he had received "encouraging"
Continued On Pare 8

T

M

:

By PHYLLIS COMBS

Kernel Staff Writer
small turnout of 600 coeds elected Connie Mullins, president,
and Johnnie Cross, vice president, in AWS elections Wednesday.
Miss Mullins, a senior Spanish
major from Miami, Fla., has been sentatives; and Mary Alice Shipan AWS senator for three years ley, a Lexington math major, a
Studenserving as vice president for the member of Cwens and the
Centennial Com1965 Senate. She is also a member t-Faculty
of Women's Advisory Council and mittee.
has been active in Student ConRepresenting sophomores will
gress and the Student Center
be Amelia Sympson, a Lexington
Board.
Miss Cross is a senior French journalism major and member of
major from Somerset. She has the 1965 Senate; and JanellTobin,
previously been on AWS Senate education major from Harned, a
member of Student Center Social
and is a member of Links.
Ann Committee.
Presidential runner-u- p
First meeting of the 1966
Breeding and vice presidential
runner-u- p
Winnie Jo Perry have Senate is scheduled for March 24
with the 1965 Senate.
won seats on the Senate.
Representing Panhellenic on
the 1966 Senate will be Jean
Ward, Lexington junior English
major. Miss Ward is a 1965 Student Congress representative and
a member oftheKentuckian staff.
Colleen
Her - runner-up- ,
will also be seated on
the Senate.
By WALTER GRANT
Women's Residence Hall repKernel Editor-in-ChiThe student editorial board of
resentative is Julia Kurtz. A junior
from Sturgis and majoring in ecoStylus will resign after the spring
nomics, Miss Kurtz is vice presi- edition in protest of a policy
dent of Keeneland Hall and a giving the Department of English
member of the University Debate the "final word" on articles
team. Vicki Knight, runner-u- p
written for the publication.
board issued
The
and a past president of Alpha
Lambda Delta, will be a senator. a joint statement today which
Senior representatives to the read, "We have decided to resign
rather than remain without the
Senate arc Barbara Bates, Hamilton, O. sociology major and a final word we feel to be an essenmember of AWS High School tial part of an editor's responsibility." Stylus is the campus
Leadership Conference Committee; and Susanne Ziegler, a math literary and art magazine, fimajor from Fern Creek, also a nanced by the English Demember of the 1965 Senate.
partment.
are
The editors' statement said
Junior representatives
the present impracticality of a
Jennifer Day, an Ashland merchandising major and member of solely student edited and centhe 1965 AWS House of Repre sored magazine has been nude
A

r.

ci lv

6a

and representatives, elected Wednesday, front row, are Winnie Jo Perry, runner-u- p
vice president; Johnnie Cross, vice president;
Connie Mullins, president; and Ann Breeding,
runner-u- p
president. Second row, Vicki Knight,
WRH runner-up- ;
Julia Kurtz, WRH; Jean Ward,

AWS officers

fey

)

U

1

Panhellenic representative; and Colleen McKinley,
runner-uPanhellenic representative. Third row,
Amelia Sympson, sophomore senator; JonellTobin,
sophomore senator; Jennifer Day, junior senator;
Mary Shipley, junior senator; and Suzanne Ziegler,
p

senior senator.

In Protest Of 'Final Word' Policy

y,

Stylus Editors To Resign Posts

five-memb-er

clear in discussions with representatives of the English Department.
"The disagreement between

the English Department and the
student staff of Stylus arose over
the department's refusal to allow
a certain story to be published,"
Dr. Jacob II. Adler, chairman of
the department, told the Kernel
today.
Neither Dr, Adler nor men-ber- s
of the student board would
comment on the nature of the
article prompting the controversy.
Dr. Adler did say, however,
that "five members of the department who read the story when the
question arose agreed that it
should not indeed, could not
be published by Stylus." He

added that Stylus

is an official
English Department publication,
and the department must exercise
the right of any publisher to
establish policy.
The student editors' statement
added, "We want to make clear
the fact that the English Department's policy in the past year has
not changed in any respect. We
simply edited the fall issue under
the illusion that we had complete
control and have, since then,
learned differently."
Members of the student board
who signed the statement arejoe
Nickcll, Harlcy J. Bcal, Ron
Devon Rosenstiel and
David Polk. The board will continue in an "advisory" function
for the spring issue.
Further commenting on the
Ros-ensti-

Johnson Signs Cold War Bill
permanent program of educaWASHINGTO- N- President tional benefits, housing loans,
and limited medical treatment for
Johnson signed the "cold war CI honorable
discharged veterans
cost
bill," today but said that its
with more than 180 days of active
further than he recomgoes
military service since Jan. 31,
mended.
when the Korean CI
The bill was signed by the 1955,
benefits bill expired.
House cerePresident in a White
both
Mr. Johnson said the cost of
mony where he pointed out
houses of Congress passed the the bill would be $245 million for
the first year and then it would
measure unanimously.
The law will give aid to stu- rise to $1.8 billion over the next
who have served six live years.
dent
The President said that he
months' active duty. It sets up a
(From Combined Dispatches)

could not ignore Congress' unanimous vote on the bill.
Veterans will be given eight
years from their time of discharge
to complete educational benefits.

To Receive Benejits
The cold war CI bill which
the President signed today sets
up a permanent program of educational benefits, housing loans,
and limited medical treatment for
veterans of at least six months'

service who have received an
honorable discharge.
To receive these educational
benefits for UK. a student must
establish his eligibility with the
VA, and then apply by writing to
the VA Regional Office, Cleve-

land, O.
Applications are not available
yet, but it is a good idea for students to write now to get their
Dimes on the list, said Mrs.
Arthur Capps, at the University
Counseling and Testing Service.

English Department s policy, Dr.
Adler said, "Without going into
the literary merit of the story concerned, the department feels
stories which might achieve
publication in journals unconnected with colleges are not
necessarily
appropriate for a
college-connecte-

d

magazine."

Dr. Adler said all five members
of the department who advised
against printing the story made
"an immediate and strong con-

viction."
"One of these five, who has
wide familiarity with publishing
practice, doubts that it would be
accepted for publication by any
literary magazine in the country. Another, who
has long been connected with
Stylus, has been notable for wanting to give the students every
college-connecte-

d

possible leeway; yet he is firm in
his views that this story had to be
rejected," Dr. Adler said in stressing the decision was not a
borderline or hesitant opinion.
Dr. Adler continued, however,
that "it is only fair to add that a
staff member who saw the story
on another occasion felt, and still
feels, that it should have been
published, believing as he does,
that no consideration other than
literary merit is pertinent to such
a decision."
The department head said this
is a view which the department
cannot accept in terms of an
Continued On Pace

Z

* 2 --

lf

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Thuria-- . March 5.

Editors Resign In Protest
rfr
Tram

Ccniino

of"r.;

li'era-- y

toiie;:

n. term

err

of t

in:

P";ng
lishes

ii.ag&zm:
of ary

rich

I.

"t:jht.of

jv.'iry
content

mag.rine

puti.iln : t:
.w.
regard. ii

tir pub-

tr

Expected

Tiit student board s.u:fsrt-c-!
ai. uii.)5j:ui! solely student
edited puniuati.ti.. farmed and
printed r ii of tiit p k?ts and
tours fif coruerned students.
a:uly members and friends.
"

To Participate

In Pre? Clinic
Vo:u

S3C

nurru:

vnui.e

t:

:

;.rti-i:.a-

.

Tiif student, admitted, however, thai then art diadvaniacc-lr. term of a stable future for a
macazine not officially afnhated
viti, the English IVpatmcni.
"This pT(hi?TTi and mars others
tt' bt confronted and
so.Kfd if enouch of thr t"nhcrsit
fommuni; f?ls a mcc of this
kind i caLrd for." thp iaid.

n. tirt
Sen j

t

Ke.;iun H::.

uiiiiuo.!

s

Chni: Marc:. II

The Clinic. v;'i2s')T

S:.:r!

tirt

:

hir

iid tire
JLiurnksn
ke:iu:..y High Scii :o I'ress A
srtciati'Ji.. is o;ier. t: sudentsaiid
y
advisers rrorr.
Lrul
of

keir-tu::-

v.hoois

uxzx.

whi--

pn-du-

h

.e

T:t editors s.idtjif

tt podaif- iif

or piar.
ers

hl

d

Tirt student editors wid sever! possibit ol'en.ati es tc the
situatior tjvf :rei discussed

50(1

e;-:le:-

en ihrd atn(sphrrc." Hr
the department fia

methods which micht hr
pursued in findings wsv toTrtain
Stvltis as tn rtir publication.
The department "hope and belies rs such a method ran hr
found." be said.

.d'c? emphasized tliat tlrr
v. rrr,
student
civicrrnKTit

art

and faru'tv members lias
conducted "in an amicable

staff
been
and
said

1

to aicep

did suiec:i3i:.s.

urkirig iifw'snsi, awl von-- ei
an memrers of the
Ln faui viL conduct wyrk-iiisessui. or. b.L phases or

Tiif

s.ioj ivspa;er produrtiJi..

tirt- -

Tiit editors empiasized.

Sip:.. IzWl. C:.. profession."

tiri
tlt ;u'm.feltthest
tc
"

ever,

i:urji::i: socie . will present
awac.- - t: the tes printed iid
tffsr

announced tlit
sprinc edit i or. of
wiL h accepted b
board through March h.
also

work lor

Sr'ii:

would
opinions. adn:t

tiit-re-

howponsi-rji-

w

iio

;:

tat

suorrcitted work for tire spring
subnut to
tiid whe
trat tiie student
rjturt

:jt.

;

nev-saupliia'
nutted fx thru; evciuatior.

v-i-

:.ae.

KALeidoscoPE
THURSDAY
Sprnic Fasiaon Show, presented b the Student Center
hoard. 7.30 p.m. in the Grille.
Marc et Andre. French smz- er; b.lZ n.n.. Memorial HalJ.
FRIDAY
"Tender Is the Niziit."' .30
all!U 9 p. n... S'udeiit Center
Th eatie.

"Patience
11:

b

ai..

C.ilbert and
p.n... Cuicul

iea re.

':.

l.cppfc Tau ii

parrv

SATURDAY

""Tender Is the Night." 6:30
and 9 p.m.. Student Center
Theatre.
"Patience" b Gilbert and
Sullivan. S.30 p.m.. Guignol
Theatre.
l.
Mardi Gras Dance,
S
p.m. to midnight. Student Center Grand Ballroom.
Music b the Magnificent Seven
and the Kinetics.
Lambda Chi Alpiia house party . S p.m. to midnight. Music
b the Warlocks.
Phi Gamnia Delta house paj-t- y
S
.
p.ni. to nudmgiit. Music
tu the Maurauders.
semi-forma-

National ComiHiUtion

editorial bard does no
control o er the w ot k t liosm
tr be printed " They added, "We
-.l
every interested student und
will want to deta:uly
termine f ir himself the
this question.
lt;iv-fina-

l

f-

'-T

Miiffamoisdle Board
Sclwls I liom UK
II

iinph-tati'Miso- f

CODING
Fountainhead" will be
BONNIE

By

shown here at 9 p.m. Friday
and Saturday in the Student
Cener Theatre. Showing with
l
at fc.30 p.m. will be 'Tender
i
the Night.'
M:ss Jane liatchelder. program diredor of the Student
Center, suid "Fouiitainliead
wa sciieduled for showing last
weekend. Due to a postal error
tiit film didn't arrive on time,

hwex

er.

people were
Disappointed
shown, instead, the 192C ersion
of "Uncle Tom's Cabin." This
is Harriet Beechcrs Stowe's epic-taldenouncing the evils of
slavery .
The first of the two movies,
"Tender is the Night." based on
tiie nov el by F. Scott Fitzgerald,
stars Jennifer Jones, Joan Fontaine, and Jason Kobards.
It is the story of a group of
people searching for happiness
and unfulfilled dreams in the
turbulent 2C"s. It is a romantic-dramfocusing upon a man torn
between his love of a neurotic
wife and the demands of las
psy chiatric profession.
The late show, "Fountain-head,- "
stars Can Cooper and
Patricia Neal. It is the story
of the integrity of a man who
refuses to compromise what he
believes, in the face of tremendous opposition.
To see both shows the Student Center Board is charging
75 cents. To see only the late
show 50 cents will be charged.

I

sIhi

,

Fountainheacl'
Showing Set
For Weekend

( I.AHA

V

K,

M.ideiiniiselh
slinlents to

""

IN

H

r

pforarn

iniiiiiM-'-

Willi. eis nl

is designed to e(ogl.ie
women with t.d nt in
young
ait. writing, editing, photography, layout, l.ishion design,
retail promotion,
,
or advertising.
Hull Clay , I.lhel Marie
Dolsori, Judy Crisham, and Sally
n entries
A, Stull were selected
they submitted showing ability
in one of these fields. For example, Susan Clay suggested revisions for old ads, and Judy
Crisham gave a news analysis
on the AWS policy on women's
hours at UK.
College Board members have
an opportunity to contribute to
Mademoiselle, and they help the
magazine keep in touch with
campus trends. Members report
to Mademoiselle on
regularly
eents at their colleges, and help
the fashion editors select models
for college fashion features.

(litest

rnerdi-indising-

The magazine compiles information from questionnaires
sent in regularly by the College
Board members. Through these
questionnaires. Mile, finds out
what college students want to
see in it. campus trends, and
more about the members them-

s

"pre.t IK
t,at Mxables

on the
w

ornen

activities.

'1 he
asvigii roeiit was
It included such
due Feb. 1
topics as designing a survival
who need to le
kit for
savel 'from rotk'n roll music,
ego), inheriting new games for
old friends, and designing a children's book for adults only.
Through trV'se entries, news
dippings, and extra work. tlc
College Board mernlxTv arc eligible to compete for one of 20
grand prize., a position as Guest
Fditor. To win one of tliese
sitions, a Board member must
submit an entry that shows superior aptitude for macazinc
worL
The 20 Cuest Editors srnd
the month of June in New York
as salaried employees of Mademoiselle. They help write, illustrate, and edit the August college issue.

SKATING

Fri. and Sot. nights
7: J0 'hi 10;

10 'til Midnight

Sunday night
'ri! 10
7J3

SCOTT'S
ROLL-AREN- A

NORTHEIN

IELTUNE

selves. The topics of the questionnaires range from magazine
photography to college slang.

Diner

4th WEEK!

HELD 3rd WEEK!
First Lex. Run

1:40. 3:40. 5:40. 7.45. 9:45

At 1:00, 3:40, 6:20, 9 .00

Jack

Tcny

Curtis Lemmca
Tfv.

WriU--

h'v"
;i

the
,,smI
in.ig.iine's .inn n.d nationwide
Colli He l'.o.lld ColMM lltioli. The
ol

KINM

Mali

.mm

mI(. ,,,

.

I

l''.rd,

Cull. ye

Ihe College

.n

AMERICA'S
PLAYBOY HERO!

NatalleWood

ubiiritttON?
niiinT"

JL

psraui

piwraa joe iuam us.

U

UBBBSUB
STARTS Tom orrow!

tt

'

Life At
The Top
yV Is Tops! tt

Is vour wnrlH
full of finks and

creeps?
Wouldn't you
love to put them
all down?

N Y. HERALD TRIBJNE

1A0VEY
JEAN

SI

umllau

mm BlACmi
KICHiLEL

CEIAIS

UMjJih

i

it's Orchids
and Champagne
at the Tod...
and Brawling,
Brassy and
Unashamed
Underneath!

Meet your new
leader, Daisy

uover.

'

,VK

1

COLOR

tyDEtUU-DKEWikSCOP-

E

l

v

The Kentucky Kernel
Th

Kentucky Kernel. University
Station, Uruvernty of Kentucky,
4v506. Second-cUKentucky-Lexinstoa. Kentucky,
isvuje nv at times
rublishevt
eeklj during
th achl year except during holiday
nd exam vhtkvIs, and weekly during
the aummer aemetter.
Published for the atudenU of the
Vniveraity ol Kentucky by the Board
of Student ltblicatKsna. Prof. Paul
Olxrl, chaiman and Linda Gasaaway.
ecreiary. as
lWkun
th Cadet in I'M, became the Kecord tn 1900. and the Idea
the
in
Publikhed conUnuoualy
Kernel inc 11J.
SUlVSCRimON RATES
Yearly, by mail 4 00
lVr vxpy, from filea4 .10
v,

,

at

3:2Sfrt

01

"LifeAtTfeTd
T

tjtt

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fckrtr.&r o4

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30

OXUfStVi!

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PLummep

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PAKUl

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Mill I ICAN rivVDUCTlON

insinra

KVKNK1. TELEl'HON ES
F.ditor, KxevuUv Editor, Managing
Editor
New lVkk, M(htU, NVomen'a Editor.

8H'iala

AdvetUaing,

1

i

si

Buaineaa. Circulation Mil

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, March 3,

1906- -3

Cutchins To Give
Unusual Concert
By MARGARET BAILEY
Kernel Arts Editor
Liam Cutchins is a young man who has strummed his
guitar
across a continent, sung his way over the oeean, and performed in

4

San Francisco's "Coffee Gallery" and "The Drinking Gourd."
Now Liain has come to Ken
tucky and UK students will have bars, and seeing Franceand some
a chance to hear his
unique of North Africa.
brand of musical
g
at
S
p.m. Sunday in the Student
Then it was back to Virginia
("enter Theater. The concert is and on to California,
New
sponsored by the Student Center York, "The Jabberwok," "Cafe
Hoard with tickets available at Lena's", "The Five Flies," and
the door for 75 cents.
finally Kentucky.
1) Itr-- itj r
Liam's specialty is combining
it H
Liam entered the University
unusual instruments and crossing
song types to produce songs this )car as a freshman fine arts
which "border between blues major, but isn't sure what
Ever been strangled by a rosebush? First dress re- March 4, 5, 8, 9, and 10 in the Lab Theatre,
and folk." To achieve his quality medium he will specialize in
Tickets arc $1.50 for students and $2 for other.
of "raw, rhythmic noise," Liain because he's "interested in all hearsal for the Opera Theatre's performance of
Reservations may be made by calling 2411.
uses not only the
guitar, type of creative art." He does Gilbert and Sullivan's "Patience" proves to be a
but the harmonica and kazoo. have a particular interest in flowery affair. The show will be presented at 8:30
Kernel Photo by nick Be l
What's a kazoo? You'll hac to mechanical sculpture and is the
tome to the concert to find out. creator of what he calls a "dream
"I've always been surrounded machine."
by music," said Liam, "particuThe "dream machine" is a
larly blues and jazz. I just found screen on which colored
patterns
The complications which rethat in blues 1 have a medium of of
Haynes and Norrie Wake will by Charles Dickens with musical
light are created in unpredictsult when a "fleshly" poet and
direction by Phyllis Jenness and
expression that is more suited to able
portray the two esthetic poets.
Its one
today's needs than any other." talentpatterns. it alwaysparticular an "idyllic" poet become rivals Fred Maidment, Doug Schwarts choreography by Judy McCall.
is that
appears
for the affections of a milkmaid
and Garrett Flickinger will porStephen Atkinson is production
Amazingly enough, Liam's
to keep time to any music which
t.
musical ability is all
provide the comic satire in Giltray dragoon officers withSheree designer. Accompanist for the
is being played in the same place,
bert and Sullivan's "Patience"
He just decided one day in high
Zalampas, Bonnie Lindner, show is Nancy Wake.
Liam explained this is
which will be presented by the
school that he wanted to play the however,
Reservations may be made by
Sheila House and Phyllis Jen-nea phenomena created by
purely
as their languid sweethearts.
calling 2411. Tickets are $1.50
Opera Theatre at 8:30 p.m. March
guitar it took him a little longer the human mind.
to discover the
4, 5, 8, 9, and 10 in the Lab
"Patience" is being staged for students and $2 for others.
guitar so
he did. Then it was on to the ban"People see different thingson Theatre.
liniirrirn'i
iir' in tmnmmi mil limn
iiimnnrir
Kaye Martin will play the
jo and the harmonica after he had the screen," said Cutchins. "1
lead role of Patience while Dean
even saw Batman once."
heard a Bob Dylan performance.
From Dylan to blues was the
next jump under the influence of
Jessie Fuller, who Liam says has
a "finky blues sound with a one-ma- n
This weekend rent a new compact Corvair from Hertz-He- rtz
band." Next stop Liam's
special low weekend rates are easy on your wallet!
several inown stlc, one-mamood-makin-

r

i

'Patience' Operetta Opens Friday

self-taugh-

ss

mi

i

in

lliu

Want to get away from it all?

struments,

p

folk-blue- s.

Just $5.00 a mile
Saturday or Sunday

Liam saw quite a bit of the
world before deciding to settle
down as a student at UK. After
high school, he began studying
at the University of Virginia,
then decided to go to Spain to
study the language and culture,
ended up picking up the music in

Call

252-614-

6

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the driver s seatl

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SafurclaiftrcK 4,5

Friday

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The piercing fashion for Spring is found
in our complete collection of ideas for
pierced-fashio- n
devotees. From 2. to 6.

QP

50 last show only

381 S. LIME

ACROSS FROM HOLMES HALL

* The Scalping Proposal
Recently a proposal to impose
penalties for scalping tickets was
greeted with somewhat of a hoot
and a howl within the Kentucky
Legislature, giving the impression
that at least the vocal majority
of the members condoned the practice.
Several ordinances make scalping illegal, as the Kernel has
pointed out, but few scalpers ever
are arrested on the grounds of
violating the tax laws. Local police have said they arrest scalpers for breach of the peace or
loitering, but only then if someone files an official complaint.
Yet the scalpers are found making
sales quite publicly before major
events, while police, only a few
feet away, sit and watch.
Technically, the scalpers also
are violating a vender's licensing
ordinance. Yet the scalping game
has some similarities to the prostitution game in which those who
get "took" are willing victims and
rarely file formal complaints with
law officers.

They Asked For It"

"All KMH, Men

t,
later resold
tickets. The scalping game offers
the player the opportunity to make
a bigger profit from participation
in varsity sports than his official
scholarship contract would indicate.
We wonder how many of these
profiteers bother to file their profits
on income tax forms. Failure to
do so constitutes another possible

on

early-bough-

offense.

Scalping is illegal from several
points of view, but bringing charges
currently is quite difficult and
scalpers really enjoy a rather protected position.
The Legislators should stop
winking at the practice and pass
a specific state statute which would
crack down on these
profiteers.
law-dodgi-

Re-establi- sh

Music Room
Now

that the Centennial has

creaked to its ultimate cessation,
it is time to restore the plush
"Centennial Central" to its original use, a music room.
The Kernel raised a cry of dismay last year when students were
deprived of the facility in favor
of the administrative office, but
now that the Centennial has concluded, there should be no delay
the music room.
in
Informal meetingand relaxation
places for students on campus are
becoming scarcer as every available inch of space is being utilized, so restoration of the music
room is indeed a necessary step.
Although we realize a few Centennial projects have lingered past
the official closing date, the major
public relations projects, as well as
the need for the plush office, are
gone now.
The remaining projects and
paper work could be carried on in
some small, inconspicuous office in
another building.

We feel, however, that the process is unethical in itself and should

be declared illegal by the Legislature. Many outsiders, and some
players, too, as the Kernel discovered last year, make a regular
business of making a fat profit

Destructive Protection
The proposed bill to limit
speakers at the campuses of state
universities is somewhat similiar
to the speaker ban in North
Carolina, repealed last November.
This law, banning Communists
from speaking on the campuses of
universities, was
later changed and the trustees of
the various universities were left
with the discretion of ruling on
campus speakers.
The arguments advanced in this
article apply with equal force to a
bill the Kentucky Department of the
American Legion is pushing. In a
way, it is worse than the original
North Carolina law, which at least
was specific. The Legion proposal
is aimed at certain undefined "outside groups" and "insidious"
speakers.
Kentucky's schools, an attorney
for the Legion says, cannot "afford
to allow their eainpuses to be
by persoirsTiisiilioiislyiiuiti-vated to create undesirable and
state-support-

;

obnoxious incitement of the student
body and the community and attract degrading publicity to disrupt
the orderly state of affairs."
Why is it that people who back
this kind of legislation assume that
the principles upon which this
country was founded are so easily
subverted? Why do they assume
that our college students are so
incapable of judging ideas on their
merits? The answers might reveal
an interesting psychological pattern.
In any event, proposals of this
sort reflect a basic misunderstanding of the function of a university
as a place where clashing ideas
should be evaluated and where freedom of discussion is indispensable.
The late Justice Brandeis once said:
"The greatest dangers to liberty
lurk in insidious encroachment by
men of zeal,
but without understanding."
The Louisville Courier Journal
well-meanin-

g

Letters To The Editor:

Reader Says Protesters
Aid Enemy In Vietnam
Kernel (Thursday, Feb. 24). Mr.
Eppler was upset because fans at
Kentucky had to put up with disgusting things like applause for
good play by our opponents. It
finally appears that University of
Kentucky students are acting more
mature, and are copying the
glorious actions of Mississippi State
University fans.

the Editor of the Kernel:
would like to offer my crying towel to the bleeding hearts
who have so vehemently condemned the egg throwing episode
at our University.
Several years ago it was panty
raids, then cramming into telephone booths, and today it is
demonstrating against our commitment in Vietnam. It is demonstrating in a way that aids and
comforts the enemy, an enemy
which American fighting men are
encountering everyday and dying
on the battlefields at their hands.
Only in this country could these
Americans demonstrate
so freely and with so much public
approval. But, how far can we
allow these demonstrators to go
in the name of freedom of speech?
Where do we draw a line? American men and boys are dying in
the defense of their country.
Let us be thankful that this
time it was only eggs, and let
us calmly reappraise the extent
of the right to demonstrate.
To

I

At the Tennessee game, we were

treated to the delightful spectacle
of two young men carrying a sign
with the legend, "Go To Hell,
Tennessee". These two illustrious
Kentucky fans were permitted to
mingle with the cheerleaders and
bear their proud banner in front
of the Wildcats as they came onto
the floor for the second half of
the game. It is obvious that we
need no longer limit ourselves to
the relatively innocuous "Rip 'em
up, tear 'em up, give 'em hell
Wildcats".

so-call- ed

The only things which were
missing to show ourselves as ideal
sports fans were a little paper on
the floor, some persistant booing,
and a technical foul or two on
the crowd. After all, everyone knows
that is not showing good sportsmanship to win gracefully.

PAUL VALDES

Agricultural Sophomore

Ideal Sports
At Saturday's basketball game
with Tennessee, it was encouraging
to note the response to the letter
of Mark Thomas Eppler to the

RICHARD C. DETMER
A&S Senior

The Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding
College Daily

ESTABLISHED

University of Kentucky

1894

THURSDAY, MARCH
WALTt"

Linda Mills, Executwe Edaor

J,,N

jenv Cm.iAM, Associate New, Editor

IT

Ca1u.lvnV,mu1,6 Feature Editor

Chant,

Teh'ence

Zeh, Neua Editor
.

1Uwental,

..

unt

Managing

3, 1966

Editor

Kknnkih Chixn, Associate Kexc, Editor

Sports Editor

Mahcahct Bailey,

Arts Edit J,

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, March 3,

"Inside Report"

19fiG- -5

Uy Uotduml Evitns mA Roben

The Black Paj amas Hold Vietnam Mission
Totally removed from the

relevant Washington

ir-

debate

about coalition governments, top
U.S. officials are studying intently the mission of a few hundred Vietnamese men dressed
in black pajamas.
These are South Vietnam's
new rural construction cadres
the Saigon government's latest
effort to win the country from
the Vietcong. High policymakers
cadres,
here believe these n
dressed in symbolically typical
black pajamas of the Vietnamese
peasant, must succeed if a
South Vietnam is to
emerge from the war.
To understand the importance

of an thing so prosaic as rural
construction cadres, when powerful politicians here are debating
mysterious and inexplicable
of high diplomatic policy,
it is worth trying to understand
how U.S. officials dealing with
Vietnam on a
basis
view the problem.
Coalition government that
is, bringing Communists into the
Saigon regime is out of the question. Negotiations seem unlikely
in the foreseeable future. The
"free elections" that everybody
talks alxut also arc out of the
question under conditions that
prevail today.
In official circles here, ten- day-by-da- y

MAN ON CAMPUS

LITTLE

Vietcong attack,
villagers the
giving
protection of 59 hired guns.
Old Vietnam hands arc painfully aware of the pitfalls. The
rural cadres comprise tempting
reinforcements for man-sh- y
army
commanders. U.S. advisers recently blocked an attempt by one
Thus, the first requirement is province chief to transform a
still military. Unless U.S. and rural cadre into his personal
Saigon troops (almost certainly
bodyguard.
in greater numbers than now)
But there is also opportunity.
can destroy Communist supply
The Vietcong is losing its grip
bases and secure growing areas
on the countryside because of
from Communist troops, electerror, tax collections, and a
tions are impossible. But as
growing need to transport guer"search and secure" operations
rilla recruits out of their home
succeed and U.S. troops leave a
districts.
village, the V