xt7gxd0qs13w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7gxd0qs13w/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19310217  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 17, 1931 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 17, 1931 1931 2012 true xt7gxd0qs13w section xt7gxd0qs13w Best Copy Available

JP
TUESDAY EDITION
KERNEL

SEMI-WEEKL-

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

CONVOCATION!
FEBRUARY ASSEMBLY
BE WEDNESDAY

UNIVERSITY OP KENTUCKY
VOLUME XXI

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY,

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1931

NEW SERIES NUMBER

BIG BLUE BEATS TECH
REGULATIONS IN SOCIAL RULES OF UNIVERSITY

FOR FRATERNITY DANCES IS PASSED BY SENATE
Right of S. A. Committee to
Penalize for Absences

Wildcats Take Semblance
FRATERNITIES GRANTED
Of Shape as Football Team
THREE HOPS ANNUALLY
Is Repealed

Attendance at Greek Affairs
Is Limited by New

Tournament Teams

RaMitg

An entirely new system of rules
for fraternity dances was approved
by the university senate in a meet
ing at 4 o'clock Monday afternoon
In room 111 McVey hall. The rule
providing that "The Committee on
Scholarship and Attendance may
deduct from a student's total semester's credits and points for irregular
attendance," was repealed.
The changes in the social rules
as passed by the senate were as
follows:
Each social fraternity may give
(a dance not
one "Quest-danc- e"
in the fraternity house) each year.
There will be a formal and an informal in alternate years.
Each social fraternity may give
one "House-danc- e"
each semester
(L e. a dance in the fraternity
house), to be limited in attendance
to members of the chapter, pledges,
and girl friends.
Each woman's social organization
may give one
and one
formal dance in alternate years. The
must not
guests at the
exceed 150.
This new ruling gives the fraternities the privilege of having three
dances in the same year, but it
tends to limit the attendance at
each one. Representatives of the
fraternities and sororities of the
university met with the dean of men
the dean of women, and President
McVey several weeks ago to discuss
the problem of overcrowding at the
dances. A resolution was drawn up
and presented to the various social
groups for their consideration.

CONVOCATION

TO

BE WEDNESDAY
Prof. Carl Lampert Will Direct Philharmonic Orchestra in Concert at Memorial
Hall
Under the direction of Prof. Carl
Lampert, head of the music depart
ment of the university, phllharmon
ic orchestra of 40 pieces will appear
at the first university convocation
of the semester at 10 o'clock
Wednesday morning in Memorial
hall.
The orchestra has been broad
casting regularly every Sunday
night over the university extension
of radio station WHAS and many
letters of approbation have been
received from all parts of the country. The orchestra has been in
existence for the past nine years
and during this time has played
at many university functions, wed
nesday morning will mark the first
appearance of the organization at
a university convocation.
An invitation to present the con'
Vocation program was issued to the
orchestra by university authorities
and since the program is one which
will appeal to every taste in music
all students are urged to be present,
The program:
Overture, by Raynfond, Thomas
First movement of the Unfinished Symphony, Schubert
Harp, "By the Brook," Ann O'Brien
Court and Thomas, Leonard
March, "The Spirit of University
of Kentucky," Lampert
Xylophone, Miss Alice Penn.

University High Nets
Ninth Straight Win
Nicholas ville Tarantulas
feated by Score ef
Hilard Stem

De-

37-1- 7;

The netmen of the University
High, under Coach Peter Kemper
chalked up their ninth consecutive
win here Thursday night, defeating
the strong Nlcholasville Tarantulas
37 to 17. The Purples led at the

24 to 8.
The university quintet, playing a
fast gome, opened up the scoring
with a field goal by Hillard. As the
game progressed, the Kempermen
found themselves and led at the
end of the first quarter 8 to 3.
Hillard of the Purples led the
attack with y) points, 'capably aid-

half

Southern Conference
tries to Be Selected
Saturday

En-

The Southern Conference tournament committee is to meet at
Athens, 3a., Saturday to select
the 16 teams to participate In
the annual Southern Conference
tournament in Atlanta.
University of Kentucky is in
fourth place and the result of
the Vanderbilt game Friday will
be taken into consideration by
the committee in naming the 16
entries, eligible to compete .for
the Southern title basketball
title February 27 to March 3.

Intramural Net
Men Enter First
Basketball Tilts
Intramural basketball was opened
last night at the Euclid avenue
gymnasium with six teams playing
for intramural honors. The basketball tournament
will extend to
March 3, when the finalist will be
decided at that time.
The Sigma Alpha Epsilon fratern
ity, leader in intramural standings
maintained its slim lead by wallop
ing the Alpha Tau Omega boys,
20 to 5. The Delta Chi team de
feated the Alpha Sigs, 3. Lambda
Chi bested the Triangles, 11-- 3. Al
pha Gamma Rho defeated Sigma
Beta XI, 22-- 8.
Delta Tau Delta de
feated Sigma Nu, 6 in an over'
time game. Phi Delta Theta won
over Phi Sigma Kappa,
0.
The lineups and summarys:
Lambda Chi (11) Pos. Triangle (3)
Gartin (1)
Anderson
F
Barker
Young (2)
F
(3)
Scott
C
Little
Ray (7)
G
Moore
Gray (1)
Farris
Delta Chi (9) Pos. Alpha Sigs (3)
Weaver (2) ....F
Davis (1)
Wilson (2)
F... Williams (2)
C
Kee (1)
Carney
Settle (2)
G
Cave
Epps
Kendall (2) ...G
Alpha G. R. 22 Pos. Sigma B. XI 8.
Morgan (4) . ...F
Rehn (4)
Swisshelm
Smoot (9)
F
Howard (5) ...C
Bitter
Florence (1) ...G. Schu'meyer (4)
(3)
Olsen
G
Goebel
Sigma Nu 6
Delta T. Delta 7 Pos.
Hubbard
Smith
F
F
Chapman
Bredwell
C
Pennington
Wooten
Rowlett
G
Benson
G
Senff
Farquhar
Phi Sigs 10
Phi D. Theta 14 Pos.
Jackson
Hubble
F
Buskle
Hughes
F
Ostin
C
Judd
Mains
G
Parrish
Terrll
G
Halther

University Seniors
Will Be Interviewed
Students of Accounting, Finance, and Statistics to
Be Considered
Dr. Henry Beaumont, of the Per
sonnel Bureau has announced that a
representative
from the General
Electric Company will be here Friday March 13 at 10:15 to interview
any seniors interested In positions
after graduation along the lines of
accounting, finance and statistics.
This Is the second of a series of
interviews that are being promoted
by the Personnel Bureau. The first
one took place Wednesday, February
11.
The representative, Mr. w. T.
Grant, reported that he was greatly
Impressed with the quality of the
seniors interviewed. It is expected
that employment will soon be offered to several applicants. Professor
Beaumont has a few part time positions open in the selling field for
both men and women. If Interested
applicants have been requested to
see Professor Beaumont at the
earliest possible time.
There is also a training course
given in Bchenectedy, New York, in
which the trainee is paid $125 for
the fist six months with an Increase
to $150 for the remaining period.
Successive increases depend on the
Individual.
Those interested in an interview
rUH
minv mt 'an.
PrefMtor Beaumont, mi Neville

ed by his teammates Cavanaugh and
Olass. Howard's floor game and his
eight points were the shining light
of the Tarantula offensive.
The improvement of the University High players over their previous exhibition during the game
with Versailles allowed the teams'
followers a few easier breaths, because although they defeated the
Versailles crew they showed rather
rawea teamwork and Inability to
find the hoop.
hall

TO
HOLD FRESHMAN
PAN-HELLEN-IC

ENTERTAINMENT
Plans for Banquet Outlined
by Malcolm Barnes, Y.
M. C. A. Speaker

EACH LOD&E TO SEND
FOUR OF NEOPHYTES
Stefl Field to Be Scene of
Short Games Twice
Officers to Be Elected at Next
Weekly

Out In the lair of the Wildcat
on Btoll field a semblance of a
football team is rapidly taking
siiape. wun iwo weexs of the annual spring training period gone,
Coach Gam age has begun to do a
uiue lormuiating with his chorees.
Beginning Wednesday the squad,
wmcn nas oeen cut down to approximately 45 men, will be divided
into two groups for short eames
on weanesaay and Saturday after
noons. It is hoped that the games
will stimulate Interest and really
show what the players can do under
game conditions.
The material that has renorted
for spring practice, though a little
in tne rough as far as football
knowledge is concerned, is rapidly
being developed and it seems that
Kentucky for once will have two
good teams to place against the
opposition next fall. So far, the
two teams that have borne the
brunt of the work in spring scrimmages are of about equal strength,
both on the offense and defense.
Injuries have been prominently
missing in the Big Blue camp due
to the wonderful spirit with which
prospective Wildcat gridiron warriors go about their assignments.
According to Coach Gamage, injuries are scarce among the hardworking candidates. That being the
case, few injuries will be treated
by Trainer Mann this spring. Slight
illnesses, due to colds and other
minor infections, however, have
kept several members of the squad
indoors for a day or two.
Just how the squad will be divided for the practice games has not
yet been revealed by the Wildcat
mentor, but It is believed that the
two teams which have been working
out together against a weaker third
aggregation will be pitted against
each other. The first team, if one
can name a first team, will have
Seale, center; Carruthers and Parrish, guards; Davidson and Gibson
tackles; Bob Montgomery and Dun,
ends; and a backfleld composed of
Richards, Jack Phipps, Kelly and
Urbanlak as a starting group.
The team that will be thrown
against the first outfit will have a
line of equal strength but the back-fie- ld
will not be quite as prominent. In the line, Ed Wilder and
Kipping will start at guards; Janes,
center; Aldridge and McAdams,
tackles; Frye and Blevlns, ends;
and a backfleld of Foster, Blckel,
Asher or Thomas, and Hand making up the rest of the team.
There will be a good supply of
reserves for both teams and it is
very likely that some of these re
serves will take the places of sev- ral of the above named players before the close of the training
period.
The teams will again be named
the Blue and White. A coin probably will be tossed to determine
which squad shall be termed the
Blue and which shall be White.
However, a keen interest has been
shown by players on both elevens
and the squad in general. Down
In the locker room a friendly rivalry has become manifest
An outside practice was not held
Saturday afternoon due to the
"frozen turf on Stoll field. Coach
(Continued on Page Four)

Council Meeting; New
Members to Attend

ic
Men's
council of the
university met Thursday night at
the Phi Kappa Tau fraternity
house. The meeting was the first
of this semester. Plans for a freshman banquet were considered.
Malcolm Barnes, speaking In behalf of the university Y. M. C. A.,
outlined arrangements for the entertainments which will be given
for the pledges of the various fraternities within the next two weeks.
The plan, as set forth by Mr.
Barnes, has for Its purpose the promotion of good will between the
underclassmen in the various organisations. It Is proposed to have
a speaker who is versed in national
fraternity affairs to deliver an informal talk on the interpretation
of the fraternity.
ic
representative
Each
agreed to send at least four pledges
of his fraternity to the banquet.
The banquet will mark the first
step In the promotion of good-wi- ll
among underclassmen at the university. At present the University
of Illinois conducts similiar dinners, and it was from this source
that the idea' was taken. Bart
Peak, secretary of the university
Y. M. C. A., said yesterday that
are
plans ;for the entertainment
under way and that arrangements
will assume definite shape within

the

THEATRE RUSHING
Following is a communication
from the president of the university concerning the unseemly and childish practice of
some thoughtless students who
Insist upon rushing local thea
ters in celebration of basketball
victories in the gymnasium.
This communication was omitted from Friday's issue of The
Kernel.
The statement:
To the Editor of The Kernel:
I regret very much that the
rushing of theaters has been
taken up again by some of the
students of the university. This
practice has been going on during the fall and appeared again
on Friday night after the Washington and Lee game. There is
nothing to be said for it; it
gives the university a bad name,
arouses enmity against the student body and the university,
and in addition is a species of
bad manners and lack of courtesy.
The student body of the University of Kentucky has always
been amenable to suggestions
about their own and the university's interests.
I am asking
them through the columns of
The Kernel not to Indulge in the
rushing of theaters. I have such
trust In them that I am sure
that this suggestion will be sufficient to bring the matter to the
attention of the student body
and that the practice will be
eliminated from now on.
President of the University.
FRANK L. MCVEY,

EDITH THOMSON
GIVES ADDRESS
Speaker Describes Education
al Conditions in Scotland;
Tells of Life at St.

week.

ic
Election of ofiQcers of
council will' take place at the
next meeting. v fl
,
The present members'' of the
council and thel'r respective fraternities:
Harry Day, Alpha Sigma Phi;
W. E. Florence, Alpha Gamma Rho;
Albert J. Kikel, Alpha Tau Omega;
M. R. Wilson. Delta Chi; H. H.
Morris, Kappa Sigma; Kirk Mober-l- y,
Kappa Alpha; John E. Murphy,
Phi Kappa Tau; George Whitlow,
Phi Sigma Kappa; Frank Stone,
Sigma Alpha Epsilon; George Kay,
Phi Delta Theta; Vernon Chandler, Lambda Chi Alpha; Ben Leroy,
Triangle; Earl Senff, Sigma Nu;
and .Clarence Yeager, Pi Kappa
Alpha.

Law Organizations
Pledge at Banquets
Clay chapter of Phi Alpha Delta,
announces the
legal fraternity,
pledging of Martin Glenn, '32,
James Lyne, '32, Jack Woods, '31,
and Lewis McCormack, '31. The
Clay chapter was organized in 1914.
The chapter has eight regular members. A standing of 1.5 in the Law
College is the chief requirement
for membership.
At a banquet of Phi Delta Phi,
honorary legal fraternity, at the
Lafayette hotel on February 3
pledging ceremonies were also held:
William Hume '33, James Wilson
'31, Malcolm Strange '32, J. D. Bond
'33, Leroy Combs '33, Francis Hank-e- s
'32, Holman '33, J. T. Hatcher
'33, W. tH. Dysard "32, Clarence
Rothenburg '33. Phi Delta Phi, the
international legal fraternity was
founded in 1869 to promote ethics
and culture among the law schools
and the profession at large.

.

Miss Edith E. B. Thomson, grad
uate of St. Andrew's University,
Scotland, and a fellow at, Yale Uni
versity, gave an informal talk on
her native country to the political
science classes Monday morning,
Miss Thomson, is specializing in
American history, and American
Before
Relations with Scotland.
coming to the United States, she
received a degree of Doctor of Philosophy, and was awarded a Hark-nescholarship at the American
university.
After a brief review of Scottish
history, Miss Thomson told of the
educational conditions now existing
in Scotland, and described her life
at St. Andrew's. She also described the Harkness scholarships, by
which 30 Scotch students are enabled to attend American universities each year.
On 'Tuesday night, at 6:30 o'clock,
Miss Thomson will deliver an ad
dress to the International Relations
class at Boyd hall on the subject,
"Anglo-AmericRelations." While
in Lexington, she will be the guest
of Professor and Mrs. John Catron
Jones, and will visit Dr. and Mrs.
Frank L. McVey at Maxwell Place.
Y. M. AND Y. W. MEET
A meeting of students and faculty
interested in the National Faculty
and Student conference was held
Thursday night In the Y. M. C. A.
room of the Armory building. Miss
Eleanor Dawson and Bart Peak,
who attended the conference in Detroit during the holidays gave reports of the convention. Following
the reports, a discussion of student
problems on the campus was held.
After the discussion, the advisory
board of the Y. M. C. A. held its
Ross, chairman, presided.

Cats Regain Stride
To Capture Victory
Basketball Squad Returns Home to Train for
Last Game of Season on Floor of
University, with Vandy
Regaining their former stride, Kentucky defeated Georgia
Tech last night at Atlanta, Ga., by the decisive score of
Little McGinnis and Yates, who starred for the Wildcats, scored 12 points each. Gooding was leading scorer for
Georgia Tech with 8 points. Perkins, high point man of the
Southern Conference, was held scoreless by the Wildcat deAccording to a telfense. Kentucky led at the half
egram received last night from Coach Adolph Rupp, "the
boys looked better tonight." Kentucky was defeated Friday
night by Georgia,
and lost a return game with Clem-so35-1- 6.

18-1- 1.

25-1- 6,

29-2- 6,

sit down. "Let the lady sit in the
comfortable chair," he smiled, as he
chose a hard, straight-backe- d
chair,
and crossed his legs.
"Now," he continued, "What can
I tell you?"
Instantly words literally flew
from the mouths of his interviewers. "What do you think about
Vesper services, Dr. Durst?" "What
Is your favorite composition, Mr.
Durst?" "What do you think of
when you play the organ, sir?"
"When did you start to play the
organ?" "How about this?" "How
about that?" Ferocious machine
guns, trained on unsuspecting gangsters have never
any faster.
Dr. Sidney C. Durst, who had a
moment before gleaned every drop
of emotional reaction from these
same Interviewers, was now attempting to retain his self composure in the face of a verbal hurricane whose source was news instead of music; eagerness Instead
of passive enjoyment: realism ineHnagl affect
stead of
With an "I give up" smile, and

a characteristic mop of his brow,
Dr. Durst began. The orgy transformed into a conversation, and peculiarly enough, Into a quiet discussion of the organist. He said
that his favorite composition was
"Pasacaglia" by Bach; that he likes
vesper services very much; that he
would permit us to publish when
ho started to play the organ, but
not how long ago It was; that he
didn't know Jessie Crawford; that
the console is such a complicated
mechanical instrument that there
is little to think about when one
plays other than what one has to
do, but that despite this, making
beautiful sounds Is an emotional
outlet.
To Dr. Durst, Germany is still
the outstanding producer of great
musicians. Italians, he commented,
are also truly great in this field, but
their music is of a different school.
The venerable musician chuckled as
he imparted to his listeners that he
was employed as a church organist
several years before he had taken
any lessons.
"Dr. Durst, who were some of
your teachers?" someone

"I studied from Germans

most-

ly?" he answered, the most famous
of them Is Rheinberger, the composer of my last number on this
afternoon's program."
A pause, then, and an exchange
of eager glances from one person
to the other, the most eager of
which was that one created by the
musician's face. He laughed because he knew that his interviews
had already exhausted their barrage. A hand to hand encounter
was imperative. Dr. Durst sensed
the situation and came nobly to the
aid of the weakened reporters.
"Tho requests ,T have received
for my next program to be played
here," he smllled, "display a cosmopolitan taste for music. They
range from tho lightest to the heaviest arrangements that can be interpreted on tho organ. I have
my previous visits to the
university, and I hope that you
have, too."
As wo excused ourselves for talking so much of his time, he smiled
and said:
"Dont forget to send me a copy
of this interview, Dr. Durst, College
of Music, Cincinnati.
That's my
address."

n,

Saturday ngiht.

Coach Adolnh Runn and hl Ken
tucky Wildcats arrived in Lexington
8:30 this morning after a strenuous road trip in time to prepare
for the curtain act of the current
season.
The strain of holding the veteran
Georgia team to a' 25 to 16 score
proved too much for Rupp's boys
and they are now in fourth place
with only the Vanderbilt Commodores as opponents before they en
ter the southern conference tournament.
Georgia, after knocking
Kentucky out of first place went
through the same motions the following night to rout the powerful
Golden Tornado of Georgia Tech
by a 44 to 15 score.
Vanty Is Last Foe
Kentucky will face Vanderbilt
here Friday night in the last game
of the season with Captain Spicer
and Louis McGinnis playing their
last game before a Kentucky crowd.
A win over Vandy will leave Kentucky undefeated on their own floor
this season and they will be a powerful contender for conference honors in the tournament at Atlanta.
Only three successive baskets by
Strickland hi the closing minute
of the Georgia game, with Kentucky trailing by one basket, stood between the 'Cats and a possible undefeated season. A victory over
Vanderbilt will hardly change their
position in the Conference standing but will Insure them an Invita
tion to the tournament.

&

ESSAY CONTESTS
ARE

ANNOUNCED

Subjects Include "French Influence on United States"
and Editorial on "Root
Protocal"
Students of the university are
eligible to enter essays in one or
both of two essay contests that are
now being held for all colleges of
first rank east of the Mississippi
river. The prize for the first essay,
to be titled, "French Influence on
Civilization and Culture in the
United States," "will be three round
trip tickets to Paris. The second
is an editorial favoring the imme
dlate entrance of the United States
Into the World Court. Two prizes
of $50 each are to be given for the
best editorial.
All essays in the first contest
must be sent to the American Com
mittee of the International Colon'
ial Exposition at 80 East 11th street,
New York City, before March 25.
No essay can exceed 1,500 words.
Any person Interested in entering
the contest may obtain details at
the deans' offices or at the offices
of the French professors.
A trip to Paris this summer would
be especially Interesting, it has been
reported because Paris is staging
the grandest entertainment of its
history in 1931, the International
Colonial and Overseas Exposition.
This event, bringing together 3,000
native peoples from every place on
the globe, presents a complete world
In miniature. There will be novel
displays of art, architecture, and
handicraft; athletes of every race
will compete in Olympic games; and
exhibitions of every sort of ceremonial custom will aid in making
the exposition something of a cap
sule tour of the entire world.
The second contest is open to all
university students. The first prize
will be awarded to the student writ-Iand publishing the best edi
torial favoring the Immediate entrance of the United States into
the World Court, according to the
Root Protocoe. The other prize is
to be Riven to the student writing
and publishing the best editorial
against the immediate entrance of
the United States into the World
Court.
The purpose of the contest is to
stimulate and to set an expression
of student opinion on both sides of
this question of International im
portance.
Any student may compete oy
getting an article or editorial pub- ( Continued on page four)

Kat Will Purvey

Always the polite little reporters,

39

6

35-- 1

"Pasacaglia" Is Favorite Composition of Dr. Latest Scandal
Sidney C. Durst, Organist at Vesper Service OfCampus Life
we invited Dr. Sidney O. Durst to

WILL

Friday, February 20, will once
more mark the appearance of that
ruthless purveyor of scandal, the
Kampus Kat. Members of Sigma
Delta Chi, who are responsible for
the publication, have donned their
false whiskers with a will, and have
dug up Juicy morsels from every
where.
In this issue will appear astound
ing facts as to what goes on behind the scenes at Patterson hall,
a signed article written by the Sigma Nus, en masse. Revelations as
to what is a rushee and why, edited
with Introduction and notes by tho
sistern of the K. D. order, tell what
a prospective sister may expect from
the rest, If anything.
These are merely two of the many
highly entertaining and instructive
stories appearing In this lssuo of
the Kat. The Kat will be sold
on tho campus Friday and at the
game Friday night, if the newsboys
can survive the rush at the door.
Here Is a hint: get a Kat, laugh
loudly, thereby causing crowd to
leave door, which automatically al
lows you to walk through unmo
lested. As an added feature a
small booklet telling how guinea
hens call to their young will be
given free with each copy.

at

CONFERENCE STANDINGS
Won Lost
Team
1
14
Georgia
1
9
Alabama
1
Maryland
....87
2
KENTUCKY
7
4
Auburn
5
7
Vanderbilt
4
5
Duke
7
6
Georgia Tech
2
2
Mississippi
6
5
North Carolina
5
4
Virginia
5
4
N. C. State
3
Washington and Lee ..2
3
2
Sewanee
3
5
V. P. 1
3
5
Clemson
4
2
L. S. U.
3
7
Florida
7
3
Tennessee
8
2
Tulane
V. M. 1

1

South Carolina
Mississippi A. and M.

1

.0

6
9
0

The return of Ellis Johnson to
the lineup will do much to improve
Kentucky's chances the rest of the
season, though Worthington has
shown some first class ball playing
in Johnson's position.
Georgia went into the Southern
Conference lead and Kentucky
dropped to second place when the
Bulldogs took a 25-1- 6
decision
from the Wildcats Friday night at
Athens. It was Kentucky's first defeat in 11 games and her first In
seven conference tilts.
The Wildcats played listlessly
from start to finish while the
Georgians were holding Kentucky's
high-poi- nt
men and garnering a
few points for themselves.
Spicer,
usually a deadly shooter, could only
get one point, while Darby and.
Sale, two other high scorers, failed to register.
Until the half it was anybody's
game, but the the rest period the
Bulldogs pulled away, led by Strickland who made three baskets in rapid
Georgia's ability to
succession.
break up Kentucky's passes and the
inability of the Wildcats to make
free throws were deciding factors in
the game.
Yates and Little McGinnis led the
Kentucky attack with four and six
iwlnts respectively, while Strict-lan- d
and Reeder were best for
Georgia.
Lineup and Summary
Kentucky (1(5) Posi. (25) Georgia
Spicer (1)
(2) Moran
F
(5) Sanford
McGinnis (6) ,.F
Yates (4)
O
(2) Smith
Bronston (3) ,.G...(8) Strickland
Worthington (2).G.... (6) Reeder
Substitutions:
Kentucky Darby,
Sale; Georgia Young, (2).
Clemson Defeats Wildcats
Tho dope bucket was given another upset Saturday night when
Clemson Collego basketeers defeated
the University of Kentucky Wildcats and left little hope for them to
win
honors. Smith
of Clemson, who made 14 points,
(Continued on Page Four)

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PAGE TWO

THE KENTUCKY
he has no active antipathy toward college students. Second, he should have his stock and
trade of Jokes and repartee carefully compiled,
and If, upon presentation of the board, ns many
as a third of that body failed to sec the humor,
he should be automatically barred from the
university. However, should Re pass this haz
ard, he should be forced to sign n pledge that
the same Joke should be told In the same class
not more than twice each semester. Third,
he should promise to treat his pupils, so far ns
possible, ns Indies nnd gentlemen. (Note the
conditioning phrase "as far ns possible"). In
the fourth plncc, should he be so fortunntc as
to be given a first-hoclass he must promise
thnt never, under any crlcumstances, will ho
greet nny tardy student with the expression,
"Ah, now we can begin 1" In the fifth place,
he should sign a solemn oath that he, person
ally, is opposed to first hour classes and that
his sympathy is all with the student body in
that matter. In the sixth place, he should
promise, as far as possible, not to rate all girls
at least one grade higher merely because of
their sex. (Again note that "as far as possi
ble.")
We might go on and on, but at least here is
a starting point for those Interested in college
reform. That the list could be supplemented,
and it would be our plan to have it supplanted
If given the task of bringing about this reform,
by the Ideas of the student body as a whole,
goes without saying. And we might add here,
as a concession to the more radical group, that
a college education wflttld not be held against
any applicant.

KERNEL,

Tuesday, February 17. 1931

SEMI-WEEKL- Y

Annual Report
Advises Farmer
Reduce Cost

improve during the year, although
DREAMS
demand may Improve slowly and a
greater price stability result, acare formed by the creative genius of
Dreams
cording to the report, which stresssoul. They give evidence of an Immortal
the
POBLI8MKD 8EMIWEEKLY ON T0E8DAY AND FHIDAY
To
es the need of reducing expenses, or
presence which shapes men's destiny. They arc
producing at low cost. Quality of
Member
a link between sleeping and waking, between
The College of Agriculture has tobacco nnd other crops, livestock
National College Press Association
doing. This In substance, Is the
outlook report to nnd fruit Is also emphasized, in
Issued Its annual
thinking and
Lexington Board of Commerce
MEMDEn K. I. P. A.
the farmers of Kentucky. It ad- order that farmers may obtain the
content of a recent lecture given by George
vised them to give attention to re- additional prices that come from
OfTlclal Kcvripaprr of thf Students of the University
poet, painter, economist, and philRussell, Irish
ducing costs of production and to quality products. The reports point
or Kentucky, Lexington
osopher on the topic "An Artist and Poet ConImproved quality, rather than to out that labor, fertilizers and other
Subscription 12.00 r year Entered at Lexington, Ky.,
increased acreage.
materials which farmers buy are
siders Dreams."
Pojtolllce i focond class mail matter
With n few exceptions, prices for down In price, which should help
to
Wc feel that what Mr. Russell says Is true
farm products nrc not expected to them to reduce their expenses.
HERE SHALL THE KERNEL PRESS ALL
n large extent. Certainly many dreams cannot
STUDENT KIOHTS MAINTAIN
be explained by mechanical means; everyone
.
.
.
VIRGINIA
DOUGHERTY
BROS.
has experienced dreams which by no means
Managing Editor
.
.
.
FRANCES HOLMDAY
could be called scraps of memory or combinaSLATE, TIN, AND COMPOSITION ROOFING
.
WILLIAM ARDERY
. Assistant Managing Editor
tions of memory. Everyone has puzzled over
THOMAS L. HILEY
Dramatic Editor
Repairs of nil kinds
All work guaranteed
the significance of certain definitely "symbolic"
ASSOCIATE EDITORS
105 WEST HIGH ST.
ASHLAND 2758
"Wise Furnaces"
Elaine Oonnell
Morton Walker
dreams. And many times dreams have cither
directly or indirectly been incentives to IncreasASSISTANT EDITORS
Virginia Hatcher
Virginia Ncvlns
ed action nnd awakened conscience. The powLouise Thompson
Daniel Osodman
er of healthy dreams dreams created by the
News Editor
JOHN MURPHY
CASINO
subconscious mind rather than by drugs or by
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS
one's own Imagination is seen on every hand
Sue Dlckerton
Lawrence
William Shafer
Herron
in life. The college student considers dreams LSWBMSMSMSMSMSMSBftrL ''.BWSMSMSH
MEN
Horace Miner
Otontc Waito
as seriously as the artist and poet considers
College
Jack Keyser
Mary E. Price
them.
ADMISSION 25c
PARK PLAN
ELLEN UnOIIAN
Society Editor
One dreams that he rushes down the corridor
ASSISTANT SOCIETY EDITORS
of McVey hall and hides under a bench in the
Dancing Every Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. Nights
Eleanor Smith
Sally Hardin
SOCIETY REPORTERS
post office to escape his irate math teacher who PRESIDENT FRANK L. McVEY
PoUy Rei
Martha Falconer
JOHN (SHIPWRECK) KELLY, Mgr.
seeks revenge for an unprepared lesson. No
Dr. Frank LeRenel McVey, sieve,
JOSEPH CONDOY
Sports Editor
242 EAST MAIN
PHONE ASHLAND Ml
math teacher ever chased anyone into the post
president of the Hnlvcrslty, has
SPORTS WRITERS
Edgar Turley
Lawrence Crump
office, so how could this come from memory.
had mmch inflaeaee la opening
Woodson Knight
the eyes of the nnUie to the
No, the dream is plainly a token that one's
SPECIAL WRITERS
growth of this modern Institution.
guardian angel will open avenues of escape
DavU Rankin
Fannie Curie Woodhead
Throagh the application of ceaseBdythe Reynolds
from his difficulties. Or perhaps it is symbolic
Oertrude Evans
less effort and good will he has
of what could happen if he ever failed to prescenred both for himself and the
pare that lesson. And often such a vivid dream
university the hearty cooperation
Eleanor Dawson
Harry Varlle
Mary Prince Fowler
of stadents and facnlty. Mnch
Buford Upham
would urge the student on to more study beMary Oalloway Griffith
Turner Howard
progress has been made and the
Mary Virginia Bailey
cause he has had a glimpse of punishment to
Malcolm Barnes
A