xt7gxd0qv60x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7gxd0qv60x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19610329  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 29, 1961 1961 2015 true xt7gxd0qv60x section xt7gxd0qv60x Ohio Students Begin Classroom Boycott

HOWLING CKEEN, Ohio, March 28
banners carrying such slogans as "We
Want Freedom," hundreds of Howling Crcen
State University .students hegan a classroom boycott yetserday.

(AP)-Displa- ying

The campus In front of University Union took on
th3 appearance of n picnic as an estimated 300 students
spread blankets to play cards and listen to portable
radios.
They were only part of about 2,000 students who ran
wild thrcuth the city's downtown area Monday night
In the second of two demonstrations
which began
Sunday in a water fight. These grew Into. demands that
the University relax some regulations students believe
to be too strict.
Midterm examinations begin today, and Easter vacation starts tomorrow. Not all of the students were in
this morning's "sit-oudemonstration.
University officials said they had no plans to break
up the boycott and .demonstrations as long as they remained peaceful.
Dr. Elden Smith, dean of students, said there would
be no suspensions. He said students will have to answer

to their Individual professors If they don't show up for
examinations.
Smith said there didn't appear to be any (single
overwhelming complaint, but rather a collection of individual grievances. "It's gotten to the point where the
students are looking for a cause." And, Smith said, even
If the students did have a cause, "You can't yield to
this kind of pressure."
Most classes were well attended yesterday. Student
leaders met in the morning to see what rouid be done
about the situation.
After the wild demonstrations of the last two nights,
the students' took a suggestion of a minister that a more
sedate demonstration be held to protest their grievances
against University policies.
The Rev. James Trautweln, pastor of St. John's
Episcopal Church here, said to students before a roaring campus bonfire that they could pursue one of three
courses of action:
Stay In their rooms and refuse to attend classes,
attend classes but refuse to answer when spoken to, or
go home.
The students compromised on a voire vote to sit
outside the classroom buildings but refuse to enter, startat 8 a.m. today.
ing

A student spokesman said there should be no effort
to stop any student who wishes to attend class. Th
University has some 6,000 students.
A University spokesman said the students would
have to take their own chances on being allowed to
retake examinations If they miss classes.
The Rev. Mr. Trautweln, expressing sympathy with
the students, said he and another local minister, the
Rev. William L. Powers, had been authorized by the
University to accept grievances from students. He told
the student.? to list them and he would piesent them to
authorities.
The grievances centered on I'niversity regulations
which the students consider too strict. One rule, for
instance, bans drinking on or off campus, even brer.
The students also do not like what they say is a
ban on couples holding hands on campus, and a ban on
fellows kissing girls goodnight outside dormitories.
They also complain about what they said was a
lack of freedom of speech on campus. They claim the
campus newspaper Is censored; that all discussion meetand
ings have to be cleared by the administration;
that students face expulsion for having their names
appear in
publications In connection with
articles unfavorable to the university.

LKD Sponsors, Teams
Paired For April Event

coed sponsor groups have been paired with
Thirty-fivmen's bicycle teams for the Little Kentucky Derby April
The 35 entries are a record for
second corridor, Alpha Tau
the derby. Last year's 32 teams was
e

28-2-

University of Kentucky
Vol.

Lll, No.

86

LEXINGTON,

KV., WEDNESDAY, MARCH 29,

11

Eight Pages

SC Suggests Course

In Communist Theory
By I I) VAN HOOK
Wednesday News Associate
A resolution asking the Uni-

talked with 13 professors and a
number of students about the idea
of such a course.
"The general feeling among
versity Faculty to legin a those I talked
to," he added, "was
course in communist ideology that the new course is needed at

was appioved Monday night IK."
Sipple added that most
by Student Congress.
Sipple, C piesident, vacated the chair biielly in order to
brit.g the resolution before the
congress. His motion to adopt the
resolution was pas
unanimously.
7ne SC piesident said he had
Cinrryl

universi-

ties have a course on communism,
and he commented that UK needs
one because there is an educational
vacuum without such a course being taught.
SC received nominations from

Students Get Awards
At Annual Ag Dinner

The College of Agriculture anil Home Economics last
night honored approximately W) students who have received
academic
scholarships and other awards during the 1900-6ear.
study aimed toward "full develop- Ilr. Frank G. Dickey, University
president, was the principal speak- er at the college's annual Awards
Banquet at which the awards
were presented
Previously unannounced awards
went to:
dene T. Harris, Franklin, the
of
Ralston Tut ina Siholarship
$300; Sandra Sayer,. Covington.
K. Wells, 1'aris, the
and John
Borden Award of $300 each
Jerry Staton, Atlanta. Ga., the
Jay Weil Memorial of $200; Jimmy Don Robinson, Kevil, the
Jonas Weil Memorial of $200;
Thomas W. Price, Livermore, the
Plant food Institute
National
Award of $200.
Phillip R. Shelby, Milton, Fla..
the Bui pee Award of $100.
Dorothy Martin, Martin, Ky
the Cornell Medal; Jim Huey, Burlington, the William Danforth Fellowship for freshmen.
In his speech. President Dickey
listed four questions that the students might ask themselves in
weighing their experience at the
I'niversity.
"How well do 1 work with
others? Can I demonstrate creative ability? Have I learned to exercise measured Judgements? Do I
have firm beliefs and the ability
to articulate them?
"These yardsticks are Indicative
of the demands that society will
make on you as college graduates,"
Dr. Diekey told the students.
The IK president suggested

ment" of the individual,

"Today, the requirements for
creating and enjoying a more
abundant life call for special skills,
talent, Judgment, and understand- " ,hut '10 tnt',r race of people
Dickey said.
He pointed out that the long-ranneed is for the full man
adap(able( imaginative, trained to
tnui!

two colleges to create an additional congress seat for the College of
Nursing and to fill three vacancies
in the College of Arts and Sciences.
Mildred Ann Combs, freshman
nursing major, was eleeted from
three nominations made by Dr.
Mania Hake, dean of the College
of Nursing.
Three representatives were
chosen from nine nominations in
the College of Arts ,md Sciences.
The new representatives are Jerry Westerfield. Jerry Mitchell, and
Carol Kay Dauyhcrty. All are
sophomores.
A letter from Dean Dake asked
the congress to select a nursing
representative because the college
had met the requirements for being repiesented In SC.
state
The constitution
that a college must have one I'nimember in order
versity Faculty
for It to be eligible for representation in the Congress.
The Arts and Sciences representatives were elected to fill three
unexpired terms. Two vacancies
came as the result of the representatives not keeping their required 2.3 overall standing. The
other was to fill the vacancy
caused by Garryl Sipple's election
as SC president.
Student Congress clamped down
on its attendance rules by adopting a motion which stated that
Continued on Page 8

the previous high.
Each women's group will submit
three candidate, to the men's
group, which will choose one
candidate to represent it in the
queen contest April 13.
The winners of the six prelimi- nary heats will ride in the Uttle
Kentucky Derby itself. Last year
iruma Willi uic &1A lament, iiiuca
were chosen to ride in the derby.
Winners of the Debutante Stakes
and of the derby will each receive
$100 worth of clothing from downtown stores.
Results of the drawing for
are:
Jewell Hall 2. Kinkead Hall;
Jewell Hall 3, Alpha Gamma Rho;
Jewell Hall 4, Sigma Alpha Epsi-loBoyd Hall 2. Sigma Phi Epsilon;
Boyd Hall 3, Tau Kappa Epsilon;
Boyd Hall 4, Sigma Nu.

Omega: Holmes Hall 2. first cor- ridPr- - Bradley Hall 1; Holmes Hall
2second corridor, Bradleya
"Best": Holmes Hal1 3- - Ha8ln
Hal1
Holmes Hal1
Ha88ln
Hall
Keeneland Hall 1, 2 east, Kappa
-

KMn.linil

Alnha-

1111

1

mrtmt

Keeneland IUU 3.
Farfnnouse.
east ph, Gmn Vflu.
3 west. Delta Tau Delta;
land Hall
Keeneland Hall 4 east, Haggln
Hall
Keeneland Hall 4
west. Kitten Lodge.
SuKy. Hagin Hall B-Alpha
Delta Pi, Zeta Beta Tau; Alpha
Gamma Delta, Phi Delta Theta;
Alpha Xi Delta, Lambda Chi Alpha; Chi Omega, Breckinridge
Hall; Delta Delta Delta, Phi
Kappa Tau; Delta Zeta, Pi Kappa
Alpha.
Kappa Alpha Theta, Troupers;
Kappa Delta, Donovan Hall 1;
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Kappa
gif,ma; Zcta Xau Alpha Bradley

Patterson Hall 1, Phi Sigma
Kappa; Patterson Hall 2. Sigma
Chi; Patterson Hall 3, Cosmopoli- tan Ciub.
Holmes Hall 1. first corridor, 2n0
Holmes Hall
Haggin Hall

...

.

.

"

TI

Weldon House, Harjgin Hall
Hamilton House, Triangle.

French Negro Advances,
History Professor Says that

The Negro has made great advances in France, and
advancement has been more rapid since the French Revolution.
Dr. Shelby T. McCloy, professor
of history, made this statement
last night in his Distinguished
Professor of the Year lecture for
the College of Arts and Sciences
on "The Negro in France."
"At the present," he said, "the
Negro is made to feel at home in
Franee. This was true even prior
to the Revolution when most
Negros went to Franee as slaves."
Dr. McCloy
commented that
aloofness and condescension to- -

ward the Negro have come almost
entirely from segments of the
aristrocracy or upper bourgeoisie.
"For the most part," he pointed
out, "tjie aristrocracy and upper
bourgeoisie have dwelt In the colonies and there seen the Negro in
large numbers."
The Negro in Franee, Dr. McCloy said, is representative of the
middle class, and rarely is found
in a servant's role.
"Most of them go there for an
Continued on Page 2

Two Newman Members Seek National Posts
mittee, a policy making group for
the Newman Federation, met In
the courtroom of the College of
Law Saturday and Sunday. It is
composed cf chairmen from 23
ureas of the nation and five officers.
Miss Margaret Sweeney, a graduate student in English, was ap- proved as a candidate for the ofThe National Executive Comfice of extension vice president.
The primary responsibility of this
office is to formulate new clubs.
udinr Kxains
Ray Barber, a graduate student
The Graduate Reading Examinations in foreign languages In Library Science, will be candidate for the office of national inhave been scheduled for April
9
in Miller Hall. French and ternal affairs vice president as
coordinator of all the national
Spanish will be given on Tuescommittees.
day, April 18; German, Russian,
The names of the two graduates
and others, Wednesday, April 19,
will be placed in nomination at
In advance of taking the exa student khould the national convention to be held
amination,
confer with Dr. Paul K. Whit-ake- r, in Berkely, Calif, this August.
Barry Averill, president of the
acting head of the DepartUniversity club, was appointed
ment of Modern Foreign Lanchairman of the Club President's
guages, to get an appropriate
Conference to be conducted before
book approved.
the national convention.

Two members of the University Newman Club, a Catholic student organization, were
recommended as candidates
for offices of the National Newman Federation.

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Putting her point across, Miss Joan Cavanaugh of Sorrs, Conn.,
internal affairs vice president of the National Newman Federation,
a Catholic organization, is speaking before the executive committee
of the federation which met in Lafferty Hail last weekend. Left,
is Father Charles Albright of Washington, D C, national executive
secretary, and right, is Ed Pronehinske of Madison Wis., national
president.

* - THE KENTUCKY

2

-

KERNEL, Wednesday, March 29,

19(51

History Professor Says
French Negro Advances

Engineering Group To Spend
Spring Vacation On Field Trip
A group of students in the allurglcal Engineering, will tour
icunrn.M-c- ,
'
1
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'I"11"
Xpaitmnit ot Minmt, anil Aiab(ima ivriiiuiiiji trip will In- Xne slx.dny
will elude tours of coal, zinc, copper,
Metallurgical Lngmeering
not get a spring vacation this and iron ore mines.
The group will leave Monday,
,tir '
April 3 to Tlsit strip mines at
will spend the time
Instead, they
Lynch, Ky.. and take an under- on a field trip, designed to ac- - -- round tour of Lynch' Mine 32.
quaint them with modern mining Xnere tney V-see In operation
jjiiiLiurs a t sume 01 uie leaning the modern equipment currently
coal and ore mines in the South. brlnff used In the mining of coal.
The group, accompanied by Dr.
On Tuesday they will visit a
William II. Roll, associate profes- - zinc mining operation and proces- Bor of mining engineering, and Dr. sing mill at Mascot, Tenn.
Richard S. Mateer, head of the
will
view
Wednesday,
they
Department of Mining and Met- - methods of mining- - copper ore at
-

Copprrhill, Tenn. While there they
niii mu lour a piihtimh nun
nd sulphuric arid plant.
From Copperhill, the group will
go to Birmingham, Ala., to tour
Iron ore mines.
They will also see a centering
plant and quarry and will see in
the Concord washer
operation
used in the processing of coal
The group's next stop will be
at Mussel Shoals, Ala., where they
will visit a modern power plant.
They will then tour the TVA power
The
plant at Kingston, Tenn.
plant at Kingston Is the world's
jargest,
The engineers will conclude their
trip Saturday, April 8, with a tour
of a mine at Madisonville, Ky.
After a brief visit to the TVA
viewing last night's turmoil with power plant under construction
to
P?"T i',? d"n'! We will haveih:r at Paradise, they will return to
to
this.
Lexington.
take some kind of action."
Johns did not indicate what the
action would be'
Fort Lauderdale since the 1930's
has been an lncreasingly popular
Admission Jit
Starts 7:24
resort for college students on an
Adult and Shocking
Easter break from classes. This
First Area Showinq
"PORTRAIT OF A SINNFR"
more than 25,000 already
year
Nadia Tiller
Tony Button
roaml
naye checked t
(At 7:30 and 1:09)
Also Western
beaches and making the rounds
"THS LAST REBEL"
of bars and hamburger stands.
Carlos Thompson
In Color (At 9:30)
When newsmen asked why the
young people were engaging in the
demonstration, the reply was, "just
for the sake of a rumble some- Starts 7:24
Admission tSc
tning to do."
MIDNIGHT LACE
Doris Day
Rex Harrison
It was the closing of Jade Beach,
(At 7:30 and
1.30)
t for rornan(.lng( whk.h
fovorite
ALSO
"CHANCE MEETING"
tout.hed off the demonstrations
Baker
Hardy Kruqer Stanley
Sunday night.
(At 9:38)

Cops Book Bad Students
FOHT LAUDERDALE, Fla.
March 2S (AP)-PoI- ice
labor- i jusly looked a big, new batch
of college boys today while
city fathers pondered how to
bead off more mob revelry by
thousands of student vacation- -

lts,
An estimated 3.000 O 5.000 beer- drinking, hooting collegians kept
the entire Fort Lauderdale Police
Department on the jump last night
;.or the second time in a row.
Officers collared, more than 100
t
;,oung ppople and said they would
i liarge them with disturbing the
No violence or injuries were re- ported in contrast with Sunday
..jikius nut wiieii uetT cans ana
vocks were hurled at police. But
the college boys and girls swarmed
inrough the beach district tying
j
up traffic, and chanting demands
t.or beer, the National Guard and
access to Jade Beach.
Jade Beach, unlighted, has been
(.losed at night to the Easter vacationists from colleges mostly in the
IVorth and Midwest. The city offi-- i
ials threatened earlier to call out
the National Guard if Sunday's
riot was repeated.
Mayor Edward Johns said after
.

5WITOW

5

NEW

m

Kentucky

Continued from Taee 1
education and generally represent
the intellectual class," he pointed
out.
Dr. McCloy said about 70.000 to
80,000 Negroes now live In France,
about 50,000 of them in Paris. The
remainder are In the university
centers and the seaports.
Except for the few who escaped
or were emancipated, Nenros first
were brought to France as slaves
from the colonies, and generally
returned with their masters, he
added.
"Later, they were sent to France
by their masters to learn a trade
and to be instructed In the Christ- ian faith, and many remained in
the country," Dr. McCloy said.
The history professor said that

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AT 7:30 AND 11:57

1:30 P.M.

ROBERT SIODMAK'S

"PRIVATE LIVES OF ADAM
AND EVE"
lamie Van Doren
Mickey Rooney
In Color (7 30 and
:0i)
ALSO
"CAPTAIN
LIGHTFOOT"
Rock Hudson
Barbara Rush
(At 9:17)

Chevy CnM
TODAY!

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James Maion
Hayward
"FEVER IN THE BLOOD"
Jack Kelly
Itrem Zimbalist

Susan

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STARTING

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several Negrds have been deputies
In Parliament for French colonies
''Since 1900," he added, "at least
10
Negros and mulattoes have
served In the French government
as minister or assistant minister.
"Since 1916, Gaston Monner-vill- e,
originally from Guiana, has
been president of the Senate, the
only French political officer to
hold a high post without change."
Dr. McCloy said Negros also
have served notauiy in important
military positions, and others were
distinguished literary figures of
the 19th Century,
Present-da- y
Negroes in Francs
have made their mark in enter- tainment and sports, while their
partlcipaton In the fine arts ha
been more limited, he added.

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"CAPTAIN LIGHTFOOT"
Rock Hudson

WILLIAM

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from the novel

Barbara Rush

at 9:30

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at 9:48

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Patterson vs. Johnasson

'THE LAST REBEL'

At 9:17

"FIGHT FILMS"

Color Western

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, March

.Coed Waits Patiently
Wrong Gloves Ruin Outfit
To Go North To Alaska'

whether the gloves should be worn
Choosing a pair of gloves to wlth dressy, tailored, day or even- Bo with your Easter costume Is ln8 clothes.
SL.IP-Olike selecting a sauce for n verv
Primarily a davtlme
good dlsn. n,,, wrong choice can glove. It has no fastening and
spoli everything.
ranges from three to five button
Yet ladies can be thankful for lengths.
Rucn a diiemma because wearing
GAUNTLET It Is four to six
goves marks tner improved posi- - buttons ln length, has a flared
tlon ln a mar,.8 world
in style. It,
cuff, and is pull-o- n
nUrine the Dark Aces onlv men too, is primarily a daytime glove.
wore them. Ladies needed permisMOUSQUETAIRE
Lengths
sion from the king to put on
range from 8 to 20 buttons and
gloves. But Catherine di Medici have a buttoned
opening on the
all that. Thereafter, inner side of
changed
the wrist. It is for
gloves became a status symbol
or formal wear with sleeveamong women, with England's dressy short sleeved dresses.
less or
Queen Elizabeth I emphasizing
THE PULL-ON- S
The lengths
her status with more than 2,000 also
range from 8 to 16 buttons.
pairs.
They have no opening or fastenToday a woman shopping has
elbow length size, about
almost as many kinds, lengths ing. The
12 buttons
worn
and colors to choose from. And crushed below(orthelonger if is
the
elbow)
gloves very definitely mark her season's most
popular length befashion status.
cause they take up where cape
Easter is the harbinger of a
or elbow length, sleeves
d
season. In vogue for sleeved,
on new style coats leave off.
spring and summer are sleeveless Longer pull-on- s
are restricted to
dresses topped by sleeveless or
wear.
short-arme- d
Jackets or coats, all evening
A mere 75 years ago the act
of which require ' gloves to make of
pulling on long gloves was conup the fabric deficit.
sidered to be too Intimate to be
n.
uiove lengm is nescrioea in done in the nresencp of a irentle- terms of buttons (a measuring
f"05 a unb "shingly an as
ldea the Prench devised) even
though the gloves often may lack casually as haU
buttons altogether.
Each button
exceDt on
Generally sDe'akine
corresponds to an Inch measuring formal occasions when a long
from the lowest part of the thumb giove is an integral part of the
seam to the cuff of the glove.
ensemble, gloves are removed soon
Here are the kinds of gloves after entering a home, theater or
your accessory wardrobe should restaurant.
include :
SHORTY It stops at the wrist
where it may or may not be fastened with a button. The most
versatile of all lengths, It looks
as well with sleeveless dresses as
with long sleeved coats. The trim,
style and material determines

n

Fort Knox until they reached Fort
Greely they had traveled approxl- mately 6,000 miles.
ine nrsi ween sne speni un- packing and learning her Way
around. The most amazing thing
about the post Is that all the
buildings are surrounded by grass,
which is uncommon in Alaska. The
post engineers have planted and
babied the grass for a number of
vrnrn Thpv havp hnllt fpnrp
around the arPas t0 prevent the
buffalo that roam the
from
eating the
no't mucn to do for
,s
entermainment
in the barren
fitate. Byrle mentioned that she
nad done a lot ot flfihing whle sne
was ln AiH.ska. Tne flsh are so
abundant that you can not give
them away because everyone has
more than he can possibly eat."
The woods around the army post
re cov(,ref, wlth w.Id rrflnherrv
plants. Byrle described them as be
ing the size of a pea but sweeter
than the cultivated cranberries,
"rn mVion am ward nivin iko
cranberries we were chased by the
buffalo who were grazing in the
near woods," she said.
Byrle left ner home ln AIaska
cpt- - 5 she arrlved m Louisville
Sopt 7 ..In iuisviiie, she said,
"they were having a heat wave
I was still dressed in my wool suit,
because it had been snowing when
I left the land of the midnight
sun."

Apt Project

ENID, Okla. (jf) A Lions Club
project last year was construction
of a lion's cage at the city park,

....

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Desserts
DELT
PHI DELT-TR- I
Phi Delta Theta fraternity had
a dessert with Delta Delta Delta
sorority last evening.
ATO-ZT-

Alpha Tau Omega fraternity artel
Zeta Tau Alpha will celebrate thn
Easter holidays with a "Bunny
Hop" dessert at the Alpha - Tan
Omega house tomorrow evening.
No man should marry until ho
has studied anatomy and dissected
at least one woman. Honore do
Balzac.

THE NEW YORK LIFE
AGENT ON YOUR
CAMPUS IS A GOOD
MAN TO KNOW ,

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Tin-Mat- es

Ann Dykes, freshman commerce
major from Knoxville, Tenn., and
a member of Alpha Delta PI
sorority, to Claud Chafin, Junior
architectural
engineering major
from Tampa. Fla. and a member
of Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity.
Wickle Bogart, freshman education major from Chevy Chase, Md.,
and a member of Kappa Kappa
Gamma, to Raleigh Lane, sophomore in the College of Arts and
Sciences from Louisville and ft
member of Phi Delta Theta fraternity.

...

CHEVY CHASE
PHARMACY
848

3

Social Activities

By The Associated Tress

By CYNDIE CARR
"Only three more months until
I return to the land of the midnight sun," notes Byrle Davidson,
a Junior political science major.
She hopes to board a plane for
her home in Fort Greely, Alaska,
100 miles south of Fairbanks, the
second week of June, unless she
can find a speedy pair of roller
fkates.
The 50th state became Byrle's
home last July when her father
was transferred from Fort Knox,
He is now president of the Arctic
Testing Board. When Byrle first
learned she was moving north to
the state of Alaska she said. "This
fhould prove very educational to
lives."
tee how the "ice-ha- lf
Leaving Fort Knox last June,
Byrle and her parents drove to
Fort Hood. Texas to spend the
Fourth of July weekend with her
brother who was there for ROTC
summer camp. From there, they
headed "North to Alaska."
Onlv imp rnnri Ipnd tn Alaska
.,
after one reaches Dawson Creek,
in Canada. Thus they did not have
a hard time following a map. The
highway which leads to Alaska
non Aican nignway
is ne
which is
miles of gravel road.
"During the whole trip over the
Alcan Highway we had to seal our
suitcases and drive with the car
'windows open and the fan on, to
create a vacuum because of the
dust."
Byrle was very impressed by the
beautiful scenery along the highway. You can see mountains,
streams and trees everywhere you
look. Byrle described it as "an
uncivilized land." She also went
on to say that she had never seen
to much land destroyed by fires.
"The change ln the highway
signs from Texas to Alaska, regarding regional animals, is interesting to note. In Texas they read,
'Loose Livestock.' in Colorado and
Montana. 'Deer Crossing, in Canada, 'Loose Horses,' in Alaska,
'Watch for Moose,' and in Fort
Greely, they read 'Watch for Buffalo on Highway'."
Byrle and her parents reached
their new home after 15 days of
traveling. From the time they left

29, 1961

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It's

Easier . . . time of happy hearts and smiling faces . . .
time for the family to blossom out in new spring clothes . . .
to join friends and neighto stroll in the Easter paratlc
bors at church, where exultant voices rise in the triumphant
hymns of the Day. We greet you at this wondrous season with
the wish that the glorious story of the miracle of Easter, so
many years ago, may inspire each and every one of us with
its message of hope, faith and life renewed.

FASHION

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Where Good Friends Meet

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Open 9:30 to 6:00 Daily
Diamonds
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MASTERS RADIO
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Sales and Service
Admiral
RCA
816 EUCLID AVE. PH.
Open Mon. and Fri. 'Til 9 p.m.

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817 EUCLID AVE.

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* The Kentucky Kernel

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University of Kentucky

pootane paid at Lexington, Krnturk
week during the rrmiiiir whom ypnr except during holiday! and nami,
SIX DOLLAHS A SCHOOL YEAR

Serond-cln-

rublUllcd lour timea

Bob Anderson, Editor
Newton Sfenclr, Sports Editor
Mike Wenninckh, Managing Editor
IIohmie Mason, Assistant Managing Editor
Lew Kinc, Advertising Manager
Beverly Cahdwf.ll and Toni Lennos, Society Editors
Skip Taylor and Jim Chanson, Cartoonists
Nicky ForE, Circulation
Terry Ashley, Business Manager

WEDNESDAY NEWS STAFF
Tevis

Bennett, News Editor

Bill Martin,

Ed VanIIook, Associate
Sports

Act Like Gentlemen
It

spring and, to paraphrase a
well worn cliche, young people's
fancies turn to Florida.
In a few days many University
students will be making the annual
pilgrimage to Ft. Lauderdale in
search of the sun. Nothing will be
able to stop them as they make their
way south like Norway's lemmings
in their suicidal trek to the sea.
The UK students, however, will
be arriving in Ft. Lauderdale at a
most inopportune time. That city has
just been the scone of a student riot
that transformed Jade Beach into a
battleground with thousands of colpolice with
legians bombarding
empty beer cans and police threatening to use fire hoses and tear gas
to disperse the mob.
We doubt if residents of Ft. Lauderdale will be particularly elated to
is

see more college students invading
their city, although there is little they
can do to keep students out.
More so than in past years, the
eyes of the nation will be focused on
Ft. Lauderdale and its collegiate
visitors. Because of the quirks of
scheduling college vacation periods,
Kentucky students may find themselves one of the largest single
groups at Lauderdale next week.
What happens there will affect to
a great extent the opinion of Ft.
Lauderdale residents, and perhaps
others, will hold toward not only University of Kentucky students, but toward the entire state as well.
We trust that UK students will
act in such a way as to give the
term Kentucky gentlemen
(and
ladies) a real meaning to the embattled residents of Ft. Lauderdale.

Hidden Police Resented
The police car on a
dark empty night pulled the lonely
traveler over to the side of the desolate road along Florida's west coast.
Police: "Do you realize you were
going 65 miles an hour in a 55 mile
an hour zone?"
Single woman traveling: "But, officer, the road was so dark, not another car in sight and frankly I
wanted to get out of this area."
Police: "Too bad. Maybe next time
you'll get out slower. That'll be $30
bond and 111 see you in the Panama
City Court Monday morning at 8."
Single woman: "I never saw you
on the highway. Perhaps if you had
been patroling instead of hiding in the
brush, I would have been more conscious of my speed."
She expressed the thoughts of
many others not only in Florida but
nationwide.
These days the auto traveler rarely '
sees the familiar "Police Patrol" cars
cruising a highway beat. They are
either hidden in obscure spots for
example, in roadside tavern lots or
gas stations, dirt roads invisible because of tall corn or wheat, behind
trees or brush, or on some knoll from
which they can see and not be seen
or they masquerade by riding in unmarked cars. The latter is the epitome
of police coyness because they can
then come up rapidly from the rear
and remain undetected while clocking the speed of some unsuspecting
victim.
That is, unless the "victim" drives
mirror and can disby his
cern police hats in an approaching
auto. Keeping" on constant guard
against police by this method can be
dangerous, however, because the eyes
should, in general, be directed forward while operating a vehicle. The
driver, in this case, should have the
foresight to have a passenger always
who can check approaching cars for
the myste ry men.
These nuisances of diiwng could
e.

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rear-vie-

be avoided