xt7h18342m9w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7h18342m9w/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19360207  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  7, 1936 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  7, 1936 1936 2013 true xt7h18342m9w section xt7h18342m9w Best Copy Available

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SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

UNIVERSITY
VOL. XXVI.

BACCALAUREATE
Record Registration Is
FINAL EXERCISES
Seen For Second Term
As 2,771 Enter School ARE HELD HERE
Largest Group to Matriculate
The total second semester regis
tration as compiled at 4 p. m. yrs- -

tcrday, gave Indications of a record
accord- enrollment,
lng to announcements from the registrar's office, when 2,771 suidents
registered.
On th.s day lost year the total
enrollment was 2,481. Fin.il enioil- ment for the sicond semester la-- t
year was 2,t!)7. The total rcgistra- Uon for last term was 3,148.
Registration Will continue until
February 17. Tuesday, f ebiuary 11,
will be the last date for making
changes In registration or schiMukj
Febru- without payment of fee3.
ary 17 will be the last date on which
a subject may be dropped witnout.
a grade without permission of the
Dean.
On Tuesday, the first day of
registration, the greatest number of
students ever to register in a single
day at the Univers.ty were enro.ied,
with a total of 1990 students pass
lng through the lines.
er

Governor's Night
Will Be Observed
At Alabama Game
The traditional Governor's Night
will be observed at the University
Friday, Feb. 7, at the Kentucky-Alabam- a
basketball game at which
time fitting ceremonies for the occasion will be rendered in honor of
the Honorable Governor A. B.
Chandler, Governor of Kentucky.
Governor Chandler will be the
dinner guest of Dr. and Mrs. Mc-Vat Maxwell Place after which
be will be escorted to the Alumni
gymnasium by the University Band
and the Pershing Rifle corps.
Cadet Colonel Elvis J. Stahr will
report to the Governor at Maxwell Place and act as his aid during
the evening.
A special program Is to be presented at the gymnasium during
which both basketball teams will be
presented to Governor Chandler.
When Governor Chandler enters
all spectators will be requested to
stand until he Is seated.

Attention Called
To Library Prize
President McVey Is calling attention to the prizes offered by
Hon. Famuel M. Wilson of Lexington for the t lib ary owned
and collected by undergraduate
students. The prizes are $.!0 and
$20. Those who expect to enter the contest for the prizes
should register with the chairman of the committee on Student Lib ary prizes. Miss Margaret I. King, on or before March
ts
15.
T.io committee, which
of Miss King, Dr. George
K. Brady and Dr. Thomas D.
Clark, will visit and lnsn-- ct the
libraries offered by students for
the prizes. The decision will be
made in May.
The regulations set up by the
committee provide that any undergraduate student who has
been at the University for two
years may compete.
Students
from Junior colleges are eligible.
The library must consist of at
least fifty volumes. The books
must be of interest and value
and may not Include school
books. The contestant is expected to give reasons for having the books In his library, and
be able to indicate to the committee his ownership of the library.
President McVey and the
hope that there will be
lively competition for the prizes.

Sixty-fiv-

seniors

e

and

to Put on Campus-widContest

:'

5

ztoumv,,

ee

I

Meeting
Has Big Attendance
ed

0 LK FESTIVAL

PLANS ARE MADE

i

,

'

f."

ATI".

ROSE BAMPTON

Rose Bampton To Be

Presented

By Local

Music Group Monday
Noted

Contralto Hag Voice
Range of Three
Octaves

Community Concert association of Central Kentucky will present as the third attraction of the
winter series Rose Bampton, brilliant young American
of the Metropolitan Opera Association, on Monday evening, Feb. 10,
1936, beginning at 8:15 o'clock In
the auditorium of the Henry Clay
High School The recital Is limited
to members of the association only
and no single admissions will be
sold at the door.
Rose Bampton has risen to supreme heights In the brief space of
a few years. Making her Metropolitan debut three years ago, this consummate artist of slender elegance
is one of Its youngest stars, one Is
unable to define Rose Bampton'i
great gift, or to set Its boundaries.
Hers is a voice of phenomenal range,
exceptional flexibility, capable of
astounding effects. With a mar-- (
velous span of nearly three oc- -I
tavea, she scales their gamut with
ease and grace. At all times an Impeccable taste and genius for control gu de the liquid loveliness of
her tones.
Miss Bampton has chosen the following program for her Lexington
Th--

mezzo-sopra-

i

GETS
POST
I

Director

of Bureau of Betrecital:
ter Business Research
I.
Heads State Tax
Aria: When I am La'.d
Group
(Dido and Aeneas)

James

W. Martin,
nrt riiwt-

professor of
of ho
reau of Business research In the
College of Commerce, has been appointed acting chairman of the
State Tax commission by Gov. A.
B. Chandler. Judge William H. Rees
of the Court of Appeals administered the oath of office, and the
commission is now composed of
Professor Martin and Ben Marshall
of Frankfort.
Prof. Martin has been a member
of thj Co.lege of Commerce since
1928,

and

Is

-

I

an au.horlty on

taxa-

In the fact that those very f iculty
members who are so prone to critik
cise the
allans are the
Vv'ry ones who know little if anything about the situation which exists. They seem to have the conception thai euch week day evening
finds the entire student body at
home s.udying from Immediately
att.T dinner to about 10:30 when
they tuck themselves safely In bed.
They seem to forget that the modern university Is some rung more
than a place wherc books are kept
and read and knowledge Is abauluie.
They do not realize that the modern woraday world demands something more of the graduate than
"book larnln'."
Leading modern educators have
come more and more to realize the
value of
activities
In the last few years. The value of
knowing how to meet people and
make one's sell heard the development of personality
has come
more and niore to be regarded as
one of the primary functions of
co.lege education. To this end liberal steps have been taken with the
purpose of making the members of
(Continued on Page Two)
mid-wee-

extra-curricul- ar

The
,

T.

tion problems. He was research di
rector of the interstate commission
on conflicting taxation in 1934 and
1935, issuing the report "Conflicting Taxat on" for the American
Legislator's association. He has also
served in a consulting capacity with
he several tax associations.
The njw acting chairman Is pres
ident of the Southern Economic as- soc.ation, and is editor of the status
division of "Tax Systems of the
World," which is the annual publication Issued by the Commerce
Clearing house.

con-to-

st

.

II.
Wohln

Der Tod und Das Madchen
i

Von Ewiger Liebe
Und Gestern Hat Er

Standchen

III.

Political

Schubert
Brahms
Marx

Strauss

Aria: Una voce poco fa (The Barber of Seville)
Rossini
VI.
Le Colibri
Chaussen
Au Pays
Holmes
Ma poupee cherie
Severac
Enlevement
Levade
V.

Mary's Aria (Peter Ibbetson)
Deems Taylor
There Shall Be More Joy. . .Nordoff
Hunting Song
Edith Braun
Ah, Love But a Day
Beach

Dr. Esther Cols, assistant professor of Political science at the University, wlli be the guest speaker at
the annual dinner meeting of the
V. W. C. A. to be held at the "Y"
building Teusday evening, February
11.

!

Dances
To Be Held Fridays

for-war-

thi UnlvrsitT and the Kentnrky
Band. The Governor wMI be the
rnest of Prudent and Mrs. McVey at Maxwell Place after the

wealth."
Mr. Williams, a graduate of the
University of Minnesota, also attended Union Seminary, Columbia
University, and the University of
Iowa. He served In the World War,
where he was made a captain, was
decorated by France and cited by
General Pershing.
Interested In the progressive
movement of the middle west, he
has played a large part In the organization of the Farmer Labor
Party of Minnesota and In 1934
served as chairman of the state
whose
of Minnesota
convention
platform called for a cooperative
commonwealth.
Two addresses will be given by
Mr. Williams at the Lafayette ho
tel on Friday. The first, to be delivered at 12:15 in the Red Room,
will be "The Significance of the
Minnesota Farmer Labor Party."
The second address will be "Why
a New Party In 1936." The latter
meeting will be open to the public.
Those organization officers sponsoring Mr. Williams appearing here
are John Breckinridge, chairman of
the Favette County branch of the
League;
William
Commonwealth
Leet, chairman of the University
Commonwealth
branch of the
League, and Mrs. M. B. Guthrie,
president of the Fayette County
League of Women Voters.

rsme for a bnffet (upper.

February 12

;

CLASS RESOLUTIONS PASSED
A resolution authoring the buying of membership Into tha Alumni
association for the members of the
mid-yegraduating class was
passed Wednesday, January 22, at
a meeting of the graduating class
in McVey hall, and a second resolution requesting the student council, starting the next school year,
to elect an extra
from the senior class who would
act as executive for the mid-yeclass was agreed upon.
ar

Be-

tween halves of the rame the
Alabama and Kentucky team
will be presented to the Governor.
Besides "Governor's Night," tonight will also be known as "Dr.
Nalsmith Night," In honor of Dr.
James Nalsmith, physical education teacher at Kansas, and the inventor of the game of basketball.
The National Coaches' Association
have each high school, college and
team In the nation to
set aside one game In honor of the
father of the cage game. Kentucky officials decided on tonight's
melee. Each person will be asked
to contribute one cent to a fund
to send Dr. Nalsmith and his wife
to the Olvmpfc basketball games In
August. This fund will be collected
from each school and presented to
Nalsmith this spring. Coach Rupp
Is in charge of the Kentucky fund
and has set $300 as the goal for this

state.

Kampus
Kernels

av

There will be a meeting of the
News staff of the Kernel at 3 p. m.
Tuesday Feb. 11 In Room SO of McVey hall. It is highly important
that all reporters who expect to
continue their reporting work be
present. In the event that persona
cannot be present, an excuse to the
news editor may be turned in pr'or
to the meeting.
j

There will be an Important meeting of SuKy Tuesday, Feb. 11, In
the Alumni gym at the regular
time. Election of officers will be
held.
There will be a regular meeting
of the Patterson Literary society
at 7:30 o'clock Monday night in the
staff room of the Library building.

nt

ar

"Sourmash," New Humor
Magazine, Is Put On Sale

kly

ns

Second Term

Plana for the Y. W. C. A. group
meetings and programs for the entire semester were made at a meeting of the Y.W.C.A. senior cabinet last night at the home of Miss
Augusta Robe:ts, Y. W. C. A. secretary, which Included plans for
forums every Tuesday evening In
March for men and women students, on "World Affairs and the
Student." and d'scussions on varimeetings.
ous dates for
Delegates to the Wilberforce con- ference at Ohio were selected at
the meeting. They will leave on
Wednesday. Feb. 12. A Hobbv group
tea was planned for Thursday, Feb.
13, at 3 o'clock In Patterson hall,
which will be In charge of Betty
Moffett, chairman of the group.
Freshman group meetings were
scheduled for Thursday, Feb. 13.
at 4 p. m. In the Woman's building
for town girls, and at 7 p. m. at
Patterson hall for dormitory girls.
New transfer girls will meet At the
Transfer club at 7 o'clock Thurs-d- a
evening in Bovd hall.
Plans were alo made for a Dutch
party at noon
Lunch club
on Friday, to be held at Patterson
hal with Barbara Smith preoMtnir.
The cabinet meeting was conducted bv Martha Fueett. president,
with Augusta Roberts in charge of
worship.
Members of the cabinet who at
tended we-- e Frances Kerr. Charlotte Coffman, Betty Moffett. Betty
Earle, Theo Nadelsteln, Virginia
Robinson, Mary Frances McClaln,
Gunn Webb, Marmierlte
Marv
Goodfriend. Elizabeth Ann Krlegel,
Ann Bishop. Barbara Smith and
Mary Rees Land.

To Give

Dr. Cole, who has been on leave
of absence from the University for '
the last five months, has been in
Washington studying curreut political and International affairs. She
wlll speak on the neutrality controversy which is one of the most important problems now facing the
administration at Washington.
After more than two months of
Mrs. Samuel Wilson, president of
the Y. W. C. A., will preside at the preparation, Kentucky Sigma Deldinner and wi.l Introduce the ta Chi, men's Journalism fraternity,
speaker.
yesterday released the first edition
new student
of the "Sourmash,"
humor magazine. Copies were placed on sale at last night's benefit
Bi-Weegame and were handled by 8uK.y
organization, who will also dlspote
of copies at the Kentucky-Alabam- a
game tonight.
The Campus Book store, as well
- weekly All . Campus
as Sigma Delta Chi salesmen, wlll
The bi
dances will be held Friday night have copies for disposal on the
Instead of Wednesday night. campus today. The "Sourmash" Is
containing
publication,
Dean T. T. Jones announced
a
yesterday. The first Friday
two stories, one a short story which
dance Is to be held Friwon the prize for the best short
day, Feb. 14, In the Alumni gym.
story submitted by a student, and
The price of admission will be the other a short-sho- rt
story which
25 cents and the hour will be
was also the best ot Its kind subfrom I until 10:30 p. m.
mitted. Other material In the humor magazine Includes original hum

For

I

Howard Y Williams, national director of the League for Independent Political Action, will deliver a
series of talks in Lexington beginning Friday, Feb. 7.
He will speak to the University of
Kentucky branches of the league In
room 111 of McVev hall at 3:30 p.
m. on "America's Future: Dictatorship
or Cooperative
Common-

Schubert

inches, respectively. The guard
are held down by Bouska
and Nrgl. boys who are Fomewhat
smaller, but are still taller than
some of the Wildcats.
Coach Rupp's starting five will
b the same group that has started every other game this sa'son.
Carlisle and Hagan will be at
Lewis at center, and Anderson and Donohue at guards. J. Rice
Walker, Lexington sophomore, who
has ceated a sensation in every
gamn in which he has participated,
will be kept on the bench until the
Kentucky team begins to fail.
Tonight' game will be designated ai Governor's Night. The
Honorable AlbeH B. Chandler,
Governor of Kentucky, will be
guest of honor. He wlll have as
escort the Pershing Rifle nn't of

Conference Delegates to Go
to Wi berforce, Ohio,

HERE

Action

ransv material that will give the
small but speedv Wildcats plenty
of trouble. At center the Tide has
a lad who answers to the name of
Sneed and who is six feet, seven
Irenes tall. At forwards, th"re are
Whatley and Keller, who measure
six feet, six Inches and six feet, five

Released By Group

National Director of The.
TLeague ior independent
Series of Talks

Dunhlll
"C1""'

YWCA DINNER GROUP
HEARS DOCTOR COLE

,

W

i

adage, hiftorv repeats
An age-ol- d
itsplf, will be tested tonight at 8
o'clock In Alumni gvmnasium when
the Kentucky Wildcats and the
Alabama Crimson Tide line up for
the second game between these two
institutions tonight. Kentucky won
the first game Monday night at
Tu caioosa by 32 to 30.
The A'abamans have one of the
best teams In their history and have
an pvre'lent chanc" of defeating
tlr Wildcats, something they have
failed to do since Adnlph Rupp has
had charge of Kentucky basketball.
Coach Hank Crisp has some long,

Y.W.C.A. Programs

Y. WILLIAMS

TO SPEAK

in Earth
Purcell

Cloths of Heaven
DV,,,.

society, and the local chapter of
Omicron Delta Kappi, national
campus leaders' honor society.
The winner of the University
contest will be presented w.th the
Omicron Delta Kappa prize for
oratory and will be eligible to compete In the stats contest ta b3 h. Id
at Bowling Green on March 7. Th3
winner of the state contest will be
sent to the National dlvis.on content at Evanston, 111., on April 17.
All students enrolled In the University are eligible for participat.on
In the contest. The orat.ons s.uuU
be on any timely problem
of tne
day and mu.st be limited to 2000
words, not more than 200 of which
may be a quotation. Those desiring to participate are requested to
see Profe.sjr Sutherland in room
j 207, McVey
hall, at tneir earhest
convenience.
This Is the first year that the
contest has been held under the
sponsorship of Omicron Delta Kappa and early signs ind.cate that it
will be the biggest oratorical contest ever held at the University.
The contest has been arranged by
the Om.cron Delta Kappa oratorical contest committee, composed
of Elvis Stahr, James Moore, and
Dick Boyd, working in connection
with Professor Sutherland.

H.

l

And Never The Twain Shall Meet

be-a-

"

....

ng

pcnnnmlr-- i

Oratorical

Vey hall, on Thursday,
February
13, at 7:30 o'clock, co-- : prmsrcd by
the National Collegiate Oi at t.cj!

-

'

7

OFFICIAL

Univer.-it-

will b3 held in mom 111. Mc-

j

and

I

The

ni Ovm

After several changes, the
complete joclal calendar for 1936
hns been arranged. It consists
of eleven formnl dances and Ave
ten (lances.
Th? complete calendar Is as
follows:
February 8 Alpha Xi Delta,
fwmnl, and Delta Zet.a tea
danc?.
February 14
Morlar Board
tea dance.
15 Alpha
February
Gamma
Delta, formal, and Kappa Delta,
tea dance.
February 28 Military Ball.
F.b:uary 29 Phi Delta Thcta,
formal, and Chi Omega, tea
dance.
March 7
PI Kappa Alpha,
f oi mal. and De.ta Delta Delta,
tea dance.
March 14 Kappa Kappa Gamma, formal.
March 28 Alpha Delta Theta,
formal.
April 4 Kappa Sigma formal.
April 18 Phi
Kappa,
formal.
April 25 Lambda Chi Alpha,
formal.
May 2 Alpha Gamma Rho,
formal.

Any Student Eligible; Orations Shoul l!e on
Timely Topic

thir

Begin At Guignol

On February

.:

a

Crme Will Start at Fiqiht
O'clock Sharp in Alum-

Complete Social
Calendar Giv en

e

LOCAL WIN XT R TO
GO TO STATE FINALS

cm-F's-

will share the lead with Minna
Bloomfield, one of the favorites of
the Guignol stage, who will play
Janet Rodney. The part of her
Dr. Frank L. McVey was the prin- mother,
Mrs. Janet Rodney, will be
cipal speaker and Dean Thomas P.
Cooper of the College of Agricu- taken by Dorothy Dyer Rhodes.
An excellent supporting cast will
lture was master of ceremonies at
Conley
the 16th annual 'farm and home- Include Katherlne Bryon Wheeler
Pumphrey
banquet held at the Lafayette ho- as Claudia KiUs,
tel on Feb. 80 for 400 farmers and an Mr. Brown, Helen Rich as Ethel,
farm women from all sections of Walter Kirkpatrlck as Ed?ar Ful
ler, Wallace Briggs as Oliver and
Kentucky.
Dr. McVey spoke on "What Is It Mary Elizabeth Dunn as the cook.
All About?" and told the gathering
that farm people should seek to Farm-Hom- e
Improve their standards of living
by giving their best efforts In mind,
body and spirit. He declared that
better living conditions with greatDespite bad weather and
er opportunities for the future genroads, over 800 people attenderation are far more Important to ed the 24th annual Farm and Home
the farmers of the state and nation Convention dally. More than 500
than greater accumulations of women attended the women's seswealth.
sion in the Judging pavilion on the
second floor, while some 300 men
met In the arena.
There was a speclla meeting for
bee keepers and for veterinarians
the first day. The general session
drew over 1,000 people when Dr. J.
B. Hutson, chief of the Tobacco
Faculty Committee Exoects section of the AAA, spoke.
After a round table discussion
150 Delegates from Nine
'Southern States to Take and an address by Dean Thomas
IP. Cooper In the afternoon, the
Part, April 2 to 4
' meeting was brought to a close Frl- The faculty and staff committee, d
;
Mc- appointed by Pres. Frank L.
Vey, discussed plans for the University's first folk festival at a
luncheon meeting at Boyd hall yesterday. The festival Is to be held
here April 2 to 4 under the Joint
sponsorship of the Universtly and I The contrast In opiulons and
the Conference of Southern Moun- - outiook .on iile as of the professor
tain Workers.
ana student respectively has ever
Approximately 150 delegates from been a matter of conc-rin the
nine or more Southern states are American educational system. Some
expected to attend the festival, the simply attribute to the major dif- latttr s purpose being the promotion ference which has ever existed
exchange of folk songs, litera- - tween you.h and age. O.hvis who
ture. and .customs with particular are more broadmlnded and more
emphasis of furthering the folk understanding of the necessary
movement through the rural areas. which huve been more or Kss set
Elmer O. Sulzer, director of publ.c-lt- y changes and divergences In courses
for the University, announced for the past fifty years realise and
believe
that he plana to have the final com- about that something can be done
the situation.
petitive program broadcast over a
An example of the misunderpossibly CBS.
national hook-ustanding which exists b.'tween the
Members of the committee for
faculty and
the festival, appointed by Doctor cently arisen student body has reon our own campus
McVey, are: Mrs. McVey, Prof. C.
In the form of
dispute as to
A Lampert, Miss Sarah Blandlng, advantages anda disadvantages the
of
Miss M ldied Lewis, Miss Lulie Lo- the Wednesday night dances. These
gan, Frank Fowler, Mrs. Myrtle popular
go by the
affairs
Weldon, Mr. Sulzer, Miss Zeluia boards" because "mustastute memthe
Monroe, Miss Florence rBtout, Mrs. bers of the faculty feel that they
Marylee Collins, Mrss Anne Call!-baInterfere with the student' norM. B. Oyler, Mrs. L. C. Robmal pursuit of study.
inson, Mrs. Eda Giles, J. W. White-bous- e,
This view Is not concurred In by
Miss Btatle E. Erlkson, Mrs. the majority of the faculty but Is
E. O. Trimble, Mrs. P. K. Holmes, the representation of an organized
Dr. T. T. Jones, Miss Helen King, minority.
and Miss Katherlne Rogers.
Th paradox of the matter exists
n,

'

thirte-- n

graduate students received

degrees Monday afternoon
from
Pres. Frank L. McVey at the Com
mencement ercrclses held at 3 o'clock in Memorial hall.
Gov. A. B. Chandler was the principal speaker at the exercises and
addressed the graduates on "Youth
at the Crossroads."
'Drive git'eu and sclfl h interests
form the control of the government and you will be serving your
state and your nation we.l," declared Governor Chandler,
"and
always remember that a man's history is written only after he has
finished his Job."
"Today," he added, "you face the
master of human destiny opportunityand your future will require
high hope, high courage, and high
patriotism.
There is no substitute
for hard work, and if you expect;
to obtain happiness
through the
possession of material thing3 your
disappointment will be great.
"You have weathered the depression and overcome setbacks In obtaining your education and the
University will find contentment
and your parents Joy In your ultimate success. Always bear in mind,
however, that it Isn't the man who
succeeds In the dashes but the one
who goes the full route who finds
success at the end of the race."
Governor Chandler closed his ad1
dress by asking for God's blessing
on the members of the graduating
class as the prayer of tne presiPlay Was "The Temperamen-talists- " dent, the faculty, the families ot
each graduate, and the CommonWhen Given in
wealth of Kentucky.
New York City
Six advanced students of the
R. O. T. C. were commissioned sec"March Hares," a fantastic satire ond lieutenants In the Reserve
by Harry Wagstaff Cribble, will be
the conferring of degrees
presented at the Guignol Theatre and the administering of the
the week of Feb. 18. The play was
on Page Two)
originally produced at the Bilou
Theatres, New York City, under

16th Annual f arm, Home
Convention

p,

:.

-

Witherspoon Cn'lec President Also Addresses
Seniors

br-s-

,

,

Nal'nnal Colletjinte Oratorical Grou'. O.D.K. Conpcr-rt- e

"v.

t

DECLARES GOVERNOR

McVey Is Speaker
foni'nfr
x ui l ouii luvvmift the title, "The Temperamentalists."
'
John Pyle, a University freshman, MARTIN
r: 7 ...
.
Auuresscs wlji play Qeofrey Warehan,
U. OI IV.

F

,

'

"March Hares" To

r

Tall, Rangy Tidemen Face
COMPETE NEXT! Cats Tonight In Attempt
To Avenge Previous Loss
THURSDAY NIGHT

;

'y

32

U. K. ORATORS TO

'

Hear Address Made
by Kentucky
Governor

NEW SERIFS NO.

RID AY, FERRUARY 7, Hl!(

'

com-m'tt-

ey

I

Contralto

Graduating Seniors

Sixty-fiv- e

GAME, ALUMNI GYM, 8:00
l M., TONIGHT

KENTUCKY

OF

LEXING'ION, KENTUCKY,

in Single Hay I Tuesday Record

CAT -- 'BAM A

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

FRIDAY EDITION

or, poetry of a humorous nature,
curtoons and illustrations as well
as exchange material from other
college humor publ cations.
In the first edition is an announcement of a contest which will
be sponsored by the "Sourmash" to
Sweetheart."
select the "Campus
Details of the contest are announcas well as
ed in the publication
plans for the next edition of the
magazine which will appear on May
Day.
All the Illustrations, Including the
cover design, are the work of local
students, who have shown a remarkable ability for the task. The
two stories, also the work of students, demonstrate ability, and It is
the purpose of 81gma Delta Chi,
through the "Sourmash," to en- courage work of thi kind on the
' campus.
I

Time reports for all University
students working under the Naare
tional Youth Administration

due on Wednesday, Feb. 12. These
reports are for the month, Jan. 13
to Feb. 12.
Wanted Student to organize a
sales force for a useful hosehold
Proposition Is attrac
commodtly.
tive. All applicants for the position, see Dean T. T. Jones.

There will be a meeting of an
fraternity presidents In room 4 of
the Administration building on
Monday, Feb.

10,

at

7

o'clock.

There will be a meeting of all officers and class representatives of
the Home Economics club at 5 p.
m. Monday, Feb. 10. Everyone la
urged to be present.
All persons wishing to sell the
new humor magazine, "Sour Mash,"
report to the Kernel office Friday
morning.
AU students who wish to park
their cars on the campus this semester must register at the office
of the Dean of Men before Monday,
Feb. 10. Registration fee la. 25

cents.

(Continued on Page Two)

.

* Best
THE KENTUCKY

PRC 1 WO

Narcotic

Official

First

Mens Glee Club

Pre-Med-

s

Meeting

lo Plan Definite
Program for Seeond
Semester

'l

undergraduate students of the statement that the editorial Is orl-- :
University have the opportunity of ginal and not copied from any
ruining contests sponsored by the source, together with the name of
Follcy A.vioc.ation," the ihe college newspaper to which he
:'
"Nation" and Eddie Cantor, radio expec.s to submit it on March 15.
and screen s.ar, on "Will Neutrality l ne ndi.rsemcn. of an Instructor.
Krcp the United States Ouk of g.ving his name, department, and
War ' and "How the United States jaddie.ss of school must a.so appear
May Keep Out Of War," respective- on the Students statement. Neither
I
l
ly, it
1
the siudont'a signature nor the
u announced today.
i
i
The conditions to be complied teachers endorsement must appear
A.7 WCJ
:,
iV
w:tn in the lust contuse are: En- on he edltoiial.
trants must write an editorial of
Manuscript will be Judged on the
not more than 1000 words and
bavis of factual
manusciipts must reach the office and eifectivtnc.ss background, logic
of presentation.
of the student secretary, Fore.gn
Policy awsocia.lon, 8 West Fortieth f irst prize Is 50, second $25, third
sueet. New Yortc cl;y.. not later prizes are fiveto subscriptions, vach
year,
tne "Nation" and
or
than March 15, 1936. A copy of the five one
fourth pi lzes consisting of five
vdiional must a.so be submitted to student memoershlps, each for one
tne Kernel March 15. Students
year, In .ne "Foreign Poi-- !
t 'V
whose manuscr.pts ore refused by academic
Assoc. ation."
winners will
their college newspapers are not icy announced In Prize May 1 issue
the
barred from this contest. Where be
(I
Foreign Po.icy bulletin and
triers are several entrants In one of the
11
L
iiL
school, college papeis may wish to the editorial winning first prize
it
sponsor a campus editorial contest vnl appear In the May 6 issue ot
The Vjm.e.Sity of Kemucny
Trie program is aa io.iows:
Lampert to determine which manuscripts the "Nation."
Alma Mater
Men's Olee club, under the direc
Cadman they will print, and are free to pubIn the second contest, sponsored
tion of Prof. Carl A. Lampert, will The Builder
Dedication
Franz lish thesa any time ai.er Mai en iS. by Mr. Cantor, the first prize is
present the program at the Sunday Tenor solo To be selected
essay
Each editorial must be accom- $5,000 for the best
Afternoon Muslcale on Feb. 9, 1936,
panied by the student's signed on "How the United States May
Jesse Mountjoy
4 o'clock In the Memoristarting at
Harp solo Believe Me If All Those
al Auditorium. The Olee club will
Endearing Young Charms. .Irish
be assisted by a number of soloists
Air
All

"F.M-eig-

society
The tryor
win hold It first meeting of the
semester Monday, February 17. The
guest spealer will be an official of
the U. 8. Narcotic Farm near Lexington.
A definite program for the semester will be released at this
meeting. The tentative program
now consists of addresses by Dr.
Kornhauser, of the University of
Louisville School of Medicine, and
Dr. A. T. McCormack, secretary of
the BUte Board of Health, who has
promised to discuss health Insurance and state hospitalization. The
concluding meeting will be a banquet and election of officers for
the following year.
On the second Monday of each
month a business meeting will be
held which is open to active members only. A program meeting open
to the public will be held every
third MJnday.
Forty-eignew members
have
Joined the society this semester.
Including Jesse Mountjoy, tenor.
Mary Louise McKenna, soprano,
Harlowe Dean, baritone; Mary
harpist, and Ruth Clopton,
al

c

I

'

ri

ht

Painting Exhibit
At Art Center To
End February 18
The current e:iilbition of paintings at the Univresity Art Center
by Hlldegrade Hamilton will continue through Sunday, February 18,
This exhibit may be viewed from
8 In the momnig until 5:30 In the
afternoon and from 7:30 to 9:30 In
the evening.
Hlldegrade Hamilton spent three
years abroad traveling, observing,
and painting scenes and people of
the old world.
The 150 paintings produced by
Miss Hamilton during this period
depict scenes from Spain, Portugal,
North Africa, Germany, Hungary,
Delmatian Coast, and Turkey.
Not all of the 150 pictures are
on exhibition as several have been
purchased by interestde parties.

Friday, February 7, 19S6

Foreign Policy Contests
Open to U. K. Undergrads

To Address Group
At

KERNEL

All

"

Keep Out of War." Letters must be
in by February 22.
Entrants for either one of thr re
contests may send their letters to
the Kernel office.
HARRIS IS 8PEAKF.R
sl
Prof. William Harris, of the
y Experiment Station, spoke
on the subject of "The History of
the American Saddle Horse" at the
weekly meeting of the Rotary club
held in the Phoenix hotel.
Unl-ver-

Baptist Union To

Convene at U. K.

500-wo- rd

Mary Rudicel
Herbert
Tramp, Tramp, Tramp
Bartholomew
Battle of Jericho
Hoodah Day. . .Traditional Chantey
reader.
Reading To be selected
The Olee club has made a num
Ruth Clopton
ber of appearances throughout the Quartette
Selected
state this season and has sung beMale Quartette
fore various organizations in the Soprano solo To be selected
city of Lexington.
The program
Mary Louise McKenna
which Is to be presented is varied Exhortation, A Negro Sermon. Cook
In character and should be of speHarlowe Dean and the Olee Club
cial Interest to the student body of Soldier's Chorus from "Faust...
the University.
Oounod

BARGAIN

Leo Green, A. L. Gillespie to

TABLE

Lead Talks, Singing
at Meeting

' it

i

was speaker at the Thanksgiving
sunrise service which was attended
by a large number of students.
The meetings will be held at 7:30
p. m. at Memorial hall, beginning
Monday, February 10, and they will
continue through the week through
the night of Friday, February 14,
There will also be personal conferences conducted by Mr. Olllespie at
4 p. m. every afternoon at Memorial hall. All students are Invited to
attend these meetings.

A. L. Gillespie, who was graduated from the University of Tennessee and is now studying at the
Baptist Seminary in Louisville, will
lead the singing at the student revival which will be held on the