xt7h18342n2b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7h18342n2b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19590430  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 30, 1959 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 30, 1959 1959 2013 true xt7h18342n2b section xt7h18342n2b Guardsmen To Get Full Credit For Classes
UK students In the National
He added that students In the
A spokesman Tor the local NaGuard will receive full class credit National Guard should check with tional Ouard unit said it was a
If they are1 called for duty In the their professors to make certain "possibility"
that the unit would
Eastern Kentucky strike area. that all their course work is caught be called Into Eastern Kentucky.
Dean of Admissions Charles E. up.
Asked if the Lexington unit had
Elton said yesterday.
Dean Elton said the local Na- been alerted, the spokesman said
Under University ruling, a student who has completed 12 weeks tional Guard unit has been alerted he was not in a position to "release
of a semester and then is called for possible duty In the coal strike any definite information on that
area. He

units would rotate Into the strike

No Information could be obtained yesterday on the exact number
of UK students who would hav
to serve In the strike area.
Dean Elton said graduating seniors having to withdraw for military duty would be recommended
to the UK faculty for diplomas.
He added that comprehensives,
if required, would be waived by a

area every two weeks.
The spokesman said approximately 12 UK students were In
the Lexington unit.
A UK student In the Frankfort
National Ouard unit said yesterday it had been alerted for duty in
added that he did not yet.".
for military duty receives full
Eastern Kentucky. He said around
credit in hjs courses, Dean Elton know how many UK
He added, however, that he un- 12 students were members of the
said.
would be affected.
derstood state National Guard Frankfort unit.
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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

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Doth Candidates Say:

UK Officials9 Control
Of S C Is 6Too Great9

Taking part in yesterday's political forum are, from left. Bob
Kearney, WBKY; Dill Neikirk. Kernel chief news editor; Taylor
Jones, CP candidate; Dr. Malcolm E. Jewell, panel moderator;
Dob Wainscott, SP nominee; Jim Hampton, Kernel editor-in-chie- f;
and Gurney Norman, Kentuckian editor.

University Cancels
$35,000 Purchase

ry

three-building-

s

By BOB ANDERSON

have provided.
The Reynolds lot fronts 250 feet
on South Broadway and extends
back to the site of the College of
Education and University School
Building. A railroad spur services
the tobacco buildings.
Purchase of the property will
make possible additional parking spaces when the temporary
Little Commons Building, now used
for storage, Is razed. The space
will be converted into a parking
lot.

Peterson said the newly acquired
property would be used for storing library material, surplus departmental material, business office records dating back more than
five years, old records of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics and operational and maintenance supplies.
Four trucks used in student
fieldwork by the Geology Department also will be stored there.

Architect Is Engaged
For Library A ddition
Dr. Frank D. Peterson told the
Kernel yesterday that a Lexington
has
architect, John F. Wilson,
been engaged to draw plans for
a proposed addition to the UK Library.
Peterson said the architect and
and library officials will get together to discuss the needs of the
proposed library expansion.
He said the addition will probably cost about one million dollars.
Peterson, UK vice president for
business administration, said the
University hoped to have the plans
ready tot presentation to the 19S0
Kentucky Legislature. The legislature meets in Frankfort next January.
Dr. Lawrence S. Thompson, director of UK libraries, said suclk
plans have been on file for a number of years. He doubted that the
addition would be approved by the
legislature.
Thompson said aside from the
Medical Center, only S500.001) have
been appropriated to UK hi the
last 11 years fur capital buildin
funds. He said the new Pharmacy
Building was the main classroom
construction
curried on in that

No. 103

ir

SC Candidates 'Meet The Press9

The purchase of a $35,000 aluminum storage building has been
cancelled since last Saturday's announcement of the offer by the R.
J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. to sell
UK its tedrying and processing
plant property for $100,000.
Dr. Frank Peterson, vice" president for business administration,
has requested State Finance Commissioner Orba F. Traylor to apply
the $35,000 appropriated for the
one-stometal storage building
toward the purchase of the Reynolds property on South Broadway.
The University proposes to advance the remaining $65,000 from
restricted funds, $35,000 after July
1 and $30,000 after July 1. 1960.
Two groups of realtors have appraised the Reynolds property at
$317,000. The
have
a combined storage footage of
185.000 square feet, as compared
with the 40,000 square feet which
the metal storage building would

LEXINGTON, KY., THURSDAY, APRIL 30, 1939

and chemistry building
to be first on the list
of new buildings UK will have.
Dr. Peterson said Tuesday the
new Science
building would be
built with surplus funds from the
July, 1958, and' July. 1939, state
budgets. He said he hoped enough
funds would be available to start
construction of the science building in July.
physics

is supposed

Kernel Staff Writer
Two Student Congress presidential candidates said yesterday that
the University administration and
faculty exersise more control over
Student Congress than is to the
students' best interests.
This was the concurring opinion expressed by
both Taylor
Jones, Campus Party nominee,
and Bob Wainscott, Students' Party
candidate, at the Sigma Delta Chi
Forum yesterday.
Jones expressed a belief that a
change in this status can come a- bout only when the students and
administration unify their aims.
Wainscott attributed the situabetion to a lack of
tween SC and administration. This
is caused by
lack of
personal jealousy between some
members of the two groups, Wainscott stated. He expressed the belief that certain people in each
group resent any powers the other
group might attain.
When asked whether he thought
SC officials were called into' conference with Dean Martin several
weeks ago primarily because of a
motion made in SC that campus
drinking be studied, Wainscott
answered that he did..
He said it had. seemed to him
that the University administration
was stepping into the matter to
suppress it. If he were SC president, Wainscott said, he would
have allowed
the motion to be
made.
Jones said he thought SC should
have the right to investigate anything pertaining to students with
no exceptions.
Editor-in-ChiKernel
Jim
Hampton cited figures on the
grades of students with and without cars when questioning Jones
on his opinion of his party's sophomore car permission plank. The
figures, taken from a California
ef

survey, showed that 85 per cent of
'E students kept cars on campus.
Jones said he was In favor of
sophomores having car permission,
but a clause prohibiting students
on probation from keeping cars
might be advisable.
When asked about overcrowding
further, already jammer parking
areas, Jones cited figures from the
campus master plan calling for
4,981 future parking' spaces,
an
increase of 3,629 over the present

facilities.
Wainscott said the plan in the

Students' Party platform advocat-

ing the use of Spindletop Farm for
student activities does not mean
that the party advocated throwing
Spindletop Mansion open to "after
game blasts."
However, student
organizations could have picnics
and outings on the grounds, he
said.
The beauty of the farm should
Continued Oo Page 8

Tevis To Get $25,000
For Filming Of Book
By BILL NEIKIRK
Chief News Editor
Walter Tevis, English instructor

Tevis said his book was reviewed
by the local papers but he termed
the review "pretty sloppy."

at the University's Covington
center, has signed a $25,000 contract with a movie producer for
the filming of his latest book.
In a telephone conversation with
the Kernel yesterday, Tevis announced he had been contacted by
his New York agent 10 days ago
concerning the filming of "The
Hustler."
Tevis, who taught English here
three years ago, said he was not
told by his agent which movie
corporation had bought rights to
film his book.
He added that "there was no way
of telling" when the filming of
the book would begin. The producer who bought the rights was
he said.
His book, published by Harper's,
is a story about a pool player. It
has been reviewed by several national magazines, including the
January issue of Time.

Tevis has had numerous short
stories published in national magazines. Saturday Evning Post, Esquire and Redbook have bought
several of them.
He said the current issue of Cosmopolitan carries one of his short
stories. Entitled "Alien Love," it
concerns a school teacher.
Tevis said that many of his
pool
earlier
stories concerned
players, but added: T stopped
writing about them a couple of
years ago."
He said he currentiy is working
on a new novel which also deals
with a school teacher.
Tevis taught sophomore English
at Irvine High School from 1953
to 1955 before coming to UK in
1956. After teaching English for
a year, he worked with the State
Highway Department.
He began teaching at the Covington center at the beginning of
this school year.

well-know- n,

www

Lab Theatre To Give
Ibsen Play Tonight

ill

,:J:;:(r Til

Henrik Ibsen's An Enemy, of stad and Tommy Fister as Morton.
the People," adapted by Arthur Other members of the cast inMiller, will open at 8 p.m. today clude John .Pauli, Mary Warner
in the Lab Theatre.
Ford, Charles Helmetag, Tom
Oene Arkel will play Dr.
Marston, Howard Doll, Jay AbraStock-man-

n,

the scientist who discovers ham, Nancy Marshall, David Shirley, Tim Dummitt, Jim Perkins
become the chief money-makin- g
and Pat Ragle.
device for the city, is polluted.
nre Douglas Ray
His brother, Peter Stockmann,
mayor of the city and leader of the and James Read Jr., Douglas Ray
is director. James Read Jr. is deforces fighting against exposing
sign and technical director. Brenda
tin truth about the spring, is
Howard and Marjorie Furrant are
played by Douglas Ray.
in charge of props.
r.t'tiotl.
Al-starring in the three-ac- t
Anoidui; to the UK expulsion drama are Charles Coushhn &.
The play will run through
plan a lt an d last fall, nil addition i;i!lni:;, James Head Jr., as MorMi Saturday night. Tickets are on.;
to tiic library is caLcd for.
Kill. CIi:trij!ie 15ill as Catherine dollar and may be obtained daily
'ihe tons unction of the new biocUu.i.nn, Jai.it.' o Sioati us llov- - ut the Ciuunul Lux Office.

that the tourist spring, which lias

Guignol Players Perform
Gene Arkle stresses hU point to Jim Slone and Charles Helmetag while C'haili-uBell listens intently. The incident takes
place duiing a seine in Ibsen's "An I nemy of the People," which
Levins in the l.ab Theater tonight.
c

* 1
3-T-

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, April 30, 1959

IIE

c

Welcome Week Guides
Begin Training Period

'"I

-

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A

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.

who will serve as guides and assistant guides for next fall's Welcome Week was begun this week.
The prosrpm is being directed
by Anna Owen, head guide, and
Dianne Hichardson. Billy Joe Moore is also serving as head guide
for the Sept. 0 Welcome Week.
Students named to guide posi-

tions are Richard Armstrong.
Betty l'.ce, Ben Boddley, Marietta
Booth, Bob Brown, Charles Buster.
Charlcne Callahan. Charles Clark,
Joe Cooksey, Emily Crawford. Joy
Belle Edmonds,
Dickens. Nancy
Dean Finney, Margaret Futrell,
Rod Griffin.
Bill Gross, Sammie Guy. Lary
Heath.. Jim Heil. Lillie Ilolloway.
George Humphreys, Ralph Javins,
Melvyn
Jones, Don Kaufman.
Judy Kreis, Richard Loefflcr, Liz
.

V

15
i"'

'

if

-

Head Guides For Welcome Week

Anna Owen and Billy Joe Moore, who have been selected as
head guides during Welcome Week this fall, discuss tenative
tour plans fcr the new L'K freshmen.

attend an AFROTC
camp at Memphis State University
to prepare the
weekend
McLon. Carole Martin. Donald Mat- this for summer camp.
intosh. Ann McMahon. Bob
Transportation to Memphis will
lock, Gerald Milam, Sally Mock.
be supplied by Stewart Air Force
Linda Nalbach. David Tape.
Base at Nashville. The cadets will
James Pnrritt. Wilburn Pratt. travel in n
Lockeed HercuW v.
Reed.
Duvid Prkhett. Billie
one of the newest types of tro..;
Richardson. Dave Rout-late- e. carriers.
Dianne
Ann Rule. Ronald Schmidt.
Ncila Scott. Martha Shrrfey. Jane
Shewmaker. Wityne Smith. James
Steidly. Melvin Stewart. Neil Sillier, Ronald Summers.
Charles Terry, Harold Tinnrll,
Tippett, Zrlfie TroRden.
Tom
TODAY ONLY
Claude Vaughn. Terrill Vineent,
Law rr nre WaRers, Richard War"The Bolshoi Ballet"
ren, Betty Weaver, Warren Wheat.
Chappcll Wilson. Ann Woodward,
at 2:30 and 8:30 p. m.
and Marcia Wrrjte.
John Proffitt. assistant dean of
STARTS
men, said there was a possibility
TOMORROW
that a few more students would be
needed as guides or assistants. Any
LIFE AND
additions will bo made before the
end of the semester, he said.
TIMES OF

23-2-

be-:c-

me

Reserve right now!
THE PERFECT

Loaded Find

THE NO.

mwM)

KING OF
ALL TIME!

HELD OVER!

and
ted by it.
Also participating in the presentation of the short course is the
joint Committee on Continuing
Legal Education of the American
Bar Association and the American

MARILYN

MONROE

TOTiY CURTIS

5:s

JACK

www f ;

IEMAVW

Law Institute.

rev.

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MOVIE GUIDE
"Rally Round the
ASHLAND
Flag Boys," 3:32. 6:40, 10:08.
"Escort West," 2:17. 5:25. 8:53.
BEN ALI "Imitation of Life,"
12:42, 2:52, 5:04, 7:15. 9:20.
CIRSLE 25 "Some Like It Hot,"
7:35, 11:25.

2nd Feature Too!

A Tip

Come Early!

NOW

"Mustang." 10:00.
FAMILY "The Ten Commandments," 8:00.
KENTUCKY "Gigi," 12:33, 2:48.

anything
or anyone
he wanted!

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT

Ccile

LEXINGTON
"She Gods of
Shark Reef." 7:42. 10:25.
"Night of the Blood Beast." 9:10.
STRAND Soon! "South Pacific."

n

Ph.

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--

added

short-"Th- e

l-

-

--I-

Castro"

t

W.;". V.ViWrV.

V..1

Also

"NIGHT OF THE BLOOD
BEAST"
No girl was safe when this head hunting monster roamed the streets

38

1

AL SCHICKINGER
Gives You Another Reuson
Why You Should Support The

NOW PLAYING
LANA

TURNER-JOH-

GAVIN

N

nrr run

rvurni inu

Ull uan untKim

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r-.- v

STORY

TODAY'S TORMENTID

P

COMBS -- WYATT TICKET
"The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce has reported that
the greatest tingle weakness of Kentucky is the political inability of the State government and its attitude toward industry.
Bert Combs and Wilson Wyatt have pledged themselves to aggressively sell business oa the many advantages of locating in
Kentucky, making it possible for Young Kentuckians to find
jobs at home."

IN PANNII HURST'S
HARD-HITTIN- G

M

4 :jL,J
.

ADULTS $1; CHILD 25c

"SHE GODS OF SHARK
REEF"

U. of K. Agency
Norman McMullin
4-60-

POPULAR PRICES

See Primitive Maidens Pearl Diving
Filmed in Color in Hawaii

NEW STRAND THEATRE
For your convenience
Exclusive

J

Rebel

TONIGHT
First Run Lexington

O

r

B. DeMille's- -

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS

Starts
FRIDAY, MAY 18th

i

ON THE BELT LINE

ONE SHOWING NIGHTLY
Starts 8:00 p. m.
Over 12:00 p. m.

Todd-A-

1

CRIME

Full Length! In Tact!

Schines

ts

30

FindMONROE, Mich. (AP)
OPEN DAILY 1:30 P.M.l
ing what he thought was a cap
from
pistol on his way home
school,
Terry Marlow
Chery Chase
Euclid Avenue
twirled It cowboy fashion and
Showing!
Now
snapped off a couple of shots as
"RALLY ROUND THE
the short course.
he walked. He took a third shot
FLAG BOYS"
Some 20 lectures and panel dis- in his bedroom at home and blew
Paul Newman Joanne Woodward
Jack Carton
cussions dealing with every article a hole In the floor. Police found
Joan Collin
of the code will be held during no evidence that the first two
"ESCORT WEST"
Elaine Stewart
Viefor Mature
the course. Matthews said since shots harmed anyone.
Faith Domergue
only a few states in the country
have a uniform commercial code,
nn immediate need for instruction on the new law and its implications is essential to Kentucky
- Starts 7:30
Adm. 90c
Open 6 p.m.
others affecbankers, lawyers

5:03. 7:18, 9:33.

InT0DD-A0- 1

SHOW

er

pro-summ-

C-1-

Instruction On Law Code
To Be Given Here In June
course of
An intensive three-da- y
instruction on the Uniform Commercial Code, enacted by the Kentucky General Assembly last year,
5
A ill be held June
at UK.
Sponsored by the law schools at
UK and the University of Louisville and by the Kentucky Bar Association, the short course will deal
with all major sections of the code
and the changes in Kentucky law
as a result of it. The code will
effective July 1, 1960.
Dean W. L. Matthews of the
fJK Law School said the code will
present a new body of commercial
law which will directly affect
banking and financial institutions,
commercial agencies and the busi- ncss community in general, as well
as the attorneys who serve those
clients.
Commercial law experts experienced in all phases of the field
will participate in the instruction
program. Matthews said several
persons with experience in states
which have previously adopted a
commercial code will take part in

Nine seniors and 42 Juniors will

r.-de-

training program for students

13-1-

y$f

Cadcis To Attend
Air Force Camp

f
I

V'

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A

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:

Of

CINIRATIONI

Al is a graduating senior in Commerce. He is President of the College Cham-be- r
of Commerce and
of the Young Kentuckians for Combs-WyatCo-chairm- an

t.

SPONSORED BY UK YOUNG KENTUCKIANS
FOR COMBS AND WYATT
at

e

SUSAN KOHNER
J U ANITA

MOORE

MAHAUA JACKSON

A VMIVMtALeTHAnONAl

1

ROBERT ALDA
NCTUM

Meeting Every Tuesday, 7 a. m., Bowman Hall Lounge.
AIL Students Invited.

:

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* LCD 2Wa Heats
To Be Held Today

Pre-Pharma- cy

rwtrjjiutny utrDy inais win
in the qualifying heats on Der
cc r.eia at
p. m. today on the by Day each team will ride 10

Stoll Field cinder track, Murphy
Clrrrn, LKD division chairman of
insulations, said.
The trials, held to establish post
positions in the six qualifying rac- ts on Little Kentucky Derby Day,
May 9. will include all 30 teams
entered. Winners of the qualifying
races will compete for the champ- lenship.
In the trials, each team will be
timed for five laps around the
tan k. The trams will be composed
of five members who will ride one
lap each.
Teams posting the best six trial
times today will be awarded the
number one post position in their
ipMmjmg lien .on ueroy uay.
Trams posting the next best times
wH be awarded post position num- -

laps around the cinder track. Four
post position exchanges will be
made by each team in each race. A
meeting of team managers will be
held at 4:30 p. m. Monday, in the
Bowman Hall Lounge, to explain
the system of exchanges for the
races.
The Derby itself wll consist of
15 laps with each team member
riding three laps each.

Xwo

-

f

said yesterday.
ot th;
Pharmacy,
dCUSS tl ?n!"y?ar intermhip for
pharmacy students.
M' JT?sey'

x

4

Dean Sloane said the meeting

was important to students on both
the four and the five year plans,

open only to the top 10 per cent
of lhe senior class in the College
of Commerce, were Anne W. Arm- -

strong, Wayne E. Blethcn, Sue
Davenport, Margaret L. C. Gravitt
anH
n Mnis nil nt t,pv.
ington.
j0hn F. Ball. Clav: James L.
Gibson. Danville; Lois Goodrich,
Frankfort; John II. Halberg,
Lakewood, N. Y.; John A. Halpin,
Covington; Carol Ann Honeycutt,
Park Hills; Bill B. Hudgens, Win- Chester; Barbara Sue Johnson, La
center; Julia Schenck, Carrollton
and David B. SDain. Honkinsvill.
Dr. Robert II. Stroup, UK asso- l11
nnnm Irc? a st 1
tirnfacci nf
assistant director of the Bureau
Business Research, also was in- itiated Into the society, along with
Frank Gay, general manager of
the J. C. Penney Co. in Louis
ville. Gay was the guest speaker
at the banquet.

'

Dial

her work'. When the Richmond
was formed
C. Raymond Barnhart symphony orchestra
she volunteered as a drummer. She
the Art Department opened an
lubi; Tuesday at the Art Center was accepted as a librarian.

2-22-

ht id.

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In January of this year, he

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V

y

(By the Author of "Rally Round the Flag, Boys!" and,
"liarefoot IJoy mth Cheek.")

ADVENTURES IN SOCIAL SCIENCE: NO. 2
Today, ranging again into the fascinating world of social science,
let us take up the subject of anthropology the study of man
and his origins.
The origin of man was indeed a puzzle until the Frenchman,
Jean-Lou- is
Sigafoos, discovered the skull and shinbone oi
Pithecanthropus Erectus in Java in 1891. What Sigafoos was
doing in Java is, incidentally, quite an odd little story. Sigafoof
was a Parisian born and bred. By day one could always find
him at a sidewalk cafe, sipping barley water and ogling the
girls; each night he went to a fashionable casino where he
in between times he
gambled heavily at roulette and
worked on his stamp collection, which was one of the largest
in Paris.
go-fis- h;

and GIRLS

WESTBORO SHOES

FOR MEN

summer Sigafoos lost his entire fortune gambling
at the casino. He was seriously contemplating suicide vhcn:
quite uiioxix'tteclly, a letter arrived from one Ixtus lVta!
Mediums, a Javanese girl and an avid stamp collector, with
whom Sigafoos had boon corresponding from time to time
through the international stamp collectors journal. Until now
the nature of their correspondence, though friendly, had
strictly philatelic, but in this new letter Lotus Petal declared
that although she had never laid eyes on Sigafoos, she loved
him and wanted to marry him. She said she was eighteen years
old, beautiful and docile, and her father, the richest man in the
tribe, hud agreed to give half his fortune to the husband of hex
choice. Sigafoos, penniless and desperate, immediately booked
passage for Java.
The first sight of his prospective bride failed to delight Siga-fK)She was, as she said, beautiful but only by local standards. Sigafoos had serious doubts that her pointed scarlet teeth
and the chicken bones hanging from her ears would be considered chic along the Champs ElyseVs.
Hut sobering as was the sight of Lotus Petal, Sigafoos had
an even greater disappointment coming when he met her father.
The old gentleman was, as Lotus Petal claimed, the richest mar
in the tribe, but, unfortunately, the medium of exchange in his
trile was prune pits.
Sigafoos took one look at the mound of prune pits which woe
his dowry, gnashed his teeth, and stomped off into the jungltv
swearing vilely and kicking at whatever lay in his path. Stomping thus, swearing thus, kicking thus, Sigafoos kicked over r
heap of old bones which what do you know- !- turned out tc
be Pithecanthropus Erectus!
Put I disgress. From the brutUh Pithecanthropus, mar.
evolved slowly upward in intellect. Hy the Middle Paleolithic
man had invented the leash, which was a remarkable
technical achievement, but frankly not particularly useful until
the Mcsolithif; jKTiod when man invented the dog.
came the most important discover)
In the Neolithic
history of man the discovery of agriculture. Why i this
in the
so inijHirtant? Because, good friends, without agriculture there
would be no tobacco, and without tobacco there would U no
Marlboro, and without Marlboro you would be without thf
finet filter cigarette that money can buy, and I would be with
out a job.
Well sir, one

COMPLETE

wl

.id.

:

Radio Equipped

GO FORMAL

al

panels nnd pictures," Rich-aFreeman. Art Department

:

30

Av-cciatio- n

three-dimen-Mn-

1

Inc.

r

mrd "familiar everyday objects
iii'l pr.nt to form

Figaro.
He studied with John Wustman,
Julius Herford, Roger Wagner, a nc.
Robert Shaw in San Diego, Cai.,
during the summers of 1957-5- 8
At present, Ramsey Is ministe
of music at the Versailles Bapti
Church in Versailles. Next year 1
will attend Union Theologict
Seminary, School of Sacred Musi

YELLOW CAB

(AP)
RICHMOND,
Va.
Mildred Mason, librarian for the
Reynolds Metals Co., says it is hard
for a librarian to get away from

Con-.tructions-

of "Gianni Schicchi" as Betto ant
"The Marriage of Figaro" a

LEXINGTON

Hani To Escape

in Louisville.
Prof. Barnhart calls the exhibit
Tullepe
He has

William H. Ramsey III, baritone, will present a senior recital
at 8 p.m. tomorrow In Memorial
Hall.
Ramsey is a member of Phi Mu
Alpha Sinfonia music honorary,
assistant director and soloist for
University Chorus and will appear
as soloist later this month with the
University Orchestra directed by
Robert King, assistant professor of
music, on a Universily Musicale
Series program.
For three years, he has been
director of the Baptist Student
Union Choir and has appeared in
the Opera Workshop productions

ur

first class.

In Louisville
1

meet at 4 p.m. Tuesday in 111
McVey Hall, Dean Earl It. Sloane

Scholarships In Marketing

Naval Officer
Will Recruit
In SUB Today

Profrs-o-

students are to

Pre-pharma- cy

Ringo And Craig A warded

UnIversity commerce stu- dents were awarded $250 scno.
ships in marketing last night at
tne annual banquet of Beta
ur. Srm
E. McCubbin and Gamma Sigma, honorary com- Bcb Oray will be in charge of merce fraternity.
the trials.
Miss Mary Ann Ringo, a Junior
from Clinton, and David C. Craig,
Falmouth, a senior, were presented
the awards by C. D. Sausser of the
Ohio Oil Company Foundation,
sponsor of the grants.
The foundation also will give a
$500 scholarship to a UK graduate
student in marketing later this
year. The- awards are designed to
aid the marketing curriculum in
the College of Commerce.
A representative of the U. S.
Initiated Into the fraternity,
Naval Recruiting Station and Office of the Naval Officer Procure1 Do
1 WICe
ment will be at the SUB InforMarriage
MILWAUKEE (AP)
4 p.m.
mation Desk from 9 ajn. to
1c day.
and entry Into the Air Force were
General information for filing an only minutes apart for Erich Hal- application will be given. To be zer, 21, of Milwaukee,
A recruiting officer stood
by
tligible for the program, the ap- - as Halzer and Patricia Kucharek'
rhcant must receive a baccalaureate degree within nine months of were wed by a Justice of the peace
at the Air Force recruiting stahis date of application.
tion. Then Halzer, a former serviceman, was sworn In as an airman

Instructor
Exhibits Art

Conference
Is Tuesday

Ramsey Will Give Recital
Friday In Memorial Hall

and

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s.m.MiM.'ii.juim.,

BOYS

OPEN FRIDAY NIGHTS 'TIL 9 P.M.

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smoke tluil can't In:

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cigarette, 1'hil'm Murri, a
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* The Deep, Broad 'C
At the

arts and sciences dinner
Tuesday night, Dean M. M. White
raised eight primary questions which
he said the college (and, by simple
extension, the University as a whole)
must consider in its attempt to provide the state with the best possible
education program. All of his suggestions showed a good deal of depth
and validity, and two of them struck
us particularly because they presented
two possible attitudes toward education that one might expect the public
to hold.
One concerned the establishment of
an honors degree program, which will
enable Students to take 24 hours of
courses beyond those now required
for their degrees. This program, we
think, is one of the most ambitious
and meritorious ventures on which
the University has ever embarked. It
will provide the truly serious student
with ample opportunity to utilize his
talents by undertaking work, on a
strictly voluntary basis, which he
would ordinarily not be able to do as
an undergraduate. The caliber of the
honors degree instruction should be
upheld by a simple requirement of
it participants: that they be in the
upper 20 percentile of their class.
The second question we thought
highly important was substantially
this: Is the University to concentrate on educating the normal,
student? To this is added
another question: Is the common
man, the average citizen "not theA-ma- n
or the
but the Oman"
becoming our ideal?
This interested us particularly because of a statement last week by a
.

C-aver-

E-m- an

University of Wichita dean, who contended that the C student is being

neglected, that not enough is being
done to develop his full potential.
The Kansan's . theory is that since
there are more voters in the C catethey will be detergory than in the
mining national and international policy far more, through their votes, than
will the academically more capable
voters.

This question of the average person's needs, and the responsibilities
of institutions to provide for and even
cater to them, strikes at the very
heart of American educational policy.
We pride ourselves on the fact that
a high proportion of our high school
graduates go on to college, and that
the proportion is increasing.
Yet providing the mass of people
with a fair education, admirable as
it is, must not be allowed to become
the aim of our universities. The "average" man may be the largest voting
class, but he is not the one who contributes to knowledge, to progress in
any given endeavor. It is the extraordinary person, the one with the
added bit of intelligence, drive and
ingenuity, who ultimately makes the
significant contributions to our soFor this reason, the new honors
program may prove one way to avoid
some of the pressures brought upon
the University to keep its curricula
geared to the needs of the average
student. It will prove, we hope, to be
the extra weight needed to keep the
pendulum swinging toward superiority and away from the mediocrity that
must come when learning is only
"average."

The Readers' Form
40 More Supporters
Kappa Delta Sorority
To The Editor:
We think your editorial on Spindle-to- p
Farm was excellent! If that money
were put into classrooms and buildings for the education of students, instead of a country club, how worthwhile it would be.

Joanne Hamburg, Susan Johnson,
Peri Wells, Janie Cheatham,
Diana Mills, Pat Townsend,
Nancy Barnett, Shelley Edwards,
Theresa Nantz, Jane Clark, Chris
Cusick, Mary Ann Rives, Sally
Fluent, Betty Jesse, Sandrella
Hail, Jo Moyer, Sue Ross, Mary

Sally Kitchen, Carol McCord,
Jan Gover, Joan Pittelko, Liz
Moore, Donna Lawson, Betty

Rooks, Betty Allison, Susan King,
Mary Jo Ilarrod, Tanner L. Ott-leMay Elizabeth Briscoe, Mary
Anne Gaffney, Lane Vogel, Marilyn Burnside, Judy Krebs, Sue

Emmons, Elsey Clemmons, Barbara Uines, Jo Ann Mercer,

Ellen Riddell, Sandra Luce,
ley Dicken.

y,

Shir-

Treasures From A Past Age
-

A
PRINCETON, N. J. (AP)
vealth of Byzantine art treasures 14

centuries old lies in an' isolated monastery within the shadow of Ml. Sinai
in Egypt, an international research
team has said.
The sixth century shrine at the
monastery of St. Catherine, visited
last summer, holds material the team
calls "unsurpassed in quantity, quality
and uniqueness" in Byzantine art history.
Princeton University, the University of Michigan, and the University
d
of Alexandria, Egypt, jointly
the expedition to the monastery
150 miles southeast of Suez.
The church was founded by the
Byzantine Emperor Justinian on the
sjxm-sore-

reputed site of Moses' burning bush,
beneath the mount where tradition
says Moses received the Ten Commandments.
Among the treasures uncovered and
photographed by the expedition are
1,200 or more icons according to
Prof. Kurt Wcitzman of Princeton's

Fire Before It Gets Out Oj Range.

ciety.

Art and Archaeology Department, the
world's richest collection of them.
The icon masterpieces include a
representation of St. Peter, depicted
as young and strong with a closely
cropped beard, holding the keys to
heaven' and a staff.
The team photographed thousands
of manuscripts in Greek, Syriac,
Georgian, Arabic and Slavonic many
of them illustrated by miniature
painti