xt7h445hbg30 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7h445hbg30/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19171018  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 18, 1917 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 18, 1917 1917 2012 true xt7h445hbg30 section xt7h445hbg30 THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON,

VOL, X
ROYDEN

SCRUBS BATTLE WITH
PRESIDENT
WESLEY AN TOMORROW

TAKES CHARGE

OF UNIV.

RATI

Commandant Ready
To Receive Applications
For Third Camp
K.

QUOTA IS 26

Captain H. N. Royden, U. S. A., new
commandant of the University, accompanied by his wife and
son, arrived in Lexington Tuesday
evening on the Royal Palm from
Park. Yesterday 'he assumed
active charge of the battalion of the
University, which formerly has been
under the control of D. R. Ellis, acting commandant.
Captain Royden, a man of fine physique, when interviewed in his new
home, which he was inspecting, said
he hoped to move in the last of the
week, when his furniture arrives. He,
with his wife and son, will stop at a
local hotel until the improvements on
his new homo are completed.

a

With Captain Royden's arrival, the
regulations of the Reserve Officers'
Corp
effective.
Training
become
Classes in military science for the reserve officers will begin immediately,
and the payroll of the officers will be
compiled. The new commandant witnessed the parade drill of the battalion
yesterday afternoon, and also the
drilling of Company E at the fourth
hour.
Captain Royden for the past few
months has been Quartermaster of
the German war prisoners interned at
Fort Oglethorpe, Ga. At one time,
there were oUS German prisoners and
aliens, who were well fed, well clothed
and well housed in their
"prison" at the fort. Each prisoner
was treated as a United States soldier
treated, thus carrying out the Hague
of war
agreement.
The prisoners
wore members of the crow of tho S. S.
Kron Printz Itel Friedrich, the German liner interned off the coast of
Georgia. Captain Koyden said little
trouble was given by the prisoners of
war.
Jt has just been announced by tho
Adjutant General of tho United States
that tho University of Kentucky will
of her
bo allowed to send twenty-sior undergradgraduates
students,
uates, to the third training camp to
bo held from January ", 191S, to April
r, 1918.
Tho general plan of tho third camp
is to givo college men with some military training for appointments in tho
of
National Army. Tho graduates
these training camps, who may bo
rocommonded, will bo listed as oligiblo
for commissions us second lieutenants,
and will bo commissioned as vacancies occur. To bo oligiblo for thoso
camps, ono must have had two years'
training at tho University, bo a student In good standing, or a graduato,
and bo between the ages of 21 and 31.
who
Graduates and
x

s

(Continued on Pairo Flv

call from the Kentucky Wosleyan
team at Winchester for opponents for
a Friday game, was answered by tho
University of Kentucky Scrubs, and
the game will bo played at Winchester.
The Scrubs have practiced as consistently as tho Varsity and are confident that they will bring home a victory. Doc Laslle has been elected
captain, and tho team has been running smoothly and fast In practice.
They have often proved themselves
worthy opponents of the Varsity, and
on one occasion rushed the ball from
the center of the field over the line
by straight-linbucks.
A

New

U.

KENTUCKY, OCTOBER

e

FEATURE NEXT RALLY

Professor Noe's New Songs
To Be Introduced
Tomorrow
COVER

ENTHUSIASTIC

Professor Cover and the yell leaders
are planning for the biggest rally of
the year to be held in chapel, Friday.
Two now University songs will be
sunt; then for the first time.
The feature of tho rally will be the
of the "Alma Mater,"
introduction
written by Professor .T. T. C. Noe.
The song has a lively, catchy tune and
the very spirit of the Wildcats is in
tho words. It is suitable for ohorus
and Glee Club work, and is also excellent for singing on the field at games.
Professor Cover is enthusiastic about
the song and says lie feels sure it
will be received with appreciation by
the students.
Professor Noe has also written three
now versos and a chorus to the old
tune. "Hall, Hail, the Gang's All
Here." Tills promises to bo as great a
favorite with Kentucky students as
any of tho four now In use. Tho words
are aimed first at tho Wildcats and
their accomplishments, and then givo
good advice to tho dofoatod opponents.
Tho words will bo printed and
copies furnished to all who attend.
Good singers from tho Gluo Clubs will
bo scattered around in tho aiullonco to
assist .Mr. Cover, and It Is hoped that
ovoryono on tho campus will bo acquainted with all tho songs beforo tho
rally is over.
Moro "pep" and enthusiasm for tho
Vandnrbllt game will bo tho object of
tho yell loaders. Thoy wero highly
of the
pleased at tho
rooters at the Miami game, and aro
anxious that tho samo absorbing Interest In tho playing of tho team will
bo evidont this Saturday whon the
Wildcats moot a nioro skillful foe. Tho
.'novation or tho "Lady Snake Dance"
w .11 bo continued at tho graco of tho
co eds and tho splendid singing in the
niid'Ho of tho field will bo repeated.

VERY

MUCH

M'VEY IS
IK REMAND

Time Taken Up By Talks To
University and Local

Organizations

RETURNS

NOVEMBER

Immediately upon his arrival at 11
o'clock Tuesday morning, Dr. Frank
L. McVey, president of the Univerconfersity, began a busy three-daence with boards, faculty members,
students and associations of the city.
Since he was delayed In Louisville,
the president was unable to address
the students, assembled in chapel
Tuesday, but spoke today at the special chapel exercises on matters relative to the student body. It Is his intention to inaugurate a "Between Us
Day" a day on which University matters will be discussed, matters that
are of particular interest to the student body.
Dr. MoVey addressed the Engineering Club composed of the faculties of
the engineering colleges, Mining, Civil
and Mechanical, Tuesday evening on
the subject, "Some Observations in
Wednesday morning
Washington."
was devoted to numerous conferences,
and, at noon, he met the Executive
Board In Its regular session. As honor guest, he addressed the "Get In and
Get Out" Club last night in its rooms
on iShort street, and also visited the
V. M. C. A. of Transylvania College.
Dr. MtrVey will leave Lexington Friday evening for Paintsville, where he
will address the Eastern Educational
Association, returning from there immediately to Washington, to resume
his work on the preparation of his
monograph on war finances.
Dr. McVey will return to the University to meet with the next regular
session of the Executive Hoard tho
second week in November, but will not
be able to bring his family with him
until the complete renovation of tho
president's new home, which includes
the addition of several rear rooms.
Dr. McVey complimented highly tho
student publication of the University,
Tho Kentucky Kernel, copies of which
have boon forwarded to him at his
home In Washington, and said that ho
was greatly interested In its work and
influence.
y

FRESHMAN CLASS NOW
COMPLETES ELECTION

18,

No. 6

1917

FOOTBALL STAR IS
BIG RED TEAM HALTED
DOING "HIS BIT"
star athlete at
the University, and later at Vander- Tom Zerfoss, former

hilt, wrote home from tho Cunard
Line steamship on which ho was on
his way to France. Mr. Zerfoss is in
the United States Ambulance Corps.
He says:
"We have lifeboat drills
every day and I could go to my boat
in my sleep. The sea is getting a little rough now. I don't know which
would be preferable, to be submarined
or seasick. We are now about 400
miles out and will soon begin making
the run for port. It seems ages since
I left you but then I'm glad I'm where
I am.
It gives a fellow a feeling of
satisfaction to know he is doing his
"bit" when so much is at stake."

Referee

NOE GIVES NEW
TO

'Alma Mater' Name of Song
To Be Introduced

Friday

STIRRING

WORDS

Professor Cotton Noe, poet and educator, has presented to the University a new college song, "Alma Mater."
Professor Xoe wrote this several
years ago, but only recently composed the music, which Lawrence A.
Cover, musical director, has harmon-ized. Professor Cover will officiate
next Friday at its formal introduction
to the students in chapel.

1

The now college song is to be ono
used for more stately purposes than
'IJail. Kentucky." and other college
songs which have become known as
he University's pet songs for football
rallies and student gatherings.
Tho now songs follows:
') shrine of ov'ry student's heart,
"Our Alma Mater, gravo and gay,
What temple wrought by magic art
"Can rival dear old U. or K.?
"Majestic stand her stately hallsj
"I lor fiag Jloats proudly In the
'breeze;
walls,
"How dour her
liar sacrod
"How love enshrines
trees!
Chorus.

"Yes. White and Blue, so tried and
true,
Tho Freshman class completed Its
election or class officers in chapel, "Wo lovo thy halls and campus, too.
yesterday, at noon, with tho following
shall forovor and a day,
Miss Helen Taylor, Bowling
result:
"Dear Alma Mater, U. of K."
Green, vice president; Miss Isabella
Karl
Illchiuond, secretary;
Dickoy,
tho years sped swift away,
hero, treasWallace, tho sinoko-stue"Whllo hero wo sat at learning's
urer.
feet,
"The troasured wisdom of a day
NOTICE, MASONS!
"Has often proved a blessing sweet,
"Thus mom'ry loves to linger hero
"Mid scones that never can decay,
The Masonic Club will moot Thursday night at 7:l.' in tho Law Depart- "Within thy hallow'd products dear,
O. (J. WALKIOIl.
"Dear Alma Mater, U. of K.
ment.

Admits

Mistake

That Caused Glorious
Fray To Be Scoreless

PUNTING FEATURES
(By Thornton Connell.)
When those torn and shattered,
brave ibut battered wearers of our beloved Blue and White plodded off the
bruised grass of a gridiron that had
never before last Saturday afternoon
seen a finer display of Wildcat spirit
and determination against antagonistic and superior bone and muscle,
they bore with them the big end of a
score.
nothing-to-nothin-

PROF.

WILDCAT WARRIORS

BY
i

g

The "Dig Red Team" from Miami
knew and was experienced in the gentle art of "smashing 'em." In the first
quarter, In the first few plays following the kick-of- f
which began that
glorious fray, they went thru the Wildcat defense like the murderous Bodies
must have gone over the frontier of
But
little, but spirited Belgium.
what Belgium did to Germany, the
Wildlats did to Miami. Kentucky
stopped that "Big lied Team."
Thrills
a movie
studio, Saturday, and the Wildcats
had been extras who wore used only in
a pinch to put in a punch, there would
have been no hot and harassed director imploringly megaphoning them to
"Put in a Punch! Put in a Punch!!"
For of punches there were
The livest thrill of all probably
came in the first quarter. Beanpole
McVey, fullback and original jack- knre ne bniis01. rrom Miami, hurled
n
,wss (5ay rliano(l toward
the wnmlorillK porker, gathered it up
habit
aml ran but right here old
stalks in upon the scone. Conscientious referee, Fred Hnmm, who likes
to keep the game clean awl fast, and
blows his whistle
who sometimes
when lie shouldn't, saw McVey step
toward the line of scrimmage and then
pass, it was a toui, nut tno wuisiio.
a toot of which moans that the ball
has become dead, should, not have
been blown. If It had not been Captain Brlttaln could have either demanded a penalty or accopted a gain.
And Gay's gain was a touchdown.
Hamm admitted his bono after the
game in which ho fried Kentucky's
chances when ho sounded his tootor.
nut rules aro rules and the referee's
habit has not been broken.
From this time on both tennis
defense. A punt- played an eagle-oyejnS duol botween tho two kickers on- sued and from It Gay came out
scathed.
Hard To Believe.
Followers of scrimmage and spao- tutors at tho t wo preceding games find
this difficult to believe, for most o&
the kicking done heretofore by Augus.
or out of
tus has been cross-eyespiraln
These wonderful
bounds.
booted by tho mystified legman were
If Stoll Field had been

d

* 1

Pae

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Two.

STRAND
beautiful to watch an;I wore nil Hint
saved Hit? Wildcat bacon.
A
change In Kentucky's llno-uwhich
has boon contcmplntcd since
tho initiation of the season, proved
vory effective. It was the shifting of
nrittnln from fullback to loTt guard.
From this position our Western whirlwind was nble to Jerk a passage thru
Miami's powerful line and throw her
backs again and again behind tho
crimson forwards. Hed Adair, who
played full for the entire game, also
fought n good light. He tackled well
and hit tho line like an unleashed
demon.
Jimmy Hedges evidenced his usual
skilful headwork in piloting the team.
He used excellent judgment, when it
came to handling punts.

as they dashed out on the

lively

DENTIST

Held or battle between hnlvcs nnd followed the cunning Mr. Floge, assist-

ant cheer loader, thru the weird

FOB STANLEY

gyra-

snnke dance made charmtions
ing by their presence. The boys took
whirl too,
a lllng at the serpentine
Is gone thru with every
but theirs
game.
To see those graceful goddesses of a
t:itc noted for its beautiful women,
"orgpt the bonds of conventionality
uul display college spirit equal to
hit of the warriors or the gridiron,
alone worth the time and
roe to the spectators and the
rlcp of black defeat to the "Rig Red

DR. J. T. SLATON

SMITH

127

The

line-u-

who went to center. Riddle
ran back. punts in a manner sufficient-- ' Wildcats
ly dexterous and brilliant for him to Miami

Score by Periods.
0
..- -

0

0

0

0

0

00
00

Shanklin
Substitutions Wildcats:
i- - Walker. F'iddell for Hodges, Moore
for Downing, Downing for Dempsey.
For Miami Robertson for Blalk.
Time of Quarters 15 minutes.
Hamni, of Konyon: Umpire,
or Ohio State; Head Linesman.
.'bley, of Vauderbilt.
Ref-cce-

and Classmate
Honor to First
War Victim

Instructor
Do

,

MORE

WILL

FOLLOW

service was held In chapel Tucs-- '
day morning, by tho faculty nnd stu-- I
dents of the University, to commem-- i
orate the memory of Stanley Smith,
the first of Kentucky's students to
give up his life in the light for democ
racy.
Uoy,d, acting
president,
Dr. V.
said that this service was not only n
duty but n privilege, and was history
in the making. Students in years to
come will revere the nnme of Stanley Smith because of his patriotic act.
Likewise will they honor all students
services to
who have offered their
their country. A compiled record of
.1
these students and graduates Is now
being kept by the registrar.
W. T. Lafferty, dean of the College
of Law. of which Stanley Smith was
a student, said: "This morning we
are confronted with a new realization
that war Is being waged. The last few
months have in some degree impressof war, the
ed us 'the declaration
free use of money (Congress having
voted seven billions of the people's
money with no dissenting voices), and
the mobilization of troops. Hut all
this appears but a great play going
on behind the scene. Now, today, we
are impressed. We begin to add to
tho casualty list. One from our midst
has been taken. If this war is to conyear, you may know
tinue
next fall, many of the hundreds of
men who have been killed or sent
back home wounded. We mention
this not to depress, anyone, but to impress the fact Wi at our activities must
go on."
Speaking of Stanley Smith, he said
that as a student and a man, Smith
was strong, able and courageous, bid-- j
ding fair to do muoli in his chosen
A

.s

Team."

i

Hood-tide-

Miss Laura Spur r
Dancing Studio
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS HALL
Dances Wednesday and Saturday Nights at 8:30
Teaching Wednesday and Friday Nights and every Afternoon except Monday
Special Rates to University Students

VaDA MEADE
"Superior Vaudeville"

ALL NEW BUT THE NAME
NEW SEATS
Same Management, Same Classy Shows
"If a Laugh Was Worth $1.00, You'd Leave Here Rich"
Boxes, 35c, 50c
Prices, 10c, 15c, 20, 30c, 35c

PHONE

612

John MaeKensie, follow classmate
of Stanley Smith, told of Smith's on- trance into the University last fall
Smith, "Tiny,"
ar.d of his popularity.
as he was familiarly known, enlisted
as a yeoman when war began, and was
stationed off Newport. R. I. He sot
sail on the S. S. Wilkes for France,
ard was lost in foreign seas one week
ago. No details as to his death have
been received.

AT THE ADA MEADE.
With a stage full of stunning girls,
brimful of melodies and snappy
dances, the patrons of the Ada Meade
will bo introduced to tho Marselles
on Thursday.
There are six girls.
Every one of them is pretty and clevor
and knows how to dance. Adelaide
Francis, tho "Grafanola Girl." Avho
comes here from Cincinnati, whore
she starred on 1!. F. Keith's bill, is
an added feature. Ono of tho drollest
events In vaudeville should bo enjoyed by Ada Meade goers In the appearance or tho Wlldhats in their
musical act. More laughter Is guaranteed in tho present action of Kono,
Keyes nnd Melrose in their novelty
singing, talking and acrobatic act.
Allman and Sykes, suave entertainers,
eloso tho bill with n Hinging and piano
net.

$1.01 Per Year

CHEAP8IDE

Ofllcr lioiirn, 8 n. m. to

fl

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in. t'linnr

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Bfll--

Per Copy

The College Boys' Store
CO.

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INCOIU'ORATED.

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"WEAR FOR YOUNG MEN AND MEN WHO STAY YOUNG"

EVERYBODY EATS AT

Uncle Charlie'
YOUNG MEN
HART, SCHAFFNER & MARX
Clothes For Style and Value.
better ones; they're made right and priced right;
sport suits and overcoats,
the styles are the latest ideas in
rejular sacks or full skirted overcoats anything you want we see
Vou can't lind

d

Hint j ou get it.

BETTER MAKE IT TODAY.

Kaufman Clothing Co,
C D. Calloway

INTERESTING LAW SOCIETY.
The Henry Clay Law Society meets
ery Wednesday evening at 7:15 in
'e Law College. Every man and
woman who has one or more classes
hi law is invited to become a member.
Utc.dance this year has been unpre- .
Interest is at
t

Kentucky Kernel

For any kind of dentnl service call on

of n

Downing,

012

5c, 10c. and 15c.

Admission

and summary follow:
Maryvllle.
Wildcats.
Sexton
A "Sauer" Pickle.
Cowning. D.
Left End.
Fun, too, was furnished by Jimmy
Stoll
and a
tub called Saner. .Murphrec ..
Left Tackle.
Whenever Jimmy was downed, "old
Heakley
..
obesity" would waddle over and sit niittain
Guard.
down on him. It looked like the elc-- j
Lcrt
.....
Peronne
pliant was tring to smash our snap- "ompsey
Center.
ping terrier. Jimmy would twist and
Mittendorr
squirm and spasms of wrath would flit T. Downing
Right Guard.
over his usually angelic countenance.
Sauer
Hut his was wasted eneregy. For he IJastln
Right Tackle.
was forced to await the pleasure of
Dlaik
the pickle. And, by the way, sitting Hcber
Right End.
on people was about all Sauer did.
Ilurk
Relics of brother Gip were seen in Hedges
Quarterback.
tho Downing huskies when they
Treadmore
doubled up on poor old McVey in the Walker
Left Half.
last quarter and got about all that'
Munns
was left of him. Three of our dear Gay
Right Half.
freshles were sent in the game in the
McVey
final
frame. Riddle for Hedges, Adair
Fullback.
Shanklin for Walker, and Moore for

gain recognition and hearty applause
from the spectators.
Shanklin also
played well, especially on the defen-- j
sive.
Sterling ''Cupid" Dempsey, whose
steady and brilliant work in the middle of the Wildcat line for the last
three yonrs has gained him an envious reputation in Southern football
circles, was the only man taken out
of tho game on account of Injuries.
His 'knee was severely twisted shortly after the fourth started and the
pain for a time was hard to bear.
Dompsey's work at center thruout the
game with the Uuckeye boys has
never been excelled on Stoll Field.
Flitting Fairies.
"Away with precedent," shouted

Home of Paramount Artcraft Goldwyn Pictures.
High-clas- s
that's why they cost more.

Open from 10:00 A. M. to 11:00 P. M.

&

Co

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146 WEST MAIN STREET

A

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Mr. M. Levy the cuttings and fitting being done right on our premises.
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Suits and

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-

Lexlngton, Kentucky.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Ben Ali Theatre

Be"t

Best Music
Prices 5 and 10 Cents

OLD STATE MAN DIES.
HONOR
GRAND

PAID M'VEY BY
FORKS PEOPLE

New President Gives Farewell Message To
Club
TALK IS ENCOURAGING
from Grand
Ills departure
Forks, North Dakota, where for the
last eight years he had been the executive head of the University of North
Dakota, to come to Lexington to assume the presidency of this University, Dr. Frank L. McVcy was tendered n farewell dinner last Wednesday
evening by the Commercial Club of
Grand Forks, which was attended by
several hundred representative business men of that city anxious to pay
tribute to the high regard In which
the distinguished educator is held as
a teacher, citizen and man.
Addresses were made by a half
dozen leading citizens of Grand Forks
who have been closely identified with
Dr. McVey, and by President Lewis F.
Crawford, of the State Board of Regents, and Harry C. Evans, who iwas a
member of the Ford peace party to
Europe in 1915. W. P. Davtes was
toastmaster, and after formally expressing his regret at the loss of President McVey to the city and State, introduced the other speakers of the
evening.
President McVey, in replying to the
expressions of the speaker, said: "No
man could have had more good said of
him and I am almost ready to believe
some of it may possibly be true,"
which sally brought a good laugh. He
recalled the elaborate formal banquet
with which he was (welcomed Ito the
presidency of the university, and said
lie guessed he had been a trifle stiff
when he came to the position, but in
the eight years, he guessed he had
become a little more genial., "I guess
can say a few more swear .words on
provocation," lie said, and I smoke
more cigars, and I have accumulated
some of the other little vices that
mark men among men in the inspiring
atmosphere of the West.
"It takes a little time to learn not to
be afraid of the horses, but I was inspired by the motto engraved on
Washington's sword 'do right and
fear no man.' So if there is any reason I Have found a place in your
hearts It is because I had tried to do
the right thing. That which Is nearest my heart is the University of
North Dakota, and you have made it
very hard to sever the ties here.
"The attitude of you here will determine the future welfare and usefulness of the University," said Dr. McVey. ''If you look upon It simply as a
business asset, it will not reach its
best purpose. It must be a beacon
light to hold up to the highest things
The men
Tor the city and the State.
who are to control and to teach must
bo left freo to think for themselves,
for if they are hampered in any degree, tho University can never pros-peIt is for ybu of Grand Forks to
see that the institution comes to its
full fruition. There must 1e the wildest and most universal tolerance and
the men, those who are to lead, must
liavo tho right to express themselves
after having arrived at conclusions
thru sincere study, oven .when their
Upon

1

Raymond Llchonor, Hopklnsvlllo,
died suddenly October 11. Mr. Llchonor was a student In the University
from 1908 to 1911. He was a chemistry major, and since leaving tho University, at the end of his Junior year,
lias hold a number of Important positions In Now York and Detroit.

W.

ENGLISH MAJORS STAR

The Lexington section of the American Chemical Society held its
annual meeting nt the Experiment Station Wednesday, Ootober 12.
A trip was made through
the new
sewerago and disposal plant, the
workings of which were explained by
"Milef Engineer Johnson.
The party
was conducted from the Experiment
U:.tion to the plant in machines
loaned by members of the society.
The trip was planned and in charge
)f J. S. McHargue, secretary of the
(wington section.

forty-secon- d

5ECIL

JAKE

GETS COMMISSION.

B. Marlins

P. B. ROBARDS

Barber

COLLEGE

SHOP
WITH ORIGINAL SKITS

The Closest Shop to' University

iOYS'

TAILOR

Suits Dry Cleaned and Pressed.
Cleaning
$1.25
$ .35
Suits Pressed
..

HAIR

War Program Is Feature of
Social Meeting
Club
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152

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CHEMICAL SOCIETY MEETS.

Page Three

TAPS

A war program was the feature of
the first social meeting of tho English
Club, which was held Friday evening,
at the home of Ruth Matthews, on
North Limestone. These social meetings will continue thruout tho year.

Martialled by Professor Farquhar, a
battalion,
drill wias given by a
with Major Piper in command. Everything in Butt's Manual and a great
deal not In It, was attempted by the
feminine forces. The competitive drill
had to be called off, since the green-eyemonster appeared in the ranks,
and threatened to rout the troops in a
feminine
Under the direction of Professor
Farquhar, Professor Dantzler, John
Price. Mildred Graham and Eliza Spurrier, five original plays, each bearing
on some phase of the war, were pre-

S. Limestone St., Lexington, Ky.

r

Sam Gullo

to voir
Hair Cut

25c
Geo. T. Martin Barber Shop
139 EAST
llHNOtncnt

MAIN

0ii.

PROGRESSIVE SHOE
REPAIRING SHOP

NTKKKT

Work and Prices Always

My

I'liiirnix llolrl

Keep Me Busy.

1'I.AtN. SIIOWKH AND
TUKKISH BATHS
COI Jt C'HAfllS
of Service

ltrt

140

South Limestone.

co-e-

TUG O' WAR PICTURES
FOR SALE.

J. D. PURCELL CO.
LEXINGTON,

or Moosnick.

See Planck

IN
NEWEST FALL
SUITS, DRESSES, COATS,

d

hair-pullin-

Cecil Jake. Owenshoro, who was a
student at the University three years
ago, has been appointed a petty officer
in the navy, according to Information
received here by friends. Mr. Jake
joined the navy about three months sented.
"The Trials of a Slacker," featuring
ago and only recently has been called
Lee McLain In the title role, with an
Im'nto active service. His almost
r
support, was the curtain-raisemediate promotion testifies to his
followed by a screaming comabllitv as a seaman.
edy entitled "The Girls They Left Behind Them." Next on the prgoram
GRADUATE OF '17
Sole Survivor,"
was "Cupid
ENLISTS IN SERVICE in which Mr. and the easily starred.
Slappey
Another of Kentucky's boys lias en- "Five Fair Favorites' 'in "No Man's
tragedy, closed
listed In the fight to save democracy. Land," a
the siiow, for the masculine continRichard M. Green, Stamping Ground,
a graduate of the University in June, gency, who had planned a skit, "The
overin the aviation Meeting of the Censors," were
1917. has enlisted
and refused to
come by stage-frigbranch of service. Mr. Green planned
Moosnik,
to enter the University of California face the audience. Bernard
of his sex,
but instead has entered a camp for in- to save the reputation
two
tensive training in the art of flying. came before the curtain and read
letters which brought 'home the horrors of war to all present.
views do not fully meet your own.
Refreshments which had not the apTheir viewpoint is necessarily differpearance of war rations, were served,
ent from that of mere business relaof Women called "taps"
tionship. By getting together and then the Dean
meeting adjourned.
will be little and the
studying things out there
cause for anything but harmony.
"The things that will save this na- STOCK-JUDGIN- G
TEAM
tion after the war are the universities.
ENTER NAT'L CONTEST
The next step In world progress is In
science and for that you must look to
team of the UniThe
The men who are
the universities.
versity, the members of which are V.
the leaders In the training camps are
R. Galbert, C. L. Morgan. F. L. Lancasthe youug men who have gone out of
G. Stewart, with Professor
you will have to ter and J.
the universities, and
J. .1. Hooper, left yesterday for the
look to them In even greater degree.
National Dairy Show at Columbus,
So you should keep open mind and
Ohio, where they will participate In
tolerance so that their work shall go
tho National Students'
on unhampered.
Friday.
"It has been a privilege to know the Contest.
In 1912 Kentucky students won the
strong men and this community
virile,
or seven silGrand Forks Is a great contest, and took live out
of progress.
ver trophies offered. In subsequent
little city, and North Dakota is a truly
great State that has not yet come into years the University has held second,
her own. Tito State is misunderstood rourth and sixth places. Students from
thruout tho Nation, misunderstood all parts or tho country tako part In
now In tills war, but it will become the contest.
known for what it Is. I bollovo thoro
should be promoted a public campaign
PADUCAH CLUB TO MEET.
for the vigorous, growing Stato and
community, for am most eager that
Tho Paducah Club will meet in
you should have tho best from all
In the Stato or North chapel Monday, October 22, nt 12
points and that

Patronize

KY.
MODES

SKIRTS and WAISTS.
Pleasingly Priced.

Our Advertisers

Your Attention

r,

all-sta-

FOR A FEW MOMENTS
F
YOU
PLEASE THAT
ARE INTERESTED IN
IS--I-

WHAT IS GOOD AND

ECONOMICAL
AND

FALL

IN

WINTER WEARABLES

THIS NEW IDEA SHOP BEGAN PROVING
TO THE UNIVERSITY

MEN TWO YEARS

AGO THAT IT IS USELESS AND FOOLISH
TO HELP PAY THE BIG RENTS AND HIGH

F ALU TIN FIXTURES OF STORES WHEN
BUYING CLOTHES.

stock-judgin- g

THE REMARKABLE

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HATS, CLOTHES, UNDERWEAR.

nnpppHgnnpnvji

1

ROUT. MITCHELL. Jr.
Dakota In which I have had tho privi- o'clock.
lege to live and bo u part there shall
continue to develop tho best thoro is
In life." Lexington Leader.
Patronize Our Advertisers,

WW'""

FALL

mmmmmmmm

* 4.- -.

Page Four.

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

The Kentucky Kernel
I'libllnhctl every Thursdaj throughout the College year by the student body
of the Unhcrslty of Kentucky, for the benefit of tho students,
alumni and faculty of the institution.

The Kernel appreciates the many kind expressions
and commendations which it has received from faculty
members and hopes that they will see fit to add their
names to the subscription list.

EDITORIAL STAFF.
Estill D. Woods
Miss Eliza M. PIggott
J. Thornton Council
Miss Eliza Spurrier
Miss Mildred Graham
Charles Planck
Frederick Jackson
Sam Morton
Lee MoLcan
John J. Lonian
Mrs. F. O. Mayes
Virgil Chapman
Miss Virginia Helm Mllner

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

.

Managing Editor
Associate Editor
"Squirrel Food"

Sporting Editor
Feature Editor
Law
Agriculture
Engineering
Philosophian
Literary Societies
Patterson Hall
...

REPORTERS.
Henry Grehan.

Miss Margaret Wilkinson.

BUSINESS STAFF.
Business Manager

Eugene Wilson

The Kentucky colonel

says,

now

that the world's scries

Is over, and
W. W. situation settled, we will

the 1.
turn our minds toward freshman pot
itlcs, suh.
Lykelle Poem.
The referee kicked the game away,
Though hard the Wildcats fought.
A touchdown he stole from 'Gustus
Gay,

The score was nought to nought.
But there is no derision,
We like his rank decision.

Just Ask the Profs.
great many students' answers are
like Quebec founded upon a bluff.
A

Real

Co-Ed- s.

spirit which aroused itself in chapel
last Friday increased during Saturday's game, and
reaching a climax at the end of the first half, exhibited
itself in a novel manner, when the gentle
brought to a point of admiration for the dauntless Wildcats which they were unable to restrain, laid aside the
bonds of precedent and wending their way to the middle of Stoll Field, showed the boys what football spirit
The

old-tim-

e

co-ed-

s,

That's Rig