xt7h445hdm85 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7h445hdm85/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19650702  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July  2, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, July  2, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7h445hdm85 section xt7h445hdm85 Inside Today
Readers discuss the students for a
Democratic Society, pro and con: Poge

IS. IE ER'Rr JJE J
University of Kentucky

Vol. LVI, No. 120

Two.

Four rages

LEXINGTON, KY., FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1965

Students picket meeting
to discuss Viet teach-i- n
A large group, made up primarily of law students and law professors, picketed Tuesday night s
joint meeting of the Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS) and the Campus Committee on
Human Rights.
Purpose of the meeting was purportedly to

Editorial cartoonists from around the
nation have piqued and depicted the
war in Vietnam: Page Two.
The Rare Book Room in the Library
has many interesting and intriguing
displays: Poge Three.

Kernel

$

The Lexington Junior League's annual
horse show, now in its 29th consecu-

tive year, starts Sunday: Poge Four.
Saturday classes sometimes inspire
poetry for both students and professors. Pjgo Four.

trr

said, ". . .and as long as we still hold on to the
principles of the Constitution (we must remain in
Vietnam).
"We belong in Vietnam and the communists
do not," Bush said.
Dr. Edwardo Hcrnandcx, a professor in the
Modern Foreign Languages Department and a
native Cuban, denounced the communists and
seemed to imply that the SDS was tainted by
communist infiltration and control.
.

t

j

1

'V

News Analysis

jv

)

.(Ju.;..
i

ax
(

He referred repeatedly to the Abraham Lincoln
Brigade, which the American Communist Party
sent to aid the loyalist forcer during the Spanish
Civil War in 1937, as typical communist tactics,
i.e., of using names of famous Americans in their
work, although he failed to make a connection
between the Spanish Civil War and the SDS.
The SDS, which is the student branch of the
League for Industrial Democracy, an organization
oriented toward the Socialist Party, has recently
been active in civil rights work in the South and
in social and welfare work in the slums of the
North.
A reporter for the New Republic recently dewithout
scribed the organization as very loose-kna real set of goals and organizational structure.
The SDS has been especially active in slum work
in Ohio and New Jersey.
The most recent teach-in- ,
held in Washington,
D.C., was sponsored for the most part by the SDS
chapter at the University of Michigan. Such academic giants as Hans Morganthau, Authur M.
Schlesinger Jr., Clinton Rossiter, and Max Lcrncr
attended the meeting.
Undersecretary of State McGeorge Bundy was
scheduled to speak at the teach-in- ,
but cancelled
his appearance at the last minute.
The pickets at this week's meeting on campus
were concerned that both sides of the Vietnam
issue would not be presented at the proposed
teach-in- ,
even after Sherer assured the group that
freedom to speak at such an event would be open
to all University professors and that selection of
the speakers would not be biased.
The pickets had a number of different protest
signs, examples of which read "U.S. Can't Be A
Paper Tiger," "They Fight Now For Your Safety
Tomorrow," "Peace Creeps Go Home," "Support
U.S. Policy," and "Contain Chinese Now Or
Later Some Dunces Say Never."
As a sidelight to the unexpected furor over the
meeting, Sherer commented that "you certainly
can't say the students on this campus are
it

The Kentucky Kernel

Dr. Hernandez makes his impassioned

speech.

have been to discuss plans to organize a teach-i- n
on American military and political policy in South

Vietnam.
The meeting, however, rapidly turned into a
farce as the SDS chairman of the meeting, Bill
Sherer, tried to establish order.
The meeting, which began later than its 8 p.m.
scheduling, had to be moved from Room 109 in
the Student Center to Room 309 in theSC because
of the lack of space. It was estimated that about
J5-8people attended the meeting.
Sherer was beseiged by a barrage of questions
from the pickets before he could establish order
at the meeting. When he tried to bring order,
Sherer, a research assistant in the Behavorial
Sciences Department in the Medical Center, was
0

apathetic."

asked:

"Isn't this the Students for a Democratic
Society? Can I speak?"
"Yes," he answered, "but not all the students
are democratic."
"And some aren't students," someone quipped,
status.
referring to Sherer 's
Sherer announced at the meeting that the SDS
and the Campus Committee on Human Rights
would hold another joint meeting at 8 p.m. Tuesday night but tltat the meeting would be closed
to everyone except the organizations members
and those who wish to join.
(Sherer said that a $3 fee is charged to join the
non-stude-

SDS.)
Several

of the law students heckled Sherer
with charges and insinuations that SDS was a
communist-fron- t
organization and the SDS members in various parts of the country were responsible for phoning and harassing the families of servicemen killed in Vietnam.
They also queried him on his military status,
has no right to criticize
hinting that a
American policy in Vietnam, whereon one person
in the meeting rose and said:
"Well, I'm a veteran and I think you should
let the young man organize this meeting.
Ring I. Rush, a second year law student, requested the flour the only parliamentary procedure followed at all consistently during the entire
meeting and set forth his ideas on American involvement in Vietnam.
"We are committed to South Vietnam," he

A

)

,.

A

AA

LJ

Kernel Photos by Dick Ware

Bill Sherer asks for SDS recruits.

'Foxes' a success
A

Review

By ROBIN WHITE

Last week with Lillian Helhnan's "The Little Foxes" the Centennial Theatre gave Lexington its second taste of theater-in-the- round.
will be held secret until he dies,
Charles Dickens, the director,
and so Regina does not lift a
has given the audience the joy
finger when moments later Horof seeming to be an unseen charace suffers a heart attack and
acter on the stage itself. By sitting
dies.
so close to the drama the audience feels more a part of the play
Regina shows her true colors
than if they were sitting hundreds and bribes her brothers into letof feet away. The actors in turn ting her have a bigger share of
can use facial expressions and the profits. With the thoughts of
movements more to an advanwealth wrilling around in her
head, she tells her daughter that
tage.
The entire cast made use of they will be going away to live
all techniques of arena theater off the siils of the land.
and gave a magnificient performAlexandra, who has guessed
ance. Elizabeth Franz, asHegina,
that her mother had a hand in
gave the role all the vengence
her father's death decides not to
and fury that a
add any more to those who have
woman possesses.
for years stood around and
Peggy Kelly and Bill Hayes
watched the Hubbard's make
domiwere supurb as Birdie, the
money out of the troubles of
nated wife, and Oscar, her overothers. She declares that she will
bearing husband.
leav e and then w ishes her mother
Robert Shy as Ben Hubbard, a
good night and hopes that she
Robert Pitman as Horace, .Howisn't afraid to live with the deeds
ard Enoch as Leo, and Elizabeth
that she has done.
Hoagland as Zan rounded out a
The second coined) of the Cenperfect production.
tennial Summer Theatre series
Miss Helhnan's play revolved
around the Southern Hubbard opened in the Cuignol Theatre
family. The family had made its last night with the production
"Oh Dad, Poor Dad, Mamma's
money from "cheating poor niggers on a pound of bacon." From Hung You in the Closet and I'm
his meager beginning they saw Feeling So Sad."
the chance to acquire big wealth
Resident actress ElizaUth
by establishing a cotton mill.
Franz, plays her second lead in
The raising of the necessary two weeks as she portrays Mafunds brought all the bars down
dame Resei)etal,a wealthy widow
in this seemingly happy family.
w ho becomes involved in arious
Regina was determined to have comic activities with her
her share of the money and to do
family.
so she had her sick husband
Theatre Business Manager
brought from a Baltimore hospiGeorge Dexter said approximatetal, by her lovely daughter Alexly 133 tickets will be available
back to the happy houseandra,
for each production in the Cuighold.
nol Theatre. As the productions
When Horace, Regina's husare being "central staged," an
band, wouldn't put up the money, innov ation in w hie h the audienc e
Oscar and Leo decided to "borris seated on three sides of the stagow " Horace's bonds and thus
is limfor a bigger ing area, seating capacity
cut themselves in
ited, Dexter said.
share, but Horace found out.
He made the mistakeof tilling
Persons who wish to reserve
seats for various eifoiniances by
Regina about his discovery and
also that she was to tell no one telephone may do so by calling
about this. He tells her that this 232.2200, extension 2111.
money-grabbin- g

v

hotel-stayin-

non-vetera- n

:

1

The Kentucky Ken if J

King I. Bush asserts the U.S. Is "committed
South Vietnam."

to

g

* THE VIETNAM GAME; ESCALATION

cartoonists pique, depict war in Southeast Asia
Ve.c.oTKo

"v

'

MV'

yy

;

Le Pelley In the Christian Science Monitor

Tall man in deep water.

Mauldln in the Chicago

Sun-Tim-

'Now we play game called escalation."

Escalation

Haynie in the

Courier-Journ-

Letters

al

To the Editor:

.

;

York in the Louisville Times

'And if the natives shoot you in the back, they're
probably members of the Communist front."

Crook in Newsday

WWWWW The Kentucky Kernel
Summer
JKJl

JcL

JkJL

JvyL

JTl

Nuix-JT-

JKJi

JJL

University of Kentucky

ESTABLISHED 1894

Sandals

!

FRIDAY, JULY 2, 1965

Kenneth Gheen,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

Published at the University of Kentucky's Lexington
week during the school year except during holiday and
weekly during the summer term.
Entered at the post office at Lexington, Kentucky, as
under the act of March 3, 1879.
Subscription rates: yearly, by mail$7.00; per copy,

campus four times each
exam periods. Published
second class matter
from files

n

in

ENDS TONIGHT

John Wayne
Also

SATURDAY

"MCLI NTOCK"

"LILIES OF THE FIELD"

HUGE FIREWORKS

DISPLAY

"FOUR
FOR

5

By

A

tticnne Aigner

3rd Feature

$ 10,95

(Hit?

mark forrest

lutwnrittj i'lftfjt

U. of
OHIO STATE
OHIO U.
BOWLING GREEN S.U.

KENTUCKY

MIAMI U.
PURDUE U.
U. of FLORIDA

wwwwwww
n
jFa

jTa

TEXAS II

ONlVf RIAL PICTUftt

jtjc

jCk

yy.

jQt

$C0 Huge Aerial

Fireworks Display
"Son Of Sampson"
Sat, and Sun. Nights
SUNDAY MONDAY
JULY 4-- 5
--

1
CF

III ELVIS PREbVeY
III
III

ROUSTABOUT
TFCHNICOlOt

MAMOUNT

IEUASI

The University has made
amazing progress toward the
mainsteamof college activities in
the last few years. Three years
ago, a "panty raid" was pulled
on campus two years after the
fad had gone through the other
universities.
Today, a group of students,
the SDA (Students for Democratic Action) are organizing a
"teach-in- "
to protest the United
States' policy in Vietnam. This
is just two months after it has
become a dead intellectual fad
elsewhere.
Due to increasing evidence of
communist aggression and the refusal of the North Vietnamese and
Red Chinese to negotiate, it has
become apparent that America
has no other choice (than to continue fighting) if it is to stand
upon its principles.
I suggest these belated "intellectuals" devote some of their
angry energy to the study of history. They are behind the times
anyway and here might find some
hero to ensconce. Perhaps Neville
Chamberlain would fit this role.
His action in signing the Munich
Pact in 1939 and proudly stating
"Peace in our time" could be
their motto and guide.
Don M. Gash
Arts and Sciences Junior
1

must deplore the tactics used

by some individuals in disrupting
the Students for a Democratic
Society (SDS) meeting last Tues-

day evening.
It was implied by some that
SDS planned to present a onesided picture of the American
policy in Vietnam. Actually, the
SDS plans to show films of the
debate.
People to whom 1 have talked all
agreed that McCeorge liundy presented an excellent case for the
Administration. Certainly proponents of the Administration's policy cannot be displeased with
Hundy's performance.
Likewise, any debate
by SDS on this campus
would give fair hearings to all
sides, including supporters oft he
Administration, as well as advocates of a tougher policy in Vietnam.
have an unpleasant feeling,
howev er, that the
elements are more interested in disrupting than in holding fair debate. hope that will be shown
wrong in this feeling.
Hubert V. Franipton
Mathematics Graduate Student
Hundy-Morganthe-

sx)ii-sore- d

1

right-win-

1

1

g

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, July

news shorts

L

total of 3,819 students have
registered for the summer session
at the University, Charles F.
Elton, dean of admissions, has
reported.
This figure represents about
500 more than last summer's registration, and does not include
persons who will attend various
seminars and shoit sessions
throughout the summer on cam-

f

4

L

U

t

'...

t

I

'

if

v: -

7'

V

.

'ex

In addition, the community

y
.

hand-lettere- d

resemble their finished printed
counterparts.
Another display is an exhibit
of miniature books, including a
tiny Bible, a version of the "Night
Before Christmas," and a small
copy of the Inaugural Address of
John F. Kennedy.
To historians interested in
Kentucky's beginnings, Mrs.
Shine has bound copies of the
Mirror, a newspaper which was
started in Maysville in the 1790's
and which later became the Palladium.

it

life.

"It's amazing," Mrs. Shine
said, pointing to a warrior in full
dress, "that he could have drawn
these pictures from real life.
Think what a remarkable feat
that must have been."

For relaxation and friendly competition;
bowling af the Wildcat Lanes r

try

7
ill
I

f

X

Rates (The same in all bowling

Reasonable

d

FOR YOUR COMPORT

OPEN: From noon to 11:00 p.m. daily
2:30 p.m. to midnight; Sunday 7 p.m. to

Saturday

HELD OVER!

AIR

Protection
Investment

"m rimit"

Phone

'

254'-195- 5

i

II
it II
I
1

1

ah,

if
i ri III i
A V if
I

II

ii

I

S

i

i

1

1

Famous Name Shirts

I

1

Shirtdresses and
Sportdresses
Cotton rrints from

h

l

V

CONDITIONED

Pjiuhshhi

Savings

Located behind the Wildcat Grill on Euclid Ave.
Except:

In

I

I

lanes in LVington)

ts

AIR

I

I

hand-lettere-

Your Agent For
LIFE INSURANCE

n

WILDCAT BOWLING LANES

Conkwright, whose
of book pages closely
lay-ou-

Neil Sulieh

4.

Room-especi- ally

to printers, journalists,
and artists are displays of original works by VV. A. Dwiggins,
designer of the Caledonia and El
Dorado type faces, and P. J.

made mostly of Indians from real

Three University law professors participated in last week's
National Conference on Law and
Poverty, cosponsored by the Department of Justice and the Office
of Economic Opportunity, held
in Washington.
The purpose of the conference
was to discuss the legal problems of the poor, various methods
for meeting the problems, and
opportunities for finding new or
extended programs through the
OEO.

M

Vt

I

Other displays and assets of
the Rare Book Room are equally
as interesting.
Mrs. Shine indicated the fascination the Room's contents
hold for many people:
"One day a student came in
here and took out the copies of
the Mirror," she said.
(This was not the first news"I saw him poring over the
paper in Kentucky, however. The
first was the Kentucky Gazette,
papers for the longest time, and
first published in 1787, here in about 10 minutes of 10 a.m., 1
went over and asked him if he
Lexington.)
had a class that period.
The Rare Book Room also has
"He said, 'Yes, I didn't reaa portfolio of copies of drawings
lize what time it was,' and rushed
that Swiss artist Carl Bodmer off. He said he had been
reading
drew when he and Prince
the ads in the paper.
of Germany visited the
"And, you know," she said,
United States in 1832-3"I can see why he spent all that
The drawings, copies of which time just reading the ads. They 're
are now valued at $6,50C, were very interesting."
Maxi-millia-

colleges have reported an enrollment of 1,015, a gain of 421 over
last year when only five colleges
were in operation.
The community college break-

down includes 311 at Northern
Community College at Covington; Ashland, 216; Ft. Knox, 133;
Southeast at Cumberland, 67;
Henderson, 60; Prestonburg, 143;
and Elizabethtow n, 85. The latter
two colleges began operations
last fall.

Rare Book Room holds
dime novels, chant books
The Margaret I. King Library's Rare Book Room holds a
wealth of information and intriguing displays of interest to almost everyone.
The Room, furnished with
posh carpeting, fine old bookcases, and comfortable chairs,
houses such valuable items as a
15th Century chant book,
on vellum; a 10th Century edition of the Koran, the oldest book in the collection; and
papyri bits dating from the second century.
Dime novels, which the
Room's director Mrs. Hill Shine
said surprises visitors, are shelved
on a bookcase made in the early
19th Century.
Mrs. Shine noted that the
books, which were popular in the
late 19th and early 20th Centuries
among the younger set, are deteriorating rapidly because of
the cheap paper on which they
were printed, while the older
books in the collection, printed
on vellum (or animal skin), are
preserving well.

ing members

pus.

-

'

Vi'.'r' J

Also of interest in the

Invitations wire sent to leadof the bar. representatives of local community
action programs md professional
and business people who deal
with the kk)i.
V. L. Matthews Jr., dean of
the College of Law; Frederick
W. Whiteside, professor of law;
and Eugene F. Moorey, associate
professor of law, attended the
conference from UK.

A

II

-

l3-- 3

2,

11 p.m.

--

(j

I

Ifn

FRANIC

and

j

SLMATRA

CONDITIONED

TREVOR
STARTS

TONIGHT

racing from

Ingmar Bergman's
v

7;

fill

J

the toe of

Ml
r

o

the Italian "Boot-tthe tip
of the
Swiss Alps!

7:00, 10:00

AND
bold

work,

touched

with genius!- "- Tim Woo.

IfJ

jr

INGMAR BERGMAN'S

J..

i.'

J.

wracs

trrrn
-v

r.

tnifi

W

SWl

WYIO

W WINOEU

triii.mn

DkM
MAVIS

W

t JOStPH

coion

y

I

ROBSOK

ev dc

UNOON

luxi

I

SF

u.&::.i

i

"nuw ma

Jr'i

f

j
MARX

Ii

M

MA

.

aiiiwiiniii.,

IonMI

At: 8:23

ivv'-- '

i

u

$"

Limt

4

ii

lmbry',"0n"ThC'mpu

""

3,1

ij

ui-i- -

Across from Holmes Hall

y

I

j

1

.ii

i

r

........ v

.

.

i

s.

x

s

* A

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, July

2, 1965

29th horse show,
largest of its kind,
to run July 0

i

4-1-

By NANCY LOUGHMDGE
Sunday is the opening date
set for the Lexington Junior
League Horse Show. This show,
now in its 29th consecutive year,
is the largest outdoor horse show
in America.

In addition to being the
show of its kind, it is also
rated as an Honor Horse Show
Asby the American Horse Show
sociation. This rating, given only
to the very best shows, has been
awarded to the local one four
years in a row.
meet
During the seven-dathere will be six afternoon performances and six evening shows.
These will include hunter classes
on Sunday through Thursday afternoons and a Saturday matinee
for equitation and show horses.
The evening performances will
debut on Monday evening and
run through Saturday night when
the trrand champion will be
named.
The hunter classes are especially interesting because they
contain the finest riders of this
type in the country. Lexington is
noted for its excellent hunt country and the best riders from the
area and from other parts of the
United States will be competing
for honors over intricate courses
of jumps. These classes cannot be
beaten for excitement and good
horsemanship.
The evening classes will feature the best juvenile riders in
the country as well as the finest
and
horses in the
categories. There will
also be hackney and harness ponies, road bikes, and walking horsy

sylvania College doccnt program,
restoration of historic Morrison
music program,
Chapel,
Manchester Street Center, and
Workshop,
the Opportunity
w hich is the only sheltered workshop for the physically handicapped in Kentucky.
All work on the horse show is
done by members of the local
Junior League, thus making it the
only show in the country run exclusively by women. The Junior
League is an international orgawomen.
nization of
The Horse Show will be held
at the Trotting Track in both the
infield, for hunter classes, and on
the Red Mile Track in front of
the grandstand. Also on the
grounds is ample parking at the
new Red Mile Club House, which
includes a dining room and cocktail lounge.
There will be over 400 riders
and o er 600 entries in the seven- civic-minde-

.roV,

i

i

A

...

.L

ii

s

-

r-

:

'

'

'.--

iS

,v

ty

''

d

A

three-ffaite-

mare goes through her paces at an evening performance.

d

day meeting. An estimated $30,000
in prizes and money will be
awarded during the show.
Returning to compete in this
year's classes will be last year's

grand champion My
My, owned by the Dodge Stables
and ridden by Earle Teater, one
of America's finest showmen.
Tickets for the meet may be
purchased from any member of
the Junior League through Saturday and from the Horse Show
Office at the Trotting track.
General admission tickets can
be bought at the gate for $1.25 or
in books of six for $5. 15. There are
also reserved seats available for
each evening performance, as well
as box seats. These may be obtained by calling the Horse Show
Office. The afternoon performances require only general admission tickets.
.

five-gaite-

d

Lexington offers fine entertainment on many occasions, and
this is one of the better events.
It is certainly one of the most
worthwhile from the standpoint
of proceeds going to deserving
civic projects.
Cochran is Acting Chairman
Dr. Lewis Cochran, professor
of physics and acting provost,
was named acting chairman of
the Department of Physics for
July and August.
In other action, the executive
committee adopted a resolution
endorsing the $176 million state
bond issue which will be on the
November ballot.

Lexingtons First Summer Theatre

thiee-gaite- d

five-gaite-

"""""

A

v-t-

d

"

i

jTi

I'

-- "

es.

This horse show is sponsored
by the Junior League of Lexington
and all proceeds from the performances will go to chairty. In
the 28 years of the show's operation the Junior League has turned
over $300,000 back into the community through various civic
projects.
Among these are University
baby
Laboratory,
Language
health, YWCA girls camp, Tran- -

J'wlF-- .

'7

--

J

'7

Fine Arts Building

W1

University of Kentucky

-

v.:

'r-- r

V

if? L.'lt

u- -

OH DAD, POOR DAD, MAMMA'S HUNG
YOU IN THE CLOSET AND I'M
FEELING SO SAD
July

1-

-4

Controversial 'Theatre of the Absurd' by Arthur Kopit

Saturday class
inspires poetry
EUGENE, Ore. (CPS)-T- he
University of Oregon reports a
growing dialogue on the subject
of Saturday classes which has
now reached poetic levels. The
following note, the university
says, was added to a test paper
after a Saturday morning exam:
Hoses are red,
Violets are black,
Saturday morning
Should be spent in the sack.
According to reports, the professor returned the exam with a
low grade and this reply:
Your paper I fear
Is full of conjectures.
Instead of complaining,
Attend a few lectures.

Outstanding horse and horseman win awards.

THE IMPORTANCE OF BEING
EARNEST

Ritchies

CLASSIFIED

Oscar Wilde's brilliant comedy

ALTERATIONS pff dresses, skirts,
and coats for women. Mildred
Cohen, 255 E. Maxwell. Phone
254-744- 6.

SPECIAL
Steak
Baked Potato, Tossed
Salad, Homemade Rolls
Char-Bro- il

$129

or prior
Karmen Ghia convertible
good condition. Call

WANTED

1959

$1.19

STUDENTS

1960

From 4:fc0 to 8:30

in

211EJpT

254-286- 3.

252-667- 2

1.
Portraits of Quality
Made To Please You
The Subject

July

'

July

"--

1

ust

August

5--

8

August

And so the truth is broadcast, through the air. where
it can't be stopped by walls and guards, up to 18 hours
a day to millions of people in the closed countries
behind the Iron Curtain.
Will you help the truth get through? Whatever you
can give will mean a great deal to a great many people
behind the Iron Curtain. Senu your contribution to:

12-1- 5

Light comedy by Noel Coward

August

19-2- 2

A new version of a perennial favorite

curtain isn't soundproof.

n uu curuuo, uua iuoj, i.il iw wuh, n.

29-Aug-

i

TEN NIGHTS IN A BARROOM

lidUiu

5

Luigi Pirandello's disturbing drama

1

PRESENT LAUGHTER

The Iron

22-2-

The great modern opera by Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht
Presented by the Guignol and Opera Theatres

RIGHT YOU ARE (IF YOU THINK
YOU ARE)

o
5

and

17-2- 0

A contemporary classic by Thornton Wilder

TT
-

THE THREEPENNY OPERA

THE SKIN OF OUR TEETH

MAIN

Spengler
Studio
PHONE

11

Cafeteria

X.

222 South Limestone

8--

July

For reservations call:
252-220-

0,

Ext. 2411

Admission $2.00
Students

Thurs. and Sunday

Ctrri 8:30

$1.50

*