xt7hdr2p639x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7hdr2p639x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19231026  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 26, 1923 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 26, 1923 1923 2012 true xt7hdr2p639x section xt7hdr2p639x The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
VOL XIV

ELECTION

LEXINGTON, KY..

OF OFFICERS
WILL

OF FOUR CLASSES
BE HELD OCTOBER

30-3-

1

and Freshmen to Vote
October 3; Juniors and
Sophomores 31

Seniors

5

SENIORS FOR PRESIDENT

New Ruling Makes Petitions For
Presidents of iCIasses

Necessary

The senior and freshman class elec
tions will be held October 30, while
the juniors and sophomores will cast
votes for their respective officers
October 31. The voting this year is
to be by secret ballot, and the students
may cast their ballots from 8 o'clock
in the morning till 4 o'clock in the afternoon.
The petitions for the following candidates for class officers were filed in
the office of Dean Melcher Saturday,
October 20, before 6 o'clock and are
therefore eligible for electiom: For
president of the Senior class: Sidney
B. Neal, Law College; Troy L. Perkins, A. & S.; Dell Ramsey, Engineering College; Gardner Bayless, A. &
S.; Sneed Yager, Law College. For
vice president: Louise Connell, A. &
S.; Mary Peterson, Agr.
Four nien have been nominated
from the junior class for president:
Tom Ballantine, Law College; W. O.
Billiter, Engineering College; Thomas
Clore, Agr.; Turner Gegg, A. & S.,
while Miss Esther Gilbert is up for
vice president.
Emmet MilwardA. & S., and Albert
Kirwan, College of Engineering, are
the candidates for sophomore class
president, and Janet McVey is nominated for vice president. Robert Montgomery, Law College, is up for class
treasurer.
Clifford Fuller, A. & S., and Charles
Watte, Jr., College of Engineering, are
up for freshman class president, and
Marie Pfieffer for vice president.

NATIONAL

ADMITS
Alpha

PAIf-HELLE-

KY.

Delta Theta Becomes
Member of National
' Council

At a meeting of the National
Council of fraternity women,
held in Boston, October 22, Alpha
Delta Theta was admitted as a national fraternity.
Before a frtarenity is
admitted into the council, five chapters must exist which are voted on
when the convention is held.
Alpha Delta Theta was founded in
1919 at Transylvania College and now
the chapters number five, which are
located in the following Universities:
Alpha, Transylvania; Beta, University
of Kentucky; Gamma, University of
Cincinnati; Delta, University of Illinois, and Epsilon, at Butler College,
Indianapolis.
National
is always delirious of admitting new fraternities
into the council and best wishes have
been extended the local chapter for its
growth and development.
Beta chapter was organized in 1922,
with the following girls as charter
Lucy Wilson, Opal Cox,
members:
Margaret Cole, Esther Higgins, Alma

ic

ic

(Contiaucd on pag

4

'

I.)

Professor Wm. S. Webb,
University of Kentucky,
Lexington, Kentucky.
Dear Professor Webb:
Will you please say to the
freshman class for me, as chairman of 'the general committee,
that their action and interest in
this matter has given me keener
pleasure than any one of the fine
things which have happened in
connection with the entire campaign. I regard it as meaning
more for our dear University
and old Kentucky than anything
that has happened at the University during my recollection.
If they put this thing through
as outlined in your letter, it
means the beginning of that finer and greater day for the University and old Kentucky, for
which many of us absent ones
have been hoping for years. If
this thing is done, this freshman class will go down in history as one of the greatest benefactors of the University, and
the most potent power for good
in the state in recent years.
Cordially and faithfully yours,
' C. C. CALHOUN.
--

Z7

I

IS QUOTA

OF FRESHMEN

Yours to win,
HERBERT GRAHAM,
Secretary.

Freshmen and All New Students
Are Eligible For
Subscripion

Week

j

fund $40,000 the name of the
basketball stadium to stand as a me
morial to them for all times and the
satisfaction of having done a great
thing for the University of Kentucky,
which after 1927 will be their Alma
Mater, is the aim of the freshman
class of this institution.
The campaign to raise the fund will
start Tuesday, October 30, and will
have its termination on Friday, just
before the "tug of war" between the
sophomore and freshman classes.
Forty teams of two persons each will
comprise the working force to put the
drive over and with every freshman
interested in thx bier movement, there
is little doubt that on the eve of the
y
game the word
great
will be spread that the freshmen have
gone over the top.
The need of the additional amouni
is known by everyone who has taken
any interest in the building program
and to the class of '27 goes the honor
of giving the last bit necessary before
actual construction on the stadium
will start. Already a good showing
has been made on the basketball
building and at the end of the present
football season, work will begin on
the large stadium.
The button illustrated in the cut on
this page is the badge of honor to be
worn by the subscribes to the fund
during the campaign. Among the ones
who are eligible to subscribe are the
freshmen and about two hundred new
students enrolled in this institution
for the first time in their school career.
The quota of every new student is
set at forty dollars, this to be paid in
four years and the person pledging the
amount may get anyone to subscribe
all, 'or any part of the pledge, thus
eliminating the necessity of paying it
personally.
Any information In regard to the
drive may be obtained at the Y
Centre-Kentuck-

--

K-

SEVENTEEN CHOSEN FOR
YEAR'S
120

STROLLER

PLAY

Students Try Out For
gibility to Try
Cast

Eli-

Booth Tarklngton's "Seventeen" has
been selected as this year's Stroller
play. It is a cleverly written comedy
charming and amusing from start to
finish.
It was played in New York
several seasons and has met with great
applause all over the country, being
the prize play of 1918. For the past
few years the Stroller productions
have been of a deeper type but now
the organization has become so effi
cient that it feels 'Competent to put on
a play of lighter vein a much more
difficult undertaking. The new Stroll
er material combined with that al
ready tested in the past three years
will furnish ample dramatic talent for
a superior and select cast for "Seventeen" which bids fair to excel all previous Stroller productions
Stroller tryottts were held Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday and a large
number of aspirants gathered at the
Little Theatre to have their dramatic
ability passed upon.
The tryouts
were in the form of one-askits, no
skit having' more than five characters.
About 120 students tried out during
the three days ancLamong this number
several actors of real ability were discovered.
The three best plays will be reproduced on amateur night, October 31,
and the best of the three awarded a
prize. At this time the names of
those making Stroller eligibility will
be read.
K

IMPORTANT NOTICE

Beginning Friday, November 2, the
y
Circle will sell blue and white
K
streamers for people to wear to the
game and also for decNOTICEI
orative purposes for automobiles. The
Proofs for pictures in "The Ken- - proceeds will be used to buy a satin
tuckian" will be shown in the office K banner. Show your loyalty by buyy
from 3:30 to 5:30 daily.' Numbers 450 ing your streamers from the
to 1175 will be ready Friday.
Circle,
(Continued on page 8.)

Members of the faculty will give a
Hallowe'en party for the students of
the University of Kentucky on Wednesday, October 31 in the Armory.
Games will be indulged in and dancing
will be another means of diversion in
the boys' gymnasium.

I would like to see you just
sweep us off our feet like the
Wildcats handled Washington
and Lee in the last half. Why
not make us back numbers when
it comes to doing something big
and fine for old Kentucky? Make
the state gasp with your determination to do things. Where
is the man who is afraid to try?

DRIVE TO START OCT. 30

"The Meow" is Name Given to
Magazine to Appear Next

K

Now you are surrounded by
conditions that might reasonably
be expected to beget considerable loyalty and enthusiasm.
Just how far above the Kentucky average you are we of the
alumni have yet 'to learn.

of '27

PUBLISHED OH CAMPUS

HALLOWE'EN PARTY

Six months ago the undergraduates of the University blazed a trail unknown in collegiate
circles of Kentucky. They showed a spirit many times bigger
than was rightfully expected of
them.

FOUR YEARS

COMMITTEE

MEETS ADMINISTRATIVE

Greetings:

Basketball Building To Be Dedicated to The Class

COLLEGE COMIC TO RE

editor-in-chie- f.

IN

WELFARE

Twenty-seve-

HaASKET
)AUI-lyUILDING

$40,000

No. 5

The Class of Nineteen

rUILDS

K-

Within" the next two weeks there
wjll appear upon the campus a hu
morous magazine, known as lhe
Meow." This magazine is the out
come of a long felt need for such a
publication at the University of Ken
tucky. In nearly every college or un
iversity of any size in the United
States there is a humorous magazine
that has been very successful. There
i9 no reason why such a publication
will not be a success at the University
"The Meow," taking its name from
the well known wail of the wildcat,
will endeavor to give to its readers a
wealth of material that is original and
humorous. It also aims at the constructive as well as the humorous.
The executive staff consists of
Wickliff Moore, ant editor; Clarence
Moseley business manager, and RayThere is
mond Kirk,
also a large staff of associate editors
and assistants that limited space prevents us from announcing at this time.
There will be solicitors who will
approach every student on the campus in the next few days who will get
the signatures of those who want the
Meow. The success of the magazine
will depend upon the 100 per cent subscription to the publication.
Every
student can do much toward making
the Meow a permanent thing on the
University campus.

OCTOBER 26, 1923

Su-K-

State-Cent-

COUNCIL IN DISCUSSION
Student Problems Brought
fore Body For Consid- eration

Be,

MARY PETERSON PRESIDES

Faculty

Pledges
Committees Are
pointed

;

Ap-

The student welfare committee of
the University
Women's Club met
jointly with the members of the Men's
and Women's Administrative Councils in the Little Theatre Wednesday
afternoon at 3:30 for the purpose of
finding in what ways that organization may be of most help to the student body.
Mrfry Peterson,
president of the
Women's Council, presided over the
discussion. Dean Melcher and Dean
Jewell made short talks. Mrs.
Mrs. Boles and Mrs. Maxon
expressed the club's desire of being of
some practical help to the students,
as well as bringing them into closer
personal and social contact with their
professors. Plans of helping with fraternity house management problems
and of appointing an "official mother"
for each home were talked over.
The members of the council spoke
for the entire student body in their
expressions of gratitude for the interest of the Woman's Club, and promised to take their plans back to their
various organizations for further consideration.
After the business, of the meeting
was finished, tea and a pleasant social
hour was enjoyed.
The members of the Student Wel
fare Committee, to which all students
are urged to go with their problems,
are:
General chairman, Mrs. Ralph Max- on, doo i. ransyivania rarx, pnone
Far-quh-

1813-- y.

Girls not in dormitories

Mrs. T.

(Continued on page 5)
--

Y.

K-

W. TRAINING SCHOOL
CONDUCTS

LECTURES

Miss Van Sant Jenkins to Train
Girl Reserve Ad-

visors
Miss Van Sant Jenkins,
of New
York City, a member of the faculty of
the National Y. W. C. A. Training
School, is at the University for the
purpose of conducting a series of lectures for the Girl Reserve advisors.
The lectures have been given every
afternoon during the past week in the
recreation room at Patterson Hall.
university
There are about thirty-fiv- e
women enrolled in th ecourse.
Briefly the program is as follows:
Monday, 3 to 5 The Girl Reserve
Movement, Its Scope and Purpose.
Tuesday, 3 to 5 Girl Psychology.
Wednesday, 3 to A A survey of the
community.
The principals upon
which an organization of girls is built.
Thursday, 3 to A Organization of
the group.
Friday, 3 to A Program planning.
Saturday. The University girl9 entertain the advisors of groups in surrounding town.
On this day from

Su-K-

(Continued to Page Four)

* THE KENTUCKY

Faff Tw

Alumni Notes

KERNEL

Betwixt Us

titer Alumni Sisraiary
I

CALENDAR
Philadelphia, Oct. 27. Dinner- Hotel.
dance,
In honor of Centre football team.
Detroit, Oct. 27. (Last Saturday
iRegular) dinner, Dixieland Inn.
Business meeting and election of
officers.
Lexington, Oct. 27. Luncheon
12:30, Lafayette Hotel.
New York, Nov. 11. (Second
Regular) luncheon.
Tuesday
Cafe Savarin.
Bcllcvuc-iStratfor-

d

Dividends in happiness preferred
have been paid regularly by each of
the alumni clubs in the last year. The
especially those outside
members,
Kentucky, having counted the organization one of their finest investments.
Those living within the state fully appreciate the dividends paid after they
have gone a little farther from home.

among the supporters of the move
William Thomas Carpenter graduat
ment. In the next three weeks every
active alumnus should be talking about II ctl from the General Staff School, Ft
the drive and its imports with every Leavenworth, Kansas, in June, 1923
other former student. Unanimity is retaining the rank of major. He is
a great asset.
now professor of Military Science and
The Student Loan Fund, Basket-ha- ll Tactics, University of Michigan. AdFootball Stadium dress 520 Walnut street, Ann Arbor,
Auditorium,
and Memorial Statue for President Mich.
Patterson constitute a broad appeal.
'01
One of thcic objects' and the underlying thought, a bigger and finer Uni"Due to the fact that I was changversity, arc sure to appeal to every in- ing position I had rather let the stadividual. With the University at its dium fund slip my mind. Here is a
best the state is sure to prosper.
small contribution and probably I
shall make another like it 'in six
months, when wc have conclusive eviCLASS STANDING, OCT. 23
dence that something is to come of
the movement. I am now chief engineer with the Imperial Electric Co.,
Dues
Number
Percent Akron O." Henry T. 'Bcwlay. adLiving
Paid
Class
dress, 25 Mayficld Apts., Twin Oaks
1
"69
Road.
3
74
1
100
75
'06
100
,1
77
1
25
"I am enclosing two checks one
4
79
33.3 contribution in full to the stadium
3
'80
1
fund and the other for dues. Please
'81
sec that I receive the Kernel." I am
5
'82
1
sorry, to have been tardy in my con83
4
4
tribution. I wislv your colleagues the
best of success in your efforts to put
3
'85
over this campaign for a bigger and
2
'86
better University of Kentucky."
87
2
50 Wylie B. Wcndt, professor Civil Engi4
2
88
neering, So. Dakota States School of
4
'89
62.5 Mines, Rapid City, S. D.
8
90

October 17, 1923. Mr. Parmer was
an honor graduate in Agriculture in
1921, and is farming near Midway,
Ky., where they will make their home

'IS
"Enclose check for dues. I am
again in Chicago and wilt appreciate
it if you wilt kindly have the Kernel
forwarded to me, including all back
numbers. Every good wish for the
success of the University and the Ascx-- ,
Ray Lovercombe
sociation."
Holmes &
supt. of construction,
Flinn, No. 8 So. Dearborn St., Chica-

after a wedding trip east.
Iff UjmIm aMIseA aAaA Wf easjlM WWmm
B
nlfflU BjSTOT nMI mm WBV1
aaXaa
Aafl BH iBHWillBJ gVLgAA IBBHW &a BMBflal
VWW
fw BnBBPB
IVlflf
gtt

hmfey te take

Yews fer

go, III.

BJVBBI

smi pan.
'Xentaeky.'

even my

better

Wm. B. Thornton, Carrier Engineering Corporation, 750 Frelinghuysen
Ave., Newark, N. J.
"I look forward eagerly each week
for the Kernel as I am interested in
any move at the University. May she
have a very bright future." Corine
Martin, Franklin Ky.

"Indeed I am glad te have a part in
this great work. It win be a gnat
calamity if we do net g ever the te?
Here's hoping and
with a wheep.
wishing for the beet for our beloved
Alma Mater." BriHa May Lleyd.
Mies Lloyd is librarian and teacher of
French in the high school, Beckley,
W. Va., p. o. box 5N.

'22
Miss Ollic Depcw, who received her
B. A. degree in '22 and M. A. in Eng17
Clyde M. Hubble is farming and lish in '23, was winner of the second
speech condealing in livestock, near Somerset, prize in the four-minu- te
in Augducted by the Courier-Journa- il
Ky. Address p. o. box 498.
ust. Miss Depcw lives at 424 Linden

Walk, Lexington, Ky.
"I certainly want to keep track of
the Wildcats this fall so send the Kernel." G. W. Baumgartcn, with West- inghousc Electric Co., address 920
Franklin avenue, Wilkinsburg, Pa.
Gerald Griffin and Miss Flora Lee
Winfrey were married in Louisville,
October 16. Mr. Griffin is a special
After
writer for the Courier-Journa- l.
November 1. Mr. and Mrs. Griffin
will be at home at 1509 Hepburn Ave.,
Louisville. Ky.
"Please find enclosed application for
my reservation on the 'U. K. Alumni
Train.' I am here at U. K. doing
graduate work but am glad to have
the Kernel sent home." W. R. Hutch-crso-

'IS

Elmer Wcldon is superintendent of
city schools at Corbin, Ky. He married Miss Kate Ransdcll December
31, 1919. They have a little son, Elmer
Wcldon, not quite two
Durward
months old.
"In compliance with your scvral reIn this alumni body as well as in all
quests I am pleased to enclose conothers is the individualist who is like
tribution to the Greater Kentucky
the "independent" in politics, never
campaign fund. I greatly, regret that
If all
recognizing an organization.
it is impossible at this time to give
men were like him the world would
more but the spirit is behind this small
retrogress faster than electricity ?ocs
gift and I hope some day to be able
down a copper wire.
to show my interest in 'Kentucky' to
a greater extent. Please see that the
Some of the alumni now are talking
reaches me regularly."
'Kernel'
about an additional organization namPrentice Sladc ex- -, with Howe, Snow
ed the "Help Al Club." To be eligi1
20
91
,5
& Bertles, Grand Rapids, Mich. Adble a man must have done a favor for
"Am enclosing chock to cover dues
'07
9
dress 553 Wealthy St., S. E.
that will pay the 92
a fellow
and pledge to stadium fund. I met
1
9.1
11
'93
enclosing herewith two pledge
"1 am
latter a financial dividend. This
more alumni at Columbia this summer
11.7 cards with check for first payment on
17
2
94
would mean turning over a contract
19
than last and old U. K. was a favor23.5 one. These were not forwarded soon17
4
95
or a new account of business, a rec'
Mr. and Mrs. L. Raymcr Jones, of ite topic of conversation. Best wishes
27.3 er because I was waiting to see if the
3
11.
96
ommendation to a position with a bigfor her success and a 'Greater Ken23.3 project was a success,
6
26
which now North Middletown, Ky., are the par'97
ger outlook or any one of a score
ents of a son, born October 14. Mrs. tucky." Nellie Stone, Ala. State Col38.8 seems assured, and alSo because these
7
18
98
other ways in which cooperation can
lege for Women.
Col25
6
24
'99
cs were secured cn'tirly on by Jones wa9 formerly Miss Marie
be made to count in dollars and cents.
6
22.2 own initiative. These
27 '
00
contributors lins.
23
This kind of fellowship is not unknown
"Please send the Kernel to my office
25.6 have not attended the University but
10
01
39
in several of the stronger clubs. Not- "I shall be happy to receive the Keraddress, 49 Wall street, Room 1201,
23.8 arc interested in the institution.
10
I
42
'02
,
,
able among tnc pioneers is rmtauci-phia- .
City." 'Margaret Tuttle. nel. It furnishes a splendid means of
9.7 hope .these arc not too late to do New York
41
,4
'03
finding out 'who is where.' The preNew York has a large field
16.9 good." Paul C. Grunwcll, 924, 23rd Miss Tuttle is librarian for the law
12
71
'04
'
which is being developed quietly. In
offices of Sullivan and Cromwell. She diction of the 'The Kcntuckian' that
17 street N. W., Washington, D. C.
53
9
Lexington much progress has been '05
I would wield a rolling pin and man20
12
60
06
"Dtie to change in my" address, I also asks- that her residence address age the finances of an
'
d
made in the last few months by a
in the new directory 69, 28th
33.6 regret that I am rather tardy in my show
23
07
68
group who one day may, in all likeliprofessor, is true in part. I wield the
17 stadium contribution.
I am enclosing street, Jackson Heights, New York.
82
08
i 14
finhood, dominate the affairs of state
"Reserve a seat for me on the 'Ken rolling pin and help manage the
30.6 check for dues also. I am now chief
62r
'09
. 19
more than any crowd at Frankfort.
tucky Boosters Express' and put me ances but my husband is not
14.8 engineer of lock and dam construction
13
88
10
So long as the ideals of Kentucky
I married Winfred Payne,
15.1 with U. S. Survey on the lower Ohio." down for pledge to the 'Greater Ken
12
11
79
men and women are unchanged such
June 20, 1923, former instructor in
19.5
18
92
12
Mrs. Scearcc tucky Campaign,' check for first pay- mathematics at U. K., and now at the
George G. Scearce.
a "combine" is acceptable everywhere.
22.3 was Katherinc A. Ward. They have ment enclosed. Should have done this
25
112
'13
University of Cincinnati. I naturally
lOnce it has fuuct:oned for a while in
18 two children, George Gwin, Jr.., eight before but you know how- it is when
21
117
14
this nianner its sphere can be widened
busy. insisted that wc both sit on the bleach
16.5 years old and Edward Manoguc, two. a fellow's far from home and
27
164
15
game, alers at the Wildcat-Bearcto include the whole statu.
20 The residence address is Addison. Ky. The few of us out here are pulling for
29
145
16
the Wildcats to down everything in though wc were a bit afraid some of
16.6
Applications tor mcmncrsmp in me '17
133
22
the South this year, especially the the U. C. students would mob their
uh are not bcine received at this 18
17
17.2
97
'09
'Praying Colonels.' Here's hoping the economics instructor when they saw
18.8
19
101
19.
4
"I am enclosing check for
campaign goes over big." James E. him among the 'Kentucky rooters.'
19.4
27
139
'20
dues and I wish you would sec that
McClellan, Tiltz Eng'g & Equip. Co., We were very proud of the Wildcats.
18.3
153.
28
21
the Kernel is sent me as soon as pos 1112 West 16th St., Los Angeles, Cal. Best wishes for the 'Greater Ken- 15.8
35
214
'22
Alma Mater Loves Them All
Payne,
sible for I miss it. Our work on the
DuckwaW
tucky.' " Luanna
28.8
64
222
Somewhcrcin the U. S. A. is Al, a. '23
stadium campaign was slow in getting
1832 Josephine St., Cincinnati, Ohio.
20
University of Kentucky, Former students paid-7- 7
son of the
under way here, but I hope we arc not
McDanicl and F. B.
G. Ridgely
Mr. and Mrs. Howard Forman, who
who sent his contribution to the Associate members
5
too late to help." II. H. Lowry, recently came to Lexington from the Jones are chemists with the National
Greater Kentucky Fund, five dollars,
Engineering Dept., Western Electric
Buf599
2586
east, are welcoming a lovely aaughter. Aniline and Chemical Company,
which left his bank balance at $12.15. Total
Co., 463 West St., New York City.
Mr. Forman is falo, N. Y. They reside at 1693 Main
born October 14.
institution are
Few alumni of the
The chart above shows that of the
with the L. & N. R. R. Co., and unt:l street.
held in as high esteem by all ac- 2,586 living alumni 594 have paid their
MO
"I must receive my Kernel without
recentlv has been located at Ravena,
quaintances as Utis man. Few have dues for the year 1923-2The dues
fail as it is all I have to connect me
"Find enclosed pledge to the U. K. Ky.
earned such recognition. All those who this year include the Kentucky Ker
fund, with check for first payment
"Enclosed find check for stadium with school and that life that I love.
really know him love him.
nel and the Alumni Directory, .soon thereon." Leon M. Allison, sales enpeer
fund and two dollars, being amount I am; assistant engineer with the I
Across the continent is another to be published., Only two classes gineer, Trust-oSteel Company. Phila- required to put me aboard the 'Boost- Carbon Company." Wm. G. Hlllen,
alumnus whose response was negative. have paid up 100 per cent. The two delphia, Pa. Address 6205 Ilavcrford ers' Express.'
Best wishes for the New Franklin Hotel, St Mary's Fa,
Dorothy Blatz is teaching in the
Rather than be a "piker" as he phras arc 75 and 77, which have one mem- Ave.
University
and the Association."
ed it, he would make no gift to Old ber each still living. The class of '88
"The same thing that 'got' the farm- Anderson S. Gill, with J. C, Cooke public schools, Louisville, Ky. AdHe with four members has paid up 50 per ers throughout the country got me
camnaiuu.
in this
Kentuckv
Oil & Gas Co., Ardmore, Okla. Ad- dress 414 West Hill Street.
diK
would feel like a "hypocrite" for giv- cent and those who passed out with
and I was not able to send pledge dress 129 B Street, S. W.
plomas in '90 have contributed dues card sooner.
are better
ing ix simall amount, he said.
Prospects
I must tell the truth as I know r
Of the later now and I am planning to come back
to the extent of 42.5.
soon I cannot know the truth when
'21
Fortunately in the mind of the avclasses with more members the per- next year and stay until I get my B.
is no such
"I have received your card in re- I sec it. O. P. Gifford.
erage former student there
memories S. in Agriculture. I am for 'OLD
centage is smaller while the
gard to riding on 'The Kentucky
doubt as the latter man lias. In com of 'Old State" must be stronger. We
ALWAYS'y-Elija- h
C. HenBoosters' Express' and am enclosing
It's an overworked faith that puts
paring the size of gifts, how apropos should like to see the classes since STATE'
dricks, ex- Franklin, Ky.
check. Please keep the Kentucky a nickle in the collection plate once a
rank is "but the: 1900
es the verse. "The
their feathers and friends
show
Kernel rolling to me. There are prob week and expects a crown of goM in
guinea's stamp, the man's the gowdt for of the 19th century that they are in a
'13
ably fifteen or twenty 'Kentucky' men the end.
a' that." No man's mite is too small class 50 per cent, too.
"1 am now Dr. Huff, a Palmer grad- and women here in Boston, some of
K
to bring happiness to those who love
So far as we have been notified on- uate chiropractor,
with offices over them attending Tech or Harvard. We
Kentucky and are directing this camly four clubs have started drives for Farmers Bank, Tarboro, N. C. En- hope to arrauge some kind of a
paign.
this year's alumni dues. The four close check on stadium fund and for
Dues arid The Kernel
soon. Best wishes for conhave reported the following results:
dues and please send Kernel to above tinued success of the University and
BACK CAMPAIGN
75 per
Birmingham, 12 members,
One Year
address." Mary F. Huff.
Alumni Association." W. D. "Fats
cent, paid.
II" Thompson, care Armstrong Cork
ConFormer Students Swell Total of
Buffalo, 31 members, 68 percent
Co., 275 Congress St.,
& Insulation
tributions to Fund
paid.
Mrs. George W, Freiheit (Jennie Boston, Mass.
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION,
Schenectady 17 members, 41.2 per- May White ex-- j is now living, in WilThe. marriage of Roy Harold FarResponses to appeals of the cleanUniversity el Kentucky,
cent.
mington, Delaware, 606 No. Van:Buf-en- - mer to 'Miss Louise Halley Marvin,
Kenup squad working in the Greater
Lexington.
St,,' and isks that the Kernel be was &c4eoinizcd at the home of the
38 members, 44.8 'peV
Philadelphia,
tucky campaign indicate that every
address.
mailed to that
former student wants to be counted cent paid.
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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Brownnller, Marc Buettel1 Ralph
Byron, C. Cannon, G. J. Danielson,
E. W, Dare, E. G. English, M. K.
Fahnestock, F. B. Farquharson, J. D.
Fitch, O. E. Guerin, R. H. Hall, C.
T. Harman, Theodore Hatch, A. E.
Howell.

Society
The pledges of Tau Delta Alpha
fraternity cntcrtainc dthe active chapter and alumni with a theatre party
last Wednesday evening. The hosts
for the evening were:
Malcolm
Henry, Robert Bullock, Dudley
Denver DcHavcn, Frank Berry,
Hulbcrt Crowdcr, Carol Fortson and
Chester Malick.

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The Delta Zeta of the University
celebrated their founder
day with a
banquet in the private dining room
of the Phoenix
Hotel Wednesday
evening. The electrical design of the
fraternity emblem and Killarney roses
were used for the decorations. Dainty !:
banquet programs in rose and green,
the fraternity colors, served as place
cards.
was an tftaborate
There
,
menu.

I

Announceme

Chapcrones Dr. F. L. McVey,
Dean and Mrs. E. P. Andersen, Dean
and Mrs. P. P. Boyd Dean Frances
Jewell, Profand Mrs. W. E. Free
MEAL TICKETS
man, Dean and Mrs, C. J.
.
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FRESHMAN
$5.30 for $5.00

Salads

University Lunch Room
I

Mr. and Mrs. W. M. POULOS, Prop.
Lexington, Ky

Corner Lime and Wkislow

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SMOKES

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FOR THOSE WISHING TO RENT A CAR TO DRIVESTQ THE
STATE-CENTR- E
GAME SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 3rd,

Regular Meals

WE WILL MAKE A SPECIAL RATE.

SPECIAL PRICE TO STUDENTS
SOFT DRINKS
SANDWICHES

Drive It Yourself Company

Uneeda Lunch

:

A. B. GUNN, Prop.

NOW LOCATED Between PHOENIX HOTEL and Western Union

Phone

529 South Limestone

The Y. W. C. A. entertained last
Friday night with a delightful Hallowe'en party at Patterson Hall. The
recreation hall was beautifully decor
ated with corn shocks,
black cats and Hallowe'en
colors
Amusing games and contests furnish
ed the entertainment for the evening,
including a trip through the room of
horrors where rattling bones, black
cats, clammy hands, skeletons and
witches terrified the guests. Delicious refreshments of cider, ginger
cakes, apples and nuts were served.
About ISO guests were present.

Caitdles

Home-mad- e

At "HOME OF STUDENTS"

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Alpha Sigma Phi Dance
Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity enter
tained with a house dance Saturday,
October 20, at the chapter home, 218
South Limestone, in honor of their
pledges.
The house was beautifully decorated
with autumn leaves; the lights were
in the fraternity colors, cardinal and
stone. The 'Wildcat Five" furnished
the "music for the dancing. Punch
and mints were the refreshments.
Those who chaperoned the delightful affair were: Prof, and Mrs, L. S.
O'Bannon, Mrs. A. J. Wieman, Mrs.
Emma Gibson, Mrs. A. C. Wallace,
Mrs. O. O. Carpenter.
The guests were: Misses Elizabeth
Wheeler, Martha Duncan, Lucile ColeEdwards, Mildred
man, KatMeen
Cowgell, Martha
Pate, Mary May,
Iva Dudgeon, Virginia Baker, Elizabeth Williams, Marie Pfieffer, Annelle
Kelley, Kathryn
McGurk, Lillian
Rasch, Margaret Chenault, Jane Man-lel,
Gladys McWhorter, Estella
Kathryn McMeechy.
Messrs. J. H. Layman, Marshall
Barnes, Jimmy Reed, Will Milward,
E. DeCoursey, H. R. VanZant, John
Shaw, Layman Mays, Ray Steosser,
Emmet Milward, Al Kirwan, Bowen
Nelson, W. King.
y,

Kel-sa'l-

Tau Beta Pi Dance
The annual dance of the Alpha of
Kentucky Tau Beta Pi, honorary engineering fraternity, was given Friday evening in Honor of the officers
and delegates here for the twenty-secon- d
annual convention of the Tau
Beta Pi Association, and the pledges
to the chapter of the University of
Kentucky.
The ball room of the Phoenix hotel
was the scene of the delightful occasion and was decorated with the
fraternity embiem in a great electric
illumination opposite the entrance.
The programs were dainty white
booklets tied with brown: silk cords
and tassels and marked with the bridge
bent and letters embossed in brown.
They contained the lists of the guests
of honor, the dances, the alumni, the
chapcrones and the active chapter as
follows:
Guests of Honor: R. P. Johnson.
W. P. Kinneman, W. J. Lyman, L. E.
Mallott. E. G. Maddock, R. W. Manly, G. T. McKee, J. M. Mcllvaia,,
Louis Moason, A. D. Moore, E. P.
Moran, R. J. Pyle, H. L. Rusch, S.
W. Scarfe, Ralph Stagg, D. F. Walsh,
C. N. Warficld, E. F. Wicrer, H. D.
Wild, Jr., E. A. Yotf. E. L. Werft,
F. G. Ahwgren, H. O. Anitttem,
Neal P. Isiley, W. S. Becker, R. If,
BcchwoH, W. V.- - Beraart; L. T.

i
BSSSaSS

Bm

Real Service Must Be Engineered
Many of the men whose names are writ large
in engineering history are design engineers; men
like Westinghouse, Lamme, Stanley, Hodg