xt7hhm52hp5r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7hhm52hp5r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky 1962 athletic publications  English University of Kentucky This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. University of Kentucky Football Media Guides University of Kentucky Football Facts For Press, Radio, and TV, 1962 image University of Kentucky Football Facts For Press, Radio, and TV, 1962 1962 2015 true xt7hhm52hp5r section xt7hhm52hp5r ‘   VT; · N Y? vm. <:> ¤-»· ~ .   _ _
iw E     \f}i Um     i HJ   /7“`*?¤. EF
V  ‘ *   yi:     1 M   M Ev-;
· x 4 Q;   1   L: Q ,,.4  
  *=;· V   KV "
    { Al}
’ ‘- . ·*‘"·/A,·.. ’ `~. .
‘ ‘ ’     \
J   /    \
\ Gag"  W ` “’/z?E+?r. \\ _/"’\ \ I
  J \—~//X ~ »- L
  '  " -~  _"/_  - "
  ~    ,5** 
V ww     5   V if 
    A   K V  '*v_.;v .:. _I~t;. Q:@`.    "-`
    ·     ri  
f};;ii‘3;\   j{`_ ,, _»’‘`   V :  
V   Y)   `*¤ pt UB 2 ·V’» 5  
]       ·   rs’ {C,   ' { K, r
f“' ,  gx l ` ff j   s’ . 5**
  {Ax?}     iv?     i   {    
(   I     "   ,    
“ " '`‘‘’' ' ;   "     J {  ~  
      Z j _»  e   i fw ..;;,_
  1   < _   /
  s   — ‘`·‘`’   V»VVV   ""     i  
r·-—~. V   '   5 · ;C . ·’ ; ~ .  
glu/5 M;. . `j·`€·\`;V ~‘   ° _ , V M
"’ · ’>*¢& ”.·>...     —  far.- · .
.~   V#*§i*¢~¢s§i34.;%‘ ‘   ”¢  " ’Z "==‘ *¤‘=iA·¤¤
#@5. Hi', ‘·  .   gr   J S;
§¢···-—. RL       V 4 l ~_\"!. ;;.._.aé ;: L.
  —   ” Ei?  I   {F
           A” ` » ‘  
· .1   `¤'· :>1V¢ *V··     ‘ he VVV.r— ’ J
I · LM   ie    4     .·   ;~ .V      
l { ‘ V`;    EQ, EE. %       · _·;·§?»—,.'% ;·'· »     
 ¢‘ L.   ‘.·4     »‘M— E   ‘       ·‘ ‘.V·‘   V
N},;»,».·{»2_ *7; /4 -.3:    _ #_._> » *!,x·~V;&`_._>’   yp /,.  !<2€n"i._>,:*#’
- I ;, :·<.·»'·¤ if   ·· “ .4, 87-88
Lettermen Lost-Returning ..,......... 26 Travel Plans ............ . ..4.4..4....4,,....... 5
L Modern Record ........,,4....,...,..,.,....... 66 Univ. of Ky. Sketch ........................ 65
{ Nickname Origin ..................,.,..,.... 34
` SPORTS PUBLICITY OFFICE
l TELEPHONE: 2-2200, Ext. 224'I
MISS LINDA HILL SCOTTIE HELT
Secretary Assistant Director
Cover: Allen Brewer Printing: The Kernel Press.
3
\

 ATHLETICS AT KENTUCKY
Kentucky’s athletic program, a well-balanced antl ambitious ac-
tivity featuring inter-collegiate competition in nine different sports, is
organized under the Department of Athletics and a corporation known
as the University of Kentucky Athletics Association. i
The program is conducted without overemphasis or sacrifice of ‘
educational objectives and in strict compliance with the rules of the  
University, the Southeastern Conference and the National Collegiate $
Athletic Association.
A Board of Directors, headed by UK President Frank Dickey, main·
tains overall policy supervision of the athletic program. Dr. Leo Cham-
berlain, vice-president of the University, has general supervision over
the Department and serves as vice-chairman of the Board. Dr. A. D.
Kirwan, one-time Wildcat coach and UK’s faculty representative to the
Southeastern Conference, serves the directors as secretary and Dr. Frank
Peterson, UK vice-president for business administration, acts as treas-
urer in an ex—officio capacity.
Supervising the steady growth and balanced development of one
of the nation’s top athletic programs is Bernie A. Shively, a former
Illinois grid All-American and a veteran of nearly 25 years in the post
of Director of Athletics.
The Association's Board of Directors is composed of the following:
Dr. Frank G. Dickey, Dr. Leo M. Chamberlain,
Chairman Vice Chairman
Dr. A. D. Kirwan, Secretary Prof. john Kuiper
james B. Allen Dr. W. L. Matthews, jr.
Dr. Ralph Angelucci Robert Stephens
Dr. Aubrey   Brown Dr. D. V. Terrell
Dr. Thomas Clark Prof. William A. Tolman
Dr. Lyman Ginger Floyd VVright
Prof. W. W. Haynes jim Daniel (Student) A
- BAIT FOR THE GRADS  
Kentucky will be the homecoming opponent of only one team- l
Georgia-this season. Last year, two clubs—Georgia and Vanderbilt-
picked the WVildcats to help entertain the old grads and in years gone
by the Kentuckians appeared in as many as four such contests during
the same season. UK saw its own string of 13 straight homecoming suc-
cesses ended in 1961 by Tennessee.
4

 KENTUCKY FOOTBALL TRAVEL PLANS
1962 SEASON
MISSISSIPPI at jackson, Miss., Sept 29—Kick0lf 8:00 p.m. CST
( Leave Lexington Delta DC 6 Friday, Sept. 28 .......... 1:35 p.1n. EST
‘ Arrive jackson, Miss. ..........,.,....................,.................. 3:00 p.m. CST
Q (HQ in jackson at Holiday Inn Motel)
  Return—Leave jackson Sunday, Sept. 30 .,.,,.,.....,..,.... 8:30 a.m. CST
Arrive Lexington ...........,........,.,..,..,..,.......... 11:55 a.m. EST
DETROIT at Detroit, Mich., Oct. 12 (Friday)—Kicko1I 8:15 p.m. EST
Leave Lexington Delta DC 6 Thursday, Oct. 11 .... 1:40 p.m. EST
Arrive Detroit, Mich. .............,.............,.,........,....,........ 3:00 p.m. EST
(HQ in Detroit at Harlan House Motel)
'Return—Leave Detroit Saturday, Oct. 13 .,................ 10:30 a.m. EST
Arrive Lexington .........,....,.............,............. 11:50 a.m. EST
GEORGIA at Athens, Ga., Oct. 27-Kickoff 2:00 p.m. EST `
Leave Lexington Delta Convair Friday, Oct, 26 . ..,.... 1:20 p.1n. EST .
Arrive Athens, Ga. ..,.....................,..........,..,.,............... 3:00 p.m. EST
(HQ in Athens at Georgian Hotel)
Return—Leave Athens Saturday, Oct. 27 ...........,..,... 5:00 p.m. EST
Arrive Lexington ......,..........,..,..................... 6:40 p.m. EST i
MIAMI at Miami, Fla., Nov. 2 (Friday)-Kickoff 8:15 p.m. EST
Leave Lexington Delta DC 6 Thursday, Nov. 1 ...... 11:20 a.m. EST
Arrive Miami, Fla. .............,.....,.,.............,.,.....,....,....... 3:00 p.m. EST
(HQ at di Lido Hotel, Miami Beach)
. Return—Leave Miami Saturday, Nov. 3 ........,..,..,..... 2:00 p.m. EST
1 Arrive Lexington ..,........................,............., 5:40 p.m. EST
I TENNESSEE at Knoxville, Tenn., Nov. 24—Kick0ff 2:00 p.m. EST
A Leave Lexington Delta DC 6 Friday, Nov. 23 .......... 2:12 p.m. EST
Arrive Knoxville, Tenn. .,.............,.....................,.....,.. 3:00 p.m. EST
(HQ in Knoxville at Andrew johnson Hotel)
Return—Leave Knoxville Saturday, Nov. 24 ............ 5:00 p.m. EST
Arrive Lexington ,.., ., ...........................,........ 5:48 p.m. EST
5
x

 DIRECTOR OF ATHLETICS
BERNIE A. SHIVELY
Supervising the steady growth and balanced development of one
of the nation’s top athletic programs is the Herculean task being car- `
ried out successfully by Bernie A. Shively.
I·`ew who have observed the untiring efforts of the tall, silver-
haired fornier .-\ll-America footballer in the service of the University
of Kentucky since 1927 and as Director of Athletics since 1938 will argue
his fitness as an athletic Hercules. Not only has Shively guided the de-
velopment of Kentucky as a
nationally-respected p owe r in
- V    V , V major sports, but he has also
  __-`` ( V gained personal prestige through
 ég? Y   l   M " a fair-minded approach to many
    V V ‘//,   a ` pI`O1)1€II1S.
y  ’   During his tenure as Athletic
  I *1   iizi ii ,V_ is  V Director, Shively has directly su-
  ’ VV,-·»   ·V__ _` ``_=,   y V pervised major expansions in
‘     '; Vlnj  "M  Kentucky's athletic plant result-
  ,____       ing from the progression of the
.   fi ,   V       ·,’· school's football and basketball
»    ,WV         A _ teams to greater national promi- .
  hence and increased patronage
  ;~»·v*""”   I by the sports—mindecl public,
'* ttit   /Ar/_     Q A The seating capacity of Ken-
  '’‘‘l     tucky’s football stadium, McLean
,   A   A _ jj,_;__   Stadium on Stoll Field, has been
____  ,.V»—     doubled to bring the current
,,—-‘’‘ `   number of seats to approximate- j
fj; ly 37,500 and on par with most ;
[ £§ other schools located in heavier- 1
· ‘ * populated areas. Powerful light-
ing equipment also was installed i
during the 1948-49 construction  
and a new-type "ioclized" light put up in 1961 to bring night foot-
ball into new popularity. Partly to satisfy the overwhelming number of
basketball devotees, who could not squeeze into the 2,800—seat Alumni
Gymnasium, a 1ong—planned Memorial Coliseum was completed in 1950.
Seating 11,500 persons for cage contests, the four-million dollar Coli-
6

 seum also houses the Athletic Department. More recently, Shively di-
rected the acquisition of a pair of modern, ranch-style living units which
have served as the home of the football team since 1954. "Wildcat
Manor" and "Kitten Lodge" replace three frame houses which the
gridders had occupied since 1949.
4 A large dressing room building and football practice field, used
° since 1955, was abandoned in 1959 to make way for a huge new men’s
dorm. Under Shive1y’s supervision, a spacious new Sports Center was
prepared a short distance away on the University farm to take even
better care of the footballers and spring sports teams. The Sports Cen-
ter is generally regarded as one of the finest sports facilities in the
nation. During the past few months, Stoll Field has undergone a major
"face-1ifting" to improve its playing surface and the view of the fans
sitting in the lower rows of the stands.
All-America Guard At Illinois
A native of Paris, lll., Shively attended the University of Illinois ~
where he was an All-America guard in 1926 on the same grid team `
made famous by Red Grange. Demonstrating a claim to being one of
the finest all—around athletes in Illinois’ history, "Shive" also laid claim
to the Big 10 heavyweight wrestling championship and annexed letters iq
in track before graduating in 1927.
Shively came to Kentucky in 1927 as line coach of football under
. Harry Gammage and six years later was named head of the UK Physi- »
cal Education Department. He succeeded Chet Wynne as Athletic l
Director in 1938. During this period and the years following, he also i
served as track and baseball coach for several seasons and continued
to assist the football staff as line coach until 1944. The next year, 1945,
he assumed full charge of the grid squad for one season before turning
the job over to mentor Paul (Bear) Bryant in 1946.
t The Kentucky Athletic Director is currently chairman of the
’ NCAA Basketball Tournament Committee and for the past nine years
i has been president of the Southeastern Conference Coaches and Ath-
, letic Directors Association. He served as chairman of the SEC Basket-
Y ball Committee for a number of years and is a past chairman of the
l NCAA summer baseball group.
Shively and his wife, Ruth, have two children. Doug was a star end
on the UK grid team for three years ending in 1958 and is now coach-
ing at VPI while daughter Suzanne was a Phi Beta Kappa graduate
of UK in 1957.
7

       1. `VTVCV     VJ?  >V`V’;*VVV>"‘¥iGV¤7¢;¤>V€‘2<;?,» V V V; ,;VV;2V ’‘,,   ,V—,.;..z,¢ V
    J1? VV- ~VT>j/`,Z.?£T}" V .’ ’ K " V. ,V     VVfc , VV,¢$,    ’:‘»”?Vg'V,.:/   2i, U /,’·,   ’
  V.   ;~¢V.> ._,/V V _ >V»•;>V;V%V‘  ’‘,, i. .   , - ~ é/V5§’VKi   Z’VVVilVi.<’I&VVV'~VV€ ~ VV   .    
      V   V ' V V V   /V V  VV  »v-V:,.   .=V; . ”   l ////     ’V; VV‘,/~   VV V   VV
;~»·V;§   V;   V . .,.1; . V V VV _  -   ’ .__.  -:,7 . V . V -V ·.   .V V V V V V V V
EQ  1* V   I . . .kVV / N   ,..-~ V  U     V V V VV r,/, ,~ V _ . V V V V
  V X >   ` ., V       *¢=-.é~,.:;;.‘   ·»·· '    -V    K. V V' V V   .V V
  Va   V V   J V V   .V;»     ..VA;,hv-   .=,_,    ¤.V -·   V * V. V VV ’»’’ V
»     V   VV   l,  ;-;   ```’ V   `    »,,-` V . V .' T .
V . , _  ZZ:-= Vj; _jf V ‘°V-»•A.Vl V- .1.,,,.   __ _V   »:      , \ V V V · .
s   V .   »-=·’   L.   ’·-v· -   V V V V -     ~
_/V . , _ / .    ,,.,. __:   v_ __  (..4 / _ __V V, .> , V .. Z ,  __ V V V
» V — V V V »`   VV    ··-=v     . "VI`-.     V Y V V
.» . VV » » V   `   `-;·   IL VV    ~     V-=-, `   T  ‘ V   V
‘V`   V V x   v-.· ` ‘‘`'  ‘ °   ..‘"' ‘ ‘’‘‘,'   __;_     »_   "V·-    V V V
    V  .31;     - V»=  VVVV “‘ V    . 7-»7 VV-   ._.,    
` ..T   5        `   ~
. - ..:  V··· g     V  ’. 
’ \ I   ,,.       
  V   VV ‘VV· -
' ` V ~ . ` 3*-  R-·:21 `~ V ,» ,
` .   Q_ _ JVL_ .V=%.: { wi?  
-   »_,, V  V
V V  ¤;     .-,;—     1;; 
- V-  #2.. =·‘ V%V€iZ  “.,V Q   .  - ·
·    $2;:1 -    »V > -V<2-  ·~ —    -
  V V     ``‘=’‘‘      VV »   ._._. ,     ;’;‘`  
. §   VV »  . ,4_G .   _/   V j§..:,.¤ , > . . ’
V -" V V-   ‘`:: 2 V »         `r`·     A
f A V -V,,VV   ‘‘VA‘‘’V  V ’  -2 V    V .V V     V
Y .   ,=V’V- V. V Z . .. V V V ' ‘  ‘V--=--·» .      ..V   z<  
f   ·``V     . — V   VV VV   .V:; ·,-»· ;  
  V V   - -     \ ,§,,, H,   . V- I  ..V
  V- V. .V   ‘V’‘   .   ., 3%;.. -4. V ~~V V ·V   V. ‘    
  V"??- `   ·V§:·=··j-     V v   it ' "}' ’¥ * V   V  
  V V V. - 1 ·     ... g 2:-   V   V   ’   V; ;:.V:i: ’‘.V  
ii V‘`‘»‘ V V . V   -V—VV — * ‘°`‘‘   ‘     VVVVVV       VVV V  V VV    
-;V  V V V   _ .     ·»—VV -' .=V·. .V .·'-`-   ·,»*—-.V   '   ` V .    
V »- .VV ' · V V V ‘ ·- ,,·V-   ‘V.'`   .---     VV . fi ‘·=' ? ··’»  
  _V_._   . V     _..V     V-»»     IV     I     VV  
*§iZ;.Z ...»... " »»':r' V V  . ‘ -     -1   A E V V -V   I
  V=V>   V   . ‘ ' — V.   V- VVV- . ' " V A   ¤
  .,,.. J V    V V .
  ` 
  .   -§.

 . I
HEAD COACH CHARLIE BRADSHAW
(Kentucky '49)
(First Year As A Head Coach)
The personification of qualities of inner toughness, outwardly
serious demeanor, quiet determination, confidence and integrity . . .
That`s lientucky’s capable new head football coach in a nutshell.
Youthful Charlie Bradshaw, 37—year-old ex-VVildcat player and
assistant coach, fulfills all these qualities that are the background for
success 2lIl(l goes a step further. He’s an inspirational leader who
exudes the toughness that it takes for those around him—staff and
players—to get the job at hand done in a way that will pay off with
success. His influence already has 1TlZl(l.€ an indelible impression in
relations with alumni, coaches of the state, followers of Kentucky foot-
ball, prospects and players.
The football philosophy of Bradshaw, who assumed his first head
coaching position last january l0 when he succeeded Blanton Collier
as the institution’s third alumnus coach, has been schooled into him by
nine years’ service in an assistant’s capacity on the staffs of UK and
Alabama. Yet, the approach to the game taken by the new ¥Vildcat
mentor is mainly and uniquely Bradshaw in nature.
A positive approach is foremost with Charlie Bradshaw. lllustra- (
tive of his thinking is his simple statement of d€{€I`II1lll2lIlO11 made as .
a comment upon his being hired as Kentucky’s coach: "If I didn’t think ~
I could get the job done, I wouldn’t be here!"
Emphasizes Winning \Vays
. He believes in the direct way of doing things. The emphasis will
be on how to win instead of what mistakes can be costly enough to
4 cause a loss. He has declared that l1e will be fair, sincere and honest `
  with his team but in turn will expect the same from his players. He y
  stresses the pride to be gained from 100 percent effort and of doing
  things right—which he feels to be synonymous with winning football.
, The church and school also play prominent roles in the plan of de-
; 3 voutly Christian (Baptist) Bradshaw.
§‘  Directness and the positive approach sometimes get mixed up with
;  touglmess and extreme rouglmess. While every sign points to the new
  regime as more demanding to some degree in relations with the squad
I .
 Av. 9
,  \`

 011 the Held, Coach Bradshaw sees 11is reputed "tough guy" approach a
little differently than most people. "There’s a lot of difference between
toughness and unnecessary rougl1ness," he explains. "V\’e are going to
° be tough, I assure you. Football is a contact type of game in which you
have to be tough to win and if it takes rouglmess to teach toughness
that’s what our young men will get. \Ve believe young men will put
out just about as much effort as is demanded of them. 1Ve intend to
demand a great deal through strict discipline rather tl1a11 brute force/’
Charlie grew up in Montgomery, Ala., and started his football at
tl1e age of 15 in Sidney Lanier High. Upon graduation, he was at-
tracted to tl1e University of Kentucky and attended one semester in
1942 without seeing any grid action.
After that first semester, he withdrew to enter tl1e Marine Corps.
He served for three years and saw 19 months’ action in the Pacific Thea-
ter. Following his discharge, Bradshaw returned to UK to play on Paul
Bryant's first tl1ree \\’ildcat aggregations. He earned the first of four
§ letters as a center in 1946 and picked up his three subsequent mono-
1 grams as a 165-pound end. Attempting to get in an allowable fourth
l year of co111petition as a graduate student in 1949,,he was ruled ineli-
gible after three games by SEC Commissioner Bernie Moore.
Coached Under Collier, Bryant
Bradshaw remained on the coaching staff as a student assistant for
the remainder of the seaso11 a11d then, in 1950, returned to his l1o1ne
town 11igh school (Sidney Lanier in Montgomery, Ala.) as coach and
coordinator of a junior high i)I`OgI`2lIH—H position he retained until
I chosen an aide on the first UK staff of Blanton Collier in 1954. After
five years as end coach and later offensive backfield coach, Charlie
moved in 1959 to Alabama as a line tutor for Coach Bryant. In this g
position and the11 as offensive coach last year, he gained much recogni- 1
tion for contributing greatly to the Crimson Tide’s success in progress-
i11g to the peak of undefeated National Cl1Z\1I1I)lOH in 1961.
Coach Bradshaw was graduated from the University of Kentucky -
in 1949 with an AB in Commerce and physical education and later was 1
awarded a master’s degree in school administratio11. He married 11is ‘
high school sweetheart, Martha Austin of Montgomery, in 1945 and
they 11ave a daughter, five-year-old Leigh.
The new `Wildcat football chief will be operating under an initial
four-year pact at undisclosed salary.
10

 rl
KENTUCKY COACHES THROUGH THE YEARS
Record
Years At UK C0ach—Scho0l Tenure Won Lost Tied Pct.
1881 Unknown .................................... I 1 2 0 .333
1882-1890 No Competition
1891 Unknown .................................... 1 1 1 0 .500
1892 Prof. A. M. Miller (Princeton),. 1 2 4 1 .357
1893 ]ohn A. Thompson (Purdue) .. 1 5 2 1 .687
1894 W. P. Finney (Purdue) .......... 1 5 2 0 .714
1895 Charles Mason (Cornell) .......... 1 4 5 0 .444
1896 Dudley Short (Cornell) ............ 1 3 6 0 .333
1897 Lyman B. Eaton (Cincinnati).. 1 3 5 0 .375
1898-99 W. R. Bass (Cincinnati) .......... 2 12 2 2 .813
1900-O1 VV. H. Kiler (Illinois) .............. 2 6 12 1 .342
1902 E. N. McLeod (Michigan) ...... 1 3 5 1 .389
1903 C. A. \Vright (Columbia) ........ 1 7 1 O .875
1904-05 F. E. Schact (Minnesota) ........ 2 15 4 1 .775
1906-08 I. White Guyn (Kentucky) ...... 3 17 7 1 .687
1909-10, ’12 E. Pt. Sweetland (Cornell) ...... 3 23 5 0 .821
1911 P. P. Douglas (Michigan) ........ 1 7 3 0 .700
1913, ,15-16 ]. ]. Tigert (Vanderbilt) .......... 3 16 4 3 .760
1914 Alpha Brumage (Kansas) ........ 1 5 3 0 .625
1917 S. A. Boles (Vanderbilt) .......... 1 3 5 1 .389
1918-19 Andy Gill (Indiana) ................ 2 5 5 1 .500 I
1920-22 W. ]. Juneau (\lVisconsin) ...... 3 13 10 2 .560
1923 ]. ]. Winn (Princeton) ............ 1 4 3 2 .556
1924-26 Fred ]. Murphy (Yale) ............ 3 12 14 1 .463
1927-33 Harry Gammage (Illinois) ...... 7 32 25 5 .556 7
1934-37 C. A. Wynne (Notre Dame) .... 4 20 19 0 .513 ;
1938-42, '44 A. D. Kirwan (Kentucky) ........ 6 24 28 4 .464 7
1943 No Team—War Year `
1945 Bernie Shively (Illinois) .......... 1 2 8 O .200
1946-53 Paul Bryant (Alabama) ............ 8 60 23 5 .710
1954-61 Blanton Collier (Georgetown) .. 8 41 36 3 .531
g 29 Coaches in 80 Years—Recorcl for 635 Games .... 351 249 35 .581
F
Q GALS' COACH FIRST UK MENTOR
Prof. A. M. Miller, who became Kentucky’s iirst football coach in l
1892, was chosen because he had learned about the game from sideline
observations while a student at Princeton. His only previous coaching
experience was at a girls’ school in Pennsylvania.
11
 

 \ WILDCAT COACHING STAFF
i _ ~”‘   MATT LAIR
      Assistant Head Coach
l ~ »—  =—--    T \Videly-experienced Matt Lair returns to his alma
  f     mater as the first Kentucky aide ever to l1old the title
    ,. I of assistant head coach. The 38—year-old native of
      _.,;;   ,,_é _, North Middletown, Ky., brings to the staff a back-
      ground of 13 yczu‘s’ coaching experience in high
       Tf school and collegiate ranks. Following play as a block-
  _/         ing back and guard at UK in 1941-42 and 1946-47
  if       _   (after Air Force duty), Lair spent five years as line
  N ~ S. .. Couch at Lanier High in Montgomery, Ala., lTl0V€d to
  Louisville Manual for one season and then became head coach at Parrish
Q High in Selma, Ala. He next worked five seaso11s on the UK stad before
` shifting to Texas A & M in 1959 for a two-year hitch. Last season, Lair was
line coach at Texas Tech and l1is primary duties at Kentucky this year will
be with thc defensive line. Born 5/25/24 . . . Married to former Helen
Davis of Lexington. No children.
  ___= HOMER RICE
f ` if   Offensive Coach
      Entering the collegiate field after a highly-success-
  \ ` ful career as a high scl1ool tutor, Homer Rice is as-
  . fi singed responsibility for making Kentucky’s T offense
  __ at operations go. His 11-year coaching record in school-
fi`_   ·  ; ’ boy ranks was an amazing 101-9-7. Rice-coached
  teams went undefeated in 50 straight games, posted
  seven perfect seasons and annexed nine champion- i
  ships. He was personally recognized with seven  
 “" "Coach of the Year" awards. Rice started his coaching
career in 1951 at \Vartburg (Tenn.) High following graduation from Cen- l
tre College where he was a Little All-America QB. Hc spent the next two `
seasons at Spring City, Tenn., and then took over at Ft. Thomas. In each  
assignment, he produced the best record in tl1e school’s history. I·Ie is a ’
\Vorld \Var II veteran (Pacific Theater), holds a n1aster’s degree from East-
ern Ky. State College, and is autl1or of a hook on “The Explosive Short-T.”
Born 2/20/27 . . . Home town: Ft. Thomas, Ky .... Married to former
Phyllis \Vardrup of Middlesboro, Ky., and they have three daughters-
Nancy 11, Phyllis 9, and Angela 6.
12

 `I
  BOB FORD
  if   Defensive Coach
  A youthful veteran of coaching experience at three
V,  .,3 _,___ ”  ”* major southern schools, Bob Ford joins the Bradshaw
"   staff with a reputation as one of the brightest young
'   defensive minds in the game today. A native of
j ‘’i‘‘ if l_,_.  if  :`i i Wynne, Ark., Bob was center and captain of his
 ‘   hometown grid outfit in 1950 when it captured the
state schoolboy championship. Later, he compiled an
» outstanding record as a center and end at Memphis
State, including selection as the Tigers’ most valuable
player in 1954. He started his coaching career by staying on at his alma
mater for two years (1955-56) as freshman football coach and doubling as
tutor of the track team. Ford then entered military service and spent the
next two years with the U.S. Amiy in the Korean Theater. Upon his return
to the states and discharge, Bob joined the Alabama staff as a line assistant
working principally with the Tide frosh. After three seasons there, he moved
last year to Georgia as defensive line coach. Born 11/18/33 . . . Graduate
Memphis State 1955 . . . Married to former Sarah Hornsby of Memphis,
Tenn., and father of two sons—Robert ]r. 2% and Paul 6 months.
DAVE HART '_
Backfield Coach
W"?     Tough and tested, this 36·year-old Pennsylvania I
    native has deep roots in the Keystone state that make g
1% i f _:_' _    ° :``   him an invaluable coach and recruiter. Dave will l
` ‘=`’` f work with the varsity backfield and help out some
  with the freshmen whose numbers include numer-
  ous Pennsylvania products. For the 11 years prior to
  joining the Wildcats, Hart-coached teams compiled a
.   ' record of 86-18-3. He began his coaching career in
K l V 1950 as backfield coach at St. Vincent College in La-
trobe, Pa., following graduation from that institution, coached at Hurst High ?
{ School of Mt. Pleasant, Pa., thc next three seasons and then took over at
{ lohnstown (Pa.) High. In eight years (1954-61), Hart’s teams recorded 63 *
wins, 12 losses and three ties and copped the \Vestern Pennsylvania cham-
l pionship in 1958 on a perfect, 11-O mark that also earned him Class AA
' "Coach of the Year" honor. Hart is a veteran of 28 months in the Air Force
with 30 combat missions over Europe and holder of the Air Medal with Oak
Leaf Clusters. He picked up a master’s degree in education from University
of Pittsburg in 1959. Born 5/25/26 . . . Home town: Connellsville, Pa ....
Married to former Patti Furtney of Connellsville and they have three sons
and a daughte1·—Da\id ]r. 13, Dickie 11, Danny 4, and Candy 1.
13
\

   `
    CHUCK KNOX
  `*’`     `»·. -     Offensive Line Coach
. *1T*  [_   . TY! One of three UK assistants retained on the Brad-
A »   jj shaw staff, Chuck