xt7hmg7frx8p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7hmg7frx8p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19321011  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 11, 1932 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 11, 1932 1932 2013 true xt7hmg7frx8p section xt7hmg7frx8p Best Copy Available
TUESDAY

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

EDITION
KERNEL

SEMI-WEEKL-

ANNOUNCING!
KERNEL PRESIDENTIAL POLL
WATCH FOR R ALLOTS

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
ViOLUME

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, OCTORER 11.

XXIII

Entrance Test

KERNEL TO HOLD Walsli Suggests
STRAW VOTE FOR Kercheval
COMING ELECTION

As

AII-Amerie- an

Ralph Kerrheval, Kentucky's
great punter and star quarter-hacwas selected as an
player for the pa
C.
week through a nation-wid- e
B. 8. hookup Friday night. The
k,

Ballots Will Hear Names of
Hoover, Roosevelt and
Thomas
IDEA ORIGINATED
BY PRINCETONIAN
Announced
October 25: National Tabs
Due October 28

Results Will

Re

A Ft raw vote tn which students
and faculty of the university may
express their choice for the next

President' will be conducted by The
Kernel the latter part of this week,
according to a statement issued by
Lawrence Herron, editor of the

paper.

Ballots will be sent to the

u

presided over by
program
Christy Walsh, who Interviewed
Alnnzo Stags, Chicago university

coarh.

team

An

will be selected each week, and,
In all probability, the season's
will be taken from
this group. Much; credit was
given Kercheval and considerably comment was made on his
ability an a triple threat man.
Each player selected on the
week's team Is to receive a certificate of merit. One many hear
this program at 8 p. m. each
Friday locally through WIIA3.

stu-

dents and faculty through the

uni-

versity post office Friday, October
14, and the votes must be tn the
ballot box in The Kernel news room
before S p. m. the following Tuesday.
The ballots will bear the
names of Herbert Hoover, Franklin
D. Roosevelt, and Norman Thomas.
The name of Thomas Is being added to the ballot as the result of
student organization of a Thorn
club on the campus.
Space will be left on the ballots
for the name of additional candidates; or a petition signed by 30
students may be presented to The
Kernel before the ballots are released In order to add another
name on the ballots.
The purpose of this balloting Is
to stimulate Interest among the
students In national elections, and
not to satisfy the curiosity of either
party. This straw vote Idea originated In The Daily Prlncetonian,

THOMAS TO VISIT
U.K. DURING TOUR
Socialist Candidate for Presidency Will Speak at
Woodland Auditorium, Oct. 19
CROWD

IS

EXPECTED

Norman Thomas, Socialist candi-

date for President, will visit the
university for a series of addresses
on October 19. This was announced by Sidney Schell, graduate of
the university and state organizer
of the Socialist party. The meeting
will be held in Woodland auditorbeing made
publication at Princeton, ium and, provisions are
student
votes are being held to care for a capacity crowd. Loud
and similar
In other colleges and universities in speakers will be Installed outside
the United States. It Is the Inten- the auditorium in order to care for
tion to hold straw votes In schools the throng expected to be attracted.
in every state.
Thomas Is being brought to the
The ballots must be signed and
placed in the ballot box In The university through the
Kernel news room on the ground of the university
floor of McVey hall, where two
club and the Lexington ormembers of the staff will be posted ganization of the Socialist party.
to prohibit "stuffing" of the ballot
Heartened by the enthusiasm
box. The ballots will be counted shown at the first two meetings of
by senior members of The Kernel club, the executive committee of
staff and the tabulation of results the organization has announced
will be announced on October 25. that plans are being continued for
National results will be released a meeting every week until the Noon October 28.
The speaker at
vember election.
the meeting this Thursday night
MB HOP II. P. ALMOV ABBOTT
will be D. H. Stanley,- - prominent
Thomas-for-Presi-de-

nt

WILL ADDRESS ENGINEERS

mining engineer, who will speak
on Roosevelt's "Forgotten Man."
The executive committee are at
present making a survey of the
university faculty to find who will
support the Socialist candidate in
the coming election.
Following the presidential election".
tion the executive committee hopes
enBishop Abbott is an able and
to form a permanent organization
tertaining speaker of keen percep- which will
with the
will be especially League far Industrial Democracy
tion. His subject
to college men and and League for Independent Poliinteresting
women.
tical Action in their discussions of
vital national questions.
Bishop

H. P. Almon Abbott, of
the Oood Shepherd Episcopal
Church, will address the Engineering assembly at 10 o'clock a. m.
Wednesday in Memorial hall. Bishop Abbott's subject will be "Evolu-

Law School Sets
Dates for Speeches

Kampus
Kernels

Four Addresses To Be Made
By Well Known Speakers;
Oct. 27 First Date

A program of addresses has been
arranged by members of the Law
Hnffh Adcock, rotund director of
the Blue and White orchestra, has school, and the following have
promised addresses: Judge John M.
d
Issued a call for a university
who ean sing blues a la Mildred Stevenson, of Winchester; Mr. Mac
Bailey or Connie Bosworth. If she Swlnford, president of the Kenhas any leanings toward that kind tucky State Bar association,
a;
of a voice, she will receive training
Judge Rogers Clay and
result. Apto produce the desired
plicants are to call Adcock at the Judge Kelly Rees of the Court of
A.T.O. house. The girl who gets Appeals, Frankfort. The date of
the assignments will be given an
set.
opportunity of singing with the Blue these addresses has not been
Mr. Casslus M. Clay will speak some
and White orchestra.
time in January. The subject of
All girls wishing to do office work his address will be "The Trend in
request- Public Utility Regulation."
at the Ouignol theater are
The speaker at the Law school
ed to meet with Mrs. Lillian Mea-cheat 3 p. m. Wednesday at convocation at 10 o'clock Thursday,
October 13 will be Prof. Frank Murthe Guignol office.
ray. The subject of his talk will be,
All members of SuKy are urged "Methods of the Study of Law."
to be present at a meeting to be The program of addresses for the
held at 5 p. m. Wednesday In the Law school convocations during the
year is as follows:
basement of the Alumni gym.
October 27 "Legal Ethics and the
co-e-

Cyn-thian-

m

It

is Imperative

that

all members
3 p. m.,
Thursday In Room 53 McVey hall.
Final plans for the November convocation will be explained. All subcommittee members must be present in order to hold their positions.

Defense of Bad Cases," Dean Alvin
E. Evans.
November 10 "The Significance
of the Approach to the Study of
Constitutional Law," Prof. F. R.
Black.
November 24
"Natural Law,"
Prof. W. Lewis Roberts.
Alpha Delta Sigma, professional
December 8 "The Lawyer and
advertising fraternity, will hold its His Compensation," Prof. Frank H.
October business meeting in the Randall.
Kernel business office, at 7:15 p. m.
Monday, October 17.
of

meet at

The annual business meeting of
the University club will be held at
8 p. m., Friday, October 14, at which
time officers for the ensuing year
will be elected. A social hour will
follow the business meeting. The
business meeting will be held in
one of the classrooms on the second
floor of McVey hall.

Theta Sigma Phi will meet at
7:SQ p. m. Thursduy, October 13, at

thj

home of Sue Dickerson Anna,

329 Clifton avenue.

There will be a meeting of the
World Fellowship committee of the
Y. W. C. A. at 4:15 p. m. Wednesday In the basement of the Administration building.

Will Select Menus

For Fraternities

The cluss In speciul nutrition in
home economics department of the
College of Agriculture Is working
with the Interfraternity buying corporation in the planning of menus
to be sent to the various members
of the group for their approval.
This cluss has chosen the subject of planning menus for both
men and women in college as one
of the projects to be completed this
year. Graduate students and seniors make up he class. The menus
are to be planned at various price
levels so that the fraternity or sorority will have a range of prices
and foods to consider.

ROIC Sponsor 100

NEW SERIES NO.

19.12

Five

Result of the entrance tests taken by 565 freshmen at the beginning
of this semester have Just been released for publication by E. J. Ash-e- r
of the psychology department,
who has compiled the data. Tests
In Intelligence, mathematics, and
English are given to all freshmen
enrolling In the university for the
first time, In an attempt to classify
them according to their merits.
A list of the highest 10 percent
in each of these tests is given. It
is interesting to note that the 16
highest graded students on all the

An attendance of approximately
persons Is expected at the 25th
annual meeting of the Kentucky
Library association which will be
held at the university Library this
Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.
The Phoenix hotel has been designated as headquarters of the meeting, but all business sessions will
be held at the library.
The meeting will open with an
executive committee luncheon at
noon Thursday at the university
commons.
The afternoon session
will be devoted to business and re
ports of committees until 4 o'clock,
when the staff of the university
library will entertain with a tea in
the staff rooms at the library. At
the night session, beginning at 8
o'clock, President McVey will deliver the address of welcome to the
convention, and response will be
made by Mrs. Mary T. Leiper, Prof.
George K. Brady, of the English
department, will give an address
on "The Perfect Lady of Seventy-Fiv- e
Years Ago"; and Euphemia K.
Corwin, a charter member of the
organization wil speak on "Twenty-five
Years of the K.L.A. After
the evening session an informal reception and
will be
held In the main lobby of the library.
Friday's sessions will be devoted
to reports of committees on objectives, appointed last year. On Friday afternoon the visitors will be
entertained at tea at the Maxwell
place by President and Mrs. McVey. At 7 p. m. on Friday evening,
the annual Book Dinner will be
held In the Phoenix hotel ballroom.
On Saturday morning, R. D.
of the college of commerce,
will speak on "The Sales Personality as an Aid to the Librarian."
At this session all business will be
completed and the meeting formally adjourned.
In the afternoon
visits will be made to the Training
School library, and the library at
Henry Clay High school.
Preceding the regular sessions of
the meeting, a Library institute
will be held In the Library science
study at the university library,
Wednesday afternoon and Thursday morning, under the direction
of Mildred Semmons, head of the
Library science department. There
will also be round table discussions
on vexatious questions arising
among the librarians in connection
with their work.

tests represent

five

different states.

The complete list is as follows:
Highest 10 Percent On All Freshman Tests
John T. Adair, Lexington; Richard M. Boyd, Louisville; George W.
Cooksey, Henderson; Dorothy Dun-doParis; Mary E. Earle, North
East, Penn.; Charles Edmonson,
Laurel, Miss.; Adele Headley, Lexington.
Alice McCrea, Winchester; James
Alfred Moore, Washington, D. C;
William Hicks Pell, Lewisport; Henry Schobert, Jr., Versailles; William Stanley Stagg, Frankfort; Elvis J. Stahr, Hickman; William H.
Swisshelm, Cairo, 111.; Samuel Henry Tabb, Sonora; Carroll Welslger,
Louisville.
Highest 10 Percent On Intelligence
Test
John Adair, Lexington; Helen
Pikevllle; Henry Phillip Bacon,
Lexington; Bazill L. Baker, Lexington; Lewis T. Baldwin, Arlington;
James Russell Blakemore, Marian,
Ind.; John Bennett Bolen, Louisville; Richard M. Boyd, Louisville;
Frank L. Caw wood, Winchester;
Tom S. Chalkey, Ft. Mitchell; Wln-thrP. Clark, Lexington; George
W. Cooksey, Henderson; Charles B.
Cracraft, Mayslick; Dorothy Hall
Curtis, Maysville; David Difford,
Louisville.
Dorothy Dundon, Paris; Mary E.
Earle, North East, Perm.; Charles
Edmonson, Webster; Irene E. Foster, Lexington; Howard Greene, Mt.
Sterling; Waller Griff ing, Lexington; Audrie Guthrie, Albany; Adele
Headley, Fayette county; L. M. Hel-seHenderson; V. Cora Hibday,
Falmouth; Leland Bernard Howard,
Wallins; James Bosworth Irvine,
Lexington;
Naomi Isgrig, Paris;
Margaret Anne Kelly, Pinevllle.
Robert Morgan Lathrop, North
East, Perm.; Thomas Kinnaird Lisle,
Lexington; John Anthony Lucian,
Jamestown, N. Y.; William F. Luther, Hoptown; Alice McCrea, Winchester; Donald L. McDowell,
N. C; Omar McDowell,
Lakewood, Ohio; H. Clay McKee,
Bronx ville, N. Y.; W. Reid McKee,
Mt. Sterling; Willis Montgomery,
Mt. Sterling; James Alfred Moore,
Washington, D. C; James William
Myers, Newport; Robert H. Nichols,
Lexington.
William Hicks Pell, Lewisport;
Joseph William Quinn, Waterbury,
Conn.; John Reynolds Rametta,
Cedar Knolls, N. J.; Beverly Robertson, Hazard; Eloise Ruley, Lexington; Henry Schobert, Jr., Versailles; Lucy Denney Simpson,
Burnside; Maynard Skogen, Louisville; R. S. Smallwood, Beattyville;
Raynore Rita Smith, New York.
William Stanley Stagg, Frankfort;
Elvis J. Stahr, Hickman; William
Walker Strow, Benton; William H.
Swisshelm, Cairo, 111; Samuel Henry Tabb, Lexington; Leonard V. Van
(Continued on Page Four)
n,

MISS BLISS WARREN
Bliss Warren, Munroe, N. C, recently appointed sponsor of the second battalion of the R.O.T.C. She
is a senior In the College of Arts
and Sciences, is president of her so
cial sorority, Alpha Gamma Delta,
is an assistant editor of the Kernel,
and Is active in numerous campus
activities.

YJI.C.A. PLANS

er

FOUNDERS DAY

y,

y,

Couch, Former President Will
Speak; Carter and James
Miner Also on

Program

Y" ROOM

IS

SCENE

To pay respect to the founders
and the early members of the organization, the university Y. M. C.
A. will hold a reception tonight in
the "Y" room in the Armory at the
same time that hundreds of other
college Y. M. C. A.'s are observing
international "Founders Day."
Virgil Couch, president of the Y.
ML C. A. four years ago, will speak
of his group and will be followed by

John Carter, president, and James
this year.
"In these tunes when the problems of youth need to be thought
through with care, it Is well for
those identified with the Y. M. C.
A.'s of this country to consider the
sound principles on which its services to men and boys were established and the sterling character of
its original founder. Sir George

Miner,

nt

Plans Are Made For
Eighth Annual Rural
School Tournament

Dr. George P. Cutten,
of Colgate University,
said recently. Bart N. Peak, basing
his material on this suggestion, will
give a history of the Y. M. C. A.
as an internatinal organization.
Because no records of member.
ship and lists of officers of the
campus organization can be found
prior to 1910, it Is not known ex
actly how many members of the
faculty might have been among the
or early members. All
founders
members of the Y. M. C. A. of past
years are invited to attend the
meeting tonight. A musical pro
gram In charge of Julian Cox, with
Joe Reister singing a baritone solo
is planned.
Williams,"

President

The extension department of the
university is making plans for the
eighth annual Rural School tournament which will be held November
The participants in this
tournament will be from all over
the state with approximately 30
counties represented. The boys and
girls that will take part in the
tournament will be students from
the fifth to the eighth grades.
The principal events of competition will be in declamation, oration.
English, mathematics, athletics, and
music.
The music will be glee club competition of children with unchanged
voices. The singers will be Judged
on their tone quality, rhythm, diction, and interpretation. Only from
12 to 20 members will be allowed
to compete in a single glee club.
The songs that will be used are
"Come All Ye Faithful," "All
Through the Night," "Lovely Evening," (A round), and one song of
the club's choice. Miss Mildred Lew
is will have charge of the glee club
competition.
Scholarships will be given by Dr.
Lewis,
C. O. Ross, Miss Mildred
andE. M. Potter.
4-- 5.

SCOUT GROUP IS

NEW FRATERNITY
Leon W. Cohen
To Address First
Beta Sigma Alpha Receives
Pi Epsilon Meeting Approval of Senate To Be
Dr. Leon W. Cohen will be the
principal speaker at the first meeting of Pi Mu Epsilon, national honorary mathematics fraternity, which
will be held at 4 p. m. Thursday.
At that time he will speak on
"Topology," a branch of mathematics in which he is an eminent authority. Doctor Cohen came to the
university last year from the University of Michigan, one of the outstanding schools in the field of Analysis Situs, a new field which will
be introduced at the university.
Analysis Situs Is that branch of
mathematics which pertains to the
theory of the Invariants of the
group or groups by deformation.
The remainder of the meeting will
be given over to routine business,
and the discussion of new members
for the year. All members are urged to be present.
Each year the society presents
the general library with a volume
of books dealing with some phase
of mathematics.
This year the society will donate a number of books
taken from the German EncycloSubjects inpedia of Mathematics.
cluded in the presentation are: algebra, analysis, geometry, and mechanics.
According to present plans, the
organization will have approximately ten meetings during the year. A
number of authorities on the subject of mathematics from other colleges and universities will be invited
to address the society.
Officers of the Kentucky chapter
of Pi Mu Epsilon for the ensuing
year are Dr. Leon W. Cohen, president; Dr. H. H. Downing,
Prof. M. C. Brown, secretary;
Dr. C. O. Latimer, librarian; and
Miss Buena C. Mathls, treasurer.

come a Recognized Campus
Organization

Beta Sigma Alpha, an organiza

tion composed of former members
of Scout troops, received the approval of the university
Senate,
and so became an officially recognized honorary campus fraternity.
Officers and members of the or
ganization at present are H. J.
Templin, president; W. F. Dannec-ke- r,
C. H. Talbot,
treasurer; William H. Nicholls.
scribe; Halbert Leet, Crosby Bean,
Eric McLefresh, Gildeon
Hample,
Walter Williams, Ralph Winfrey,
Jack Hickey, and F. E. Twadell;
pledge J. M. Stewart.
Faculty advisors are M. E. Potter,
senior councillor; L. J. Horlucher,
A. N. May, W. H. Hanson, and R. P.
Meacham.
The fraternity, an honorary,
e
professional
fraterni
ty, Is open only to students former
ly affiliated with the Boy Scouts of
America.
The group was organized late in
the yeur 1931 by a group of Eagle
Scouts, under the leadership of H.
J. Templin. It was formed for the
purpose of carrying on the spirit
and fellowship of Scouting among
the college men, to provide a
friendly contact on the campus to
former scouts and to render con
structive work to the Scout movement. Much Interest was shown in
the organization which has been
meeting for a semester under the
name of Beta Sigma Alpha. Any
student who is Interested In the or
ganization may write to W. H. Nicholls, 126 University avenue, for
Information.

Plays On Reserve
For Stroller Trials
Ten Minute Limit for Plays;
Selection of Winners by
Committee
Plays for Stroller tryouts are now
on reserve at the library and may
be obtained by calling for them at
the desk In the reserve book room.
No extension of time will be
granted for the tryouts which are
being held this week, ending Friday.
These plays, taking only about ten
minutes, make no further extension
of time necessary, according to a
statement made by Winston Ardery,
president of the organization.
Selection of the winners will be
made by a committee composed of
Prof. Enoch Grehan, head of the
department; Helen
Journalism
King, of the publicity bureau; Prof.
Robinson, of the geology depart
ment, Alvin Reesor, of the Herald,
and Joe Jordan, of the Leader.

social-servic-

GKADl'ATE
'

Matthew

IS HONORED

Darnell,

a

Frankfort, was

fellowship in
chemistry from Massachusetts State
college at Amhert, Mass. He is to
report October 15. Durnell is a
graduate In the class of '32, a member of Phi Kappa Tau. and Lances,
and Alpha Chi Sigma, honorary

the recipient of

chemistry fraternity.

TO GAMAGEMEN
IN TECH BATTLE

By Harry Carnage
Oeorgia Tech played a hard
and Inspired game of football
against my boys, and we were
seriously handicapped by losing
Drnry and Warner out of the
same tarkle position by Injuries
and by having Kerrheval sustain
Injuries to his ankle whIMi removed, him. as. an. offensive

100

ft

BREAKS

WiMeals
Deserved To Win

Executive Luncheon at Commons Opens Association
Conference

Different States Are
Represented By Sixteen
Highest Grades

ARE AID

Gamagc Declares

To Attend

Annual Meeting
Of Librarians

Tabs Complete;
Taken by 565

8

Alertness of Wildcats At Crucial Moments Shows
Good Football
KREUTER'S FUMBLE
CAUSE OF DISPUTE
Bach's Return of First Kick-ofPaves Way for Initial
Touchdown

threat.
Our boys were In the hole In
the first half after making their
tourhdown and were unable to
employ an effective offensive In
the second half due to Injuries.
Kercheval

merely

For the first time since Coach
Harry Gamage has been at the
helm of Kentucky's football ship,
luck was with him. But it was not
all luck that aided a Big Blue
football team to whip a battle-ma- d
Georgia Tech team 12-- 6 Saturday
afternoon at Atlanta.
Other reasons for the victory are
the alertness of the Kentucky eleven that aided them on each of
their touchdown. It was a defensive eleven, made so by the Injur-

In

remained

the game during the second half
to punt and for pass defense.
Terh has a fairly good team,
but our boys deserve to win a
close one now and then. They
have lost a lot of games In the
post on bad breaks; maybe this
Is our year to be fortunate.
Our boys played alert football
on the defense and. In their

condit'on, all played as well as could be expected
under the circumstances. Montgomery was substituted Into a
position the plays for which he
did not know when Wagner and
Drury were hurt. Darby played
a great game from a defensive
semi-crippl-

KITTENS DEFEAT
MARSHALL FROSII
6

GILMER STARS IN TILT
By DELMAR ADAMS
ar-

bone-crushi-

high-power-

ray of human tanks, ran about Stoll
field Saturday afternoon and showed scattered splashes of power and
brilliance in defeating a surprising
Marshall College freshman team,
13 to 6.
Both teams were slow In getting
started and neither threatened to
score in the first period. The game
was rough at times and frequent
penalties were inflicted. The young
Cats showed plenty of latent power,
and seemed to need only more
smoothing out before they will be
a dangerous team.
Gilmer, of Big Stone

Gap,

Va.,

and fellow townsman of big Frank
Seale, was the added attraction
Saturday afternoon.
He drove
through the line and around ends
for about half of the Kittens' gains
and figured in both touchdowns.
His passes were things of beauty
and his punting was good. Lack of
capable pass receivers was all that
handicapped the frosh from pushing over several scores via the aerial route.
Marshall, after a poor showing
in the opening quarter, showed
signs of power in the second, pushing and passing their way to Kentucky's
stripe.
But after
rd

one line play, a pass was intercepted by Long, Kitten guard; Gilmer picked up 11 yards and a first
down on two plays through tackle.
Hay made six more yards and Gilmer made four on two plays to
make another first down on Mar
line. Hay and Gilsnail's
mer carried it to the
stripe, where Hay went over for
the score.
The trial for extra point was
missed, but Plymale, Marshall tackle, was caught slugging and Kentucky was allowed another kick,
which Gilmer made god. The visitors were penalized half the distance to their goal on the next
kickoff.
Marshall drove down to the
one-ya-

until the last of the third quarter
when Georgia marched from her
own
line to Kentucky's
goal for a touchdown. Cherry, Galloway and Barron carried the ball
in steady gains down the field, and
Cherry burst through the Kentucky
line for the final two yards and
six points. Seale blocked the kick.
A short while later the third
quarter ended with the ball on
Georgia Tech's 21 yard line, third
down and thirteen to go. It was up
to Kentucky to do something desperate.
Johnson was replaced by
Kercheval, who could either pass or
placekick, but who was in no shape
to run or tackle. The first play
called for a pass. It came Kercheval to Kreuterl Almost immediately Kreuter was completely surrounded by a swarm of Yellowjack-et- s.
Either sensing that he was
doomed he passed laterally to Bach,
or he fumbled the ball, and Bach,
on the alert, picked it out of midair and scampered the remaining 10
yards for the score.
This turn of events caused no
rd

The Kentucky Kittens, hailed as

a

ies of several backfleld men, that
fought off the machine-lik- e
drives
of a powerful and fresh Yellow-jackbehemoth
at the critical
tmes.
And because they were
alert and on the defensive they
saw and made the breaks that
placed victory within easy reach.
Within the first five minutes
Kentucky lashed at Tech with such
fury as to cause them no end of
nervousness. It resulted in a fumble punt that placed
Kentucky
within 11 yards of the goal. Trickery deceived the Jacket line and
Kercheval skirted the end to cross
the Tech line standing up after he
saw that his line plunge would
fail. Neblett bowled Seale off his
feet to block the place kick.
Kentucky's six points stood good
et

standpoint.

Huntington Team Falls 13-Victim of Young 'Cats in
Slow Game on Stoll
Field

f

rd

end of controversy which ended officially after the referee called it
a fumbled ball, recovered in midair.
The fourth quarter was played
nearly even, but ended after Kentucky had repulsed a last desperate drive that lasted to her own
line.
Kercheval's punting was not up
to par due to an injury, but it was
his kicking that aided Kentucky's
return of the
chances. The
by Bach did a lot
opening kick-ord

ff

to unnerve the 'Jackets, and the
stubbornness with which the Blue
repulsed the rentless drives of the
Georgians featured the game.
According to the statisticians

Georgia Tech gained 16 first downs
to Kentucky's 5, but statistics do
not take into consideration the type
game played.

LAFFOON IS HEAD
OF CONFERENCE

Kentucky Child Health Group
Will Meet in Lexington
Oct. 28 and 29; Will Open
as the third quarter endline
With the beginning of the
at 9 A. M. Friday
rd

ed.
visitors,
final period, the white-clo- d
aided by a penalty, had the ball on
The Kentucky White House conline. In two plays ference on Child Health and Prothe
they carried it to the one-yatection which will be held here Ocline, where the young Wildcats held. tober 28 and 29 is under the general
Wllke then sneaked a lateral to direction of Gov. R jy Laffoon,
Kneadle on the right flank and he honorary chairman, Pres. Frank L.
to score Mar McVey, directing chairman. Dean
eluded the wing-bac- k
snail's only touchdown. T he try William S. Tavlor, active chair- e,
man, and Prof. W. L. Nocifer,
for extra point was blocked.
associate chairman.
Gilmer received the kickoff from
Dr. Jesse E. Adams, head of the
Marshall and returned it to the
through department of education of the uniline. Gilmer slashed
the enemy line for a first down on versity, is chairman of the educaline. Another tional committee. The reports from
the opposing
dash by the frosh backneld ace put the committees of this division,
the ball In good scoring position on which will begin at 9 a. m. Friday
stripe. Gilmer then October 28, in Memorial hull are as
the
passed to Adkins for eight yards. follows: "Family and Parental EduPritchard made It first down on the cation," Dr. R. L. Hoke, Morehead;
d
line and Gilmer toted it "Infant and Pre - School Child."
across for the final score of the af- 'Miss May C. Hansen, Richmond;
s.
The School Child," Dr. R. E.
ternoon.
Richmond; "Educational
Guidance and Child Labor," Ethel
M. Lovell, Louisville; "Vocational
BUiucation," Ernest R. Miller, Bowling Green; "Recreation." O. Ivan
Haines Frankfort: "Special Classes"
With the resignation of Buiiiham J. D. Falls, Ashland: "Character
Pearlinan. Hist assistant unnouncer Education," Lee Kirkpatrick, Paris;
of tile University Extension studios "Physical Health and Education,"
of WHAS. Elmer O. Sulzer director Dr. J. D. Farris. Richmond, and
of the studios, announced the ap- "Safety Education," Miss Mary May
pointment of J. H. Mills, of LexingWyman. Louisville.
ton and Combs Hlanford of MaysThe final meeting of the conferas second and third assistant ence will be held at 9 a. ni., October
ville
Wesley 29 in Memorial hall to hear the rerespectively.
announcers
Carter remuins as head announcer ports of the committee on social
and Ralph Johnson was advanced welfare which Is headed by Dr.
to first assistant.
auoj)g
vjw8jw
six-ya- rd

rd

Wil-mor-

rd

rd

one-yar-

Jag-gcr-

Mills and Ulanford

Are New Announcers

a

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incident might be overlooked as an
impetuous prank not to be repeated
These students, who are victims of
mob psychology, should remember
that they are casting reflections upon thrlr college whlrh Is a community In itself, and in doing so. are
Injuring its reputation.

Official Newspaper of the SturiV nt ot the

University ot Kentucky, Lmlngton
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EDITOR
BUM Warren

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SPORTS WRITERS
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PRESIDENTIAL

POLL

On the front page of today's issue The Kernel announces a student and faculty presidential poll.
During the balloting period, students and faculty of the university
will be afforded the opportunity of
casting their votes for the candidates they would like to see take
office on March 4.
The Kernel is sponsoring its poll
in conjunction with' one undertaken by The Daily Princetonian in
organizing a simultaneous expression of undergraduate opinion. In
with The Daily Princetonian and other campus publications. The Kernel will be able to
furnish its readers a resultant
n-wide
focus of campus presidential preferences as well as the
opinions of undergraduates on the
Kentucky campus.
The Kernel's independent poll is
inaugurated In an effort to stimulate student interest in the national
election, and most specifically, not
to forward the cause of any one
candidate, nor even to determine
the choices of Kentucky students.
Results of the poll will be tabulated
and undoubtedly will prove interesting. On the other hand, they will
not be publicly representative.
Students in Kentucky educational
institutions usually are not voters.
The majority of them are unqu.:-fiebecause they are not of age;
many others, because they are away
from home( Kentucky does not provide for absentee voting). Nevertheless, they are potential voters,
and more, potential voters whose
future ballots should be cast intelligently.
The uneaucatcd voter is readily
swayed by his emotions. Unfortunately, the majority of voters are of
this class. They do not think for
themselves. In the end it is a small
minority, either the educated group
or a coterie of politicians with a
purpose who decide the country's
important political issues.
The cultural and educational
facilities of a university provide
its matriculants with the requisites
of the intelligent and thoughtful
voter