xt7ht727d523 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7ht727d523/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19650730  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, July 30, 1965 text The Kentucky Kernel, July 30, 1965 1965 2015 true xt7ht727d523 section xt7ht727d523 Inside Today s Kernel

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Vol. LVI, No. 124

University of Kentucky

Six Pages

LEXINGTON, KY., FRIDAY, JULY 30, 1965

5pf.
rote

4 is the deadline to register t)
in the Norember election: Page

Sen. fulbright hot raised some fundamental questions obout US. foreign
policy: Page Four.

Two.

The state has erected additional historical roadside uarkers: Page Two.
Small businesses con become big
nesses: Poge Three.

The "grammar revolution" hasn't yet
reached Kentucky's tnglish teochers:
Page Five.

busi-

n

UK student stars
in 'Sound of Music'

f

Trustees name

s

new director
of UK institute

-

A director of the Developmental Change Center at the University was named recently by
the executive committee of the
Board of Trustees.

major from Louisville, will play
Capt. Von Trapp in "The Sound
of Music," which opens tonight.
The musical also has scheduled performances Saturday and
Aug. 6 and 7. It is being staged
at the Henry Clay High School
on East Main Street. Curtain
time for the performances is 8 p.m.
Craig has participated in
drama groups in Louisville. He
was a member of the cast of
"Oklahoma," which was presented here last summer.
"The Sound of Music," an
e
favorite musical, is one
of the most exciting and beautiful of all the Rodgers and

University student has been
chosen to play the leading male
role in an area musical.
Skip Craig, a senior speech
A

He is Dr. Edward

V. Weidner,
since 1962 of the
University of Hawaii
Center and former chairman of
the political science department
at Michigan State University.
The Developmental Change
Center was established by the
University in 1964 to promote
understanding, through research
and training, of the "factors and
processes of human behavior related to social change." It has
been under the guidance of an
acting director, Dr. Art Gallahcr,
associate professor of anthropoEast-We-

all-tim-

Ham-mersei-

n

scores.

ft

The leading female role,
Maria, is being played by Joyce
VVatkins, a Georgetown College
music major from Dayton, O.
The production is sponsored
by the Fayette County Recreation
and Parks Board and the Lexington Recreation Department.
Tickets are on sale for $2 for
adults and $1 for children. They
are on sale at the Main Record
Shop on Main Street, Sagesers
in Southland,
Dawahares in
Gardenside, and at the door.

Skip Craig, a senior speech major
at the University, plays the lead
role in "The Sound of Music."
(Kernel photo by Dick Ware.)

A

st

logy.
Dr. Weidner holds three degrees, including the doctor of
philosophy, from the University

of Minnesota. He was on the
Michigan State faculty for 12
years before acceptin g t he II a waii
assignment in 1962. He taught
earlier at the University of Wisconsin, the University of Minnesota, and the University of California at Los Angeles.

What , . , a Saturday class?
Pat Bailey, a sophomore transfer from the Ashland Community
College, looks as though she had just learned she has to take a Saturday class this fall. Pat registered for the fall term last week.
(Kernel photo by Dick Ware.)

'The Skin of Our Teetli

Centennial Theatre sails into last half
of summer program with Wilder play
The University's Centennial Theatre sails into
the last half of its summer program with the production of Thornton Wilder 's "The Skin of our
Teeth," July 29 through Aug. 1.
stand in Guignol Theatre, beThe
nightly at 8:30, has only a limited number
ginning
of tickets remaining, according to business manager George Dexter.
Peggy Kelly, Lexington, has her first leading
role of the series as she portrays Mrs. Antrobus,
wife of a typical American husband befuddled by
the usual woes of husbandhood.
Miss Kelly, a alumna of UK and a Guignol
Theatre veteran, is familiar to Centennial audiences for her roles in "The Imaginary Invalid," "The
Little Foxes," and other shows.
Robert Shy, Shelby County High School speech
four-nig-

teacher, plays the male lead opposite Miss Kelly,
portraying her husband, George. Shy is a resident
with the group and a veteran of "The Book of
Job" company at Pine Mountain State Park. He
has starred in various other UK productions this
summer.

The production is a comedy about the Antrobus
family and their general utility maid, Lily Sabina,
all of Excelsior, N. J. The family and Lily come
to grips with the usual problems to which humanity is susceptible, most of which they manage to
escape by the skin of their teeth.

UK Press publishes
WSU prof's work

on French general

SI y, two other professional
actors, and an actress arc handling the leading roles in the
series of productions being staged
weekly in the Cuignol Theatre.
Student apprentices from surand high
rounding colleges
schools fill out the supporting
roles for the nine productions
being directed by UK Drama
Professor Charles Dickens.
Shy already has had leading
roles in the series' first four productions, and plays the main
lead in this week's production of
Thornton Wilder's "The Skin of
Our Teeth." The play opens at

i

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IIOIJFKT SHY

p.m. Thursday and runs
through Sunday.
"We're very fortunate in getting Dob to join our cast for the
summer. His enthusiasm and
competence have certainly been
significant contributions to our
productions," Dickens said.
Shy is a Georgetown College
graduate and a veteran of three
seasons with the Pine Mountain
State Park's "Book of Job" cast.
8:30

The University of Kentucky
Press this week published "Marshal Villars and the War of the
Spanish Succession," by Claude
C. Sturgill.
"Brave, impetuous, fiery"
Claude Louis Hector, duke of
Villars, was the last of the great
generals of Louis XIV.
Marshal Villars was not a brilliant tactician, Sturgill states,
but he had a good general's
knack of winning the confidence
of his soldiers. He also had the
knowledge and determination to
wield ably the clumsy war machine of the early Eighteenth
Century. Though hampered by
his arrogance and lack of political sagacity, he did possess qualities which won victories for
Francei
An assistant professor of history at Wisconsin State University at Oshkosh, Dr. Sturgill received the M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from UK.

r- -;

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Elizabeth Franz and Bill Hayes, the other resident professionals, are also members of the cast.
Each has played various leading roles throughout
the summer series.

Actor Shy practices
(on stage) what he
teaches (in class)
Shelby County High School
Drama Coach Robert Shy is one
teacher who believes in practicing what he teaches.
Shy, who also teaches art at
Shelby County, is spending this
summer as a resident actor with
the University's Centennial Summer Theatre.

jrm

At

1

Future metallurgical engineers

Three University students, all from Northern Kentucky, are headed
high-pafor careers in metallurgical engineering, a
profession. Wth research equipment are, from the left, Kenneth
Stephenson, Florence; Ronald Gossett, Bellevue; and Rodney Gross,
Newport. Stephenson, studying under a NASA fellowship, and
Gossett are graduate students.
high-deman-

d,

y

N.Y. typographer calls

for 'cooperating patrons'
"The word 'patron' should be

as a

snob-wor-

d.

from its connotation
We in the United States need 'cooperating patrons'
'dry-clean-

as well as more intelligent patrons behind artists and craftsmen,"
commented Mrs. Beatrice Warde, internationally-knowtypographer
of New York, said last week at a lecture sponsored by the University Department of Library Science.
Speaking on "The Chasm Between Art and Typography," Mrs.
Warde said that "a work of art is a
job in which the man
who designs it says 'yes, it is my work, what of it?' "
She said that printing is the first example of industrial teamwork
in which the designer works through about eight processes to produce the printed book.
"We cannot call the designer an artist because he cannot take
full responsibility for his work," she added.
Contrasting this with the situation in Britain, where she lived
and worked for many years, Mrs. Warde said that printing schools
in England are teaching young technicians the history of printing
and typography, as it is believed to be their birthright.
"What the young man learns of the history of design and printing will remain with him all his life as an inspiration, whereas
what lie learns technically may be outdated ! the time he is 5,"
she said. "He can use his basic knowledge to help him make the
jump to the new technologies."
The great technological schools in the U.S. train persons for
management, she said. "The fine teachers should be in the gutter
the history and greatness
of the trade schools, telling
of their craft."
n

one-ma- n

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, July 30, 1963.

Institute warned r
of contamination

W1 (

in hospitals
Floors and shoes are one of
the biggest sources of
in a hospital, Donn
E. Cook told more than 90 persons attending the eighth annual
Executive Housekeepers Institute
at the University last week.
Speaking on "Myth versus
Method in Sanitation Practices,"
Cflok said that floors adjoining
patient areas of the hospital
should be carefully cleaned and
that personnel working in isolation units should wear special
plastic footwear to avoid spreading bacteria by their shoes.
Cook, of Vestal Laboratories
in St. Louis, warned the participants to make certain that public
bathrooms and showers in hospitals, universities, and other institutions are cleaned with a
germicide. "They are critical are
infections
eas, where
can originate."
The speaker said he would not
promulgate the myth that isolation units should be aired for 24
hours before being occupied by
another patient. "What makes
you think bacteria will die if you
air a room?" he asked.
"Many bacteria will die, but
the tough ones will just be encouraged to grow." He added
that the procedure is costly, as it
deprives the hospital of revenue
while the room is being aired.
Another procedure discounted
by Cook is "the (myth) that all
isolation units must have the
walls washed between occupancies." Cook said that it often
turns out that a patient does not
have the suspected disease and
that such a procedure is wasteful
of time and materials.
'
'The executive housekeeper,
he said, "should first check with
the hospital's medical authorities
is really
to see if
necessary."

) VlC-'-

l

Coed wins award at UK

Miss Elizabeth Ann Wright, a sophomore medical student at the
University from Derea, Calif., has been awarded a natch in recognition of her standing as the outstanding sophomore student In the
College of Medicine. On hand for the presentation were Associate
Dean of Admissions and Student Personnel Dr. Roy K. Jarecky, left,
and Associate Dean of the College of Medicine Dr. Thomas Whayne.

Two Louisville debaters, participating in the fifth annual Kentucky High School Speech Institute at the University, have been
selected by their peers as Junior and senior speaker of the assembly.
Mitchell Ash, a senior at Waggener High School in Louisville,
is senior speaker. He is captain of his high school debate team
and business manager of the literary magazine.
He was recipient of the Williams College Hook Award, given to
student in the junior class.
the outstanding
Randy Gcmcrt, a junior at Seneca High School in Louisville, is
junior speaker. He is managing editor of the school newspaper and
publicity editor of the literary magazine.
He was elected speaker of the house at the Kentucky Youth
Assembly, is vice president of the Kentucky National and International Assembly, andisvice president ofthe Junior Classical League.
Runnerup for the senior speech title was William Van Arsdale,
last year's junior speaker from Harrodsburg. Herbert Pasternak of
Houston, Tex., was runnerup for junior speaker.
The institute has a membership of 112 students from four
states Kentucky, Tennessee, Kansas, and Texas.

state puts up new
roadside markers

Bits of history:

large-scal-

Marine is among the
and places commemorated
people
in the 111 new historical highway
markers put up in the state last
year under the auspices of the
Kentucky Historical Society.
Added to the 478 markers already dotting the State's highways, this year's number brings
the total to 589.
markers
The
ranging in subject from how a
county got its name, to the friends
and relatives of national heroes,
to heroes themselves arc scattered throughout 77 counties.
Every county now has one or
more of the markers.
Before a marker can be
erected, it must be approved by
the highway marker program
county chairman, administrative
committee, and editing committee. The editing committee,
composed of historians and
writers, insures that the inscription on the marker is historically correct.
The State Highway Department steps in after the marker
Aug. 2 is last day
to apply
fall term has been, purchased and is ready
to put up. The district highway
Aug. 2 is the last day that office, in conjunction with the
persons who plan to attend the county chairman, determines the
University in the fall may submft exact spot for the marker, taking
applications and transcripts to into account the best historical
the Admissions office, Dean of site.
Admissions and Registrar Charles
Sometimes the marker is put
F. Elton said Monday.
up immediately; frequently its
Dean Elton said that dormierection is timed to coincide with
tories will be open for the fall a homecoming, courthouse dedsemester on Sunday, Aug. 29, ication, or similar events.
and that registration, classificaThe historical marker identtion, and orientation will take ifying the burial place of one of six
place on Aug. 30 and 31. Classes men who raised the American
are scheduled to begin on flag on Mt. Suribachi on Iwo
Wednesday, Sept. 1, he added. Jima in 1945 received a special
The summer term concludes dedication ceremony this year.
its final class periods Aug. 6. Fleming County native Franklin
wall-washin-

Louisville debaters
win awards at UK

r

11

A U.S.

R. Sousley was one ofthe Marines
immortalized in a photograph
made by Associated Press photographer Joe Rosenthal.
On one side of the Sousley
marker is a reproduction of the
Iwo Jima photograph. Several
Historical markers have maps of
the Civil War raid routes on one
side with the description of the
local battle on the other.
Although a large proportion
of the markers designate battle
sites or early settlements, the Historical Society is turning toward
recognition of people who were
prominent in the nation, state,
or their community.
Others are telling the origin
of the county's name and the
date of its formation, though
apout half the counties do not
have this, type yet. And the origin
of a county's name is often news
to both residents and visitors.
For example, Lincoln County
was not named for Abraham
Lincoln, but for Benjamin Lincoln, a high officer in the Revolutionary War. Grant County was
not named for the Civil War
general, but for a couple of early
settlers in that area.

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State Parks Commissioner
Robert D. Bell and the Perry-vill- e
Advisory Committee are
looking for relics from the Battle
of Perry ville for the new museum
at the Pcrryville Battlefield State
Park.
"I'm told that many reminders
of Pcrryville are scattered
throughout Kentucky, and probably elsewhere, too," Bell said.
"We hope that, by assembling a
collection noteworthy of public
attention, we can promote a
I VI M
I

I

better understanding ofthe battle
by Kcntuckians and visitors to
our state.
"Especially needed are diaries, guns and bayonet., canteens, field caps and other parts
of Confederate and Union uniforms, flags and banners anything at all that was a part of
or was intimately connected with
the Battle of Perry ville."
Fought October 8, 1862, the
battle was the last serious Confederate attempt to take over
Kentucky for the secessionist
cause. It was the bloodiest Civil
War fight in the divided states.
The museum will be dedicated
during Perryville's homecoming
celebration on Oct. 9 the day
after the 103rd anniversary of the
battle. In addition to relics from
the fight, it will house a
visual display with
sound that tells the story of the
battle.
Anyone owning or having information of Perryville battlefield
relics should write to the committee, P. O. Box 1861, Louisville, 40201.
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Scientists are digging up the
bones of mammoths and mastodons again this summer at Big
Bone Lick in Northern Kentucky,
23 miles southwest of Cincinnati.
The old salt springs have been

HELD OVER!

3rd Week

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called "the nation's outstanding
prehistoric boneyard."
Since it was discovered in
1729, Big Bone Lick has given
up its relics of the great beasts
to collectors and souvenir hunters
without restraint. By 1840 it was
estimated that the bones of 100
mastodons, 20 Arctic elephants,
and innumerable smaller animals
had been carried away.

HAK01D

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TUESDAY AND WEDNESDAY

HECKLIAH

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LAURIE

thumSy ("LAWRENCE OF ARABIA"

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, July 30,

1965- -3

Small business can become big business

The Kentucky Research Foun
dation mitrors the popular story
of "small business" rising to the
rank of "big business."
You won't find KHF listed on
the stock exchange, but it is one
of the Commonwealth's major
enterprises. For money invested
in it, it turns out two products
research data and scholarly
knowledge. These cannot be
denk'd as being important contributions in this era of technology and emphasis on higher education.
Celebrating its 20th anniversary this year, this University

not money. So, back to those
products.
The KRF membership, which
is made up of UK personnel and
individuals, was told
at its annual meeting in May that
the Foundation is currently administering funds for 142 different
research and special projects distributed among 47 UK departments and divisions. The total
appropriation for these runs well
over $4.4 million. The largest
single research giant under jurisdiction of the foundation is the
multidisciplinary tobacco-healt- h
study. The federal government
has earmarked $1.5 million for
this.
Dr. Bard, who also assumed
the office of University assistant
vice president for research development in December, referred
to a
academic analysis
as his chief guide for the Foundation's planning.
Dr. John W. Oswald, University president and president of
the Foundation, drafted this verbal "blueprint" which includes
his statement that "a concerted
effort must be made within the
next decade to encourage greater
cooperative research between the
faculties of the various graduate,
undergraduate, and professional
colleges of the University.
"Encouragement must go to
interdisciplinary institutes and
team-typ- e
research, for the effect
of this activity will be felt
throughout the University and
the Commonwealth," wrote Dr.
Oswald. "An enlarged national
and international role will find
the University expected by the
federal government and by an
increasing number of state agencies to answer questions and
probe more deeply into areas
where additional knowledge is
needed."
The analytic document further
states that by 1975, the University
can expect to handle $13 million
from outside sources and have its
own approved research budget
of $4 million.
Granting and administering
fellowships and scholarships are
additional services which afford
KRF its other chief product-schola- rly
knowledge.
During the past year, fellowships were granted from the KRF
10-ye-

DR. RAYMOND BARD

facility has never faltered in its
climb for financial security and
recognition for service. It was
established with less than $2,000
but at the end of the first fiscal
year, it boasted total assets of
its
$8,070. By the
treasury held over $370,000. The
$1.5 million mark was hit in
1958 and last year's figure hovered around $2.5 million.
The trend for increased assets
won't stop this year, according
to KRF's new executive director,
Dr. Raymond C. Bard. He anticipates an even higher influx
of appropriations than for any
previous year.
"The money is there in industry and in federal agencies
which want answers to technical
problems and there is no reason
why we shouldn't receive our
share," said the director who,
although a scientist (cell biologist) by profession, handles administrative chores with Madison
mid-1950'-

Avenue

s,

finesse.

However, there are profits, if

budget to five graduate students
working in significant areas of
research. Ten freshman scholarships worth $250 each also were
awarded.
The Foundation manages a
number of restricted and endowment accounts in support of study
stipends for deserving students,
lectures, and other educational
activities. These sources provided
197 scholarships and fellowships
last year.
Dr. Bard said he has a willing
car for any UK faculty member
who has a proposed research
project. If the proposal appears
sound, he intends to follow it
through until some agency can
be attracted to give pecuniary
support.
"And this just does not mean
research in the physical and natural sciences," the director
pointed out. "Proposals coming
from the social sciences and humanities will warrant equal consideration and action from me."
He added that he will be on
the alert constantly for new research projects and will keep an
eye on pilot projects to see if
they should be broadened.

Dr. Bard acknowledged that
much of the research going on
at UK is highly technical and

"above the layman's head."
Nevertheless, he advocated that
the public should be informed as
to what scientific and scholarly
projects are under way in each
of the colleges, pointing out that
the University is an institution
supported by Kentucky taxpayers. "People have the right
to know," he said.
The Foundation's board of
directors has adopted an operational budget for the current
fiscal year that will provide
$150,000 for research equipment
sored
and
research
and $100,000 in support
grants
of institutes proposed by Dr.
Oswald and approved by the
Board of Trustess. They will in
KRF-spo- n

clude the Institute of Theoretical
and Applied Mechanics, Center
for Developmental Change, Institute of Water Resources, and
Institute for. Public Administration.
The Foundation board has
authorized purchase of a $42,500
electron microscope to be used on
a campus-wid- e
basis. It will be
housed in the Funkhouser Building in a laboratory made possible
by a $4,500 contribution from
University funds.
The board also has begun
legal proceeding to ament the
Foundation's bylaws in order
that the Foundation have its title
changed to University of Kentucky Research Foundation, and
to add a sixth member to the
board's executive committee.

WWWW
Here Comes Fall
ssm-

...

JKJl

We have some

smart transitional items

ALTERATIONS of dresses, skirts,
and coats for women. Mildred
Cohen, 255 E. Maxwell. Phone

which

compli-

ment the later
fall wools and
tweeds. Stop
n and browse
around.

6.

LOST Red key case with four
keys. If found call Ester Far-ran- d,
Keeneland Hall, ext. 8340.
FOR SALE Mobile Home, 1962,
13' x 19 V2 '
20' x 42'
Vagabond.
living room. Dining room, two
bedrooms, built-i- n range, washtwo
er, central
porches, awnings, underpinning,
fenced-iextra large lot. College neighborhood. Call
n,

255-617- 7.

1958 MG; British
FOR SALE
racing. Green with wire wheels.
Excelletn condition. Phone
266-260- 8.

FOR SALE 1964 Triumph Spit-fir- e.
Good condition, $1,650 or
make offer. Call Fred Partin,
UK ext. 8031.
FOR SALE DKW Auto Union
1000S. Saxomat. 25,000 miles, excellent condition, sun-roo- f.
$825.
Ext. 2315 or
277-501- 0.

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* Foreign policy: some fundamental issues

Senator Fulbright has raised
some fundamental issues in airing
the dismaying story of how Government bumbling, a misapplica

tion of business rivalry and right-win- g
fanaticism combined to frustrate American policy toward

President Johnson long ago vigorously to Firestone's defense,
enunciated the objective of build- and the company abandoned the
ing bridges to Eastern Europe. More entire arrangement.
than a year ago the State DepartPresident Johnson personally
ment picked Rumania the most
has encouraged this trend, and
independent Communist ruled
of State Rusk has tried to
country in the area as a special Secretary
area of concentration. As part of explain the reasons by speaking of
this policy, the Firestone Tire and the need for a differentiated policy
Communist-rule- d
Rubber Company was encouraged toward different
to enter negotiations to pi vide nations.
Bucharest with a synthetic rubber
The underlying issue is not new.
plant.
vigilantes searching
The result, according to Senator stores for Polish hams or CzechoFulbright, was to make Firestone slovak shoes, union longshoremen
the target of a propaganda cam- refusing to unload Soviet goods,
paign by the Young Americans for are other instances of what is now a
Freedom. He accuses the Goodyear
long and dreary history. If the PresTire and Rubber Company of inident is to build any bridges to
disEastern Europe, he and the State
structing its salesmen to help
bittribute right-win- g
pamphlets
Department will have to give more
terly attacking Firestone. In this energetic backing to American ensituation, the Senatorindicates, the terprises willing to help him.
State Department failed to come
The New York Times
--

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.

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Self-appoint- ed

Black day at Ohio State
In voting to retain their infamous gag rule, the majority of the
board of trustees of Ohio State
University has flouted public opinion, defied the faculty and the
students and ignored the university's president.
The five members who voted
to keep the
rule can be
held responsible for the continuation of the poor name OSU has
in the academic community of the
nation.
They can also be held respon- -

Engelhardt in the St. Louis

"Man, that Constitution bugs me."

Cuba: old story repeats itself
By RALPH McGILL

ed as the number one member. One

Yugoslavia's party newspaper,
"Borba," has accused Cuba's number two Communist Ernesto (Che)
Guevara of "irresponsibility,"
"badly confused theorizing," and
socialist heresy in general. This
attack from Belgrade coincides with
the downgrading in Havana of the
man who, for more than a decade,
has been the evil, effective genius
of Communist organization in Latin

day when the reporter was at the
bar in the American Club for a beer
a bomb was exploded in the mail
box in front of the ciub. It broke
the front windows. That night the
reporter protested to his Rotary
club friend: "Do not explode bombs
in places where I am likely to be."
The Rotarian asked for the reporter's schedule.
Machado was a gross, evil man,
his face pitted with smallpox scars.
He butchered fellow Cubans. Once
the reporter saw the contents of a
shark's stomach, caught by a fisherman off El Moro Castle. It contained the initialed cufflinks of a
student who had disappeared from
El Moro Castle a few days before.
Once 50 students came to the reporter's room in the National Hotel,
took off their shirts and showed
their backs, cruelly scarred from
beatings administered while in prison. One day the wives of Havana
business and professional men staged a protest parade before
palace. Prostitutes and female prisoners were released and
provided with razor blades with
which to attack the demonstrators.
Sumner Welles, then U.S. ambassador to Cuba, arranged for the
reporter to see Machado. It was
necessary to pass through machine-gunguards, and many doors to
reach him. The interview was

America.
g
The story stirs memory. A
reporter remembers the Cuba
once-youn-

of the 1930s when Gerardo Machado
was the despot. He was, with
reason, called "the butcher." Memory recalls being in the wine cellar
of a town officer of the Havana
Rotary Club. A small group was at
work manufacturing bombs. The
racks for wine bottles also served
to hold sticks of dynamite. An underground movement called "the
A. B.C." was actively at work. It
operated with "cells" of 10 men
each. Each of 10 organized 10 more.
One day the young reporter was
in the American club at Havana.
His old friend Tillinghast L'Hoin-medie- u
Huston, one time
of the Yankees and an engineer
who, after the Spanish American
War, had built harbor installations
at Havana and also designed the
city's sewerage system, had given
the reporter a membership card.
The Colonel, incidentally, was list
part-own-

er

Ma-chad-

s,

Fulgencio Batista overthrew
Machado. There were riots. The
body of Machado's much hated
police chief was disinterred from
the cemetery and dragged through
the streets. Batista, the reformer,
in time became as much a butcher
as had Machado.
The reporter recalls talking with
Felipe Pazos, head of Cuba's national bank, and two other members of Castro's cabinet a few
months after the overthrow of Batista. The communists had worked
with Batista. They had not supported Castro until they were sure
he would win. The cabinet members said they knew there were a
few communists in the army and in
the bureaucracy, but they were not
enough to prevail. They did prevail,
largely because of Che Guevara, a
disciplined, highly trained, dedicated communist.
Guevara, appointed minister of
industry", made the error of trying
to establish a heavy industry. He
failed. As of this writing, Guevara's
status is in doubt. He has lost his
official position. But it is almost
certain that he remains in charge of
organizing guerrillas, saboteurs,
and specialists in fomenting riots
and anarchy, and that his hand
was evident in Santo Domingo. It
is interesting to await the next
chapter in the history of this evil
and dangerous man.
Copyright 1965)

sible for the expected resignations
of a number of respected faculty
members who threatened to quit
if the rule went unchanged.
And any student demonstrations
protesting the decision can be
charged also to the bullheaded
backwardness of the five who disregarded the recommendations of
the professional educators they
hired.
President Novice G. Fawcett,
following the recommendations of
a faculty committee, urged the
trustees to eliminate his power to
veto speakers he felt were subversive.
Since 1951 an OSU president
has been empowered to bar from the
campus any guest speaker he judged
to be subversive, allied to subversive purposes or whose views
he felt to be just not in the best
interests of the school. In the '50's
Ohio State was one of only eight
universities in America using a

gag rule.

According to Fawcett, 75 percent
of the students favored changing
the rule. But the five trustees who
voted against the change apparently believe most of Ohio
State's students are not capable of
making responsible judgments. And
apparently these five trustees feel
the faculty judgment is also wrong.
-- The (Cleveland) Plain Dealer

July 9,

1965

The Kentucky
Kernel
The SoutJi's Outstanding College Daily

University of Kentucky
Established
FRIDAY, JULY

Kenneth Ciieen,

1894
30, 1965

Editor-in-Chie-

f

Published at the University of Kentucky1!
campus four times each week during the
school year except during holiday and exam
periods. Published weekly during the summer
term.
Entered at the post office at Lexington, Kentucky, as s