xt7j0z70zk2s https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7j0z70zk2s/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19660919  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 19, 1966 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 19, 1966 1966 2015 true xt7j0z70zk2s section xt7j0z70zk2s Inside Todays Kernel

YEM IE NIB JL
Vol. 58, No.

13

University of Kentucky
SEPT.
I960

LEXINGTON, KY., MONDAY,

19,

The money really flows of the Keene-lanbreeders' sale: Poge Two.

d

Clones begin at two new stale
tostern and Morehead: Poge
Three.

Pages

AWS slow in liberalizing
Tour.
Po9

tor'at saV':

hours,

edi-Eig- ht

Scries on const utionot revision

Poge Five.
Terry Beodles is Kernets first "Player of the Week": Poge Sis.
Rupp is named Delta Sig of
Ihe Year: Poge Seven.
Adolph

Student Teachers
In Record Number,
Seeking Few Posts
A record number of students
arc placed under a supervising
must be placed in practice teachteacher in Lexington and Fayette
ing positions during the spring County schools.
semester by the University ColApplicants for student teachlege of Education.
ing at the secondary level are
From
students, who placed in cooperating districts
must do student teaching before located in the northwest quadbeing certified to teach, are ex- rant of Kentucky from Covington
to Lexington to Louisville.
pected to apply for positions, acOther sections of the state
cording to Dr. James H. Powell,
director of student teaching.
are reserved for student teachThis number compares to only ers from other colleges and uni190 students now doing student
versities in Kentucky.
Due to the number of students
teaching.
"The imbalance is due to eligible for positions, many more
placing most students in the must leave campus to practice
spring semester," he said. "The teaching at the secondary level
number of placements remains this spring.
All assignments are made on
constant, but more studentswait
until the spring semester to stuthe basis of priority, according
dent teach."
to Dr. Powell.
All applicants for student
In deciding who will teach
teaching in elementary schools away from campus, Dr. Powell
400-42-

5

Prof. Reeves Predicts
Hard Fight On Charter
Prof. Jack E. Reeves, a member of the Constitution Revision
Assembly, said Monday he is not as optimistic about the passage
of the proposed new state constitution as Gov. Edward T. Breathitt.
Breathitt said Saturday new
support for the document has a former Farm Bureau Federamade him "much more optimis- tion president, is for the new
tic" about it's adoption in the document. The Federation voted
to oppose the constitution in
November election.
August.
an associate profesReeves,
sor in the Political Science DeLouisville officials

of
partment, said, "Opposition
for a Better Constituagainst the new constitution is tion also took exception to
strong." He predicts a hard fight. Cook's statement.
Reeves claims the opposition's attacks on the charter are
Nathan S. Lord, Republican
either false or
cochairman of the Louisville
Many
organizations have campaign, said the decision to
come out against the document submit the charter directly to the
asserting the document will abol- voters has been upheld by the
ish county offices. Reeves said Court of Appeals, and "there is
this not true. The new document nothing more democratic than
merely puts the responsibility allowing citizens to decide
for establishing, or abolishing, whether they want an improved
local offices on the legislature constitution."
rather than including it in the
He added that Cook was vice
constitution.
chairman of the Constitution ReReeves said he was for the vision
Assembly and "took a
new constitution because "it
very, very pro stand" on the
leaves things to the legislature."
document's content.
Breathitt's new optimism
came after a news conference
in Frankfort when the Kentucky
Bankers Association, the Kentucky Rural Electric Cooperative
Corporation and the Kentucky
Welfare Association all had endorsed the proposal.
However opposition flared
A faculty committee to adThursday when Jefferson County vise the Administration on busiJudge Marlow W. Cook stated ness affairs has been created
he opposed any vote on the proby the University Faculty Senate.
posed, charter because of the
The Advisory Committee on
"reckless, unconstitutional way
Business Affairs, chaired by Dr.
it is being presented to the people.
Robert Rudd, Professor of AgrBreathitt said:
icultural Economics, will serve
as liaison between the faculty
"Judge Cook's only disagreement is over the method of suband both President Oswald and
mission, not the quality of the Vice President for Business AfHe supports the fairs Robert F. Kerley.
document
document.
Committee members are Dr.
Breathitt also said the electric
John Douglas, Dr. Stanley Smith,
Dr. Clifford Amyx, and Dr.
cooperatives represent 280,000
farm families, that "various local Ceorge Schwert. The committee
will hold its first meeting in late
farm bureaus" support the revision and that Burl St. Clair, September.
Ken-tuckia-

half-truth-

s.

Faculty Group

Will Advise
Business Office

...

said that anyone who requests
a position away from campus
will be sent. Those who apply
for a Lexington and Fayette
County position will be assigned
ba- on a
sis.
All student teachers, even
those w ho teach away from campus, must return once a week
for a student teaching seminar.
Under the priority system,
it is possible, for example, that
a student who lives in Louisville may be assigned to a practice teaching position in a Lexington school, while a second
student who lives in Western
Kentucky may be assigned to
a Louisville school. The second
student must then find housing
in Louisville and provide his
own transportation to the weekly
seminar session.
Dr. Powell mentioned the possibility of setting up a seminar
in Louisville for the practice
teachers there. The majority of

will
those who teach
teach in Louisville.
There is an overflow of practice teachers in English and social studies, Dr. Powell said,
and a need for practice teachers
in mathematics, languages, music, and art.

Moving At Last
day Anally came Friday for 200 coeds who have been
living in the Phoenix. Hotel since the beginning of school. M & O
employes, top, begin to move the girls' belongings from the hotel
early Friday. The boxes were delivered to dorm number 8, bottom,
in the proposed complex. Things .still are not perfect, however.
For 17 coeds perfection will come when they can move from the
lobby of the building into their dorm. Building 7, which will
house the 17, is expected to be completed Sept. 23. At that time,
M & O will move the 129 coeds living in the Town House Motel.
Moving

;

Evening Class Program
Having Enrollment Boom

By STEVE ROCCO
Kernel Staff Writer
Enrollment in the University's
Evening Class Program this fall
is up 50 percent over the night
school enrollment for the entire
1963-6- 4
school year, Millard F.
Allen Jr., director of the program,
announced last week.

There are currently

1,491 en-

rolled in evening school, as compared with 1,427 for both semesters in 1963-6This number in4.

cludes 620 evening-onlstudents,
65 graduate students, 359 students enrolled in
courses and 477 students taking
both day and evening work.
Presently, the Evening Class
Program centers around three
associate degree programs under the auspices of the
Lexington Technical Institute, a
part of the Community College
y

non-cred-

two-ye-

it

ar

System.

In addition, evening school,
also a part of the extension service, offers a Masters in Business

what courses may be offered."
One thing bothering Allen is
that a large portion of the student
body has little understanding of
evening school. "Students may
take academic courses in the
evening and receive residence
credit," he said. "A day student
may enter an evening class by
slip after comusing a drop-adpleting regular registration, pending approval of his advisor."
Although students may not
for an evening course,
there is no
if they are
additional charge for an academic
night class. They will be charged
regular fees for the
d

pre-regist-

er

full-tim-

e

non-cred-

it

work.

One of the biggest boosts to
the evening school, according to
Allen, came recently when instructor's stipends were upped
d
to onephalf. Credit
courses and many
courses are being conducted by
regular University teaching staff,
although a few come from nearby
colleges and universities such as
Transylvania and Eastern.
one-thir-

non-cred-

it

Administration.
It is because the University is
Academic approval of anyone
located in a relatively large city
that the Evening Class Program teaching a course with credit
was inaugurated in 1954, Allen must be given by the dean of
feels. He notes, "Classes to be the respective college. The same
taught are decided by demand. standards apply to evening
I'm responsible for consulting teachers as those who instruct
with all departments of various during the day.
Allen says that he often en
colleges offering credit to see

counters small teacher shortages
from time to time. Often a course
is in demand, and there will be
no one to conduct it. In such a
case, the course is shelved until
the next semester.
Since Fayette County began
introducing modern math in its
schools, numerous teachers have
flocked to an evening class in
the teaching of that subject. Allen
believes when the course is
offered again in the spring, two
sections will be needed.
Allen apparently is conv inced
that Evening Class Program is

doing both the University and
the City of Lexington a genuine
service. He proudly points to the
fact that 16,000 benefited from the
program in the first decade.
He hopes soon that the biggest
gap in the service will be closed.
This is the offering of a bachelor's
degree. Presently, none is available, "But I believe we may soon
offer a bachelor's degree in
Business Administration, when
we get more students enrolled in
the program," Allen said.
The thought of offer ing a
second master s degree, or at
least some graduate woik,
in engineering, is being
tossed about by Allen.
"We try to stay on top of
what the demand is," he said.
"1 can't say as we miss too
badly."
is-sibl-

y

* 2

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Sqit.

'Who Wants Her

...

19, 19fifi

Only $100?'

Keenelqnd: Where Money Flows
By MARYJEAN WALL
Kernel Staff Writer

"Who wants
The
auctioneer begins to work himself into a frenzy as he leads
the bidding on the thoroughbred
horse in the ring. He talks in
a
voice, but most of
Jhe words, except for an occaher-$400-

red-face-

fast-talkin-

d

sing-son- g

sional price, are not distinguishable.
Out in the aisles, alert "spotters" catch the bids from buyers
in the audience and immediately
relay them back to the auctioneer. Someone raises a finger
to signal $1,500; then there is
a nod of a head for $2,000;
and seconds later . . .
"Charlie-$3,00You bought
her, sir. Thank you."
And the yearling is quickly
led from the ring back to its
stall in one of the barns. The
0.

next horse is brought into the
sales pavillion and the bidding
begins again.
This is what actually goes
on each afternoon and evening
at the Keenland Breeders' Sales,
at Keeneland Race Track. Here,
thousands of dollars worth of
horses arc sold each day, and
among them perhaps a future
Kentucky Derby winner. At least
the buyers hope so.
Students enrolled in Kob
Ryen's Light Horse Husbandry

and

Light Horse Production

classes went to the sales last
week as a class assignment.
Each person in the Light
Horse Husbandry class was to
write a paper on a particular
yearling, hip number 852, discussing its good and bad points,
describing its general appearance, and, as a personal touch,

chairs arranged around a squared-of- f
partition where the horses are
shown. The floor is brick, and
the sales ring is carpeted with
imitation grass. Behind the
roped-of-

ring is a rustic elevated

f

stand, where twoauctioneersand
an announcer sit.
The horses are brought in one
at a time, according to their
numerical hip numbers, from the
paddock area behind the pavillion. They are brought out in

quick succession, by uniformed
negro grooms, for the auctioning
of a horse usually takes only a
few minutes. In these few moments, however, any amount from
several hundred dollars to sev eral
hundred thousand dollars may be
spent by one buyer.
While the auctioning is going
on inside the pavillion, a "tag
and call" man in the barn area
makes sure that the proper horses
are ready on time and on their
way down to the paddock so that
there won't be any unnecessary

CHIGNONS
made by

everyone was to give the horse
a name of his own choice.
Students in the more advanced
Light Horse Production were told
they each had $5,000 to spend,
theoretically, on a thoroughbred.
Each person was to pick any
horse he wanted, under $5,000,
then write a paper discussing
why he chose this particular
horse.
Keeneland's sales pavillion is
a small room, with rows of rustic

Billie

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interruptions.

"rue

the

Candidates For Wednesday Election
Associated Women Students will

conduct an election Wednesday
to select a freshman representative to the House and Senate.
Candidates for the House (top photo) are, bottom row, left to
right, Judy Dorton and Kathy Wall; middle row, Ann Atallard and
Pat Nickell; and, top row, Pat Wykstra, Cathy Cropper, and Susan
Blythe. Senate candidates (bottom photo) are, bottom row, Anne
Bridges, Cathie Sackfield, and Evelyn Anne Smith; middle row,
Carol Cisney, Kathy Eldridge, Laurel Vandermark, and Cynthia
Pritchard; top row, Mary Lou Swope, Marilyn Munday, Ann
Patterson, Pat Thacker, and Betty Brown.

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KERNEL TELEPHONES
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News Desk, Sports, Women's Editor,
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Advertising, Business, Circulation 2319

735

S,ro"' Misquoted
In the Sept. 12 issue of the
Kernel Dr. Robert II. Stroup,
a University professor of economics, was misquoted concerning his trip to Vietnam.
The incorrect line was "But
the people in the lowlands are
not communist sympathizers and
they hate the mountain people
in the highlands who are."
It should have read: "There
are communists both in the Cen-

tral Highlands and in the lowlands but the infiltration in the
highlands is greater because of
its density. The people in the
highlands and lowlands are not
exactly compatible because they
speak a different language and
come from different cultures."

THE NEW OWNERS

of

for appointment

233-132- 7

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, 40506. Second-clas- s
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Published five times weekly during
the school year except during holidays
and exam periods, and weekly during
the summer semester.
Published for the students of the
University of Kentucky by the Board
of Student Publications, Nick Pope,
chairman, and Patricia Ann Nickell,
secretary.
Begun as the Cadet in 1894, became the Record in 1900, and the Idea
in 1908. Published conUnuously as the
Kernel since 1915.

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THROUGH SEPTEMBER 30, 1966
Contact

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2713431

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Sept.

19,

Eastern, Morehead Start Classes Today
men on its campus and physical

(Trom Combined Dispatches)

academic changes are abundant.
Freshmen are being enrolled in Central
r
program
University College, a
they must complete before they start
speciali2ed work in advanced colleges.

More than 7,500 students are expected
to begin classes in Richmond this
morning the first to be held at Eastern

two-yea-

Kentucky University.
Another 5,500 are expected at More-hea- d
as another new university More-hea- d
State begins classes for the fall
term. Late registration will continue
through the week at both schools.
Both colleges were among four state
colleges granted university status by the
last session of the Kentucky General
Assembly. Both assumed their new titles

Upperclassmen will be divided among
four advanced colleges: Applied Arts and
Technology, Arts and Sciences, Business,

and Education.
Students in the Graduate School may
,now work toward an MA in English or
history. Eastern has offered graduate work
in education since 1935.

Julyl.
Eastern has more than

The present faculty of 400 is the
largest in Eastern's history. There are

3,200 new fresh

30 Places Open
For U.N. Seminar

Thirty students will participate in an annual United Nations
seminar in New York City Nov. 2 through Nov. 6.
The students will meet with Center. The cost of the trip
U.N. delegates, tour the U.N. is $50 which covers hotel and
headquarters building, and at- transportation fees. Thirty aptend mixer and discussion sesplications will be selected by the
sions. The session will center
Steering Committee.
around problems now facing the
on the commitU.N., which will begin its annual
tee are Steve Gray, a senior
session this week.
The University is a member law major, and Dianne Jordan,
of the Collegiate Council for the a senior history major. The semiU.N. and will be one of 500 nar is sponsored by theY.M.C.A.
and the Y.W.C.A.
colleges participating in the seminar.
The application for places in
the seminar group will be available in Room 203 of the Student

and

g

VflT Ihree Sisters

I THE

CORNER
F0R JUNIOR FASHIONS
LITTLE "STORE" WITHIN OUR STORE
FOR JUNIOR FASHIONS
THAT ARE
"WITH-IT- "
FOR THE "IN" CROWD.

A SPECIAL

Applications should be made

Building.
Applications are now available for the United Nations Seminar Steering Committee. Applications may be obtained in Room
204 in the Student Center.

The Gardenside Bridge Club
will offer a free duplicate bridge
game at 6:30 p.m. Sunday. This
offer is to attract those who
have never played bridge before.

The University chapter of
Young Americans for Freedom
will meet at 7:30 p.m. Tuesday
in Room 363 of the Student Center. All former members must

The UK Woman's Club will
meet at 1 p.m. Tuesday in the
Student Center Ballroom. Kentucky artist, Ray Harm will
speak.

frrmnstance!
LACE-YOK-

Russell, University associate professor of education, will present
the report to the local chapter
of the Phi Delta Kappa education
honorary.

The local chapter of National
Society of Interior Designers will
meet at 4 p.m. Wednesday in the
lounge of the Home Economics

attend.
The Student Art Committee
will hold its organizational meeting of the year at 7:30 tonight
in Room 209 of the Fine Arts

The University institute on
integration problems in public
schools will report at a luncheon
meeting Wednesday in Room 245
of the Student Center. Dr. Ivan

Building.

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-3

111 new faculty and administrative staff been added and the school has committed
more than $14 million for new buildings.
members this term.
The faculty, including the new additions,
The most material sign of Eastern's now numbers more than 250.
progress, however, is the construction.
Under construction, or scheduled to
Projects include two new dormitories, start this year, are two residence halls,
a $3.6 million expansion of the library.
a married-studen- t
apartment building, six
Work will begin later this year on a new classroom buildings, an addition to the
home economic office and classroom Doran student house, an addition to the
building.
administration building, expansion of the
Eastern's building program since 1960 utility system, and 12 new faculty houses.
is now ncaring the $50 million mark.
orientation
In Lexington, week-lonSome $16 million more is planned this
activities began for new students at
year.
Transylvania College.
The Morehead registration figure is
Centre College in Danville began
850 more than last year's.
orientation activities during the weekend:
Some 61 new faculty members have with a record number of students.

soon. Further information about
loans and scholarships can be
had from Y.M.C.A. office.

UK Bulletin Board

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Associated

Women Students organization has a tradition
of being extremely hesitant to act
on proposals to liberalize women's
hours. Senior hours were established only three years ago and two
years later the curfew law for junior
women was eased.
,

Currently, AWS is considering
liberalizing sophomore hours. As
AWS officials see it, three possibilities exist:
1.

priviExtending junior-senio- r
leges to sophomores. (Qualified

up-percl-

"Aw, Conic On

many problems for AWS and
the University.
The first proposal granting junior-senior
privileges to sophomores is the next best. But AWS
officials question whether there is
a need or a desire on the part
of sophomores for these privileges.
We think underclassmen not only
want, but need a more liberal
hours structure. The present system
remains only as a ridiculous restriction, both socially and academically. If nothing else, it excludes women from the library
for one and one half hours before
it closes.

women can stay out of
the dormitory after hours if they
make arrangements in advance.)
The deadline cannot realisti2. Granting an arbitrary number
be considered a safeguard
of late nights a semester that a cally
for students who want a curfew.
sophomore woman can stay out Even if the ban were
lifted, coeds
of her dormitory.
could establish hours for them3. Revamping the entire system
selves. And they would at least
of women's hours.
have the responsibility of governThe third proposal, in our
ing themselves, a responsibility
opinion, is the best. Although we which they will have to assume
recognize the inherent problems sooner or later.
of having no hours at all, we
AWS' planned evaluation of the
think every woman should have
hours to
extension of junior-senio- r
the freedom and responsibility to
summer school
sophomores during
determine her own curfew.
has been called a possible springArguments for maintaining board to action. Hopefully, the
women's hours, never strong, conevaluation will spur some action
tinue to weaken. Each semester's this
semester, to be effected at
growing population puts more the
beginning of the next semester.
women in town apartments, and
practically speaking, completely
fre of University authority. At Letters To The Editor
the same time, some coeds continue to be locked up promptly
at 10:30 p.m. on weekdays.
Other arguments against the
To the Editor of the Kernel:
antiquated hours system remain
I know that every UK student
the same. AWS is assuming an
unwarrented "in loco parentis" sleeps well at night knowing that
his beliefs in God, mother, and
role, and in many cases, coeds
are put under stricter supervision country are protected 24 hours a
at the University than at home. day by a group of
campus heroes known as the S.S.
However, we realize complete
elimination of women's hours prob- (Super Students, who were prefor egging SDS
ably is too radical and presents viously recognized
members.)
Living a slightly sheltered life,
it was only two days ago that I
"It was better, he thought, to had the pleasure to see them in
fail in attempting exquisite things action. While sitting in the basethan to succeed in the department ment of the Student Center I
suddenly saw several students set
of the utterly contemptible."
up a card table and then start
Arthur Machen
passing out literature. Because it
was orderly I had no idea of the
"I have never met anyone who
wasn't against War. Even Hitler subversion taking place.
Suddenly the S.S. appeared from
and Mussolini were, according to
all sides. They wore weejuns, the
themselves."
David Low American flag, and carried broken
beer bottles. In no time, they had
"When you have eliminated the sent the students at the card table
fleeing then proceeded to set the
impossible, whatever remains, literature on fire.
however improbable, must be the
Being impressed by so many
truth."
American flags, I scurried up to
Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
one of the S.S. to see what was
"Poverty is the parent of revo- wrong.
"What were they going to do?"
lution and crime."
I shouted, "Kill my mother,
Aristotle
rape
indu

rr

Trnl f.L'
-

7-

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as, Va- FTr7
.

tfsr Wfv

-

Readers Discuss SDS Booth, UKATS
red-blood- ed

Kernels

'

The Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily

ESTABLISHED 1894

University of Kentucky
MONDAY,

Walter

M.

Chant,

SEPT.

19, 1966

Gkne Clabes, Managing Editor
Judy Chjsiiam, Associate Editor
John Zeh, Associate Editor
Frank Browning. Associate Editor
Phil Straw, Sports Editor
Ron Hebron, Daily News Editor
Larry Fox, Daily News Editor
Barry Cobb, Cartoonist
Business Manager

"Nothing like that," Super
Student said, "They don't think
we are right being in Vietnam."
I gasped and started to ask
another question when my Super
Student saw a Marine recruiter
coming toward him. In a single
bound, he leaped out of the Student Center.
Being interested in the broken
beer bottle, I grabbed another
American flag and asked the purpose of the jagged glass.
"To keep niggers out of my
way," he replied.
W. Kent Hicks
Education Senior
SDS Has Rights
At an educational institution,
one would think that students
would not condemn others holding
or expressing different viewpoints.
But apparently some students here
at the University fail to realize
why organizations such as the Students for a Democratic Society
should be allowed the freedoms
of speech and assembly.
For those who find thinking
difficult, it will suffice to say that
the Constitution of the United
States of America guarantees to
every citizen, under the Bill of
Rights, the freedom of speech, provided he does not slander or libel
another, and the right to assemble,
if done peacefully.

Editor-in-Chi-

Terence Hunt, Executive Editor

William Knapf,

my sister, tear up my Honda?"

Ed Campbell, Circulation Manager

Stt W

For those who can and will
think for themselves, such a group
as the Students for a Democratic
Society can serve as a very integral
part of a university life. Different
points of view cause individuals
to question both their views and
others. When such individuals have
questioned and have come to their
own conclusions, they emerge as
more informed and educated individuals.
Robert Duncan
A&S Freshman
Dwight Moore
A&S Freshman

More Than Grades
I am sorry that the Kernel saw
fit to criticize UK athletics in the
manner in which it did in the
September 14th editorial. There is
little enough pride and desire for
winning tradition at UK without
your encouraging more apathy in
this direction. (This is the same
apathy which you justifiably
deplore in academic and intel-

lectual pursuits.)
There is more to a campus than
its grade point standing and its
cultural contributions. Informal education in this case football (yes
FOOTBALL)-- is just as important
to the student, and I for one think-tha-t
the team will prove this before
December rolls around.
Jack Milne
A & S Senior

W,.shln& to comment on any topic. Because ot space
reserve
to edit letters received.
Longer manuscripts will be accepted at the editor's discretion; the riant
lei.ter submitted should be signed as follows: for students, name colleae and class and
i

llmiSfoe?eet!eelshS

wi

* .THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Monday, Sept.

If),

Proposed Charter Changes Court System
By WALTER GRANT
Kernel Editor-in-Chie- f
Few citizens of Kentucky,

The major changes are involved in the Supreme Court and

es-

pecially judges and attorneys,
can deny that the state's judicial
system has long needed a drastic
overhaul.
At present, the higher courts
in the state have an excessive
work load, and the lower courts
face a confusing jumble of overlapping jurisdiction.
Oftentimes, it takes years before a case is finally settled. Even
then, official bodies are forced
Sixth In

Series

A

to keep from
getting completely bogged down
under the restrictions of the
present constitution.
Framcrs of the state's proposed new constitution recognized the need to revamp the
judicial branch of government,
and sweeping changes in the
court system have been proposed.
court
The present three-tie- r
r
system is replaced by a
in the revision. The new
system
charter provides for a Supreme
Court, a Court of Appeals, Circuit Courts and District Courts.
to use gimmicks

four-tie-

the District Courts. The functions of the Court of Appeals
and the Circuit Courts will be
basically the same as under the
present constitution.
The new charter specifies that
all of the courts "shall constitute
a unified judicial system for operation and administration."
The state Supreme Court will
be the highest court in the
r
system, and as such will be
the court of last resort.
The Supreme Court, consisting of seven judges, will exercise
general control over all other
courts in the state. However,
the legislature will have the right
to disapprove and recommend
procedural changes in rules established by the Supreme Court.
This court will have appellate
jurisdiction only, hearing appeals
from the lower courts. The new
charter provides for majority rule
on the Supreme Court. The judges
on the court will have the power
to appoint their court clerk,
presently an elective position.
The Court of Appeals, now
the top court in the state, will
become the second highest court
four-tie-

under the new constitution. It
will have powers of direct review
of decisions of administrative
agencies and such appellate jurisdiction as provided by law.
This court will consist of
nine judges, one from each of
the seven Supreme Court districts and two selected at large.
The legislature will have the
power to increase or reduce the
number of judges on the Court
of Appeals at the request of the

legislature.
The revision says the Court
of Appeals may be organized
into divisions if the work load
so demands. Assignments of
judges to divisions will be made
by a chief judge, who will be
selected by the judges of the
court.
Framers of the constitution
thought the judges in divisions
of the court could travel around
the state, at times using the
original records from the Circuit
Courts. Money could be saved,
and it is estimated that cases
could be disposed of in
of the time it presently takes.
The third level in the judicial
branch will be the Circuit Courts.
one-thir- d

The proposed constitution guarantees that a Circuit Court will
be held in each county, and the
present districts will continue
unless changed by the Supreme
Court and the legislat