xt7j0z70zk3c https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7j0z70zk3c/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19691023  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October 23, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, October 23, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7j0z70zk3c section xt7j0z70zk3c EC

hi

Thursday Evening, October 23,

EMTCKY MEOTIL

19

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

VoL LXI, No. 42

UK Changing Image:
Seeking More Blacks,

AidingThe Community
Dy ELAINE ROBERTS
Kernel Staff Writer
"It is an act of discrimination

in," adding that those who
graduated in the lower half of
their high school classes are Invited by letter to "come in for
counsel, relative to their possible
success at the University."
He concluded, "It could be
that this letter is discouraging."
get

to ask students to register race,"
Dr. Alvin Morris, Special Assistant to President Singletary, said
in his speech to the Human
Rights Commission Seminar held
in the Student Center Wednesday night.
"But we had 137
black students at the University
last year, and that number agrees
with Black Student Union
figures," he added, stating,
"Seven percent of the UK student
body is black."
Agreeing that this is not an
acceptable figure, he remarked
however, that he is "frankly
frightened of people with simple answers in this complex

Why Not UK?
In further statements of concern regarding admission of black
students. Dr. Morris said, "Is it
playing "Dixie" at sports events?
Do they get a negative attitude
about UK from supper-tabl- e
talk,
hearing relatives who are unhap-

self-declar-

o
Lew Colten leads discussion at a Wednesday night meeting of the
UK Students for a Democratic Society following SDS Steering Committee Elections. Colten, Marie Allison, Dick Poszuto, Peter Mitchell,
Karen Schroeder and Mike Dobbs were elected to the committee
which has been expanded this year because of larger membership
'
in the SDS chapter.
Kernel Photo By Bob Brtwcr

Expanding
Membership

Peter Mitchell, Karen
Schroeder and Mike Dobbs.
John Junot was elected an unofficial adviser to the Steering
lison,

Committee.
..
,.
The SDS voted to expand the
committee from five to six mem-

bers when Peter Mitchell and
Mike Dobbs tied in the voting.
It was decided that since both
were new members, bringing in
"new ideas," it would be ad- -

SG Committee Investigating

Merger Problems

By RON HAWKINS
Kernel Staff Writer

The Student Government UK-of L Merger Committee decided Wednesday night to try
to publish its report Nov. 7,
rather than Nov. 14 as originally
scheduled. The earlier date will
coincide, with a meeting of the
UK Board of Trustees which
will receive a report from President Otis Singletary on the subject.
Whether the report will be
ready by Nov. 7 depends upon
the time it takes to finish a survey on the views of UK and
University of Louisville students
on the merger, the committee
said. A questionnaire was compiled at last night's meeting. The
nature of a merger, possibilities
of conflict, and general attitude
toward a merger are among
topics covered by the questionnaire.
The Merger Committee is
meeting weekly to report on
gathering of information for the
final report. Wednesday night,
committee members reported on
interviews with UK and U of L
U

officials.

Gradual Merger
Detlef Moore spoke to a "major administrator" at U of L
whom he said told him the
merger would progress gradually over six years.
The U of L official also reportedly said that if the school
does not receive the money it
needs, U of L may have to drop

area."
50,

SDS Picks New Leaders

UK-U- L

find UK congenial? When they

Speaking to a group of about
of whom nine were black per-- ,
sons, Dr. Morris said that 30
percent of the land in Pralltown,
a black community, is owned

Steering Committee Elected
By JIM FUDGE
Kernel Staff Writer
Steering Committee elections
were held at Wednesday night's
Students for a Democratic. So-- v
ciety (SDS) meeting, with an
additional member being added
to the committee as a result of
a tie vote.
Members elected to the SDS
Steering Committee were Dick
Pozzuto, Lew Colten, Marie Al

py UK employees speak? When

these students investigate do they

many of its major programs and
become an "arts and sciences
school." He allegedly claimed
that the state then would have
school
to start a new four-yein Louisville, which would be
"much more expensive" than a
ar

merger.

Rivalry Denied
The U of L official was said
to have denied the possibilities
of rivalry between the schools.
He reportedly said U of L was
"more an urban school" than
UK and that U of L's emphasis
lay in different areas, noting that
the school could draw from private and Louisville resources,
whereas UK could not depend

by UK.

vantageous to have both on the
Steering Committee.
An increase in SDS membership this year allowed expansion
of Steering Committee membership, which is set at no more
than one committee member for
every five organization members.
Following the elections, there
was a short discussion on the
possibility of a small delegation
of SDS members participating
in the "I Am An American Day"
parade, to be held by the Veterans of Foreign Wars.
There was some dissent in the
ranks about the advisability and
the "reason" for any participation in the parade.
The aim of SDS participation
in the march would be to express the opinion that people
can be against the military establishment, imperialism and the
Vietnam War and still be Americans, a proponent of the plan
said.

No definite plans were made
for participation in the parade,
but several members are working on a course of action to follow if there is a decision to

on Lexington in a similar manner.
Committee member Chillie
Falls spoke to a UK official who
allegedly said he felt there
n
should be a state
institution in Louisville.
However, he pointed to U of L's
$16 million debt and reportedly
added U of L was trying to get
"the good end of the deal."
It was pointed out to the committee that a merger was not
possible "without new taxes."
Thus it was concluded that initiative for a merger should be
taken by the General Assembly.

j

that it has been a pol- icy of the university to purchase
land as it becomes available on
its periphery, and that this
tice inflates the value of property adjacent to the campus,
absentee landlords and
creates insecurity for the people
living in Pralltown; he concluded
that "this is a direct example of
the adverse affect UK has on the
community."
"UK will buy no more land
in Pralltown," Dr. Morris said,
in a formal announcement of a
S tarting

pro-"mbt-

es

new university policy.

Singletary Concerned
Commenting that "human
rights and disadvantaged black
students" are concerns of President Singletary, Dr. Morris said
that at a recent meeting it was,
decided UK has a "splintered-- '
type program" this year, and "we
are adrift now with no one in,
charge."
However, he added that the!
vice president of BSU met with
President Singletary on Wednesday and was told there will be a
"$15,000 recruitment and tutorial
program and a Black Arts Festival in the spring."
Discussing UK's "white only
d
image," Dr. Morris said he
if the problem was that it
was "hard for black students to
won-jdere-

visit, do our black students discourage them? Are our black students too militant?"
Pointing out valuable contributions the university makes to
its environment. Dr. Morris mentioned that UK is the community's largest employer, "even exceeding IBM."
Traditionally it is responsible
for 1) teaching, "we need to know
what to teach and to whom;
2) research, "in order to understand society's ills; and 3) service, "our new knowledge and
expertise must be brought to bear
on society's problems," continued Dr. Morris.
He added, however, that the
university may advise the fanner
on how to increase his crop yield,
but "must not ride the tractor"
and that the University "may
sponsor but cot run it is not appropriate for it to run a community center."
"Ours is an aware and a concerned and an involved university," he said, "and I speak for
an administration with which it
is possible to have clear and
honest dialogue between sincere
and reasonable men."
Assistant Morris added that
it would "of course be too little
and too late, no matter what we
.

do."

Panel Discussion
In the panel discussion which
followed two fifth year architecture students spoke of their summer projects in Pralltown of
"playgrounds and small community-type
projects" to "help
Continued on. Pace

S, CoL 4

!

higher-educatio-

j

Merger Committee chairman

Bill Dexter stated that the committee felt something "should be
done for U of L." He added,
however, that they were looking
for a merger plan "which would
be good for both schools."

f
Kernel Photo By Bob

New Policy

Stated

Brwr

Dr. Alvin Morris, (Far right) special assistant to President Singletary,
was the key speaker at the Human Rights Commission Seminar
Wednesday night. Dr. Morris indicated that UK would buy no
more land in the Pralltown area, citing the adverse affects of such
transactions on the local citizens as a reason. The speaker also indicated that UK will attempt to attract more black students.

* 2

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The AVVS Bridal Fair will open at 11 a.m. Saturday
in the Student Center Grand Ballroom. The Fair
feature two bridal shows, at 2 and 5 p.m.
Besides the fashion shows, representatives from
local merchants and national china and silver
firms will set up booths to aid in making wedding
plans. The Fair will last until 10 p.m.

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SUPPORT THE ADVERTISERS WHO
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Who's Who At UK
Who's who at UK? Thirty-seve- n
students were chosen from
74 nominations for Who's Who
Among Students in American Colleges and Universities.
The students were cliosen by
an SC committee of four students,
two faculty members and a representative from the dean of students office. Applications had
been sent to all organizations,
departments and advisors. They
also were available in the SC of-

Fudge, Timothy Ray Futrell,
Brian Correll, Stephen DeWitt
Cary, Vonda Lynn Crise, Lee
W. Harvath, Virginia Robin
Lowry, Terry Ly mi McCarty, Guy
M. Mendes III, James W. Miller, Winston Miller, John

Mul-lin- s.

John Nelson, Douglas G.
Overhults, Anita Marie Puckett,
Jerome Joseph Schmitz, Deborah
Anna Caroline Sherley, Evelyn
Smith, Sheryl Snyder, Keats
fice.
Sparrow, Terry Sutton, Damon
Each student was judged ac- Ray Talley, Joseph Terry, Carol
cording to his activities, academ- Tipton and Philip Wayne
ic achievement and recommendations. "We tried to get a group
that would represent a wide specUK Department of Theatre Arts
trum of campus life," commented
Buck Pennington, chairman of
AUDITIONS
the selections committee.
Coxe & Chapman's
The students' names will be
sent to Tuscaloosa, Ala., headquarters of Who's Who, where
Based on a novel by
they will be put into a national
Herman Melville
directory of students and their
activities.
GUIGNOL THEATR
The students are Robert Luther Abrams, Robert Arnold, JuSunday, Oct. 26
lie Anne Beasley, Sara O'Briant,
2 p.m.
Stephen Brooks' Bright, Robert
Monday, Oct 27
Joseph Brown, Carol Bryant, D.

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Ray Cook, William S. Cooper.
Oliver Cash Curry Jr., Sue
Dempsey, David N. Felty, Vicki

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WORTH 25
May the answers to all your

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Stretch with Conoco in three important ways.
First, in 34 countries and six continents.
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We encourage you to look over our
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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Oct. 23,

.

Problems In Pralltown

n

Q(Q Jo ones
1970 Kentuclcian Yearbook

ltr

Continued from
One
us understand the lvople better."
Saying that "Pralltown has
become a vast parkinglot," architecture student Allen Brown
added that the car count on an
morning is 517
average week-da- y
parked cars "in the street, in the
park and in illegal lots" in the

SEMIOR CLASS PORTRAITS
Call extension

community.
Some residents even tear down
their houses because it is "easier
to get $20 per month for parking space than it is to get $G0
per month for a house," Brown
said, "you can get plenty of cars
in the space of a house."
Displaying a mapshowingthe
sharply defined geographical demarcation of Pralltown, which is
bounded by railroad tracks,
tobacco warehouses, the University, and a "seven foot high
barbed wire fence put up by the
Lexington Seminary last year,"
the architecture students said
they found many "positive things
in the community that should
be reinforced" and they have had
the "enthusiastic support of the
community."
Panel member Judy Schroeder
said, "I think as students we are
a threat to the community of
Lexington."
Mentioning on the hostile reaction of townspeople to the
Moratorium March last week
"heckling at the courthouse,"
Miss Schroeder said that the com--

2827

APPOINTMENTS . . .
available for mornings, afternoons, and evenings.

A bout with the
look of today . .

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The
1u

At The

NEW WAY BOOT SHOP It:
The progressive shop featuring
Boots, Moccasins, and Clothes
for the new establishment.
120 NORTH MILL STREET

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UK Campus

Construction
In Progress

ment has accomplished much
now that the preliminary drawings for the $4.1 million addition
to the King Library have been
completed. In addition, the offor the new Myficial
cology Laboratory has been received.
According to Mr. Cliff Marshall, Director of Physical Plant
Development, a large portion of
the recent construction and remaining planning is a direct result of the $33.5 million bond
issue which was authorized and
approved January 20, 1967.
This bond issue included: the
main campus projects consisting
of the Classroom Building, the
Office Tower, and the Agricultural Science Laboratory; the
newly erected parking structures; the proposed soccer field
and renovations to the campus
utility systems. Sidewalk improvements and additional lighting facilities also are under this
program.
Of these projects, the finishing touches are being applied
to the modern classroom and office structures. Parking facilities
are making progress as they are
nearly complete.
For those, many curious students who are wondering about
the chaotic developments near
and around the King Library, it
is only part of the construction
due to the renovating of the
campus utilities.
The Centrex Telephone System is being installed in order
to avoid the confusion of dialing
the University before being connected with the desired party.
By next September campus calls
can be made by dialing directly.
Other improvements to the
utilities systems include the
engineering aspects such as
heating, cooling, water and elecgo-ahe- ad

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Kernel Staff Writer
The Physical Plant Develop-

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Office, Den, Dorm

Si

:

munity "tries to put down UK
students."
"There is an ambivalence on
the part of UK and of Lexington,"
she said, "Is the student an individual and a citizen, or should
he be treated as a ward of a
state institution?"
"The active, thinking person
should not serve just in Pralltown," she concluded, "but in
the white community in Lexington as well. Our best function
would be to communicate to
white citizens in Lexington."
Panel member Beverly
said that "our differing
life styles result in friction" and
all the "super brains" coming
out of UK "increase educational
requirements for Jobs here."
"The University will have to
contain its community within
its geographical boundaries, or
else get out there and help," she
stated in further remarks. "They
are only concerned with getting
numbers in and getting numbers
out. A university that deals only
with numbers," she added,
"can't relate to people."

SS
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OF 1969 MODELS

The Kentucky Kernel

Th Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during trie
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4tfati.
Begun as the Cadet in IBM and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein is
to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

* The Kentucky

Iernel

University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 23,

1894

19C9

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Janu s V. Miller. Editor-in-ChiBob Brown, Editorial Tage Editor
('.eorRt II. Jrpson, Muiuiging Editor
Dottie Bean, Associate Editor
Robert Duncan, Advertising Manager
Dan Gossctt, Arts Editor
Chip lluttheson, Sjtorts Ed tor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist
Carolyn Dunnavan, Features Editor
Bill Matthews,
Mike Herndon,
Frank Coots,
Jeannie Lecdom,
Jean Renaker
Assistant Managing Editors

Committee Power
The Department of Political Science has never been noted for its
concern for its undergraduate students; however, a recent move indicates that this department might
begin to cancel its image. An Undergraduate Advisory Committee has
been formed to provide a contact
between the students and faculty.
This will undoubtedly be another
committee which was formed with
good intentions and will become
diseased and probably die from
lack of power. The most encouraging part of the department's action is that a promise was made
that soon two undergraduates will
have a vote on the department's
committee which deals with curriculum requirements.
Advisory committees are commendable. They can provide an

added perspective which is most
needed by the faculty and administration at the University. However, those who participate in such
committees usually become discouraged quickly because seemingly their best advice and hardest
work is ignored. It is only when
students are given votes in the
processes which concern them that
they will be able to effect any
meaningful ends.

There are some departments on
campus, notably the Art Department, which are genuinely concerned that students be heeded
when they speak. It is indeed encouraging that Political Science
is awakening to the needs of its

constituents.
Perhaps it

i$

d.

even an omen.;

"Kernel Soapbox
By WAYNE H. DAVIS
The brown pelican, abundant 15 years
ago, faces extinction in the U.S. and the
bald eagle and peregrine falcon have become virtually extinct in the East as a
result of DDT poisoning. Few care. Why
should we? Farm groups and chemical
companies, repeat after" me: "We don't
give a damn for the dicky birds; we gotta
feed the ever increasing number of people
in the world!"
Dicky-birder- s.
You few who care. I got
news for you. It will shock not only you,
but the apathetic masses as well, if the
full significance can soak through for them:
the impending extinction of these magnificent birds is a relatively trivial matter!
A toxic substance is one which interferes with basic life processes. One of the
lessons of modern molecular biology is that
basic life processes are essentially the
same in all organisms. DDT interferes
with calcium metabolism: absorption, excretion, deposition in the bones and in
egg shells. It affects steroid hormone
metabolism, which in turn controls calcium. DDT does this by inducing in the
liver enzymes which break down the
steroid estrogens (Biol. Cons. 1:
19G9). The result is that birds lay eggs
with shells which break. Brown pelicans,
which still occur on the west coast, produced no young last summer. Many eggs
layed had no shell whatsoever.
Now, kiddies, to the crux of the matter,
and let this soak in because it is extremely important. Can you think of any other
organism to which steroid hormones and
123-12-

9,

calcium metabolism are important? You
don't have to go far afield. Think about the

creatures nearest to you right now. Or get
introspective. How about all vertebrates?
I'll take that for an answer.
DDT is also toxic to invertebrates. The
shrimp and oyster industries can testily
to that. OK. Vertebrates and invertebrates.
Now, students, list the kinds of animals
to which DDT is not potentially toxic.
Cive up? So do I.
DDT also lias an interesting effect on
plants. A few parts per billion can inhibit
photosynthesis in marine algae (Science,
150:
19G8). Not only are these
plants the indispensable base of the food
chain upon which all marine animals
are dependent, but they are also responsible for producing 70 to 80 percent of
the ox) gen which all animals must have.
In our industrial society we use oxygen
at such a fantastic rate (for example,
your car uses over 1,000 times as much
as you do; Pop. Bull. 22: 46, 19CG), that
all the green plants in North America
can now produce only about CO percent
of what we use. Most of the rest comes
1474-147-

from the Pacific Ocean (Pop. Bull. 24:
110, 1968). Now why should we pesticide
manufacturers and farmers give a damn
about the microscopic marine algae? We
don't have time to be concerned about
such trivial things. We gotta feed the
world. We are giving grain to 111 hungry
nations and territories which have so
many people now that they are unable
to feed themselves. DDT covers the earth.
It is in the soil, the air, the streams,
the oceans, antarctic penquins, arctic
seals, and in you. Fish kills from DDT
have been known for 10 years (Can. Fish
.

Cult. 24:
1959). The decimation of our national emblem and the total
disappearance of the state bird of Louisiana, are simply a couple of milestones on
the road of progress that have received
some general public notice because they involve large spectacular birds.
The toxicity of a substance varies
considerably among different species of
living things. The concentration of DDT
on earth is now enough to kill many
species. As concentrations rise more will
go. Which ones go next? I don't know.
The game is called Russian roulette. Or
Progress. Or the game of trying to guess
just how long the world can go on feeding
an additional 70 million people each year.
17-2- 2;

23-4- 0,

Qjv.t

5

I'LJ

&gjK anwM. W3

"Where do they get those crazy ideas?"

iKernel Forum: the readers write!
activities was to wonder just who this
"Joseph Cardner" is and why I haven't
met him in my three years in the EngTo the Editor of the Kernel:
lish Department. I would certainly like
I suppose that one can expect to be to meet
him, for I think we could have
misquoted slightly, but it is a little much an interesting discussion; we seem to
to have whole sentences put in your disagree on a number of
important issues.
mouth. Indeed, my primary reaction to
JOSEPH H. CARDNER
reading your account of last Wednesday's
English

Ticket Questions

FoPtfUo
By

C (D

DALE MATHIEWS

Well, it finally happened. Peace has become a communist plot. Of course it was
bound to happen sooner or later. The communist have been trying to take over our
homeland for a long time.
Think back to your history books. Remember how the commies started discussion groups, thereby infiltrating and duping the American intelligensia? And let
us not forget the "New Math." Why,

according to one unusually reliable

red-

neck; "Only one person in a hundred can
understand the new math: a conspirator)'
subject dreamed up by atheistic scientists,

intellectuals and other communist dupes.

Are these the kind of people you want
teaching your little boy or girl? Especially when the things that they are teach-

ing can destroy young impressionable
minds and put them beyond our control."
And heaven forbid if we should ever
a
forget the
plot. Completely communist of course. The commies are supporting the
companies wluch
manufacture low calorie cola in an effort
to get as many gullible Americans as
possible to drink sugarless cola. Then,
alter we have become weak from the lack
of sugar in our blood, (Americans get
almost all of their sugar from
we will be unable to fight off the troops
Russia is massing in Mexico and Cuba.
To point out the ungodly arrgance
of the conununists some authorities relate that the commies have among them
women who bear children, thus,infiltra,
diet-col-

soft-drin-

k

soft-drink- s)

0 09 &na6D

ing MOTHERHOOD! There is even evidence to the fact that some communists
are going so far as to bake APPLE-PIE- !
The last step before undermining peace
was to make a communist plot out of
sex. They teach things in those sex education courses like "Freshman intercourse 101" and have graduate requirements in seduction with prerequisites in
advanced fornication. All good Americans
should keep sex education in the alley
behind the garage where it belongs!
In view of all of these previous activities, it is a wonder that the
not try to take over the peace
movement sooner. With America at peace
it would be very difficult to die for your
country, as all good partiotic citizens
must be willing to do. Instead, one might
be forced to live for his country, an absurd idea by all standards, obviously a
communist plot, and not at all healthy.
It is time for us to wake up. AMERICA TO ARMS! Lower all bed posts six
inches so the commies will liave no place
to hide and we can flush them out and
shoot them. Watch your neighbors and
friends, the communists are everywhere,
and repoit any and all suspicious activities to the local chapter of the Minute
Men. Do your part to keep America
free. And don't forget the motto of the
day; "Long live Joe McCarthy!" There
is still time to stomp out Math,
sex and peace; but time is running
soft-drink- s,

out,

* THE KENTUCKY KEKNEL. Tlmrwlay, Ocl.

ROTC Office Ransacked
At State U. Of New York
BUFFALO, (New York)-In-ceby the continued presence
of the military on campus nearly
100 students ransacked four Air
Force ROTC offices at the State
University of New York at Buffalo
on moratorium day.
Amid chants of "ROTC must
leave UB," students ran from
Clark gymnasium, where the
ROTC offices are located, carrying files, papers and books. Dropnsed

confiscated materials
about 25 feet from the
the demonstrators set
fire with a homemade
mixture of gasoline and soap
detergent, described initially by
spectators as napalm.
Inside the ROTC headquarters, protesters smashed a large
trophy case on the third floor,
overturned tables and desks,
sprayed red paint on ROTC uniforms and desks, broke windows,
and destroyed files and office
equipment. Splattered glass from
windows and pictures coated the
floors of all the rooms.
When campus police arrived,
they immediately began to extinguish the fire. Students gradually dispersed with, chants of
"ROTC's stopped, war must
too."
Acting President Peter F. Regan issued the following statement: "This is a genuine tragedy
that a day which so many of us
ping the
in a pile
building,
them on

2.1. l!Mfl-

U.K. COEDS

and all brides to be

dedicated to opposition to war
and violence should be marred
by senseless destruction. If there
is to be real peace ami security in
the world, a university should be
a model for the rational solution
of difference."
Andrew Steele, Second Vice
President of the Student Association, said, "The basic problem
that the university community
has right now is that the incident is being interpreted as an
outright act of vandalism and fanaticism. This is not true. What
has happened is a reaction to the
continuous refusal of the U.S.
government to recognize the antiwar feeling that has grown steadily since the Vietnam war began.
"Those people who destroyed
ROTC obviously reached the
breaking point between violent
and nonviolent action. Unless the
president recognizes the wish
of the American people to end
all war, we will unfortunately
have to live with incidents similar to, and exceeding what happened to ROTC.
"It is truly a tragedy that we
are at the point where students
have to militantly attack facets of
the university and suffer the consequences of those acts when the
true crime is the perpetration of
the war," Steele said.

VICTOR BOGAERT JEWELRY IS PROUD TO BE PART OF THE

ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS'
BRIDAL FAIR

Saturday, October

25, 1969

Stop in and see our display of beautiful

wedding and engagement rings
:00
STUDENT CENTER BALLROOM
11

a.m.-10:0-

0

p.m.

PERSONAL MESSAGES IN THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

CLASSIFIED COLUMN BRING RESULTS.

.

Mus 193 Offered

Next Semester

The Music Department will

offer MUS 193, the Men's Glee
Club, next semester.

The course is open to all
male students "who feel they
can sing." It's a
course
and will meet at 3 p.m. Tuesdays
and Thursdays.
For further information contact Sara Holyoyd, who will teach
the course, or the Music Department. Hie course is not listed
in the schedule book for the
spring semester.
one-cred-

Phone -

254-7-

jr

it

S

3

tooth

SALE ! M
Sale now in progress with substantial saving on
ALL current styles, ALL colors and ALL sizes.

rf

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"We Never Disappoint"
M

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Winchester Road, Lexington,

assic

A--

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Mi
'

,

Meyers joins French Shriner to celebrate
their 100th year of fine shoemaking. Start-

DL 710167

Andres Segovia, far and
away the master of the
classical guitar. 'The,
Unique Art of Andres
Segovia" offers a new
program of
selections. A magnificent
wide-rangin-

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INCREDIBLE NEW
EXCITEMENT ON
DECCA RECORDS
AND TAPES.

i

ing tomorrow, for two weeks only . . . save
on all French Shriner styles. Boots, oxfords,
Come in now,
brogues, handsewns, slip-onsave on every pair.
s.

Meyers men's shoes
first floor

-!

* 4
(i--

TIIE

19

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, Oct. 23,

Sports

Of Our Times
By CHIP

A recent issue of Sports Illustrated magazine discussed how
the Southeastern Conference has
caught on with the rest of the
nation in the switch from defense to offense.
The lead story in the Oct. 13
edition talked about the "pitch
and catch" craze that has been
runni