xt7j3t9d5n3r https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7j3t9d5n3r/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19200109  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January  9, 1920 text The Kentucky Kernel, January  9, 1920 1920 2012 true xt7j3t9d5n3r section xt7j3t9d5n3r The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

MIY

DR.

No. 14

LEXINGTON, KY JAN. 9, 1920

VOL. X.

PUBLISHES

REPORT TO TRUSTEES

HOPELESS NUTS FORM SIX PROPOSITIONS
"POOR FISH CLUB"

"CHINESE LANTERN"
MISS MARSH ATTENDS
TO BE ANNUAL PLAY

BE VOTED

Red and Green

Ribbons Mark Those
Who Acknowledge Fallings

Phllosophlans To Present Production
s
Begin.
In April;

TO

Try-out-

Summary of Needs of University Sent To Governor and Legislature
STATE'S

AID

URGED

The biennial .report of President
to the Board of Trustees,
which was read to that body in its
monthly meeting December 18 and in
turn transmitted to the Governor of
Kentucky for the consideration of the
General Assembly in its present session has just been published. It is a
concise, forcefully presented report,
dealing frankly and fully with conditions as they obtain in the University
at present and making recommendations to meet requirements for the
forthcoming biennial period that the
State of Kentucky is expected to impose upon its chief institution of
learning.
The report explains under four
heads what the University has accomplished, cost of operation, the needs
of the University, and legislative requests. Commenting upon what the
University has accomplished in the
biennial period ending July 1, 1919,
the reports sets out that this iwas a
period of war. There was an embargo on materials and supplies with a
rapid increase in price. Besides these
adverse material conditions, the Government called on the universities and
colleges of the country to assist in the
training of men.
McVey

Many Trained

Here.

The report sets out that in May,
1918, the War Department established
a camp known as Gamp Buell, for the
vocational training of soldiers at the
University.
In the first installment
376 men were sent for eight weeks.
This group was followed by two others of 429 and 419 men, respectively.
In consequence the University trained
1,214 men up to the time of the Armistice in vocational subjects, such
as automobile mechanics, engineering,
signalling, carpentering
and
In addition to the men
trained in vocational subjects there
were 855 men in the Student Army
Training (Corps. All these men were
housed, fed, taught and drilled on the
University campus.
Our Part In the War.
The Bulletin states that 1,068 Uni
versity men served during the war In
the military forces of the United
States. This number does not include
1,244 regular soldiers given technical
training by the University, nor 855
in the S. A. T. C. The classes of
1892, '93, '94, and the classes from
1896 to 1919 had representatives in
the world war. The following army
and navy commissions were granted:
Two colonels, five lieutenant colonels,
captains, one
eleven majors,
hundred and sixteen first lieutenants,
second
one hundred and eighty-twblack-smithin-

nfty-nla-

e

o

(CoBtiBued

on Page Two)

'The Chinese Lantern," a costume
play of fifteen characters, by Laurence Hausman, has been chosen by
the tenth annual dramatic production
given by the Philosophian Literary
Society. The play wll lbe presented
early in April, in the Little Theater
s
will be
of the University.
gin next week, the exact date to be
announced later.
'The Chinese Lantern'' has the rec
ord of having been successfully pro
duced by the Idler Club at Ratcllffe,
by the Arts and Crafts Theater in
Detroit, and by many other theatrical
clubs.
Try-out-

PRELIMINARIES

HELD

FOR STROLLER PLAY

Cast of Beau Brummel To
Be Selected Within
Two Weeks
s
for parts in
Preliminary
Clyde
Beau Brummel, the
of early Nine
Fitch comedy-dramteenth Century English life, which
will be presented by the Strollers this
year, began Wednesday evening in the
Little Theater. Rehearsals will continue each evening until the cast Is
selected, the final designation of parts
being made sometime within the next
two weeks.
Lively competition has been manifested in the preliminaries and it Is
already indicated that there will be
a contest for every part. This year
the entrants will be permitted to try
for any part for which they deem
themselves fitted for the first rehearsals after which they will be assigned
to regular parts to study and make
a fight for.
Beau Brummel calls into action a
cast of seven women and twelve men
It is
with several supernumeraries.
largely a character play and is one
of the most difficult productions the
Strollers have ever undertaken. The
idea of the play was Richard Mansfield's and after its completion by
Mr. Fitch it was presented by Mr.
Mansfield in several hundred performances. It has been revived since
its original presentation in the early
'90's, but has not been seen in this
locality. The parts for women are unusually difficult, but from the wealth
of materiaf at hand this year, it is believed that all places can be filled.
Present plans contemplate the presentation of Beau Brummel in this city
early in March with subsequent pertowns
formances
in neighboring
month. Tentative
later in the
dates are being planned for
some of the nearby cities, where
Stroller plays have formerly been
successfully presented.
,
.,
try-out-

well-know-

a

n

University Press Association Only One of Kind
In United States
The University Press Association
was represented at the third annual
meeting of tho American Association
of College Publicity Organizations
held In Chicago, January 2 and 3,
by its chairman, Frances Marsh.
The association is a pioneer in its
field and was termed by the Chicago
papers as one of the most interesting
of the numerous "enfants de guerre."
About twelve universities were represented, including the state universities of Minnesota, Indiana, Illinois,
and Kentucky. Plans for larger publicity in various phases were discussed in an extensive program. It is
noted here with pride that the University of Kentucky in its Press Association has an organization unlike
uny in the country. The working
basis of the club, its foundation, and
accomplishments aroused marked in
terest in Chicago.
The distinctive feature of this organization is the fact that the activities of the individual student are reported to his home paper, not written
in a general way to other uninterested
state papers. The fact that this task
is the entire work of university students was also a matter of great in-

Universities to Define Stand

Among the youthful organizations
which have sprung up In our midst
during tho last few weeks, tho Poor
Fish iClub demands publicity. It was
organized by a number of students,
who from their college standing, and
dignity of appearance would seem to
be above the average nut who comes
with bursts
forward
enthusiasm which he
of
has been unable to suppress.
Lo, among the ranks of those who
red
have appeared with the
and green ribbons adorning the lapels
of their coats, are Grover Creech, Pat
Campbell, Dick Hagan, Tom Gorman,
Raymond Connell, J. M. McKenzie,
and even Frizzy, who never condescends to ask us to print any of the
work of his unequalled Imagination
Even Frizbut the most
zy succumbs to the temptation to become famous by acknowledging that
he is a Poor Fish.
The requirements of this most es
teemed body of prominent students
are 1, that each member be able to
drink one quart of whiskey; 2, that
he has been jilted at least once, and
3, that he be willing to promise that
he will let women make a fool of him.
Shades of departed common sense,
attend the meetings of the august
gathering, and look to the interests
of the weary ones who look on!

on League of Nations Compact
DISCUSSED THIS WEEK

tell-tal- e

high-browe-

terest.
A trip thru the Hearst newspaper
plant from engraving room to the
DELEGATES BACK
morgue was an interesting event of

FROM

the program.
A report of this convention will
be made at a meeting of the Press
Association on Monday afternoon at
3:45.

Report of Programs To Be
Given at Joint
Meeting

LEAGUE OF NATIONS
DISCUSSED IN CHAPEL
Dr.

McVey

Urges All Students
Vote.

To

Chapel hour was taken up Tuesday
with a brief discussion by Dr. McVey
of the League of Nations, and the
six propositions to be voted on Tuesday by students and faculty members
of the University.
The purpose of the discussion was
to urge all not only to vote, but to become thoroughly acquainted with the
questions involved. The reservations
suggested for the sixth proposition
were explained and commented upon.

TAKES
POSITION AT SAYRE

SENIOR

CO-E- D

and a
Betty Davis, senior
prominent member of all college ac
tivities, has accepted a position at
Sayre College for the rest of this
year. Betty will have two classes in
History, and will change her residence
from Patterson Hall to Sayre College.
She wlH continue her work in the
University.
pre-me-

The Eighth International Conven
the Student Volunteer 'Move
ment for Foreign Missions which was
held at Des Moines, Iowa, December
by nine
4, was attended
University students, who returned
Tuesday night. They are, Margaret
Woll. Adele Slade, Fannie Heller, Lil-liCromwell, George Zerfoss, Jesse
Tapp, J. P. Barnes, George Gregory,
Flenor Heath, Secretaries R. W. Owens and Carl Zerfoss.
A convention of this kind is held
only once in a student generation and
those who attended this one came
There
back with glowing reports.
were 8,000 delegates from the various
colleges and universities of the United
States and hundreds of noted Y. M.
and Y. W. C. A. leaders and returned
missionaries.
At the Joint meeting of the "Y"
Association Sunday evening, January
18, a Des Moines program will be
given and interesting and' inspiring
ideas that were gleaned at the convention will be presented to the
tiori of

e

Simultaneously, January 13, every
college and university of the United
States will take a vote for the purpose of ascertaining the stand of stu
dents and faculty members on the
question of the League of Nations.
That this vote may be an intelligent
thoughtful one, the past week has
been given over to discussion and ex
planation of the league in practically
all (University circles.
College authorities are agreed that
the question of the league is one of
paramount importance, deserving of
all men's careful atetntion and interest.
It has not yet been decided how the
vote will be taken, but it is possible
that instructors will be instructed to
take the ballot in their classrooms.
It Is not deemed necessary at this
time to republish the articles of the
covenant in full, but for those students who may desire further infor
mation of the subject, the purpose of
the league as contained in the pre- able, together with the last part of
Article 1, 16, and 20 around which
discussions center chiefly, are published as follows:
The purpose of the League is to
and
promote International
to achieve international peace arid
security, by the acceptance of obligations not to resort to war, by the
prescription of open, just and honorable relations between nations, by the
Arm establishment of understandings
of the international law as to the actual rule of conduct among nations'
and by the maintenance of justice and
of a scrupulous respect for all treaty
obligations in the dealings of organ-ize- d
peoples withone another.
Last part of Article 1: Any member of the league may, after two
years' notice of its intentions to do
so, withdraw from the league, provided that all its international obligations have been met and that all its
obligations under the covenant shair
have been fulfilled at the time of the'
withdrawal.
Article 16: Should any member of
the League resort to war in disregard of the covenant it shall ipso facto
be deemed to have committed an act
of war against all the members of the
League, which hereby undertake to
subject it to severance of all trade
and financial relations, the prohibition
of all intercourse between their nationals and the nationals of the
-breaking
state and the prevention of all financial, commercial or
personal intercourse between the
-breaking
state and of any other
covenant-

covenant-

(Continued on Page Two)

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 2
CONCERTS DAILY, AFTERNOON AND EVENING.

THE

STRAND ALL AMERICAN
ORCHESTRA

"THE IEST
DR. McVEY

(Continued From Pago 1)

lieutenant colonels,

lieu-

twenty-fou- r

tenants, grade not stated; 662 noncommissioned officers. The present
roll of those who made the last great
names.
sacrifice Includes twenty-onIn the year of 1918-1there were
2,284 students in attendance at the
(University, 179 of theso candidates
for degrees, 1,156 were not candidates
for degrees.
New Department Added.
The report calls attention to the
fact that departments were added in
art and design, music, sociology, botany, farm mechanics and dairying.
The Home Economics Department was
entirely
and suitable
equipment provided.
Needs of the University.
"There Is no use disguising the fact
that the necessities of the. University
are great," says the report, "especially if it Is to represent adequately the
educational requirements of a spirited
people like those that dwell in the
Commonwealth of Kentucky. What
seemed adequate two years ago for
and construction
of
maintenance
r
period Is now
buildings for a
sufficient only to keep the institution
up to its present development without additional growth. The University
is faced with the care and instruction
of a
student body, the
requirements of better salaries, new
buildings and repairs."
No Building Fund Since 1904-0"The matter may be put simply.
The University has had no general
building appropriation since
when about $400,000 was appropriated
in the four years. At that time, the
student body consisted of 412 college
students and 293 other students, a
total of 705. In
the total
student body reached 2,335, including
,
the S. A. T. C. This year
the
college student body will be the
largest In the history of the University, 'in seventeen years' time, 1900
to 1917, the college students have increased 377 per cent."
e

9

i

OPEN 10 A. M. TO 11 P. M.
Children, 9c
18cplus 2c war tax
Adults,

ORCHESTRA IN THE SOUTH"

PUBLISHES
REPORT TO TRUSTEES

STRAND

for instruction in mining engineering,
that Kentucky's young men may
be trained at the University to take
part in coal and oil industries. The
volumes in the library are not sufficient for the needs of the University.
There is need also for a farm mechanics building; for a ljome economfor dormitories, comics building;
mons building, .engineering shops, a
women's gymnasium and a central
heating plant.
$300,000 Building Fund Needed.
The Board of Trustees are of the
opinion that an annual appropriation
to erect buildings and purchase
equipment running for a period of
years, is the only adequate way to
meet the situation. A Bum of $300,000
annually for five years would do much
to bring the University to a modern
basis.
The report closes with this significant remark: "The year 1920 marks
the date whether the University of
Kentucky goes forward or remains in
the rear of the procession."
bo

SIX PROPOSITIONS TO
BE VOTED ON TUESDAY

(Continued From Page 1)

five-yea-

rapidly-growin-

g

THE CLASSY PLACE
FOR THE COLLEGE STUDENTS
HOME-MAD-

Pin-so-

CANDIES AND LUNCHES

E

McGurk & O'Brien
"EVERYTHING NEW"

PHOENIX FRUIT STORE

ALPHA SIGMA PHI
GIVE NOTABLE DANCE

state whether a member of the league
or not.
It shall be the duty of the League
Council in such case to recommend
to the several governments concerned
what effective military or naval forces
the members of the League shall severely contribute to the armaments of
the forces to be used to protect the
Cole.
covenants of the League.
The members of the League agree,
further, that they will mutually support one another in financial and economic measures which are taken
under this article, in order to minimize the loss and inconvenience resulting from the above measures and
that they will mutually support one
another In resisting any special measures aimed at one of their number by
the covenant-breakinstate.
Article 21: Nothing in this covenant shall be deemed to affect the
validity of international engagements
What Other States Are Doing.
such as treaties of arbitration or reIn the report appears a table of gional understandings like
the Mon
what other states are doing. It sets roe Doctrine, for the securing
and
out that among the southern states,
maintenance of peace.
Virginia, West Virginia, Tennessee,
The six propositions to be voted on
North 'and South Carolina, Mississippi, January 13, are:
and Texas surpassed Kentucky in the
The propositions, for one of which
per capita contributions of the Unieach member of the student body and
versity support. According to this each member
of the faculty will be
table, the amount so contributed was requested to declare himself on Tues26 cents per capita, placing Kentucky day, January 13,
are as follows:
place. It will also be
in the forty-firs- t
Proposition 1. I favor the ratificaobserved that only three other south- tion of the League and Treaty withern states have a smalled investment out amendments or reservations.
in University plants than Kentucky.
Proposition 2. I am opposed to the
These are Louisiana, Mississippi and ratification of the League and the
California's investments Treaty in any form.
Arkansas.
are largest, being $13,584,432. KenProposition 3.- - I am In favor of the
tucky invested $1,185,542.
ratification of the Treaty and the

PARAMOUNT, ARTCRAFT, GOLD-WYAND SELECT PICTURES

pto lc warjtix

defeating ratification while still making clear that America can only be
Involved In war by a declaration of
Congress,
that domestic questions
and the Monroe Doctrine are entirely outside of the jurisdiction of the
League, that plural votes of any member are all disqualified in the event
of a dispute wherein iwe are disqualified from voting and that on deciding
to withdraw we are to be the Judge
of whether our obligations have been
met.

The active chapter and pledges of
Alpha Sigma Phi entertained with a
notable dance in Buell Armory. The
hall was artistically decorated in the
fraternity colors, cardinal and stone,
with palms and cut flowers arranged
around the orchestra. Delicious punch
was served, confetti, paper caps, and
other favors were distributed among
the guests.
The program consisted of eight
of popular, favorite music.
The hosts of the dance were as follows: Active Chapter: E. E. Kelly,
J. D. Wood, W. E. Endicott, W. C.
Brown, E. S. Winter, J. J. Slomer,
C. .H. Heavrin, C. L. Short, G J. Martin, A. L. Lisanby, T. B. Propps, C.
B. McCarty, O. C. Racke, W. J.
H. F. Watts, Oakley Brown,
George C. Bauer. Pledgesi
H. W.
Sullivan, O. L. Jones, R. W. Sauer, C.
D. Brown,
George Hillsman, Sam

HOME OF

"ONLY THE lEST IN MOVING PICTURES"

FOR FRUITS, CANDIES, NUTS
PHOENIX BLOCK

WHy

A TIP FROM BECK

worry about Clothes?

New Clothes are so high right now that we all
can't afford to buy them and to those who can't
just get out one of the old suits that you have and
send it here, it will be just the thing to wear to a
dance, party or school call.
BECKER DRY CLEANING CO.
Cleaners That Satisfy
Lime at High
Phone 621-X

Cropper's Laundry
(Incorporated)

114 N. UPPER

PHONE 210

1904-190-

1918-191-

1919-20-

Housing Problem Grave One,
For some time the University has
been confronted with the problem of
housing students. With the changing
of old and new dormitories to recitation buildings, the men of the University were left without dormitory provisions. Girls' dormitories are also
"Another need of the University is
new buildings for instruction purposes The Chemistry Department Is
housed In two buildings, one of them
very old, and the other Inadequate.
Larger facilities should be provided

1

g

League, but only with the specific
reservations as voted by the majority
of the Senate.
Proposition 4. I favor any compromise under reservations which will
make possible the immediate ratification of the Treaty and the League.
Proposition 5. I favor the Government proceeding to make peace with
Germany at once and leaving the
question of a League of Nations to
be settled afterwards.
Proposition 6. I favor a compromise of the reservations of such a
character as will avoid the danger of

Graves, cox & Co.
OFFER SPECIAL VALUES IN

Warm Winter Overcoats at
e
Union and
Underwear at
New style in Soft Hats, special at
Two-Piec-

$39.50
$1.90
$4.50

JUST TO FEW LEADERS TO "SHOW YOU"
THE GREAT VALUES TO BE HAD HERE.

Graves, cox & Co.
Incorporate.

N

* PAGE 3

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
HOE'S WORK PRAISED
BY KENTUCKY

Down Toiun

WRITER

James Lane Allen Writes
Interesting Letter to
U. K. Poet
December 19th, ProfeRsor J. T. C.
Noo delivered an address on Jnmes
Lane lAUen bcforo tho faculty and
Btudents of the Lexington High
School. Ills address was published in
tho Lexington Herald and a copy of
the address was sent to Mr. Allen by
Superintendent JU. A. Cassldy. Mr.
Allen wrote Superintendent Cassldy
that ho regarded the address as a fine
piece of literary criticism and had
this to say: "I shall write also to
Professor Noe on tho subject of his
remarkable paper as a piece of liter
ary work, and shall try to tell him
of the pleasure It gives to discover,
before It is too late that my books
have been so studied and so enjoyed
by him. To find after waiting so
long, a new critic of such vigor, Inheight
and
dependence,
breadth,
sweep of things, right at home refreshes and encourages me beyond
words. I am instantly impressed with
the quality, the stamp, the
of his thought. I expect to put his
address in circulation among my critical friends up here."
In a letter to Professor Noe Mr.
I am glad to
Allen says this: "
discover since my long absence from
Kentucky makes It a discovery that
you are a Kentucklan and that you
are putting out original work of your
own. Cassldy was good enough to
send mo a copy of a recent issue of a
magazine that contains a group of
your poems. I should like to tell you
how instantly and warmly I. have
I
it 'A Barnyard Festival.
have read it over and over. It is a
fresh, genuine, gushing, original note
amazingly limpid, very sure of what
."
It sings.

University Book Store

Meeting Place

The College Store

for

For College People

University Boys

Text Books

Open Until 8 P. M. Every Evening

Pennants

High Class
Haberdashery

Kodak Books

Fountain Pens

College Boys Styles in Our Special Designed Clothes

DOBBS FIFTH AVENUE HATS
MANHATTAN SHIRTS

Down Town Store
233 West Short

Basement Main
Building University

Most Complete Assortment of Silk Shirts
We Earnestly Solicit Your Patronage

hall-mar- k

Geddes & Luigart

WE BELIEVE IN YOUR WILDCATS

Phoenix Block

ALSO

GENE SULLIVAN
"Let's Get Acquainted".

STUDEBAKER
AUTOMOBILES

Ours is the Quality Shop

KELLY SPRINGFIELD

U. K. HAS HONORARY
MUSICAL FRATERNITY
Local Organized With View of Petitioning National.

The finest and most complete exclusively retail Optical establishment
anywhere in the South.
A faithful and accurate Optical Service in all its branches.
EYES examined by an Optometrist intimately familiar with the most
intricate problems of refraction.
The grinding of the lenses, the expert fitting and all other details
are accomplished within our establishment.

SOLID AND PNEUMATIC TIRES

AND SUPREME AUTO OILS

A local honorary musical

"THAT GOOD GULF GASOLINE"

"PEP" REVIVAL
"testimony" meetAn
ing is announced for the members of
tho University Press Association, testimonials of the chairman's Chicago
trip; shouting exhortations for real
pep are promised by Harry Cottrel,
and Jimmy Dixon, and some really important business must be discussed,
so every member is urged to meet In
the Journalism rooms, Monday afternoon at 3:45.
Ours Is the only organization of its
kind In the country.

WE FEATURE ONE DAY SERVICE

Fayette Optical Shop

DROP IN AND SEE US

fraternity

for men, under the name of Tau Sigma, has been organized at the University. To be eligible for membership the student must be a member
of one of the musical organizations on
the campus. It is the intention of
Tau Sigma to petition one of the national musical fraternities in the near
future. The annual pledge day is during the week immediately preceding
the Christmas holidays.
The members of the fraternity five:
Auryne E. Bell, R. M. Guthrie, T. H.
Green, M. T. Brooks, R. A. Bradley,
Edgar Gregg, Raymond Kirk, William
Williams, Neal Sullivan and R. H.
Calg. Professor Carl Lamport is the
faculty advisor and an honorary
member of the fraternity.

GEO. LUGIART

GEO. GEDDES

,

..

313-31- 5

Mammolh Garage Co.

Lexlnflton, Ky.

Phone 3972

W. Main St.
H. CLAY

ODENBAUGH,

Optometrist

(Incorporated)

EAST MAIN ST.

R. S. WEBB, Pres.

ft

WELSH

MURRAY PRINTING

0.

&.x

COLLEGE STATIONERY

GRADDY-RYA-

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ENGRAVING

CO.

AND

Incorporated

DIE STAMPING

THE COLLEGE BOYS' STORE

FRAT and DANCE PROGRAMS

Clothing, Furnishings, Hats, Shoes and Tailoring

DE LUXE
Ladies' and Gents' Tailors

Pianos
Player Pianos
Columbia Grafonolas
Aeolian-Vocalto-

ulMInf,

24

FImp
Ky.

PHmm

Established
1899

Records
Musical Instruments
Player Holla
Sheet Music

Everything Pertaining to Music
Moving, Tuning, Repairing and Refinishing
Pianos a Specialty

Competent Home Tailors
4 Trust

n

PHONE 592

The E. C. Christian Music Co.

P. ANQELUCCI

UrIm

LEXINGTON, KY.

N. LIMESTONE

124-12- S

177Y
205-20-

7

East Main

Lexington, Ky.

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

PAGE 4

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
Published every Friday throughout tho Collcgo year by the student body
of tho University of Kentucky, for tho benoflt of tho Btudents,
ahunnt and faculty of tho Institution.
,
Tho Kentucky Kernel Is tho official newspaper of the University. It
is Issued with a view of furnishing to its subscribers all the college news
f Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest concerning the
Universities of other States and Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR AND FIFTY CENTS A YEAR.
FIVE CENT THE COPY.
mall matter.
Entered at Lexington Postofflce as second-clas- s
EDITORIAL STAFF.
GAVIN NORMBNT.
Uulse Will

DITOR-IN-CHIEF

A

.Managing Editor
Managing Editor
uOo-eEditor
.Squirrel Food Editor
Sport Editor
Exchange Editor
Feature Editor

.Assistant

Robert Ralble
Adele Blade
Mary Elisabeth- - James.
Donald Dinning
Margaret McClure
Frances Marsh

:

ON TREATY QUESTION.

Intellect rules the world. This Is the first and last word of the wisdom
to be gathered from the annals of political history. Force may desolate
a land and reduce a weak people to a race of slaves. But it is in the minds
of trained men that the real wars are won; here and in the hearts of the
peoples involved. It Is seldom indeed that the two are Joined.
The members of a university, students and faculty, are almost unique
in their position In the social organization, for they combine the keen and
trained intelligence of diplomat and statesman, and the unspoken convictions of the homefolk. An expression of opinion by such a body of
citizens is important and it will not be overlooked by the legislators and
executives of the country. It is undoubtedly the weightiest expression
possible from any body of citizens of like number in the United States.
Next Tuesday, we, the student body, will have the privilege of expressing ourselves on the questions involved in the ratification of the
League of Nations. It is a privilege, indeed, to be able possibly thus to
sway the destiny of our country; and it is also our duty, as citizens, enlightened, trained, disinterested citizens, to accept in good part the request made by the Universities and Colleges of the country to record our
opinions upon this vital question. This we can do by thoughtfully considering and voting on the propositions to be presented in chapel, turning
i
out every man for himself, after having debated the situation in his own
mind and reached his own decision.
CRUCIAL

7Z

BBWKsY

9

L.

PROMINENT STUDENT.
OF UNIVERSITY DIES

OOTRRElk

FOOD

Mademoiselle on Dit, Bays: "I do the Lexington Drug, "to me there is
hate puns but just the same If Sally nothing more pathetic than 'miss-lesBurns, Louise Will."
mistletoe."

d

REPORTERS.
Elizabeth Marshall, Elisabeth Card, Mary Archer Bell, James A. Dixon,
Margaret Smith, Martha Buckman, Robert Mitchel, Terril Corn.
BUSINESS STAFF.
:
Business Manager
J; P. Rarnea
Circulation Manager
H. B. Loyd
.
Assistants
J. Burton Prowitt, Gilbert Smith
VOTE

:

HOUR

FOR

EDUCATION.

The biennial report of President McVey to the Board of Trustees,
which was in turn transferred to the Governor and the Legislature of
Kentucky, as set forth in a bulletin issued by the University, is a digest
of what the University has been able to do during the biennial period.
In clear, concise manner, the president has summarized what was
accomplished by the University during the war, and set out what must
still be accomplished in the future in the training of students, both for
military and civil (life. The fact is brought out that there are growing
demands to be met; that students must be brought to an increasingly
higher standard of citizenship, (which can be accomplished only when the
to maintain the University in its present progressive
State
status.
The report is an appeal to the State's representatives in the General
Assembly for help to perform the duties which the Commonwealth has
imposed upon the University. The Kernel urges that every student, every
citizen of Kentucky, and especially every legislator become thoroughly
acquainted with this report which deals with matters of vital importance
to every Kentuckian.
This is undoubtedly a crucial hour in the history of the educational
institutions of Kentucky. Within the memory of this writer, there has not
been in this institution so marked interest in higher education among the
students, nor so emphatically gratifying esprit de corps in its faculty and
administrative branches as is now evident upon every bend. Any parsimonious handling of the problem at hand which will retard this spirit
or extinguish this interest on the part of the youth of the State would be
false economy and a step backward that 'would be disastrous.
The Kernel is able to record at the beginning of the new year profound confidence felt on all sides in the present administration of the
University. It desires likewise to express its faith in the statesmanship
of those men who have been elected as the State's representatives in the
General Assembly. The Legislature has not yet reached the stage where
this problem has been brought up, but when it does, the Kernel is looking toward these men to meet the issue frankly, fairly, broadly, free from
parsimonious spirit.
Discussions have been heard on how best to procure funds to meet
the demands of the State's indistrial programs. The one that appeals
to the Kernel as the best in vision and statesmanship is that of bonding
the State for enough money to give all its institutions now the funds
needed to meet the demands of the fateful hour.

Miss Jewell was asking questions
IN OUR LIIRARY. .
concerning general Information. "Mr. "Come Out of the Kitchen." Home
Dinning," she Bald, "what do you as
Ec.
sociate with the words, 'the follow- "The Man With the Hoe." An Ag.
ing'?"
Student.
"The Follies," said Donald.
"The Passing of the Third Floor
Back." Law.
Mattle, the maid of Pat. Hall: "Can "Studies
of Animated
Nature."
you tell me wheah Miss Alpher Gam
Pre Med.
mer Delter rooms? Theahs a tele "The Port of Missing Men." Patt.
gram fo' her."
Hall.
"Hard Times." All the time.
Bill Hlllen:
"What's the matter "The Crisis." Final exams.
with you?"
"The Music Master." Prof Lambert.
Scroggan Jones:
"I swallowed a "The Task Master." Any of 'em.
Do you notice any change in "The
dime.
Kentucky
Warbler." Auryn
me?"
Bell.
"A Fool There Was."?
Monkey Talk.
"The Trail of the Lonesome Pine."
Campus on Sunday.
Professor Garner reports that the
female ape says: "Moohoo," and the "Paradise Lost." Missing graduation
by
"Wahoo." Evolumale ape replies:
credit.
tion doesn't appear to have carried us "Marvels of the Heavens." Astronvery far. A chap on the moonlit
omy.
beach last night said, "Whose is oo?" "The Book of Numbers." Math.
and the girl replied,