xt7j3t9d614x https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7j3t9d614x/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19350219  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 19, 1935 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 19, 1935 1935 2013 true xt7j3t9d614x section xt7j3t9d614x Best Copy Available
TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

Y

f

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
UNIVERSITY

VOL. XXV.

OP

MILITARY BALL
TO HE HELD IN OYM

THURSDAY NIGHT

KENTUCKY
NEW SERIES NO. 3

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 19, 1935

Wins Smashing
'PINAFORE' IS
Victory In Supreme Court NAMED AS NEXT
Decision On Gold Clauses STROLLER PLAY

MILITARY BALL Government
SCHEDULED FOR
THURSDAY NIGHT
Queen of Rail to Re Elected
Today, Will Reign

at Affair

Rare Majority of Court Rules
in Favor of New Deal in
Delayed Decision

VOTE IS S TO 4 IN
SPONSORS OP UNITS
IMPORTANT RULINO
WILL BE PRESENTED

Pledging of Fifteen Men by Chief Juctice Hujrhes Heads
Majority; McReynoldn
Scabbard and Blade also
Leads Dissenters
to Take Place
The Military Ball, one of the outstanding social events of the spring
term, will take place at the customary time, the evening before
George Washington's birthday, in
the Alumni gymnasium from 8:30
to 12 o'clock.
Kappa Kappa Oamma sorority
had the highest ticket sales of any
sorority for the Military Ball and
the three Cadet Hops, It was announced yesterday, and thus the
Quern of the Military Ball will be

selected from that group at a meeting of Scabbard and Blade at 4:30
p. m. today, but will be kept secret until the evening of the Bail.
The ball is sponsored and directed by members of Scabbard and
Blade, honorary military fraternity,
and the features of the event will
Include the crowning of the Queen
of the Ball, the annual spring
pledging of Scabbard and Blade,
and the Introduction of the new
military sponsors, who are chosen
by the members of the R. O. T. O.

regiment.
The grand march will begin at
0:15 o'clock and will be led by the
Queen of the Ball, who will be
chosen by the members of the
honorary organization. She will be

escorted by William Eversole, captain of Scabbard and Blade. Following the queen will be the unit
commanders and sponsors, the new
guests in double formation. The
sponsors will form the court for the
pledges in columns of two, and the
queen.
Captain Eversole will crown the
queen, following her ascent to the
throne, and with the assistance of
cadet officers, will present favors to
all the ladles.
has been arA special
ranged in honor of the new pledges
of Scabbard and Blade Immediately
after their tapping by the queen,
which will take place between the

Washington, Feb. 18 (INS) The
government won a smashing victory
today in the
gold cases
in the Supreme Court but by the
possible margin, 5 to 4.
narrowest
A bare majority of the court upheld the right of Congress to abrogate the gold clause in 175,000,000,-00- 0
in private bonds, and held that
the holders of Liberty bonds and
gold certificates, having suffered no
loss in the devaluation of the dollar, cannot demand payment in
gold or Its equivalent in the devalued paper dollar, $1.69 to $1.
Chief Justice Hughes read the
majority decisions, and was supported by Justices Brandels, Stone,
Roberts and Cardoso.
Associate
Justice McReynolds,
long noted for his conservatism on
the bench, read the dissenting opinions, and was supported by Justices
VanDevanter, Sutherland and But
ler.
Justice Stone differed with the
conclusions In one case, but supported the majority in its verdict.
This was the case involving John
M. Perry, New York lawyer, who
had demanded either payment In
gold or its equivalent In paper, at
the new rate, for his fourth liberty
bonds.
division was revealed
The
after the reading of the majority
opinions had been concluded.
It was a familiar division, 8 to 4.
for the court had so divided on a
number of important issues, with
usually the same Justices on the
different sides of the question.
One striking sentence in Justice
McReynold's dissenting opinion
was: "The Constitution, as many
of us have known it, Is gone."
long-await- ed

no-bre-ak

fifth and sixth regular

PHILO BENNETT
CONTEST OPENS
Prize of Twenty Dollars To
Be Awarded Person Writing Best Article on Government Policies

Manuscripts for the annual Phllo
M. Bennett prize, awarded for the
best paper on some subject of parliamentary government or history,

must be turned In at President

McVey's office before May 1, according to Professor Edward Tut-hil- l,
head of the history department and chairman of Philo M.
Bennett Award committee
The prise this year will probably
amount to twenty dollars, according to Professor Tu thill The
amount of the prise la determined
by the Interest collected on a fund
of five hundred and fifty dollars,
four hundred dollars of which was
given to the University by Mr. Bennett In 1804, when the first competition for this prize was held.

The sum has reached as high as
forty dollars.
The papers must be at least three
thousand words long and related to
the general toplo of the significance
of dictatorship in relation to the
principles and development of parliamentary government. AH undergraduates are eligible to compete.
Contestants must not sign the manuscripts, as an Identification number will be assigned to each In order to assure Impartiality In Judgment,
A committee of three, composed
Of Professor Tu thill, and two other
members to be appointed by Dr.Mc-Ve- y,
will decide on the papers. The
results will be announced In June
at the Commencement exercises.
The committee reserves the right
to withhold the award, should all
entries fall to come up to past
standards.
Persons Interested in further details should consult Professor Tut-hi- u.

Journalism Grad
Purchases Paper

Kittens To Play
Williamson High

Netmen Tonight
Two-Gam-

con-ect-

ed

Student Dramatic Group to
Give Annual Production
May
TRYOUTS SCHEDULED
FOR FEBRUARY 22

According to an announcement from the Registrar's office, there will be no holiday
in observance of Washington's
birthday. Heretofore there has
been a holiday, but because
these has been another day added to the Christmas vacation,
it was deemed unwise to interrupt classes for so short a time.
This is the first time In a number of years that the University
has not observed this holiday.

"Strollers", student dramatic organization, will present as its' annual spring production the Ollbert
and Sullivan comic opera. "H. M. S.
Pinafore", May 16, 17, and 18 in
OtilTiol Theatre.
"Pinafore" was first produced at
the Opera Comlque in London, 1878.
The first American production was
in the same year. The story Is centered around the love affairs of
one of the sailors, Ralph Rack-stra-

TO MEET TODAY
Garden Lovers of Kentucky
Will Convene for Third
Meeting at U. of K.
Museum Today
DR. VALLEAU TO SPEAK

preside.
Among the speakers will be Dr.
W. D. Valleau, plant Pathologist at
the University, Professor N. R. Elliott, Landscape Architect of the
University, and Professor C. S.
Crouse, Mining and Metallurgical
Engineer of the University. Mr.
Crouse is an authority on roses.
Mrs. Prank Van Deren, Lexington, will present a paper on "An
Interesting Garden in England".
The garden, which la one of the
most famous In England, belonged
to the late Mrs. Gertrude Jekyll,
who wrote a number of authoratlve
books on gardens.
Mrs. Deren's talk will be followed
by a discussion of "High Points In
Central Kentucky Gardens", given
by Mrs. Wilson Case Lawwlll of
Lexington. Mrs. Lawwlll will first
tell of John Bartram's garden In
Philadelphia, which was one of the
earliest and most famous in Amen- ca. Then the speaker will give a
description of Mrs. Louis Hagen's(

Col-Ap- ril

The University concert orchestra,
with Prof. Carl A. Lampert. conductor, presented an inspirational

has announced the following
for the summer
schedule
School:
University

July

f r s t term:
ly

13

second term: July
17

University High

,

WRITES

Mezzo-sopra-

no

an

TESTS

At

Entertains

ay

second twelve weeks.
There has been soma difficulty In
contacting a group of about one
hundred professional students who
attend only one class a week. The
department requests that members
of the group report at the dispensary for their tests as a one hundred percent survey is desired.
Knoxville, Tenn., Feb. 16. Only
ers, the Western Actuarial Bureau,
a powerful last half rally brought
the Louisville Fire Department, the
to a climax by Garland Lewis' long
Lexington Fire Department, the Inshot from the side, gave Kentucky
surance Department of Kentucky,
6
victory over TenWildcats a
the Kentucky Actuarial bureau, and
nessee and preserved their undethe State Department of VocationResults of Classification Tests feated conference record.
al Education.
the
Trailing at intermission,
sesPrograms at the three-da- y
are Released by Pro'Cats took on new life at the opension included speeches by promiing of the second period and began
fessor Asher
nent men In the field of publio
to make good their numerous opservice, motion pictures of methResults of final classification tests portunities.
ods and manners of fire fighting, given to a group of 34 late regisThroughout the initial half, the
and demonstrations of methods at trants were announced yesterday at Kentucklans missed shots repeatedthe Lexington department's tower the office of Prof. E. J. Asher of ly, while the Vols took advantage
near the University. Speakers from the Department of Psychology.
of their tries to pile up an eight
the University were Prof. John R.
From this group of freshmen, one point lead.
Mitchell,
assistant professor of ranked In tne upper ten percent In
It was only when the last period
chemistry, Prof. J. W. Manning, two of the three tests and three got underway that the Kentucky
and Dean W. 8. Taylor of the Col- ranked in the upper ten percent in machine began to click in earnest,
lege of Education.
scoring ton points before the surone test.
Robert Pemberton, Hopklnsvllle, prised Vols could even handle the
This training school Is the first
annual Firemen's Training school was In the first decile in mathe- ball. Edwards was then banished
and is a project of the series of matics and English. Robert Houpe, on personals and for a time the
training courses for publio work- a graduate of Henry Clay high 'Cut attack faltered. However, the
ers. It is planned, at present, to school ranked In the upper ten per- Insertion of Ralph Carlisle was the
conduct a similar course next year cent in English. Clinton Tucker, needed spark. Carlisle played hi
which will follow those planned for Bi'lvldue, and Edmund Thompson, best game of the season, as did Jim
social workers, policemen, and city Frankfort, were in the first decile Goforth, who replaced Anderson at
guard.
In the intelligence tests.
clerks.

Powerful Last Half Rally
Gives WUdcats 38-3- 6 Win

Final Results Of

Tests Announced

38-3-

20-1- 2,

Editor and Publisher of
ington Herald Died
day Morning

LexMon-

FUN ERAL SERVICES
TO RE HELD TODAY
Had Reen III Since Last September, When He Suffered

Paralytic Stroke

1

June
12
concert at the 8unday afternoon
Elementary-Ju- ne
University
musicale in Memorial hall audi13
torium Sunday afternoon.
All colleges of the UniversiThe University orchestra Is one
ty will be open, and a large
of the most popular campus muprogram on both graduate
sical organizations appearing on the'
and undergraduate levels has
Sunday afternoon series. This is
been planned. There will be
the second appearance of the or
a teaching force of approxiand the Captain's daughter, chestra this season and Professor
mately 178 individuals, comLampert prepared a program that
Josephine. Josephine is to be beprised largely of University
was of Interest to all music lovers
trothed to the Rt. Hon. Sir Joseph
staff. Approximately 800
present.
Porter, K. C. B.. First Lord of the
graduate course se and 400
Professor Lampert explained
Admiralty.
Ralph and Josephine
undergraduate courses have
briefly, the meaning and the signiare thus forced to plan an elopebeen scheduled for the Sumficance of the various parts of
ment
mer session.
Bchubert's "Stnfolnetta."
The cast will be chosen by Frank
The program was as follows:
Fowler and Mildred Lewis. Mr.
1. Prelude, Act 1 (Vorsplel) "LoFowler will direct the text, and Miss
hengrin"
Wagner
Charles F. Kelley
Lewis will have charge of all music.
2. 81nfonletta
Schubert
Miss Martha Bittner will teach the
Will Be
Allegro molto; Andante;
dances.
Allegro vivace
The characters are:
3. Tales from the Vienna Woods
Convocation 'Will Hear Art
Rt. Hon. Sir Joseph Porter,
(Waltz)
Strauss
K. C. B
Director of Chicago
Baritone
4. Overture to "William Tell"
Captain Corcoran, Captain of
Institute
Rossini
Pinafore
Baritone
Ralph Rackstraw, able seaMr. Charles Fabius Kelley, Assoman
Tenor
ciate Director and Dean of the Art
UK MAN School of the Art Institute of ChiDick Deadeye, able seaman ...Bass FORMER
cago will be the speaker at the
Tom Tucker, mldshipmate
next University convocation, to be
Josephine, the Captain's ,
10
ARTICLE heldm. Thursday, February 28, at be
daughter
Soprano
a Mr. Kelley's subject will
Hebe, Sir Joseph's first
"Art In Industry".
cousin
Professional Journalistic MagMr. Kelley acts in an advisory
Buttercup, a gun boat
Little
capacity to the Department of
azine Accepts Paper of
woman
Contralto
prints, which has Its annual Inter
O. K. Parnes for
First Lord's sisters, his cousins, and
national Print Show at the Insti
Publication
aunts, sailors, and marines.
tute, and Is the largest print show
"Pinafore" Is one of the best loved
of Its kind In the world.
American operas, and Is rivaled WAS ON KERNEL STAFF
The Art Institute of Chicago has
only by another of Gilbert-Sullivone of the best Departments of InO. K. Barnes, graduate of the dustrial Arts schools In the world,
works, "The Mikado". "Pinafore" is
a satire on the Victorian navy, and University in 1930 and now con- and has done much progressive
a parody on the "sea music" of the nected with the Nashville bureau work in conjunction with manuof the Associated Press, was the facturers of the Chicago area.
same era.
The dates of production will be author of an article in the February These manufacturers having exeMay 16, 17 and 18. There will be a issue of the Quill, magazine owned cuted numerous student designs.
and published by Sigma Delta Chi,
matinee on the 18th.
During
honorary men's Journalism frater- will be atthe afternoon, Mr.toKelley
meet
the Art center
nity.
with the students interested in art.
Mr. Barnes was managing editor
MEDICAL
of the Kernel in 1929. He left the
University after his first year to
Cwens
a cub
on the LexTO DE CONTINUED become Leader. reportermonths later
ington
Five
Benefit Bridge
he went to the Louisville Herald-Po- st
as a rewrite man, later beCwens, national honorary society
Examination of Students of coming assistant sports editor and for sophomore women, will entertain
paper. He at a benefit bridge Wednesday
University for Tuberculosis then state editor of that
at 3 p. m , at the Honey
to Be Continued Under Su- afterwards returned to the University and continued his work. After Krust bakery. Persons attending
pervision of KERA
graduation, he worked for two years the bridge will be shown through the
on the Lexington Herald, and then
Since the Kentucky Employment Joined the Associated Press bureau bakery before playing begins.
A prize, donated by a member of
Relief association, state branch of at Louisville, being
transferred to Cwens, will be given to each table
the FERA, has taken over the test- Nashville last September.
of pivot bridge. Persons planning
ing of students of tuberculosis as
to
a project, It is definitely known is The title of Mr. Barnes' article to attendofare urgedOthernotify some
games will
Cwens.
"Keep Cool and Don't Get Shot" member
the survey which was started being
that
an account of the recent riot be conducted during the afternoon
last fall will be completed soon.
for those those who do not wish
Under the KERA plan. Dr. in 8helbyvllle, Tennessee, of which participate in the bridge game. to
Chambers will remain In charge of he was an eyewitness.
Cwens is sponsoring open houses
the work, Charles Tucker will act
every Friday afternoon in the WomFUNKHOUSER TO SPEAK
as statistician, and Marvin Dunn
an's building this semester. Hoswill assist in the laboratory.
tesses last Friday were Virginia
Dr. W. D. Funkhouser will be the Robinson, Dorothy Whalen,
At present over 1,200 students,
Nell
about fifty percent of the total guest speaker at the meeting of the Bhearer, Nell Nevlns, and Eva Mae
enrollment In the University, have Mt. Sterling Rotary Club, today at Nunnelley.
noon. His subject for the occasion
been tested and more than 300
pictures made. All work per- will be "International Relations."
ASSOCIATION WILL MEET
taining to these cases will be com- This afternoon he will address the
pleted within the next two weeks Woman's Club of the city on "The
The Kentucky Business Education
and on March 1, the testing of tho Island of Ball."
association will bold its first semiFriday of this week, Dr. annual meeting at the University,
On
remainder of the student body will
Funkhouser will Journey to Mays-vll- le the formative period and plans for
begin.
where he will speak to the March 23. The organization is In
Tests will be made for a period of
twelve weeks and If not completed Audubon Society on "Kentucky its development will be completed
Birds."
by then, an option has been seat this meeting.
cured to extend the time for a

Firemen's Training School
Concludes Sessions At U.K.
One hundred eighty members of
fire departments of some fifty Kentucky cities attended the three-da- y
training course offered to firemen
which was held at the University
of Kentucky Training school on
Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday
of last week. This school was one
of the publio service courses which
have been planned for publio employees of Kentucky.
Dr. J. W. Manning of the Bureau
of Government Research of the
University, was chairman of the
University committee which was
composed of Dr. L. 1L Carter of the

direc-

Speaker

The third in the series of Garden Center programs sponsored by
the extension department will be
held at the University museum today. The main topic of discussion
will be "Consider The Landscaping."
Mrs. Thomas Cleaver, Lebanon, will

This will be illustrated
At the luncheon hour there will
Coach Paul McBrayer and his un
defeated freshman basketball team be an exhibit of books la the browsleft Monday morning on a two-ga- ing room of the library on landtrip to the eastern part of the scaping, the subject under discussstate where they were scheduled to ion.
The Garden Center programs are
meet' the strong Plkeville college
five last night Tonight the Kittens being held for garden club members
play Ellis Johnsons Williamson all over the state and are attractHigh School cagers at Williamson, ing a large number of garden enW. Va
thusiasts. Mrs. P; Joel Swift, presiPlkeville college has the best team dent of National Federation of
In the history of the school. They Garden clubs, says, "The garden
have defeated some of the best Jun- club, with its varied activities and
is about the most
ior college teams of Kentucky, Ohio, opportunities,
and West Virginia. Should the Kit- - stable Influences which we have at
tens win this game, they will have this time, when the whole world
a good chance of finishing the sea- seems to be in a state of confusion.
son undefeated. In Benedict, Plke
BAND WILL MAKE TOUR
ville boasts of a forward who has
averaged over IS points a game. Dick
The Concert band of the UniRobinson, stellar guard of the
freshman five, will probably be versity will make a tour of southeastern Kentucky during the Easter
called on to guard Benedict.
Little is known of the Williamson holidays, April 18, 19, 20. Thursday,
team. Coach Johnson had one of will be given at Sue Bennett
18, an afternoon performance
the best teams In that state last
year, and it Is reported that the one lege, London, Thursday night at
Somerset High school, Friday afterthis year Is even better.
Those players making the trip noon at Corbin high school, and
are: Combs, Craig, Davis, Hag an. Friday night, Barbourvllle High
LuU, Robinson, Spicer, Vou, Scrog- - school. There will be a program on
Saturday afternoon at Middles boro
gins, and Walker.
The team is due to arrive back High school and Baturday night at
Wednesday afternoon.
Plneville High school.

Concert Band
Dates For Summer
Is Feature of
Session Are Given
Vesper Service torDr.ofJesse E. Adams,Session,
the Summer

Opera Will Re Presented on
Professor Lampert Conducts
Guipnol Theater Stage
Orchestra Refore Sunday
This Year
Musicale

GARDEN CENTER

e
Trip
Freshmen on
Through Eastern
garaen on me nuaseu ikvc
Kentucky
by pictures.

Wesley Carter, former editor-ln-hiof the Kernel, president of College of Commerce, Dr. E. W.
the Men's Student Council. O. D. Montgomery, sociology professor,
K, and PI Kappa Alpha social fra- and Dr. E. J. Asher, assistant proternity, purchased the Hardin fessor In psychology.
The training school, which was
County Enterprise, a weekly paper
Mr. the first of its kind for firemen
published in Ellzabethtown.
Carter gaduated font the University of Kentucky, was under the ausIn 1934, bought the paper from Its pices of the Kentucky Firemen's
wners. and will take Immediate association, the University of Kentucky, and the Kentucky Municipwisession. He was formerly
with the CsaipbellsvUle pal league. Cooperating organizaMews before purchasing the Inter, tions In the enterprise were the
prute.
National Board of Fire Underwrit
ef

What, No Holiday?
Nope, No Holiday!

Desha Breckinridge Dies
Following Long Illness

Dave Lawrence led the Wildcat
scorers with 11 points but was
closely followed by Garland Lewis
and Ralph Carlisle who scored 10
and 9 points respectively. "Big Ed"
Edwards, who lasted only about 6
minutes In the second half was
held to three field goals during his
stay in the contest.

Funeral services for Desha
editor and publisher of the
Lexington Herald, who died at
a. m. yesterday at HlnaU, his home
on the Russell Cave plkn, will be
held at 3 o'clock this afternoon at
the Church of the Oood Shepherd
had been 111
Mr. Breckinridge
since last September, when he raftered a stroke of panUyidA while In
New York City.
A descendant of noted Kentucky
families, Mr. Brecklnridpe was the
son of Col William O. P. Breckln-rldg- o
and Issa Desha Breckinridge.
He was born in Lexington Aug. 5.
1867. He attended LawrencevlUe
Preparatory School, New Jersey, and
later Princeton University and thf
University of Virginia. He first prepared for law, a profession in which
many members of his family had
gained distinction, and was admitBreek-lnridR-

ted to the Kentucky bar in

P,

1893.

Until 1900 he was a member of the
law firm of Breckinridge and Shelby, of which bis father was senior
member.
Mr. Breckinridge first became Interested in the editorial work of the
Herald during the sound-moncontroversy in 1896, and became
publisher in 1897 and editor In 1904.
war
During the Spanish-Americhe served as lieutenant in the Third
Volunteer Engineers and as
J. C.
to Major-GeBreckinridge, his uncle.
Mr. Breckinridge had long been
interested In the breeding and rao-in- g
of thoroughbred hcrses. He was
one of the group that gave Kentucky its racing code and was Interested in the establishment of the
Kentucky state racing commission.
He had supported in Iris editorial
system of
columns the
k
betting at a time when
it was under attack in Kentucky.
Always a supporter of the cooperative system of marketing burley
tobacco, he recently had become
ey

an

aide-de-ca-

n;

parl-mutu- el

race-trac-

on Page Four)

U OF K

STUDENTS

TAKE FIELD TRIP
Museums of Cincinnati Will
Re Visited by Art Groups
Under Direction f Professor Rannells
Approximately
35 art students
left Lexington for Cincinnati early
this morning to view the art collections in the Taft and Cincinnati

museums.

The trip was arranged by the Art
department In the form of an all
day field trip for the purpose of
enabling the students to study first
hand the valuable, original art
masterpieces displayed at the Cincinnati museums. Professors J. P.
Barron. E. W. Flak, and B. W Ran-ne- la
are accompanying their students on the trip
Students who are making the trip
have been excused from classes today. They are travelling to Cincinnati at their own expense.
The group left at 7:30 a. m. this
morning and will spend the entire
day examining the original paintings, returning to Lexington late
this evening.

Kampus
Kernels
There will be a general open
p. m, Friday
0
house from
in the Womans building.
4:00-6:0-

Members of Cwens announoo a
benefit bridge party to be held at
3:00 p. m. tomorrow at the Honey
Krust bakery, West 6th St

The Oerman club will entertain
with a musical program, at 7:30
ADDED IN HYGIENE o'clock Friday night in the reading
room of Boyd hall. All students and
faculty
Interested in GerThree new courses in hygiene will man aremembers to
invited
attend.
be offered during the first term of
There will be an Important meetthe 1935 summer session after being ing of Omicron Delta Kappa at 6
approved by the University of Ken- p. m. this afternoon In White haO.
tucky senate In a recent meeting.
Rural and urban sanitation, water
There will be a meeting of
protection and purification, sewage
at 3:50 p. m. today on
disposal, and the handling of city the third floor of White hall.

THREE NEW COURSES

Pan-polltik- on

waste will be dealt with in one
course. Another concerns muternal
and child health and the third will
be called "Health Administration."
AH- - three
courses, which are
mainly for health officers, are to
carry two hours of credit.

Anybody interested in flying o
gliding, and in Joining a clu
devoted to these sports, see Cupel
McNash in the Kernel News roont
Wednesday at 3:30 o'clock.
(Continued on Page Four)

* Best Copy
They denied that Japan is press
ing fresh demands upon China
Dictator. Generaliss
fUBLWIIItO ON TUESDAYS AND FRIDAYS
imo Chiang Kalshek, The Japanese
insist that Chiang on his own acMrmhf
fttnffton nor(1 of Comm-cord Invited to a secret conference
Nlonnl Coll-- e PrcM Awocltl6n
to
,t
rr-- TntrroU--l-Aocltlon Aklva Ariyorhl, Japan's Minister
Kfntti'-liChina, and the Japanese Military
Hf- - Bcrvlrf
InWrnntlorml
Attache. Lieut. General Yoshlmlchl
Publica
of the M)nr Coll-A
Suzuki.
by A. J. Norrl- - Hill Co.,
tion- -,
According to Mr. Koki Hlrota,
York City. 123 W,
E. 47iid Bt.,
Mull-o- n
whose father wrote the "21 deSt.. ChlcMO: 10" Slid Are ,
.. inn
nrnailill. tot Aniirlp; Call mands" in 1915. Japan Is willing to
BTrl(T..
Sun Prr.r1ro.
do the following If Chlanff accepts
the tutelage of Tokyo: CI) Assist
THF.
OF
OFTliTIAk NlTWKPAr-EChina to withdraw from the League
OF THK UNIVKKSIT Y OP
KKNTUrKT. LIXINOTON
of Nations; (2) Furnish with mill
(3)
Conclude ft
tarv advisers:
Tfur. Enlf red v
ubarrlptlon 12 00
separate pact with China nullifying
Islington. Kf.. Poitofflc Ai

The Kentucky Kernel

wasp-walst-

--

lt

N--

Sfi-on-

Cltu

the Washington
and other treaties;

Mall Matter

Nine-Pow-

Treaty

er

(4)

Assume

THE KERNEL ALL responsibility
for the Japanese
ff.TJDENTa RIOHT8 MAINTAIN defense of China; (5) Exalt China
by exchanging ambassadors whereas
1. "BOrTNT" DAY- TO SHANNON
Japan has always refused to exAin't. Ker. tutor
FRIT? BORR1ES
change any diplomats with China.
Just as in 1915 when the "21
.10

HFE

RH ALL

gAttnr-tn-Cht- rt

In

(loath of Doma

hi

Breck-inride-

r,

editor and publisher of
Tb lxington Herald, the student of the University hare lost
tree friend and an active
benefactor. Coming from a fine
southern heritage, Mr. Breckinridge's character was snch that
he was admired and renpecied bT
all who knew hlm.- Ilto fame extend. beyond the
ftlne gmm. Daring the great silver controversy In the 90s, metrothe
politan papers recognized
fearless editorials of Mr. Breckinridge and not only copied them,
bat fruitlessly sought to Induce
him to leave his beloved Kentucky and work on their editorial
staffs.
Mr. Breckinridge bought a small
newspaper, and, from its nucleus,
he built one of the finest newspapers in Kentucky. At times his
editorial policies were not to the
best intercuts of circulation, but
convinced that he was right, he
did not abandon his views even

,

,

though faced with ruin. Eventually, he overcame odds and his
viewpoints were understood to be
correct. He feared no man, and
it was the knowledge of his great
oourage that made him respected
by all who read his work or met
him face to face.
He took active interest In the
Department of Journalism at the
University. The local chapter of
Alpha Delta Sigma, national ad- vertlsing fraternity, was named
the Desha Breckinridge chapter
in his honor and throughout the
years he was an
intervening
active sponsor. For years, until
the coming of the depression forced tut discontinuance, it was a
custom for the students of Journalism at the University to take
over an entire issue of the Herald
and publish It for valuable experience. The sacrifice of time,
money, and organization that this
practice entailed did not deter
Mr. Breckinridge from the yearly
custom for he was happy in the
knowledge that he was benefitting his friends, the students.
It can truthfully be said that
his kindness will be missed, but
his memory wtll remain to serve
as an inspiration and a model to
students of the University and
especially to those who hope to
embark on the tumultuous course
at the Fourth Estate.

JAPAN AGAIN
In

1913

the

Chinese

Republic

received a 6ccret ultimatum from
the Japanese Empire to the following effect: The President of China
must accept Japanese protection of
China and In return must sign over
'certain powers to the Emperor of
Japan. These powers Included control of the Chinese Army, the
Chinese Navy, the Chinese Treasury, the Chinese Police, and other
items of sovereignty. Finally Japan
demanded that the President of
China must keep all this secret,
but he, trapped and desperate, had
let Japan's ultimatum leak out to
Frederick Moore, foreign correspon
dent for the Associated Press, and

he sent the dispatch to the United
States.
Upon receiving
this dispatch
Secretary of State, William Jen
nings Bryan, along with the Gen
era! Manager of the Associated
Press, Melville Stone, went to the
Japanese Embassy, and over dell- clous tea, Tsuueo Chlnda, Japanese
convincingly
denied
Ambassador,

the

reports

of this

ultimatum,

which later came to be known as

Japan's

"21

Tuesday, February 19, 1936

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Tatre Two

demands."

It

was later found out that the
Japanese Ambassador had lied, and
the ultimatum was authentic. When
questioned by Secretary Bryan, the
Ambassador merely replied that his
instructions had been to lie about

the matter.
Last week the Japanese Empire
repeated these "21 demands," to a
certain extent, and again the officials were Instructed to deny their
authenticity.

demands" were denied, so were
these dismissed by Mr. Hlrota with
the remark "so fantastic that I
decline to comment upon It."
Now China comes to the board
and blames all Its troubles on
President Roosevelt's policy concerning silver, saying that "Roosevelt is driving our Government Into
bankruptcy."

WHERE'S JOE COLLEGE?
In years past there has been a
tendency on the part of the public
to regard college as more of a playground for youth than an institution of learning. Much of this was
caused by the wide ballyhoo given
to the rah-ra- h
college boy, better
known as Joe College, and certain
pranks such as the
fraternity "hell week".
The movies also may come in for
a fair share of criticism along this
line. They do not give us pictures
of college which show the struggle
made for learning by the majority
of the students, but rather an exwell-kno-

hibition of
in
order to produce a successful 'musical comedy"
attraction.
The lack of seriousnes and attention to studies claimed for the college undergraduate is belied by
recent 'worry" surveys conducted In
several leading schools throughout
the country. These surveys or polls
attempted to find what the college
student of today Is most concerned
about. They list a number of subjects such as sex, education, the
future,
examinations,
graduation,
appearance, drinking, grades, proficiency in athletics, failure, etc.
Beside each of these subjects are
three brackets with the headings:
"Not at all worried", "Weakly
worried", and "Intensely Worried".
Through these surveys it was found
that 70 percent of the student population was intensely wo