xt7j6q1sg75k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7j6q1sg75k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19420612  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, June 12, 1942 text The Kentucky Kernel, June 12, 1942 1942 2013 true xt7j6q1sg75k section xt7j6q1sg75k THIS MEANS DEFERMENT

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tailors a oie:

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Betty 'South
with high distinction

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"

A high point in the graduation exercises at the University
on May 29 was the awarding by President Herman L. Donovan of the Algernon Sydney Sullivan medallions to Joe
Atkerson Gayle. of Lexington, and Miss Betty South, of

ptankfor.

Gayle, a former
of
member
AJpha Gamma Rho. social fraternity, tnd treasurer of SuKy. will
soon enter the United States Marine Corps as a second lieutenant.
He also received this year's American Legion award as the graduating military student possessing in
marked decree the inherent qualities necessary in making an officer

and gentleman.
Miss South, who graduated "with
high distinction",
received
the
award as the outstanding senior
vcman. Her .campus activities included presidency of the Y.W.C.A.
and Jewell Hall. She was also a
meir.ber of Phi Beta Kappa, national scholastic honorary.
The Sullivan medals are given
to a senior man and woman having
outstanding qualities of leadership
and citizenship.'

'Alumni Elect
"Miss Margie
Miss Marguerite McLaughlin has
been elected by directors of the U.
K,. Alumni Association as their ex
ecutive secretary.
She succeeds G. Lee McClain.
former Kentucky adjutant general,
was elected president of the

tssociation.
Kiss Helen King, assistant public
relations director at the University
was appointed acting treasurer of
ty.e association. She is substituting
for Cf.pt. James Shropshire, who
new s in the Uniwd States Army
b.n6 is believed on. foreign duty.
--

message from

lie following

t-

rfficers

ilfjon successfully com
training school
pleting this course they will be commissioned secord
heutenar.ts in the Army of the United States.
(c) Students who are especially qualified for
necessary advanced study, research work, or as faculty replacements may be recommended by tiir

-

institutional authorities to continue their studies

'The War Department hopes that the
educational activities of colleges throughout
the country will be interrupted as little, as
possible and in order to insure for the army
a future source cf qualified officer candidates
from college graduates and to encourage
students to enroll and continue in college
it has adopted a plan whereby a certain number of college students will be enlisted in the
Enlisted Reserve Corps and thus be deferred
from the draft until they secure their degree
from the University.

its

TFte KENTUCKY

MTEDkMIEIL

President H.

L. Donovan
speak on "Education In
Time of War" at the opening
convocation of summer school
in Memorial Hall on Tuesday morning June 16.
Third hour classes will dismiss for the 10 o'clock assembly.
In addition to President
address,
several
Donovan's
to
announcements relative
summer school will be made.

Kernel Editor, 1935,
Receives Fellowship
John F. "Sunny" Day Jr., former
Kentucky Kernel editor and journalism graduate in 1935. and now
filing editor for the Associated
Press at Huntington. W. Va., was
recently awarded a Nieman Fellowship for a year's study at Har- vard University. He was one of 16
newspapermen selected.
Day also worked for several years
on the staff of The Lexington Leader.
He is author of "Bloody Ground,"
a study of Kentucky mountain coun-wh- o
ties published last year. Much of
the material for this book was
gathered while Day was on news
assignments in those areas from the
Lexington papers,
The Nieman fellows will go to
Harvard in September on leave of
absence from their newspapers and
press associations.

University of Kentucky, Lexington
FRIDAY, .UiNE 12. 1942

VOL. XXXIII

Tr.e War Department has author- tr.e establishment at the Uni- vers.ty of an Army Enlisted Reserve
Ccrps. whereby :men students entering the school may be deferred
until graduaIrons military sen-ic-

c
corps will be based on thes
quirements:
The applicant must be a citizen
of the United States, have enlisted
voluntarily, have passed required
physical examination and be judged
to possess the necessary qualities
tion.
for a commissioned officer.
According to the War DepartColonel Brewer called it a "studv
80.000 freshmen. 57.000
ment's plan.
sophomores and 41.000 juniors in ur "i"" PlauHe expressed the belief that the
tfcjtctfd colleges in the "nation will
program would result in an imme- t erri)ed
diiU '"cea.se in University
Cclcnel B. E. Brewer. R. O. T. C.
who has been placed iniment. since it will encourage many
tlarpe of the reserve unit, said that young men who previously have
l.e wroiiiri request all Kentucky draft been uncertain as to the best way
board to defer University students of serving their country, to enroll
until the program can be placed in the University anc secure their
degrees before entering military
in operation.
tJetecUon of volunteers, lor the service.
-

enroll-comanca- nt

NO. 1

Registration Reaches 1yZ94 Students
Dramatics

Guignal Presents 'Growing Pains'
"Growing Pains", a gay three-acomedy by Aurania Rouvelol, will
be the first Guignol theatre production of the summer. The play,
which will be directed by Frank
Fowler, will be presented on July
ct

13.

14.

and

He'll Direct

15.

very little on the
Depending
plot, the humor develops from the
The
farce centers 'S
characters.
around the love interests of the
younger generation in the home of
a professor.
According to Mr. Fowler over
twenty-fiv- e
young
eople are included in the large cast. He expects to select mast of these from
University talent.
W
Tryouts will be held from 4 p. m.
to 6 p. m. on Sunday, June 14.
'

Directing Course
Offered Teachers

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course designed to
A directing
interest returning and praspective
v
school teachers will be offered this Jl iidufctmittawn ritiftumiia'iimB
'
summer at Guignol theatre. The
. . Ciiiigiinl's in t lomedy-"('rineiii- g
class which meets Monday through
Friday, will study the theory and
I'uni.-.technique of casting.
Beginning with the selection of
a play, Mr. Fowler said that the which takes the student through
entire directing procedure would the theatrical technique of adapting the play to the stage on which
be studied.
it is to be presented: designing,
Another course in drama tics of- building, and painting the set for
fered this summer is Stagecraft. that stage; and operation of play
in production.
People in these classes will get
WORKSHOP COURSE
practical experience working on
OFFERED TWICE
"Growing Pains."

DURING SUMMER

The Workshop Course in Nutrition . a five quarter hour course
offered by the Home Economics
department. Ls designed to meet the
needs of social service workers,
public officials, and educators in
all fields. The course, listed as HE
107, is offered twice during the
summer from July 2 to July 23,
and from July 23 to August 12.

Final Enrollment
May Exceed 1600
According to Dr. Leo. M. Chamberlain, Registrar of the University, 1,294 students registered at ttt
University for the first term of
summer school yesterday. Compar
ing this figure with last year's
opening enrollment of 1,330 students. Dr. Chamberlain felt Vnn
current figure was rather hiftb.
"The chief difference
in tilts
summer session and those of past
years." he stated, "is the large proportion of undergraduate student-- ,
that are back on the campus "
He added that a loss in grHd-uatmistudents probably
3a t
rollinent
from
surpassing
year's figure. "Graduate st'.Henf i
are either in the service or engage I
in employment which they can t
leave." he said, explaining tl.e decline in advanced students.
Registration will continue tt.nt
Thursday. June 18. Dr. Oiamucr-lai- n
was confident that the fhi.U
enrollment would reach lfOO students. Last year's final enrolment
in summer school was 1643
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,

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-- i.

the University.
Tr.e quota, for the University has not as ye beta
received. However, the quota for colleges and
located in the Fifth Corps area whica
includes Kentucky. Ohio. Indiana, and West V:rgui;u
is 22,700 men, divided as follows: 8.800 freshmea
(.300 sophomores, 4.500 juniors and 4.100 seniors.
"After this year only freshmen will be allowt't
to enlist in the Reserve Corps. Based on our enrollment our allotment should be between 1,500 ar.d2,Ut.O.
"A senior who graduates prior to August 1, IS?,
is net edible for the Enlisted Reserve. The minimum
fcge requirement is 18. although the provision has befit
made for acceptance of youths under 18, provided
they agree, in writing, to enlist in the Army Enlisted
Reserve Corps upon reaching the age of 18.
"Students under 21 must have the written crrse t
cf their parents in order to enlist. Those men who
enlist in the reserve unit are not subject to military
call prior to graduation unless they fail to graduate
with the class with which they entered, or unless th r
grades fall below a standard set by the University.
As foon as detailed instructions are received, trto
military department will publish a bulletin for "distribution to members of the faculty and student boiiy
giving informaion as to the execution of the pUiU
of the Enlisted Reserve Corps."

are physically qualified, will be assigned as follows
a Those in R. O. T. C. advanced course will
in accordance with existing regulations.
b) Those not in advanced R. O. T. C. will be
ordered to active duty at the nearest training
center. Upon successful completion of
the norma) three month course there, and if otherwise
qualified and recommended, they will be ordered to

will

(Sir tirtiile nt toj nf fxit

(

the (omrnandmit of cur R. (). T. C. unit, is de
signed to darify tlte status of Uiiiveisity men
who enlist in the Army Enlisted Resen Coips.)

Donovan To Speak
At Convocation

Study Or Fight' Plan
Inaugurated at U.K.
(

BY COLONEL B. E. BREWER
R. O. T. C. COMMANDANT, IT. cf KY,

"The boys graduating from this, instillation, who
are enlisted in the Enlisted Reserve Corf? and whe

Joe Atkerson Gayle
. . . soon a marine

Col. Brewer

-- --

Williams To Head
Marshall College

kit

CALLING

JOURNALISTS

Anyone interested in workii.K oil
the summer Kernel is asked
leave his or her name and phouo
number at the Kernel Business office by Wednesday. June 17.
There are several resprnslrto
positions which have not, as y St.
been filled.

WOMEN'S MEETING

:

'

Dr. J. D. Williams, director oi
the University Training school, was All women students are aig'i
named president cf Marshall Col- by Dean Sarah B. Holmes to
a meeting in the Music Rooin
lege, Huntington, W. Va., according to an announcement received of the Student Union Buildig 4tk
4:3C this afternoon.
here yrstc relay.

d

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..

Page Twv

Net S Far Away

Jibe Kentucky Kernel
TStudert

Ov-ir-

Friday, June 12, 1042

.

Now!

OperaKd"

every Friday

Pwbiht--

ffrjgwd
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THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

t the Post Office at
ler.d ciass- m&ntr

Lexinrton.
under th

Ken-te-

c.

Act

MEMBER
Ir.U rco?lef iste Pres. Association

ft By

Bord of Commerce
Ketiturky Press Association
tiauonai Editorial Association

ftDVttWt
WMI lllin K
KationalAdvertisingSenf'ice.lnc.
SO

KDo
1H1M

Torn.

VL
-

tot

frRSCRIPTCON FATES
fmwwr-- 2 00 On

Yrar

Editor

Jay Wilson
Day Fhone
Nifht Phone

PHIL ORR, who has been grabbing the limell'pt jvith his delayed
military haircut, astonished me with this yarn last night. iTrrl'aims he
isn't an American citizen or at least if he is, he's also a subject cf tiiC
British Empire.
Phil was born in Canada and is technically a citizen of that ccuriry
until he is twenty-onCitizen or not, he will register with Uncle Sam in
July when he will be twenty. Incidentally, he applied for his citizenship
papers in Htu8 and is anxious to become an American. He's simply confused about his status.
For that matter, so am I!

N. T.

AMVlfa

tT.80 Or

......

Vn. 74
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256

article? nnd column are to he
IKe opm:onr ot the vntert themtclrct.
ml ao not necesrariit reflect the opinion or
4U

nfnri

Streamlined Education
(Requires Our Best Effort
4With the opening of the summer
quarter, the University has inaugurated a program of education designed to completely support the ultimate victory of the Allied forces.
Courses have been condensed and
requirements streamlined in order
to assist students in completing college before entering the armed
forces.
Consequently, every University
student should devote his best effort
to the increased load of this wartime program. From a patriotic
.viewpoint, as well as a scholastic
one, there can be no failure. The
University now has no time for the
youth.
idle, pleasure-seakin- g
President Donovan has emphasized the fact that "Education is Defense' One might say with equal
force that it is also an "offense",
froper training will qualify the
Oung men and women of our nation
to meet the crisis which we now
face.
Graduation is the prime consideration cf the college student. Under
plan of education
the three-yeonce hazy Commencement looms
the
on tomorrow's horizon.
The future confronts collegiate
youth more realisticly than ever before. Our preparation for such an
important and immediate task will
have to be thorough regardless of
Its brevity or rapidity if America
is to continue to progress as a
Democracy.

f

ar

Tabloid Is Experiment
For Summer Kernel
As a journalistic experiment the
Kernel will be published in tabloid
form during the summer. If this
change proves unpopular, the original size paper will be resumed in the

na.

that a tabloid newspaper
in keeping with our times. In
is
uch a paper stories will be presented in briefer form giving the gist
of the news in a few paragraphs.
Needless secondary headlines over
jjtories will be omitted.
Advertising during the summer
is invtribly below that of the other
consequently
the
seasons, and
Kerr. el will often be only four pages.
.Without doubt, this would never
.We feel

iiappcn curing the regular quar-

ters and

is r.ot to be

fault of the tabloid.

r

lay Wilson

as a

Several features have been added
to the Kernel. The much clamored
for gossip column is in the new
group which includes a weekly news
summary, film chatter, personals,
and a selected editorial.
Changing to a tabloid does not
mean the Kernel is going to become
a "sensational" newspaper. It is
true that more pictures will be used
in the summer Kernel but they are
offered in an attempt to make the
paper more interesting and attracti-

ve.

,

Selected
"To Hell With Bluebirds"
C

BY WALTER WEIR
opy Director, Lord and Thomas

Don't get me wrong I'm just an
ordinary guy. I'm not trying to
pose as an expert on the moulding
of public opinion. I'm not talking
big about what I'd do if it was my
job to whip up the country on the
war effort.
I'm talking as an everage citizen.
I'm saying, not what I'd like to tell
them, but what I'd like to be told.
Soon.
Sure, I'm buying bonds. I'm paying taxes. I'm doing with less
sugar. But deep down inside where
it really matters, somthing hasn't
taken place. I'm all a welter of confusion there. It keeps me scratching
my head and mopping my brow
when I know I ought to be clenching my fists.
You understand? It's like this:
I want to be told not to buy
Defense Stamps or Defense Bonds.
I want to be told to buy Victory
Stamps or War Bonds.
I want to be told not to remember Pearl Harbor. I want to be told
to take Tokio, to bomb Berlin, to
raze Rome.
I want a positive program instead
of a passive one. I want something
to fight for I'm sick and tired of
having only something to fight
against. I'm hungry for something
to fear. I want something to do
not just to wait for.
I'm fed up with singing plaintive
songs I want to sing battle songs.
Don't tell me there'll be bluebirds
over the white cliffs of Dover. To
hell with bluebirds. Tell me there'll
be vi?5ti;res and a deathly silence
over Ecrthtesgaden.
I'm bored with Jeep "rig a stiff

the record counter at Barney Miller's) says
in record production is a small bug. According to a bulletin
he has from the manufacturers, the shellac which coats every, record is
obtained from a tiny insect found only in India. This shellac is also ued
on bombs and in other phases of war pTtducti"n. Believe me, records are
going to get scarcer and scarcer.
BOB WATTE (behind

the

bottle-nec-

k

Letters to
the Editor
GOOD-BY-

E

TIP TO WAR DEPARTMENT:
Some of the records using that
shellac might be as effective as
bombs if they were played ever
public address systems to the
enemy.
Although its a tribute to the Jap
ingenuity, they tried a similar
trick. Taking American records of
"Heme Sweet Home", "Stwanee
River", and other American folk
songs, they played them over loud
speakers, hoping to make
the
British sailors homesick.
Most Englishmen never heard
either of these songs!
;

CANNON?

Dear Editor:
At the present time the United
Stales is attempting to salvage scrap
iron, Lut I have heard very little
about such a program on our campus.
Wouldn't the old cannon in front
of the Administration building be
acceptable for this purpose?
With such a notable beginning,
there would undoubtedly be other
donations to this campaign.
Gordon Wesley

EV

WANTED
A place to show her
wares by an antique lady with
a Spanish chest and . other odd
things.
Cole Spring (Ga.) Times.
His face was a striking one, and
even without his clothes people
would have turned to look at him.
London Times.

upper lip I want to develop a stiff
uppercut. I'm tired of being made to
feel sad. I want the experience
the purging, marshaling, driving
experience of being made to feel
mad. Fighting mad!
You get me?
PRINTERS' INK

What

Price---Freedo-

IDENTLY A MISPRINT

m?

THE FREE LANCE By Rob Worth
The recent suppression of Social

freedom of expression even though
it endanger the very existence cf
the government nurturing it. No
curious government has a right to survive,
inspection
public
that
they say, unless it can prove its
bundle of prejudice and bigotry
Charles E. Coughlin. Since case by reason rather than force.
Father
Others believe that such "radithe days of his potent alliance
with William Randolph Hearst, cal" viewpoints should be curbed. If
the state went that far, however,
Coughlin has encountered lean pickthere would be no civil liberties to
ings, the ban upon Social Justice
merely being the last blow to his protect, and progress would be unknown.
grandiose aspirations.
Has not every new idea been conThe problem posed by such demaCoughlin, however, is but sidered "radical" upon its concepgogues as
one aspect of a far larger question tion and forced to battle against
the status ouo? In fact, is that not
which must inevitably be encountered in a democracy the question the very essence of progress the
of civil liberties for the ugly fact history of the fight for "truth"?
We may have to resolve this
remains that the suppression of
Social Justice is contrary to both perennial dilemma in the immediate
future, granting an Allied victory.
the spirit and letter of the ConstituGermany's post-wa- r
Weimar Constition of the United States.
Just where are we to draw the tution failed to solve the difficulty-an- d
the result was Hitler. Given a
lire between freedom of speech and
Seme people think that a proper solution the result
treason?
vve'h
rnean peace.
democracy should allow cc?rp?ete

Justice as "seditious mailing matter" has once more brought up for

r-,- y

* Jiw

Krlday.

Society.

122

12,

'arid In Review
ky
The Anciran s.iii Japanese ra- it
met last
and this time.
Jus;, six months afier the surprise
i,Jart c.n Pear) Harbor, the Amer-Uarouted the Jap fleet and
threw the tr.err.y for a great naval
o.

less.

Vice

"Row Row
Rcw Your Boat . .

carroll

ji.m

Page Three

People

of the

STEIN FORT

KY KOY

plaint department among American

Vice of the people, by the people,
and for the people if that's possible legitimately
is the digest of
this week's sermon for the congregation of newly acquired freshmen,
returning students, old maids, and

columnists.

But here we are. melting away in
a sweltering office, with our word
caught down so to speak. Frequently, during the regular school year
Vice Of The People irks th Adschool masters.
Should we mistake this summer ministration with a bit of personand by accident or chance, libel per alized, and probably unjustified,
se or per quod any individuals, we comment.
must be excused.
Now with a wide reader Fcopt.
This is the most, assorted group we fear to trudge upon the Admin;to which this, a strict college col istration's feet. Our only choice
umn, has ever had to appeal. Col appears to be Herr Adolph. ar.d we
lege students of the undergraduate cmi hardly be original by pannint
variety are our bait in a strict sense "lm- of the word.
In future events of Vice Of The
People, we shall reserve a subject
Now. in our first summer appearance, we are perplexed just how to and then proceed to tear it, down
appetite so the readattack the subject to make lt in- with lion-lik- e
teresting tothe freshman and to er will have cause for comment
the old school master returning to criticism, and other expression
that could be ejaculated in thin
do graduate work.
PRETTY MAXINE ARI.EN is one of the few people who Dorothy Thompson has Eleanor direction.
So stick around for the next!
have solved the jrasolfne rationing problem. Maxine row to and the War to raise hell with; Peg-lhas the C. I. O. and John L. round. We're going to leave ourwork daily, usinjr the Inland Thoroughfare at Atlantic City,
Lewis; Winchell heads the corn- - selves open for an uppercut!
N. J. She dons a skirt after tyinp tip her rowboat ; doffs it for
bald-head-

Tie Japanese

Admiral Lsoroku
Vnrr.z--c- lc
is believed to be licking
hit wr.;.r.r;j somewhere in the north
Wcf.c and making preparations
foi a "lace saving" smash on the
American defenses that is if he
r.ble to f.r.d the American fleet.

"Jrv&s:cr of the French coast
is rure tc come "
This is the warning the British
government has given the people
of France. The appeal, made earlier this week in a French language
broadcast, urged the people of occupied France to evacuate
the
coastal areas, but at the same
time made no indication that a
major thrust could be expected. It
only implied What might happen
if the people Waited until the last
moment to prepare for evacuation
o' the court.

'COLONEL

Try'v

p

er

the row home after the stenographic chores are completed.

bo You Need A Car?

t)r. Downing Honored
By NaH Fraternity

Social
Calendar

Dr. H. H. Downing, professor of
and in charge ol
astronomy at the University was
recently notified of his election Ic
the vice presidency of Pi Mu
national honorary mathematics fraternity.

mathematics

OF THE

Ep-sik- n.

WEEK"
l

'

WEEK OF JUNE

WHY NOT RENT
A NEW ONE?

PHONE 8552
CHRYSLER

IT

U-DRIVE

12-1- 9

K4 E. Short St.

Friday, June 12

I

p. m. Movie

",
"The Lady
by
riirected
Alfred
Kitchcctk. Great Hall. Student
Ur.itn Euilding. Adm. inc.

:M

Van-hes-

Sunday, June 14
6:30 p. m. Buffet Supper. Music.
Balcony, Student Union Building. Adm. 50c.

Try Our
Chinese

Monday, June 15
7:-8-

Luncheon
Only 40c

Food

p. m. Social Dancing. Blue

:3

Tasty
American

Grass Room, Student Union
Building.
7:M p. m. Open House.

Great Hall,
Student Union Building.

I

V

V
X
-

i

i

"Nr t

WEET

1

Tuesday, June 16

NEED IS YOU

Shr

Dinah

""

S:00

p.

i

Bob Hillenmever

1

I
1

week's "Coionel of the
SVak" poes to Bob Hillenmever.
t'utstarxirip commerce sopho-rnoJrcm Lexington.
Eot lias served as business
r"fir:i4f r of the Kernel for three
temesiers. Previous to that he
acvertismg manager. He
wm recently elected to O. D. K.
Intl jded in a long list of his
activities are president of Lan-ot- s;
ar.d Who's Who in American
Colleges.

THREW

KISS AT THE OCEAN
Hal Mtlntyre

cf

IJiese

achievement? we invite you to
uutne in and enjoy any two cf
our dtlicioue meals.
LI ATHEON
1:45 p. tn.
JJ:35 a. m.
IHNVER
5:00 p. m.
7:45 p. m.
KVVDAY
8:0C a. m.

K:0C

p m.

Cedar Village

ReslaMt

for Faculty

???,,fT

p. m. Social Dancing.
Elue Grass Room. Student
Union Euilding.
7:t0 p. m. Open House. Great Hall,
S'.;:ric-nUnion Building.

Thursday, June

i i i " ill l l

ii

ii

m

r tjji
iHITM

COTier Lime and Main

Wednesday, June 17

A

rt

Tn

m. Reception

and Students. Great Hall,
Student Union Building.

tLOIE

Clenn Miller

A

I
I

I

ALL

"

""'

7:45-9X-

1

p. m. Folk Dancing.

0

F.cora.

raiding.

Blue

Student Union

"

SAVE ON

SPECIAL!
Feather Haircut ar.d Pemaneiit

Your

$50

IAUNDRY
15

Facials
Quitk ekantip

50c

Complete facia
We

- DRY CLE A NI NG

Discount

Drivt in Service

$1.00

are proud of cur quality tervtce.

CALL 727

Student Union
Beauty Parlor
Ask about cur eeonomv card!

De B OOT
Opposite Stadium

Laundry

Ckanin

* T( F. KENTUCKY

Fagr Four
THAT

tS A

KERNEL

FViday,

from Louisville will take time out
for an operation the early pa- -t of
the summer. He expects to return
to summer school the second term.

RECORD

Down.

Sfgma Alpha Epsilon Wins
Intramural Crown For 7th Time
Dudley Baker, of the SAEs
wHf awarded the L. G. Balfour Trophy lor individual high scorer and
paxtxipant for the year. Dickie Nay-lo- r,
Alpha Sigma Phi. was runner-u- p

i:::

Eaker was winner of the golf
singles over B. Bronston, also an
SAT, and paired with J. Calvert to
win the golf doubles championship
over Floyd Guthrie and Bronston.
Een Eubank was winner of the
liovice singles tennis titles for the
fraternity, and Jodie Wade was
runner-uWade and George Dudley won the novice doubles title
over Eubank and Bob Colins.
Dick Young of the fraternity was
wrestrunner-u- p
in the
ling division and Bob Montgomery
was runner-u- p
in the
class. J. Hall and N. Peak were
runners-u- p
in the handball doubles.
The Kappa Alpha fraternity, under the leadership of Richard Daniels, won the sportsmanship award.
During the last year, 723 U. K.
students participated in the twenty-Fpc- rt
-intramural program. Professor Hackensmith, acting head of
the University physical education
department, said.

-

It1

.

v

f:
"SWA

Ms.--

STICKING HER NECK OUT for Uncle Sam is lovely
Jane Nicholl of Atlantic City, N. J. Jane is one of a group of
girls who spend their spare hours salvaging tires and tubes
to help solve America's rubber shortage problem.

t

Rnu

VJV

'bout the swell
lunches at the

Lcnches
unly

9

fall, is play- U

U

1

summer.

iron

Grid-

team-mat- e,

Noah Mullins. is
also a key performer on the same
squad.

While Kentucky's nine was having a fair season after losing
Coach Prank Morel y to the navy
Mullins was batting out a lot of
the runs that added up to victories
for Versailles. This team has beat
such outstanding opponents
as
end Port Knox.

Joe College isn't the same guy.
A few days ago a friend told him
there was going to be a gasoline
shortage and that the government
would probably start rationing gas
on July 1.
After that Joe practically lived
in his flivver. He raced up and
down the local streets In a gallant
attempt to use the few precious
gallons he could still buy.
Then the first of last week a
front tire started leaking. By Friday another was periodically collapsing. Soon Joe was spending so
much time working on old
tubes, that he couldnt
find time to go for a drive.
On returning to the University,
yesterday, he pushed the old buggy
into the garage. College wouldn't
look the same from the sidewalk,
he reflected.
And it didn"t. Neither did Joe
with a knitted brow for the first
time since he entered college.

U-DRI-

1SS E.

VE-IT

Short Street

r

STUDENTS!
Check this list of

School Supplies
Notebook Fillers

5c & 10c

Pencils

2

Kentucky Die Stamped Stationery

12c pkg.

Looseleaf Note Book Backs

for 5c

10c

Index for Note Book

5c

Great Literature in "Pocketbooks"

5c

Campus Book Store
There's A Dixie Dealer

Gym Annex by 6:00 p. m. on
Tuesday. June 16. Scheduled
matches will begin on Thursday, June 18.

C!J

COLONIAL!"
Menu

AH

j J this
;n

NEW
Fords and Plymouth?

Gas Shortage
Depresses 'Joe'

Entries in the softball
tournament and tennis, golf,
and ping pong singles and
doubles are due at the Intramural Sports office in the

uI'm iust bustin'
to tell yuh

555

also

will

start his last sa- -

RENT A CAR!

EMPTY!

Tournament Entries
Due June 16

7

' who
s

Versailles this

v1

FORD

Rose Street Confectionery

aTnmf

fi

Cutohin,

Phone 648

W"
ran ml Pv.rv.
body has so much fun yCt
7
there they'll never see?

1

3T

v.

-

,

Snr. u

V

stellar senior

Althaus,

,

year's

.

"Didja know the
i:4
ROSE STREETS
big welcome
throwin a
for all the college kids,

351 S

NX

Carl

If

"Say! Myrt"

14

4

that their

f

5

ffigtt

work if
done you'd think the Wildcats
would be bustin' a shoe lace to pet
home, but according to Mr. Shivcly
there will be quite a few of the
boys in summer school.
Smiling, as he handed me a
rather long list, he explained that
most of them are taking R.O.T.C.
This, of course, will keep our losses
to the draft ajl a minimum next
fall.
The list included twelve football
and three basketball players.
Now

r

'

1

BY THE EDITOR

No Tire Worries For Her

p.

Phil

Sports' Lane

For the seventh time in the history of intramural .? forts at
the University, the Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity wen the
ariiual intramural sports participation cup this year.

June 12, 1942

2 VEGETIBL-E-

CHOICE OF MEAT

S5c

USED BOOKS
Bought

and
Sold

XCRIAM

OF

THFJUUJJiBMS

!l

Near You

at the

Colonial Restaurant

Campus

Across From Memorial Hall

Book Store

DIXIE ICE CREAM CO.
XNCCEr--G RATED

Rose

at Chesapeake

*