xt7j9k45rf9h https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7j9k45rf9h/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19560323  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 23, 1956 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 23, 1956 1956 2013 true xt7j9k45rf9h section xt7j9k45rf9h chool Stademts 16(O(0 Strom
Visit Gampnis Today And Tomorrow
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in preparing science students for college and a scientific
career, and to enlighten the high school student as to the
job of the professional chemist.
Separate programs have been planned for the students
nnd teachers during the monling session. The afternoon
program will be in the form ofnn "open house" with
exhibits and demonstrations.
Dr. Hans Spa use bus of Generate F.lortric Appliance
teachers on
Tark chemical laboratories will address-thIn"The I'se of Chemistry in Basically
dustries."
Presentation of the Home Economics Girl of the Year
will be a feature of today's program planned by the De-

By VIRGINIA SNODGRASS

More than 1,600 high school students and teachers will
be on campus this weekend attending clinics and vocational meetings. These meetings will be sponsored by the
School of Home Economics, the School of Journalism, the
Department of Ancient Languages and the Department
of Chemistry.
The Department of Chemistry expects about 200 science teachers and students from all sections of "Kentucky
to participate In their fifth annual high school Chemistry
Day.
As a climax to "Career Week" more than 400 high
school girls will be visiting the Department of Home Economics today.
The School of Journalism opens its doors today to
more than 300 teechers and students who will take part
in the annual High School Tress Association publications
clinic.
The seventh annual convention of Latin Clubs and Latin students will be held Saturday at Memorial Hall. Dr.
Jonah Skiles, head of the Department of Ancient Languages and Literatures, said that about 700 students from
over 20 schools are expected to attend. This convention
is sponsored jointly by the Junior Classical League of
America, the Department of Ancient Languages and Literatures, and the College of Adult and Extension Education.
The Department of Chemistry, in sponsoring Chemispurpose in mind; to aid teachers
try Day, has a two-fol- d

e

Non-chemic-

al

partment of Home Economics.

The Girl of the Year is an outstanding member of
the. University Home Economics Club. She is chosen by
the club members for her leadership, service, and scholastic qualities.
The "Career Week" program was organized and carried out by the Home Economics Club. Members have
made posters illustrating the various career fields in home
economics, set up exhibits, and prepared refreshments.
The School of Journalism will present a program of 40
classes, discussions, and other activities today. The journalism staff, students, and outstanding persons in mass
communications will help with this program.
Perry Ashley. Kentuckian editor, and D. T. Davis, of
the D. T. Davis Company, Lexington, will lead six class
sessions throughout the day on yearbook editing

HTTP
Vol. XLVII University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kyi, Friday, Mar. 23, 19:G

No. 20

Stars In Night Program

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Stars In The Night
Next Wednesday night is the big night for UK coeds. For that's the
big moment when many lovely young ladies will receive well deserved
awards for outstanding achievements. Shown above are members of
the Women's Administrative Council the organization sponsoring the
event. They are (1. to r., kneeling) Joyce Ann Kane, Jo Ann Burbid?e,
Ann Everett, and Mary Ann Kullack. Standing (I. to r.V. Jill
Marlene Begley, Janez Fitch, and Kathy Reynolds.
.Ma-hon- ey,

tive Council, which is composed of
the presidents of women's campus
organizations. Ann Everett, president of the council, will be mis- tress of ceremonies.
Among the honors will be the
tapping of new members for Alpha
Lambda Delta, Cwens, Links, and
Mortar Board honoraries. The new
members of Beta Gamma Sigma,
Eta Sigma. Phi, Kappa Delta Pi,
Chi Delta Phi. Theta Sigma Phi,
Phi Beta, Student Union Board.
Tau Sigma, and Phi Upsilon Oml-cro- n
will be presented.
The outstanding freshman, sophomore, Junior, and senior women
on campus will also be recognized
at this time. Other awards are
various cups given by different sororities for scholarship or leader- ship to individuals and organiza
tions.
At the programs. House Presidents Council will announce the
winners of the room judging contest held this semester.

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Avenue Of Champions

!

3.

Dr. Lippard, acting as consultant for the UK project, met
(ho
with President II. L. Donovan, administrative olficials
University, local members of the Hoard of Trustees, and prominent Lexington physicians while lu re, to further discuss plans
lor the medical school.
.

Tin

SGA Discusses Improving

-

Medica IA u th ority
Advises Do nova n
On Med School
12-1-

'woiiKii at 7:o() p.m., Wcdiics-dav- ,
March 2S, in Memorial
illa'll.
"toiars in me Mieni is snon- sored by the Women's Administra-

1

al

Several recommendations concerning UK's proposed medical
school were advanced by Dr. Vermin Lippard, dean of the Yal
University Medical School during his two dav visit here March

annual "Stars in the
Xilit" program will he liclcl
;to honor more than 200 VK

Wt

dent publication.
"Sunday Magazine Fditing" will be taken up by Cary
Robertson. Sunday editor of the Ioulsvll.e Courier-JournaneVJoc Creason. feature writer for the Courier-Journa- l.
This lecture, open to the public, will be at 11
a.m. in Room 211 of the Journalism building.
A campus tour will be conducted by Boyd Kennan.
Another highlight of the clinic will be the open houses
held by the Kernel Press, located on the ground floor of
the Journalism Building, and by Radio Station WUKY,
located on the fourth tloor of McVey Hall.
Contests in spelling, vocabulary, current events, and
journalistic techniques will be held. The Lexington Herald-Leader
will award a total of $75 In rash prizes.
The best in high school photography will be featured
by Dr. William Moore in Room 211 of the Journalism
Building. This display will contain the winning photos tn
n recent national contest.
Latin students will meet Saturday for the seventh annual convention. Mary Wood Brown. Henry Clay High
School, will be in charge of the meeting. She is the Junior Classical League chairman of Kentucky.
The program will include discussion groups, plays, and
skits. There will be an exhibit of posters, pictures, and
models in the Home F.ronomics Building.

By MARNF.Y BKARD

To Be Given Wednesday
i

Agisting in the yearbook program will he NillUm
Huhhell, artist, and Grnrge F. Barber, of the Kingport
(Tenn.) Pre. Barbers will talk on "Designing the Yearbook Covrr." The l.ang Company-Lexingto- n
staff will
conduct a session on stencil duplicating processes in stu-

Donovan
Expels
3 Students

Although t he erection of a medical-sis still in the planning
stage, all possible steps are being
taken by I'niversity officials to insure immediate action if the proposed appropriation for the school
is approed by the Kentucky General Assembly. This appropriation
will in all probability be voted on
within the next month by the
chool

Assembly.
Among Dr. Lippard's
recommendations were :

proposed

1
Three freshmen who were in- locatedThat the medical school bo
as close to the heart of
volved in the narcotics and theft the campus as possible. Dr. Liparrests three weeks ago were ex pard expressed the opinion, "the
pelled from the University this closer the integration, the more
all colleges of the University will
weclc
be strengthened."
Seven other boys implicated in
Th;lt, medical students not
the affair were also disciplined. be
housed in separate dormitories.
Four were suspended, one until Thc ,dpa, siluatlon Dr. Lippard
February 1957 and three until Sep- - said. would be to have these medi-tembre
1956. The other three boys cal students live with "more
n.
placed on disciplinary proba- - ture students;' such as those
rolled in Graduate School or tho
College of Law.
The action was taken by Presi- (3) That members of the
dent Donovan upon the recom- Judiciary Com-- ! cal school faculty also be member
of the
mittee and Dean of Men Leslie L. of the arts and sciences faculty,
(Continued on Page Hi
Martin.
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ma-we-

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medl-mendati- on

.

By FLIZABETII BFLL

"The Avenue of Champions looks like a cowpath and is
degrading to the University," said Jim barnman, graduate student representative, at a Student. Government Association meet-

i'rshrssi 5nrssD

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Li!Tm55I i2 H55Bii2ar
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ing Monday night.
SOA vcted to investigate the
possibilities of improving the Ave- nue of Champions. Graham Ave.
behind the Home Economics Build
lng. and tther streets near the
University.
Other business included the discussion of student jam sessions to
be s4X)nsorfd by EGA and a plan
tting committee report which pre- eented a list cf campus problems
be brought befuie the assembly
before May.
President Don U'hitehouse ap- pointed Stanley Chauvin, chair- -

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man, and Jim Bergman. Bill Luce,
and Bob Howerton to confer with
I'niversity and Lexington officials
and the Chamber of Commerce
t:--'"':'.y
?'
ij f v ? i h t
about repairing or reconstructing
the streets.
Don Mills, chairman of the social committee, told the assembly
that a Friday afternoon Jam ses- sion has been planned. SGA ap- AVir Coo per stolen Apartments
propriated $50 to cover the ex-t- o
children. The hou&lng units are to be ready for
penses of the first session. The Be prepared, married student! The beautiful new
occupancy by the beginning of the '56 fall temes- Cooperstown apartments are nearing completion.
date has not been set.
so located as to
ter. (Id. note They're quite an improvement over
The well ventilated apartments are
(Continued on Pa$e 3)
the old shacks, areu't they?)
provide more titan adequate recreation areas for
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* T!!i: KENTUCKY KEKNEL. Friday. March 23, lO.'fi

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'Ag Banquet
To Be Held
On April 5

Library Contest Offers $2,7 Prize

and submitted In chronological or- der itJi the .author! :fcidfBiiblisJi(

Thr deadline for thejvyilson Library ConVttisApfi 13. .1(
A prize of $25 is offered to the
student possessing the best personal library. Entries may be submitted to professors Gerhard
Weinberg, John Reeves or John
Henry Mclzer.
The annual Agriculture Banquet
4
All entries must be typewritten
will be held Thursday, April 5, In
the Ballroom of the Student Union
Building at 6 p.m. This banquet is
4one of the highlights of the year
for all Agriculture nnd Home Economics &tudents.
Shopping
As part of the program the judging teams will be introduced, the
i', a
i
for
different agriculture and home
economics organizations will make
their awards, scholarship receivers
A Fine Dry
will be announced, and outstanding students will be recognized.
The deans of the Southern agriculture colleges will be present at
Service?
the banquet as the guests of the
University. They will be on campus for their annual spring meeting, April
The speaker lor the evening will
.mI.TIi .... ji.i.'iii
be Penrose Ecton of the Ecton
-"
Til 'ill.
"
?,
J Supply Company on North LimeWow!
stone Street. Eceton is a graduate
"Vou'll love Sun Valley!" says the caption on this publirity release, of the University of Kentucky Coldesigned to lure U Kstudents to the University of Idaho's summer lege of Agriculture.
Free tickets will be available for
school there. Attractions are the pretty coeds with the Betty Grable
Icijs . . . the mountains . . . the legs . . . the skiinsr .'. . the legs freshmen and sophomore students
the week of March 26 in the Agri. . . the trout Ashing . . . the legs . . .
culture and Home Economics
Buildings.

The winning entry will be displayed In the Margaret I. King
Library. '
Pennsylvania Packet Sc General
Advertiser, first successful daily
newspaper, was begun Sept. 2i,
1784.

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Around

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All Campus Sing
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Window shopping's a time- - proven
way to test before you tor. We
think it works for dry cleaning
services, too! Pick the smartest
looking women, the most dapper
child
men, even the
how they got
dren. Ask them
that way. Chances are, they
don't wear new clothes every day.
Chances are, they use a
dry cleaner. Chances are,
they use us! Why not join in?
The prices are fine!

r

All Campus Sing will get underway tonight with the wom-

Think Of Us When
You Think Of

are Alpha Delta Pi, directed by
Tamara Thompson; Alpha Gamma Stadelman; Chi Omago, directed
Delta, directed, by Nadine Here- - by Marlene Begley; Delta Delta
Delta, directed

top-draw-

FINER FOODS

by Nina Vann;
Good Samaritan Nurses Glee Club,
directed by Gail Jennings: and
Kappa Kappa Gamma, directed by
Drue Cox.
Of this group four will be chosen
.

to sing in the finals Saturday.
March 24, at 8 p.m.
The three groups singing in the
men's division are Delta Tau Delta,
directed by Roy Woodall; Kappa
Sigma, directed by David Marshall; and Sigma Nu. directed by
Lawrence Jones.
The four men's groups entering
quartets are Kappa Sigma. Pi
Kappa Alpha, Sigma Alpha Epsi-lo- n,
and Sigma Nu.

fjrf

best-dresse-

en's preliminaries at 7:30 p.m. at Memorial Hall. Seven groups
are entered in the women's preliminaries.
The groups and their directors ford; Boyd Hall, directed by
Joan

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p

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Plan To Use The
PACER ROOM
For Your Next

4-

-

9

PARTY
Catering to wedding receptions

L

ADAMS

Next to Southern Station

683 S. BROADWAY

PHONE

4-43-

73

15

7

Discount On Cash And Carry
.AW.'AV.VMVLyViW
!

.'.W.V.VAV.V.'.

In Your Easter Outfit From

S'PfLE
to
what I can dc

I

4

Hart Schaffner
and Marx

$3595

Griffon
Palm Beach

Well, you're wrong! had the
very same problem. Then, I
bought an After Six tux. Look at
me now! I've got money, fame,'
big muscles, and girls aplenty.'
I

to

HATS

n

.

AW

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v.

SHIRTS

by.

by

Stetson and Lee

Van Heusen.& Rialto

$10 to $15

$3.95 to $5.00

N

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4

Complete selection of Neckwear, Hosiery, Sport Shirts, etc.
i

7T)lt CENTER
of ttntit

f

$6950

'

Jtokrt $v$rywhr

f i.

Haspel

ht

act now, while there's still
hope!

v?y V,

Suits, Sport Goats, Slacks

Have you ever wondered why
other college men have $o much
fun at dances, proms, parties-w- hile
you end up with Miss
Potluck of 1912? Do you blame
your, plight on skin blemishes,
or unsightly dandruff?

But

The Oldest Men's Store in Central Kentucky

n
r

for YOU!

light-weig-

KAUFMAN'S

EASTER

Jet me PROVE

Here's al! you do to becom
appearing. Try on a
After Six Dinner Jacket. Buy it.
Then, Fn the privacy of your own
home, spend 15 minutes a day in
the casual elegance of your
After Six. Right away, you're
handsomer, healthier, inches
taller. Women stand in line to
ogle you.

SAIUTE

155

WETMWN

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* THK KKNT1TKY KKKNKI.. Fridav. March

Roundlrcc, Reclor To Give SGA Talks
Joint Recilal Sunday

(Continued from Page 1),
James T. Miller, College of Engineering, was chosen by the assembly to fill the Graduate School
vacancy in SGA.
A list of campiy problems to be
discussed by the assembly was read
by Barbaranelle Paxton. chairman
of the planning committee.
It included putting a suggestion
box in the SUB lobby for campus
improvement suggestions, the possibility of extending library hours
on Sunday, allowing freshmen
girls an extra night out to go to
the library, and promoting better
relations between the University
and the community by forming a
board composed of members of
SGA, University, and town

The UK Music Department will present LilIy Kemper
Hoiiutrec and Hay Hector in a joint recital Sunday, March 3,
at 4 p.m. iii the Laboratory Theater of the Fine Arts Building.
The recital is in partial fulfillment of graduation requirements.
Mrs. Rountree Is vice president
of Alpha Gamma Delta sorority
and a member of Phi Beta music
honorary. MENC, University Choristers. Women's Glee Club, and
the Woodland Christian Church
choir.
"Through war ana peace,
She has been active in Cwens, and luxury, good and bad famine
Tau Sigma, Panhellenic Council, freedom and fraternity have times,
never
and Interfaith Council.
parted company."
Urr accompanist will be Carl
These words were the main
Bleyle.
Rector is past president of both theme of an address given by Dr.
the UK Marching 100 and the Earl Kauffman Jr., associate professor
Central Kentucky Youth Sym- 500 of physical education, before
students at the Greek Week
phony. He is a graduate of Henry
banquet in the Student Union last
Clay High School.
He has studied with Sam Rainey, week.
Dr. Kauffman said that it was
Prof. Frank Prindl, and Prof. Wilno coincidence that our Declaraliam Worrel.
He is a member of Phi Mu Alpha tion of Independence and the
music honorary, Kappa Delta Phi, founding of the first fraternity,
and Delta Pi education honorary. Phi Beta Kappa, occurred practiMrs. Warren Lutz will be his ac- cally at the same time in history.
"Members of fraternities and
companist. He will play Kamin-ski- 's
"Concertino for Trumpet," sororities form a large enough
"Impromptu' by Ibert and "Fan-tasi- e group to start a crusade for freeun Mi Bemoi" by Saint -- dom," he added.
Outstanding pledges presented
Saens.
at the banquet were ADPi, Nancy
Alaska was sold to the U.S. by Cunningham; AGD, Marilyn MarRussia, March 30, 1867, for $7,200,-00- 0 tin; AXD. Edith Warner; XO, Ann
in gold, through the efforts of Vimont; DDD, Frances Rouse; DZ,
William H. .Seward, secretary of Nancy Adamson; KAT, Ann Murstate under President Johnson, phy.
KD, Jacqueline Sellers; KKG,
after much opposition.

Kauffman Speaks
To Best Pledges

Siina Chi To Hold
WvsX Drosnl Content
"Americans in Paris" ulll be the
theme of the 10th annual Sima
Chi Best Dressed Contest arm
Style Show, on April 13 at 7:30
p.m. In Memorial Hall.
From the rent est the
fraternity . man and sorority woman on campus will be
picked. Gift certificates, donated
by Lexington ckthing stores, are
to be awarded to the winners.
The current fashions will be
modeled in the style show in an
effort to heighten Interest In smart
and attractive dress on the
"best-dresse-

Marilyn Mayes; PSS, Constance
Goldberg; and ZTA, Nancy Mea-

S

dows.

For the fraternities the pledges
presented were AGR, Ken Bean;
ASP, Jim Jeffries; ATO. Tom
Deye; DX, William Kenny; DTD.
Ben Darnaby; FH. David Calvert;
KA, Skip Adams; KS. Bob Moody;
LXA. Jim McGlone; and PDT, Bill
Duvall.

It DQVS
m

to add Cibbi

to yuc cAt
secretarial tramin
accomplishments if you arc ambitious
to
and hold one of those better
.positrons in business.

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CIBIS CltVS

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((Author of "Bart fool Boy with Chsttt,n otcj

HOW TO BE A THUMPING BIG SUCCESS
ON CAMPUS
Vhile up in the attic last week hiding from a bill collector I

PKT, John Ball; PSK, Walter came across a letter, yellow now with age, that dear old Dad had
Gooch; PKA, Bob Self; SAE, Bill sent me
when I was a freshman. I read the letter again and
Eaton; SX. Bill Hammons; SN,
recalled, with many a sigh and not a few tears, what an inspiraJack Hoffman; SPE, William
Stagg; TKE, Avery Jenkins; Trition it had been to me back in my freshman days. I reproduce
angle, Frank Hibbs; and ZBT, below in the hope that it may light your way as it did mine.
Robert Smith.
"Dear Son, (Dad always called me Son. This was short for
Formosa is 245 miles long and Sonnenberg, which was originally my first name. Hater traded
88 miles across at its widest point.
it with a man named Max. He threw in two outfielders and a
pitcher . . . But I digress.)

it

left-hand-

ed

"Dear Son, (Dad wrote)

tig

X

.VV.:

"I suppose you are finding

V

college very big and bewildering,

and maybe a little frightening too. Well, it need not be that
way if you will follow a few simple rules.
"First of all, if you have any problems, take them to your
teachers. They want to help you. That's what they are there for.
Perhaps they do seem rather aloof and forbidding, but that is
only because they are so busy. You will find your teachers warm
as toast and friendly as pups if you will call on them at an hour
when they are not overly busy. Four a.m., for instance.
"Second, learn to budget your time. What with classes, activities, studying, and social life all competing for your time, it is
easy to fall into sloppy habits. You must set up a rigid schedule
and stick to it Remember, there are only 24 hours in a day.
Three of these hours are spent in class. For every hour in class,
you must, of course, spend two hours studying. So there go six
more hours. Then, as everyone knows, for every hour of studying, you must spend two hours sleeping. That accounts for anhours each for
other twelve hours. Then there are meals-t- wo
breakfast and lunch, three hours for dinner. Never forget,
you must chew each mouthful 288 times. You show
me a backward student, and I'll show you a man who bolts
his food.
"But college is more than just sleeping, eating, and studying.
There are also many interesting and broadening activities, and
you would be cheating yourself if you neglected them. You'll
want to give at least an hour a day to the campus newspaper and
yearbook, and, of course, another hour each to the dramatic and
music, clubs. And let's say a total of three hours daily to tho
stamp club, the foreign affairs club, and the debating society.
Then, oX course, a couple of hours for fencing and
a couple more for square dancing and basket weaving, and ono
or two for cribbage and
Son-nenbe- rg,

bird-walkin-

g,

ng.

"Finally, we come to the most important part of each
I call 'The Quiet Time.' This is a period in which you renew
day-w- hat

relax and think green thoughts and smoke Thilip
si
Morris Cigarettes.

yourself-ju-

SPRING
a
bolero
... turnaboutblue oversize
navy
tissue

left

wool in

.

.

BEAUTIES
scoop-nec- k

.

10

.

.

.

short sleeved sheath, of sheer
119.95

d.

beige Italian silk Dupioni lined cape over a
. . . size 12 . . . 69.95
both hats from our Spring Garden Collection

right
dress

.

.

.

on
oym

a7)-.-

and

"Why Philip Morris? because they are the natural complement to an active life; they are gentle, they are benign, they
are tranquil, they are a treat to the tired, a boon to the spent, a
That's why.
haven to the storm-tosse"Well, Sonnenberg, I guess that's about all. Your mother scndi
her love. She has just finished putting up rather a large batch
of pickles-i- n fact, 330,000 jars. I told her that with you away
at school, we would not need so many, but lovable old Mother
is such a creature of habit that though I hit her quite hard
several times, she insisted on going ahead.
Your ever lovin'
Dad."
T mi hi.uiii.4ii. lire
'Aihico to freshmen It not the butinris of the mukers of Vhilit
Morris, sponsors of this column. Hut cigarettes for freshmen Is. Alt
cigarettes for upperclasment graduate students, profs, deans, and
eteryboJy else uho tit joy $ a gentle, modem smoke. Wt mean Philip
Morris, of cor r is I

stem-sli-

.

(be CCLLE

On The Esplanade

m

jewel neck

* 4

THE KENTUCKY KEHNEI,. Friday. March 2X Ittifi

"

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"

"

T),(.v said

vlM

h, failed the firl round Wednesday .,,ht

i, the lac
but he Mill
bath, wasnt !"'""
d.sagree w.ih the
points is still sometime remarkable.
Iu
Lrts editor ul.en he says Kelly is only a fair rebounderdoing
their 67" center locld,
me against Islington, with
lnm a through the
Kelly
Krcat work for them,
Wayland .was all Coleman I
came The editor also said that
liso disagree on that statement too. If Coleman was all that
out of the Regional
Wayland had they would never have gotten
Tournament at Pikeville.
on Coleman as Hupp did himSo Hupps horses didn't agree
self' They said he wa'sn't any good on defense. So what, he
has'his own defense in his scoring ability. When Hupp says he
he is talking about and what
is .rre it I think he knows what
his statement that "Coleman
he wants. I agree with Hupp in
come out of Kentucky in h.gh
is the ureatest ballplayer to ever
sehnef plaving. I guarded this boy last year myself and if.jo,,
try guarding lum yourwll
ciont Mice lies tough you should
me
Well appears
lilted 30 points.Pod as ithe usuallyto does
as

:

out-rebound-

"Thank you. I'm

complete'., overwhelmed at beln

the 969th member of Mediocre Hoard cho,en

this year."

Stars In 'The Night Ugh!

sometime.
overrated in some respects,
I think Coleman .night be a little
the one's that gave
but that isn't his fault. The newspapers were
lake his coach said, "he didnt see how
The reallv significant accomplishments are him the big build-up- .
"Stars in the Night" refer
played m.
If the "stars" in
in the Night" proanyone could judge him in the two first games he
awards at this annual minimized at the "Stars
to the coeds receiving
forty games this year. I think it
gram by the endless assortment of petty here when he saw him play
is indeed
ceremony, the event
certificates. Some of was natural that Kellv didn't show too good in the first three
of women get awards, tappings, and
was on h.m m this
because a whole universe
games because of the great pressure which
the honor groups, hoping to gain the lime"honor" at it.
be
some type of
he
fact; that" everybody expected lnm to
light at this event, stage pathetic attempts tournamenf-and-tproduces scores of meri.
No doubt UK
great because of his great"b"uild-upof ritualism.
women who deserve recogtorious young
record I
fter Saturday night's game, in which he set a
is impressed.
contention on this point.
Virtually nobody
nition. There is no
anyone will come close to for awhile, I don't see
doubtful as to whether or
no hope of doing away don't think
There seems to be
But it is highly
If that
how anvone could disagree on his great ballplaying.
a hundred such coeds with the long array of dubious "honors" benot there are over
fans who saw the game, then 1 think they
special night of high honor. stowed at this program, simply because no wasn't enough for the
who deserve a
Wpreted something supernatural of a seventeen year old boy
"Stars in the Night" each year has become group will admit that its award is not sigy
show. nificant. Each year there seem to be more, to do.
more and more like a gala
score, U.K. sure could use
By the looks of the U.K.-Iow- a
grows more stagAs one student put it, "During 'Stars in the and "Stars in
coach out of the
some of Kellv Coleman's points. Also the one
Night' girls named to get an award go to nant.
choice for
sixteen who didn't pick Kelly as the unanimous
Memorial Hall; the other five girls left on
is to do
ion
The obvious-a- nd
selections, really "goofed"!
campus go to the movies."
unneeded night of pomp and
Gene Davis
away with this
This program seems even more ridicufor women only. The Honors
circumstances
lous when one considers that UK has an
Day program should be the one, big night
Honors Day program each year, for both
of appropriate University recognition.
men and women. In almost all cases, the
One wonders if Will Shakespeare had
woman honored at "Stars in the Night" is
"Stars in the Night" in mind when he wrote
recognized again at the Honors Day proDear Sir:
"Much Ado About Nothing."
in
gram in late Spring.
Who among the students holds a position of importance
a hiss
the University? Have you ever noticed that, while quite
seem to
is made over moves by student bodies, these moves
given
mostlv concern the University social life? SGA has been
and control
a few matters to pacify it, such as parking permits
droves.
in
For the first time in several years Guignol stayed away
I say pacify because, have you ever noticed the
UK have tended to over drinking.
Many of the plays at
has staged a good production. Their version
University driveways and the student dorms.
Some unusual plays police at both the
abstract.
of Shakespeare's "Taming of the Shrew" is be rather
Of course, realizing that the University has men to control
but students get tired
should be produced,
spiritedly acted and ably directed.
and deans to run each of the colleges,
bizarre symbolism. the matter of business,
of talking animals and
to be no question of what the University
A good play in Guignol is the exception
great truths and still there would seem
A play can expound
should run itself. And, frankly, maybe it should. Using student
rather than the rule. Despite a magnificent
stay within the bounds of realism.
all
government means a carefully selected group to run almost
physical plant and a practically unlimited
in
Some Guignol players condemn the averexpense account, Guignol has consistently
the disciplinary matters and some few of the scholastic ones
age UK student as "uncultured". This can colleges. Either let the salaried employees run the University,
given students mediocre plays.
be at least partially disapproved. Campus or' give something, some duties to our weak SGA. A good uniThe only good college theatre in Lexinghas brought excellent art movies to
for a
versity, like we claim ourselves to be, would have no use
ton has been at Transylvania College. Cinema
and the students have heartily
Transy, operating with the minimum of the University,
student government which was merely a front.
Campus Cinema. It would not be
Clarence L. Lebus
equipment and money, has created excellent supported
to say that students will back
exaggeration
drama. Their production of T. S. Eliot's an
campus activity.
h
reany
"Cocktail Party" last fall was the finest colDean M. M. White, of the College of Arts and Sciences,
is on the right track now. It
Guignol
situation: "If a UK graduate is
lege play done in Lexington in four years.
marked about an
shame to see it fall back in same
Guignol's plays have been uninspiring to would be a
highly honored, mention of the institution he attended is oh
the
old mediocre rut.
scure or seldom given. I can assure you that were he sent to
say the least. As a result the students have
penitentiary, UK would be prominently mentioned."
well-name- d

give-awa-

the-Nig- ht"

all-sta- te

best-solut-

Is SGA Weak?

Mediocre Drama

.

top-notc-

and IPC

Pan-He- ll

. At least twice this year there has been
considerable confusion between the
Council, Panhellenic, and the persons these groups represent.
There was the miner problem of who were
participating in the fall Fire Prevention
Week display contest, and there was the
serenade issue. Joint action
d
could have saved
between IFC and Pan-Hea lot of time and misunderstanding.
As it is now, it is highly difficult for the
two Greek representative bodies to consult
together. An IFC. delegate naturally feels
meeting, and vice
out of place at a Pan-Heversa.
Inter-fraterni- ty

0

It would be much easier for these two
groups to have joint meetings of several
delegates, and these meetings, if held more
or less regularly (say once a month), could
benefit all concerned. There need not be
more than five members 'from each organization.

much-debate-

ll

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky
Entered at the Post Office at Lesington, Kentucky. M
iKond clM matter under the Act of March 3, 1879
Published weekly during auboul euept holidays

ad

ll

SUBSCRIPTION

mumm

RATES

- 11.00

.

per

Culture and education, even in 1956, still may not be pur
chased in cartons or containers. Work is still the only means to
obtain these items.
ot
The professors and the book store should find some way
coordinating book orders with the number of students enrolled
in classes. With the semester well underway some students
book
still haven't been able to buy books for, their courses. The
it on
store says it's the profs fault, and the instructors blame
the book store. The deans should establish some kind of policy
Tlie
on this matter. The students are caught in the middle.
teachers assign huge daily readings, and the book store laughs
at them.
'

UK students contributed nearly $1,400 to the Christmas
Seal drive last December. This is particularly gratifying since
the need is greater in Kentucky than most otlier states.)

ken-tucky- 's

TB rate is unusually high.

* TI1K KENTUCKY KERNEL. Friday. March 2.1. 1936

xjl

u

56-Year-O-

5

UK Cannon

ld

Once Rested In City Dump
By R.

University School now .stands. Certain Lexington dignitaries had it
cleaned and mounted on the campus, (then Kentucky State
e
In its present location in
front of the Administration Building facing