xt7jdf6k194p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jdf6k194p/data/mets.xml Lexington, Ky (Fayette County) University of Kentucky 1949-1950 The University of Kentucky catalogs contains bound volumes dating from 1865 through 2007. After 2007 course catalogs ceased to be printed and became available online only. course catalogs  English University of Kentucky This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. University of Kentucky course catalogs, 1865- Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Volume 23 (1949-1950) text Bulletin of the University of Kentucky, Volume 23 (1949-1950) 1949 1949-1950 2012 true xt7jdf6k194p section xt7jdf6k194p   Bulletin of the
  University 0f Kentucky
 
  umn  
  1949   1950  
  GENER · ·€   I ATALOG
 
9 41 ,,5
     9    _ 
  ANNOUNCEMENTS 1950-51
@1 VOLUME 42 MAY, 1950 NUMBER  

 ; · V BOARD OF TRUSTEES V
1950
 ":‘;”E“;D*‘ Ex omm Members w g
. , Governor
Boswell B. Hodgkin, Superintendent of Public Instruction
Harry F. Walters, Commissioner of Agriculture
From the State Board of Agriculture I
George M. Cheek, Frankfort, 1951 _
Dr. W. M. Coffee, LaCenter, 1949 \ R ¢ M    
Carl Dempewolfe, Henderson, 1950 A 3 li &*j·#ZjiT¢~’¤»··—¥:‘“:·i   M H
Members at Large
Paul M. Basham, Hardinsburg ....................................................   ...................... 1953
1/ II
Mrs. Paul G. Blazer,   ..... 1950  
John C. Everett, Maysville ..........   ....     ,.................. 1951
Harper Gatton, Madisonville ......   .. .....   ................................. 1954 !
- R. P. Hobson, Louisville .....................,...   ..........................................   :..;195U"‘
V J. Woodford Howard, Prestonsburg ............................................................. , .......... 1951  
/ {E Z g 5 Alumni Members `
. . , ................................................................................................ 1949
Guy Huguelet, Lexington ............................................................................................ 1951
H. D. Palmore, Frankfort ............................................................................................ 1950
Officers of the Board
Earle C. Clements, Chairman  
Frank D. Peterson, Secretary and Treasurer
Executive Committee
Guy Huguelet, Chairman ==
John C. Everett
Harper Gatton
R. P. Hobson
H. D. Palmore

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 Un
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VOZ

 BULLETIN OF THE
UH1V€fS1Cy of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KY.
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Genera] Catalog
Announcements 19504 95]
 
A bulletin published monthly, January to September inclusive, by the
University of Kentucky, Lexington. Entered as Second-Class Matter at the
Post Office, Lexington, Ky., under the Act of August 24, 1912.
 
Vol. 42 May, 1950 N0. 5

 . ;_‘ ADMINISTRATIVE ORGANIZATION
GENERAL
Herman Lee Donovan, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., President P
Leo M. Chamberlain, M.A., Ph.D., Vice President; C
 y, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Dean of the University U
Frank D. Peterson, A.B., University Comptroller R
Sarah Bennett Holmes, M.A., Dean of Women P
Albert Dennis Kirwan, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of Men
Dee Sprowles, M.A., Ed.D., Registrar
John Sharpe Chambers, M.S., M.D., Director of University Health
Service
Louis Clifton, M.A., Director of University Extension
Lysle Warrick Croft, M.A., Ph.D., Director of University Personnel
Office
Lawrence Sidney Thompson, M.A., Ph.D., Director of Libraries
Thomas L. Hankins, M.S., Director of Northern Extension Center
Elmer G. Sulxcer, M.S., Director of University Radio Station
Raymond W. Wild, A.B., Ph.M., Director of Public Relations
` THE COLLEGES
Martin Marshall White, M.A., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Arts P=
and Sciences
Thomas Poe Cooper, B.S., D.Sc., LL.D., Dean of the College of
Agriculture and Home Economics and Director of the Experi-
ment Station
Levi Jackson Horlacher, M.S., Assistant Dean in Resident Teaching,
College of Agriculture and Home Economics
Daniel Voiers Terrell, CE., Dean of the College of Engineering
Elvis J. Stahr, Jr., M.A., A.B. in Jur., B.C.L., Dean of the College
of Law
*William Septimus Taylor, M.A., Ph.D., LL.D., Dean of the College `
of Education
Frank G. Dickey, M.A., Ed.D., Dean of the College of P:
Education pg
Cecil C. Carpenter, M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the College of Commerce pz
Earl Platt Slone, Ph.G., B.S., Dean of the College of Pharmacy P;
Louis..A1·tliur—Par`duc, M.S., Ph.D., Dean of the Graduate School In
‘ See appended list of changes of status, p. 380.

 CONTENTS
Page
Publications and Sources of Information .................................... ....... ....... .. ........ ... 4
Calendar for 1950-51 ..............,............i.........,.,...................................... ...........,...... ........ 6
University Calendar for 1950-51 ............,........................................ -.....,..... ........... . .... 7
Registration Schedules for 1950-51 ........... . ......................................... . ...................... 9
Part I. General Information of Special Interest to the
Prospective Student .............,.................................................................... 11
Origin, Purposes, and Accreditation ........................................................ 13
Admission to the University ..............,......................................... .. .......... 14
Fees and Expenses .....,..................................................,..... .. ........................ 17
Residence Halls for Women ......,...........,................................. I .................. 22
Residence Halls for Men .............................................................................. 23
Opportunities for Financial Help ................................ .. .......................... 23
Special Services for the Student ............................................. .. .............. 24
The University and the Veteran .............................................................. 26
What Is Expected of the Student ................................... ...-.. ................. 29
Opportunities Outside the Classroom .................................................... 34
The Alumni Association .............................................................................. 38
The Plant of the University ...................................................................... 39
Part II. Educational Opportunities at the University of Kentucky ............ 44
Degrees and Curricula .................................................................................. 45
College of Arts and Sciences ...................................................................... 49
College of Agriculture and Home Economics ...................................... 84
College of Engineering ................................................................................ 101
College of Law ...................................................................... .. ........................ 111
College of Education ...............................................................................,.... 115
College of Commerce .................................................................................... 124
College of Pharmacy .........................................,........................ .. ................ 133
- Graduate School ............................................................................................ 136
Department of University Extension ...................................................... 146
Part III. Statement of courses Oifered at the University .................................. 147
Part IV. Special Services of the University ............................................................ 323
Part V. The Academic and Administrative Staii of the University ............ 331
Part VI. Statistical Summary .................................................................................... 387
Index ............................................................................,....................................................... 394

 PUBLICATIONS AND SOURCES OF INFORMATION
Several publications are issued by the University of Kentucky for the
purpose of giving prospective students and other citizens information about
the institution. The office or offices from which certain publications may
be received are listed below.
Bulletin of General Information .................... Registrars Office
General Catalog .................................................. Registrars Office
Summer Session Bulletin ............................ Registrars Office
Agriculture and Home Economics
Bulletin ..........,......................................... . ....... College of Agriculture and
Home Economics or Regis-
trars Office
Arts and Sciences Bulletin ........................ College of Arts and Sciences
or Registrars Office
Campus View Books ...................................... Director of Public Relations
Commerce Bulletin ........................................ College of Commerce or
Registrars Office
Education Bulletin .......................................... College of Education or
Registrars Office
Engineering Bulletin .................................... College of Engineering or
Registrar’s Office
Graduate Bulletin .......................................... Graduate School or
Registrars Office
Law Bulletin .................................................... College of Law or
Registrars Office
Pharmacy Bulletin .......................................... College of Pharmacy, First
and Chestnut Streets,
Louisville, Ky., or
Registrar’s Office
Summer Session Announcement .............. Registrars Office
In order to assist those who may wish special information about some
part of the Universitys program, there are listed below the members of the
administrative staff to whom inquiries of various types may be sent. In
each case, unless otherwise specified, the University of Kentucky, Lexing-
ton 1, Kentucky, is the post office address.
The general policies of the
University ...................................................... President of the University

 General information, all admissions,
i and transcripts of credits ........................ Registrar
.y Living accomodations, student
help, social affairs ............................,....... Dean of Men or Dean of
Women
A particular college and its
program .......................................................... Dean of the College
Graduate work .................................................. Dean of the Graduate
School
Summer Session .............................................. Registrar
is' Class extension and corre-
spondence study .......................................... Director or University
,ES Extension
Agricultural extension .................................. Director of Agricultural
ls Extension
Facilities for Veterans .................................. Registrar or University
Personnel Office
st
acme
5 the V
, In
ung-
;ity

  
- Lv 1950 1951 1951
July January July 1
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S 95
....   ....   ....   1 .... _], 2 3 4 5 6 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Jul
2 3 4 5 6 7 8 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 8 9 10 11 12 13 14
9 10 11 12 13 14 15 14 15 16 17 18 15 16 17 18 19?_2l,, Jul
16 17 18 19 20 21 22 22 2 25 ® 22 23 24 25 26 27 28
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 28,@ ....   .... 29 30 31 ....   ....'  
30 31 ....   ....   .... J
August February August Jul
S M T W T F S S M T W T F   S M T W T F S ul
....   1 2 3 4   .. ....   ....       ....   .... 1 2 3 _
6 7_ 8 9 10 11 12, C4) @ §) 7 8 9 O 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 Jul
13 1.14; 15 16,4* 17 _18 19 11 12 14 15 16 17 12 13 14 15 16 17'
20 21* 22 23 24 25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 ,JuI
27128 29 30 31 ....   25 26 27 28 ....   .... 26 27 _28 29 30 31 ...`.
   _._,_. *"W_-  
September March September Ju]
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S Am
....   ....   .... 1 2* ....   ....   1 2 3 ,,_,   ....   ....   1 Aut
3 4 _5_ 6 7 8 ' 9 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 `
10 11 13 14 15 16 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
17 18 19 20 21 22 23 & 21 22 @ @16 17 18 19 20 21 22
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 28 29 30 31 23 24 25 26 27 28 29
. so ....   ....   ....   Ser
   '  
October April October
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S Sel;
1 2 3 4 5 5 7 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 .... 1 2 3 4 5 6
8 9 10 11 12 13 14 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 7 8 9 10 11 12 13
15 16 \17 18 19 20 21 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 14 15 16 17 18 19 20
22 23 24 25 26 27* 28 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 Sel?
29 30 31 ....   ....   29 30 ....   ....   .... 28 29 30 31 ....   .... Sep
November May November
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S Oct
....   .... 1 2 3 4 ....   1 2 3 4 5 ....   ....   1 2 3
5 6 7 8 9 10 11 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Qct
12 13 14 15 16 17 18 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 11 12 13 14 15 16 17
19 20 21 22   20 21 22 23 24 M25 26 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 `
gg 27 28 29 30 ....   27 28 29 30 31 ....   25 26 27 28 29 30 .... Nm
December June December D
S M T W T F S S M T W T F S S M T W T F S BC
....   ,... 7( .... 1 2 ....   ....   .... 1 2 ___,   ....   ....   1 *95
3 4 5 6 7 8 9 3 4 5 6 7 8 _9 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Ian
l0 11 12 13 14 15   10 11 12 13 14 15 16 9 10 11 112 13 14 15 Jan
_  17 18 19 20 21 22 23 16 17 18 19 20 21 Z2
24 25 26 27 28 29 30 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 23 24 25 26 !27 28 29 Jan
31. ····   ····  

 UNIVERSITY CALENDAR FOR 1950-51
5 Summer Session 1950
; 195'0
D
§ June 19 Monday 7:45 a.m.—Classification tests and physical ex-
4 aminations for all new students
L.- {June 29 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.—Registration and classi-
18 fication of all students, according to an alphabetical
  schedule
; June 21 Wednesday—Class work begins
E June 24 Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class
- for the summer session
Q June 29 Thursday—Last date one may drop a course without a
grade
2Q June 30-July 1 Friday and Saturday—Pe1·iod for filing applications for
. --`· degrees
__ July 4 Tuesday—Independence Day holiday
E August 11 Friday—Summer Session Commencement
é _ August 12 Saturday Noon——End of Summer Session
ll"
2; First Semester
29 September 11-13 Monday, 8:00 a.m. to Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.———Classifica-
  tion tests and physical examinations for all new
__ students
.5 September 14-16 Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to Saturday Noon—Registration and
12 classification of all students, according to an alpha-
‘ betical schedule
20
27 September 18 Monday—Class work begins
  September 23 Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class
"‘ for the first semester
"`Q October 13-14 Friday and Saturday—Period for filing applications for
’_‘g degrees I
10 October 23 Monday—Last date one may drop a course Without a
17 grade
24 November 23-27 Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to Monday, 8:00 a.m.—'I‘hanksgiving
  holidays
TE December 16 Saturday Noon—-Christmas holidays begin
fj 1951
{ 8 lanuary 2 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m.—Christmas_holidays end
°* 1° January 22-26 Monday through Friday—Final examinations
1 22
B 29 January 26 Friday, 6:00 p.m.—-End of First Semester

 _ ; · Second Semester
February 3 Saturday, 7:45 a.m.——Classification tests and physical
examinations for all new students S9!
February 5-6 Monday, 8:00 a.m. to Tuesday, 4:20 p.m.—Registration
and classification of all students, according to an
alphabetical schedule
February 7 Wednesday-Class work begins
February 13 Tuesday-Last date one may enter an organized class for
the second semester
March 2, 3 Friday and Saturday—Period for filing applications for
degrees
March 12 Monday—Last date one may drop a course without a ' SEE
grade
March 23-27 Friday, 8:00 a.m. to Tuesday, 8:00 a.m.—-Easter holidays-
May 27 Sunday—Baccalaureate Services
May 29-June 2 Tuesday through Saturday—Final examinations 81
June 1 Friday-—Eighty-fourth Annual Commencement g;(
June 2 Saturday, 6:00 p.1n.—End of Second Semester 10:f
June 5-9 Tuesday through Saturday—4-H Club Week uic
Summer Session 1951
June 18 Monday, 7:45 a.m.—Classification tests and physical ex-  
aminations for all new students 3:8
June 19 Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.—Registration and classi-
fication of all students, according to an alphabetical
schedule
June 20 Wednesday—Class work begins
June 23 Saturday—Last date one may enter an organized class
for the summer session
June 28 Thu1·sday—Last date one may drop a course without a
grade Sep1
June 29, 30 Friday and Saturday—Period for filing applications for
degrees
July 4 Wednesday—Independence Day holiday
August 10 F1·iday—Summer Session Commencement
August 11 Saturday Noon—End of Summer Session
September 10 Monday——Opening of Fall Semester of 1951-52 Fébl

 REGISTRATION SCHEDULES FOR 1950-51
First Semester
I
September ll—-l3—l\/Ionday, 8:00 a.m. to Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.—All new
I students except those entering the Graduate School, will report to the
I Men’s Gymnasium for classification tests, physical examinations, and
advisory conferences. They must complete the tests and examinations
before they will be permitted to register. Students who report for the
tests later than 8:00 a.m. Monday may not be able to complete them
r before the registration period, and their registration will thus be
delayed. :
r
· September 14—16—Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to Saturday Noon—Registration and
H classification of all students, according to the following alphabetical
schedule: _
S.
Thursday Forenoon Friday Forenoon
8:00 to 8:50-A through B 8:00 to 8:50——N through O
9:00 to 9:50-C through D 9:00 to 9:50-P through R.
10:00 to 10:50—E through G 10:00 to 10:50-S
11:00 to 11:50-H through I 11:00 to 11:50—T through V
Thursday Afternoon Friday Afternoon
1:30 to 2;20__] through L 1:30 to 2:20-W through Z
i· 2:30 to 3;20_M 2:30 to 4:20—Miscel1aneous
3:80 to 4:20—MJ.scel1aneous A thrvueh Z
i·‘ A through M
tl
l Saturday Forenoon
ss
6:00 to ‘l1:30—Miscellaneous A through Z
a
September l8—Monday. 8:00 a.m.—Class work begins.
or
Second Semester
February 3—Saturda.y, 7:45 a.m.—All new students, except those entering
the Graduate School, will report to Memorial Hall for classification
ttsts and physical oxmninations, These must be completed before reg-
lstration.

 I °‘ February 5, 6-Monday, 8:00 a.m. to Tuesday, 4:20 p.m.·-Registration and
Classification of all students, according to the following alphabetical
_ schedule:
Monday Forenoon Tuesday Forenoon
8:00 to 8:50-W through Z 8:00 to 8:50-J through L
9:00 to 9:50-T through V 9:00 to 9:50-H through I
10:00 to 10:50-S 10:00 to 10:50-E through G
11:00 to 11:50-P through R. 11:00 to 11:50-—C through D
Monday Afternoon Tuesday Afternoon
1:30 to 2:20-N through O 1:30 to 2:20-—A through B
2:30 to 3:20-M 2:30 to 4:20-Miscellaneous
3:30 to 4:20-Miscellaneous A through Z
M through Z
February 7-Wednesday, 8:00 am.-Class work begms
Summer Session—195]
June 18—Monday, 7:45 a.m.—-All new students, except those entering the ·
Graduate School, will report to the Memorial Building, for classification
tests and physical examinations. These must be completed before
registration.
June 19-—Tuesday, 8:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.-—Reglstration and classification of
all students, according to the following alphabetical schedule:
Tuesday Forenoon Tuesday Afternoon
8:00 to 8:50-M through P 1:30 to 2:20-D through G A
9:00 to 9:50-—Q through S 2:30 to 3:20-H through L
10:00 to 10:50-T through Z 3:30 to 4:30-Miscellaneous
11:00 to 11:50-A through C A through Z
June 20-—Wednesday-—Class work begins.

 PART I
GENERAL INFORMATION OF SPECIAL INTEREST
TO THE PROSPECTIVE STUDENT
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 ORIGIN, PURPOSES, AND ACCREDITATION
The University of Kentucky, a state-supported institution, is located
at Lexington, an urban community of about 75,000 population. The Board
of Trustees includes the Governor, the Superintendent of Public Instruc-
tion, and the Commissioner of Agriculture, ex officio, and twelve members
appointed by the Governor, three of whom are alumni of the University
and three, members of the State Board of Agriculture. The University is
one of a number of institutions known as land-grant colleges, which were
established b·y the Morrill Act of 1862 and which have continued to receive
federal assistance under the provisions of this and subsequent laws re-
lating to the teaching of agriculture and the mechanic arts and the pro-
vision of agricultural experiment stations and extension services in agri-
culture and home economics.
The University of Kentucky began as a part of Kentucky University
under a cooperative plan authorized by the legislature in 1865. The purpose
of this plan was to unite sectarian and public education under one organi-
zation. This experiment was tried for a number of years. In the meantime,
the federal funds authorized under the Morrill Act were used to develop
agriculture and mechanic arts in Kentucky University. In 1878, when the
people of Kentucky decided to establish a state institution of higher learn-
ing, the College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts was separated from
Kentucky University and reestablished on land given by the City of Lex-
ington and the County of Fayette. Thirty years later the legislature changed
the name of the institution to the State University of Kentucky, and gave
it additional financial support. In 1916 the name was again changed, this
time to the present title, and additional maintenance was arranged by
legislative act.
The major function of the University is that of instruction. For the
performance of this function it is organized into the College of Arts and
Sciences, the College of Agriculture and Home Economics, the College of
Engineering, the College of Law, the College of Education, the College of
Commerce, the College of Pharmacy, the Graduate School, and the Depart-
ment of University Extension.
In addition to giving instruction to its student body, the University
contributes to the welfare of the state through research, experimentation,
and public service. While all departments make important contributions
along these lines, certain divisions and bureaus have been established spe-
cifically for these purposes. Included in this group are the Experiment
Station and the Extension Division of the College of Agriculture and Home
Economics, the Bureau of Business Research, the Bureau of Government
Research, the Bureau of School Service, the Bureau of Source Materials in
Higher Education, the Teachers Placement Bureau, the Radio Studios, the
Department of Public Relations, the Engineering Experiment Station, the
Child Guidance Service, the Family Life Institute, the Industrial Psycholo-
gical Service, the Social Research Consultation Service, and the Sociological
Research Consultation Service.
The University of Kentucky is on the approved list of the Association
of American Universities, and is a member of the Southem Association of
Colleges and Secondary Schools and the Kentucky Association of Colleges
and Secondary Schools. It is accredited in its respective colleges or depart-

 14 UNIVERSITY or xiswrucxv
ments by the Association of American Law Schools, the American Associa-
tion of Collegiate Schools of Business, the American Association of Schools ad]
. . and Departments of Journalism, the American Library Association, the ad!
' '· National Association of Schools of Music, the Engineers’ Council for Pro-
fessional Development, the American Chemical Society, the National Asso-
_ ciation of Schools of Social Administration, the American Association of wit
Colleges of Pharmacy, the American Council on Pharmaceutical Education Sta
and the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. ma
Th
Amurssron ·ro rms Umvsasrry  
Students are admitted to the University of Kentucky as freshmen, as suc
students with advanced standing from other institutions, as graduate stu-
dents, as special students, and as auditors. Admission to certain colleges col
is governed by special regulations. of
Applications for admission to the University should be made to the
Registrar on forms furnished by the Registrar’s Office. Certified copies of Im
high school credentials and of work done in other institutions should be un
submitted to the Registrar’s Office in advance of the registration period.
Failure to file credentials in time for checking before the registration period °f
will delay the student in arranging his program. All admissions, including th'
those to the professional schools and the Graduate School must be passed fu
on by the Registrars Office. Students who come to the University without Sp'
having their admission approved, do so at their own risk. The University
reserves the right to refuse consideration of applications not made before ad
the beginning of the registration period. The University classification tests Eu
must be taken by new undergraduate students before they can be registered °f
for classes. Su
Admission to the Freshman Class
Applicants who are graduates of accredited high schools will be admitted
to the University on certificate, provided they have at least fifteen units of as
acceptable high school work. A unit represents the study of any subject for pr
a school year of at least thirty-two weeks, with five recitation periods a le,
week. each of at least forty-five minutes in length, or the equivalent thereof.
Double periods are required in shop, drawing, typewriting, and all other hz
courses which demand no out-of-class preparation. One unit is the mini- in
mum credit accepted in any foreign language, and one-half unit the mini-
mum in any other subject.
While the University does not prescribe a pattern of work for admis-
sion, it recommends that at least ten of the units presented be chosen from
English, the social studies, mathematics, the foreign languages, and the
laboratory sciences, and that within these ten units the student offer at tt
least three units in English, one and one—half in algebra, and one in plane
geometry. Should a student lack these courses as prerequisites for any of
his college work, he will be required to take them in college without credit,
thus delaying his graduation. °‘
Applicants who have graduated from unaccredited high schools and T
those not graduated from high school may be admitted as freshmen if, in
addition to presenting the fifteen acceptable units, they successfully pass E
the University classification examinations.

 GENERAL INFORMATION is
:ia_ Admission to the University does not necessarily qualify a student for
,015 admission to a particular college. In every case the student must meet the
the admission requirements of the college in which he is to enroll.
)r°' Admission to Advanced Standing
5s°' Kentucky Students. A resident of Kentucky who applies for admission
{ °f with advanced standing is expected to present evidence that he is in good
Mm standing in every respect in the institution last attended. He should have
maintained a standing of 1.0 or an average of C in all previous college work.
The student whose standing is below 1.0, however, may be admitted on pro-
bation if after taking the University classification tests such an admission
seems warranted. In no case shall a student be admitted whose record is
i, as such that he would have been dropped at the University of Kentucky.
stu- The University does not disregard at any time or under any conditions
egcs college or university records in order to admit applicants solely on the basis
of their high school records.
the A transfer student ls allowed only as many advanced credits as he can
.5 of present quality points. Otherwise, work done at a fully accredited college or .
1 be university is recognized credit for credit.
,.iOd_ In order to be classified as fully accredited, a college must be a member
mod of a regional accrediting association or it must be on the approved list of
ding the state university of the state in which it is located. Advanced standing
Lssed from an unaccredited college may be obtained at the University only by
hom; special subject examinations.
rsity Out-of-State Students. A non-resident who applies for admission with
mm, advanced standing must in all cases have maintained a standing of 1.0 in
tests all previous college work. In other respects, the requirements and conditions
fred of transfer are the same as for Kentucky students.
Written applications for admission with advanced standing should be
submitted to the Reglstrar’s Office on forms furnished by that office.
_ Admission as a Special Student
lttcd A graduate of another university or college may enter the University
isfof as a special student. Any other person may be admitted as a special student
' Or provided he is fully prepared to do the work desired and provided he is as
ids ix least twenty-one years of age."
A-60 ' Before a special student can become a candidate for a degree he must
Other have his status changed to that of a regular student. This may be done
mn? in one of two ways:
mn'- l. Satisfying the entrance requirements for admission to the freshman
_ freshman class.
imlS' 2. Completing in residence sixty-seven credits with a standing of at least
from 1.5 in all work attempted.
i the A special student is eligible to take any course for which he has satisfied
B; gg the prerequisites except one numbered 200 or above.
:1; Of Admission as an Auditor
.I.€dit_ By payment of the required fees any person may be admitted to a class
or classes as an auditor. A student regularly enrolled in any college must
S and apply to the Dean of the College in which he is registered in order to be
if. in ‘ An exception to the age requirement may be made in the case of a veteran oi
, pass World War II who has demonstrated, through tests and personal interviews, his ability
to do the work desired.

 ie UNIVERSITY or KENTUCKY
an auditor. Other persons should apply to the Registrar’s Office for ad-
mission. No credit can be given for a class audited, nor is the student per- suck
- - ‘ mitted an examination for credit. No instructor is authorized to admit an by t
n °‘ auditor to any of his classes except on presentation of an auditor’s card Wm
from the Registrar’s Office. 205;
Admission to Colleges and The Graduate School
College of Arts and Sciences. Admission to this college is governed by
the general admission requirements of the University outlined on the pre-
ceding pages. mac
College of Agriculture and Home Economics. Admission to this college st