xt7jdf6k1p5b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jdf6k1p5b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19331003  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  3, 1933 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  3, 1933 1933 2013 true xt7jdf6k1p5b section xt7jdf6k1p5b Best Copy Available
TUESDAY EDITION
SEMI-WEEKL-

KERNEL

Y

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
KENTUCKY

Vi

UNIVERSITY

PLEDGES
FOURTEEN GIRLS
CWENS

ARCHERY PRACTICE
Archery pracltce for girls
will be held at 3 p. m. each
day, while hockey practice
will be held at 4 p. m. each
day, on the Women's athletic
field, back of Patterson hall,
according to an announcement by Clara Margaret Fort,
president of W. A. A.
Classes in horseback riding
will be- arranged
and any
student desiring to take the
class, either as a beginner or
as an experienced
rider, is
requested to see Miss Rebecca Averill in her office In the
Women's gymnasium.

IN MASS MEETING
Annual Exercises Held By
Sophoifiore Women's Honorary Group

-

ANNA EVANS GIVEN
MEDAL BY HOME EC
Deans of Men and Women
Are Speakers On Program;
Skits Presented
Pledging of fourteen girls to
Cwens, national honorary society
ior aopnomore women, wag a feature of the annual mass meeting
held Thursday in Memorial hall.
At the same time Phi Upsilon Omi
cron, professional home economics
society, presented
medal to Anna
Evans, the freshman girl who made
the highest standing In the home
economics department.
Oirls who were pledged to Cwens
were Katherlne Callaway, Mary H.
Dantzler, Dorothy Dundon, Martha
Fugett. A d e 1 e Headley, Lillian
Holmes, Prances Kerr, Mary King
Koger, Betty Moffett, Virginia Mur-rel- l,
Caroline P. Quigley, Lucille
Thornton, Dorothy H. Walker, and
Mary Ounn Webb.
Talks were made by Mrs. Sarah
Holmes, assistant dean of women;
Miss Sarah Blanding, dean of women; and Hazel Nollau. president of
W.8.O.A., who Introduced
T. D.
Jones, dean of men; Anita Gardner, secretary of the dean of women, and Lysle Croft, assistant dean
of men.
Skits were presented by the various women's organizations.
Hazel
Nollau gave a short talk explaining
the purpose of the Woman's Student Government association and
the scholarship which is given each
year by the organization
to the
student who makes the greatest
contribution to the University; The
members of the different committees of the Y.W.C.A. were introduced and Sarah Whittlnghlll explained how one may become a
Mormember of the association.
tar. Board members wore caps and
gowns during their part of the program.
Cwens conducted its annual
pledging as part of the exercises.
Phi Beta presented a short pageant
portraying the Rose girl of Phi
Beta. The national home economics
sorority, Phi Dpsilon Omicron, used
a ceremony based around the shield
of the organization.
For Chi Delta
Phi, Virginia Young gave a short
purpose of the
talk, explaining the
society.
Elizabeth Baute spoke briefly for
Theta Sigma Phi, national journalSeveral women
istic fraternity.
members of the Kernel staTf were
Betty Boyd gave a
introduced.
short talk on SuKy circle and its
object on the campus.
New members of Cwens and the
activities in which they have engaged during their freshman year

'

are;
Katherlne Calloway, student
the arts and sciences college,
on Page Four)

in

Kampus
Kernels
The office of the Dean of Men
wants to express its appreciation of
of the
the fine spirit of
faculty .and students in carrying out
the parking regulations.
What has surprised all of us Is
the large number of people asking
for parking space on the campus,
approximately 500 of whom 170 are
faculty. Consequently we do not at
present have parking space for all.
There Is an unsatisfied list of about
100.

Kentuckian photographer is in
the basement of the Men's gym
from 9 am. to 5 p. m. every day
this week. Seniors, juniors, and
members of campus organizations
should have their pictures made at
once.

All members of The Kernel staff
are requested to attend a meeting

at

2 p. m. Wednesday in Room 50,
McVey hall.
WESLEY E. CARTER,
f.

Lances will hold a meeting at the
Phi Sigma Kappa house Thursday,
at 7:15 p. m. Very Important.

There will be a meeting of Phi
Mu Alpha, men's honorary music
fraternity, at 4 p. m. Thursday In
the Art center.
a

all the residents of
the men's dormitories will be held
at 7:30 p. m. Thursday In McVey
hall, to make plans for the coming
A meeting of

year.

AH University students, who are
or nave been DeMolayi, Interested
In forming an honorary fraternity,

(Continued

on

Pe

J

Jt

JtX

STUDENTS

Applications For

MORTAR BOARD,

Rhodes Award 0. D. K.

MEET IN

DINNER

SESSION

Due On Nov. 18

NEW SERIES NO.

University Band
To

Ky-Te- ch

Battle

Universities Must Groups Unite For Purpose of Unit Will Make Formations
Discussing Student BuildUnder Two New Drum
Select Candidates He fore
ing Fund
Majors
November 11
The University band will make
The following announcement has MONEY RAISING DRIVE
been received from the office
SLATED FOR OCTOBER Its first appearance in formation on

Four)

"Pug" Bach Paces 77 Yards

Colleges,

In Final Period For

lit

.

:

BIG BLUE OUTPLAYED

FROM START TO FINISH
1

I

vf

'

.

1

KYIAN BUSINESS

-

Positions

'

Y. W. ACTIVITIES

H. H. Downing, associate profes
sor of Mathematics at the University, Varsity tennis coach, fn charge
of astronomy. Graduate of the Uni
versity, B.S.E. degree, 1908. M.S.
degree at the University of Chicago,
1916.
Ph.D., Chicago, 1929. Memfaculty since
ber of University
graduation, member of Mathemati
cal Association of America, Mathematical society, Sigma Xi, Pi Kap
pa Alpha social fraternity.

Hol-broo- k,

OPEN TOMORROW

KERNEL INCLUDES
PICTURE SECTION

Dairy Club Hears
Phil Wilson Speak

U. K. To Offer New

Extension Courses

,

non-cred-

Dr. Funkhouser Has
Article Published

Unique Sets For
Guignol's Opener

left

ear IOmpieilOn

K.E.A. To Promote

Debating Contest

Cal-liha- n,

Cancer Topic Of
Lecture

Pre-medi-

"Detroit Editor Praises

College Newspaper Work

-

or

Phi IJeta Sponsors
Musical Program

Only Marker

1

"I

SELECTED

6

WILDCATS TOP
SEWANEE 7 TO 0
IN CLOSE FRAY

Tennis Coach

Parade For

Stoll field Saturday between halves
President McVey
of the Georgia Tech - Kentucky
The Rhodes Scholarship will b. Support of Women's Groups game, under the direction of the
Asked; Committees Are
open for applications on or before
two new drum major's, R. C. Mc
'
November 18. The stipend of the
Appointed
Dowell and Alfred Eckles.
Rhodes Scholarship Is 400 pounds
The first formation will be that
a year. The elections will be held
Mortar Board and Omicron Del of the letters U. K., and "On, On
In the different districts on January ta Kappa held a
U. of K." will be played.
From
Joint dinner meet
2, 4. and 6, and colleges and unithat formation, the
O. T.
versities must select their ranril- - ing at 6 p. m. Thursday at the will be formed, and letters
Georgia
the
dates before November 11. Candl- - Teacup Inn for the purpose of dis- Tech song played. There also will
dates selected In January will enter cussing the Student Union Bulld-in- g be a special act portraying the
Oxford in October, 1934.
fund. A drive will be held the "Ramblin' Wreck," song of Georgia
The candidates,
Managerial
Are must be a citizen to be eligible, latter part of October In an at- Tech.
of the United
New officers of the band,
ap
Named for Annual Ry
States and unmarried; be between tempt to secure funds from various pointed last Wednesday by Director
George Vogel,
the ages of 19 and 25; and must University organizations.
Lewis, are:
have completed at least his sophoGordon Burns, president of O. D.
Editor
R.
C.
McDowell and Alfred
more year at college.
K., gave an explanation of the Eckles, drum majors;
Roy
Further Information and applica- finance plan, and asked Mortar personnel officer, business Hahn,
FEW VACANCIES LEFT
man
tion blanks may be obtained from Board to assist in the drive by ob ager and captain; Boyd Wheeler,
Appointments
to the business the President's office or from the taining the support of all women's assistant personnel officer, librarian
Secretary of
of Seand sergeant; Fred Moor, head of
staff of the 1934 Kentuckian have lection In thisthe Committee B. Tay- organizations in the campaign.
State, Mr. R.
The committees appointed to be trombone section and sergeant:
been announced by George Vogel, lor, La Grange, Ky.
in charge are: the General Union Robert Griffith, head of baritone
(Signed)
editor, and Edwin Patterson, busiBuilding committee, Ralpha Ed- section and sergeant; John Potter,
FRANK L. McVEY,
ness manager of the annual, as
wards, chairman, Walter Steitler, sergeant; Marshall Hamilton, head
President of the University.
Smith Broad bent, Prof. Roy More-lan- d, of saxophone eeetlon and corporal;
follows: Hamilton Greenup, adverEvelyn Grubbs, Alice Lang, Leslie Scott, corporal; Ralph Win
tising manager; James Bersot, cirand Mildred Lewis; publicity com- frey, head of cornet section and
culation manager; Webster Casse,
mittee, Frank Adams, chairman, sergeant: Joe McDaniel, sergeant;
assistant circulation manager; T. J.
Virginia Lee Moore, Hamilton James Miller, corporal; N. J.
Ropke, office manager; Sam WarGreenup; benefit subscription dance
corporal; J. D. Kirkpatrlck,
ren, sales manager; Ernest Shovea,
committee, Joseph Mills, chairman. head of drum section and corporal;
assistant sales manager; and Betty
Hugh Adcock, James Bishop, O. B. August Luscher, sergeant; James
Dlmock, assistant sales manager.
nri Malnr Gilpin, head of clarinet section;
Murnhv Tnm Paunrtv
Membership-Financ- e
Applications still may be presentBrewer;' committee on' honoraries Raymond Reister, torporal; Carl
Annual
ed for positions on the editorial and
Campaign Will Be Conduct- - and professionals. Gordon Burns, Boone, head of horn section and
business staff, according to an anRobinson, Mortar sergeant;
and
Justin Blackerby, ser
ed October 4, 5 and 6; All OD K- - "
nouncement Issued by George Vogel,
geant in charge of lockers; and
Women To Be Interviewed B2?rd
.
editor. The addition of, John F.
ur. waiiace jviur iiersuu aiswu Thomas Scott, head of bass section
Day to the editorial staff was made
and Dr. Robert W. Miles, and mem and sergeant.
Y. W. C. A. Membership-Financ- e
last week. Day, an associate editor
the University faculty were
of The Kernel, has reported both campaign, Wednesday, Thursday. bers ofguests
at the meeting.
and Friday, and the Dutch Lunch honor
sports and general news before taksecond
held
Mortar
ing his place on the editorial staff club organization meeting Friday meeting Board year at 5its m. yesp.
of the
noon officially open the fall activi
of the weekly student publication.
terday In the Women's building,
Members of all organizations as ties of the Y. Membership-Financwith Lois Robinson presiding.
e
The annual
well as all seniors and juniors are
At this meeting, he service procampaign will be conducted
urged to have their pictures taken
Rotogravure Section Giving
Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday, gram, which the organization In
immediately. The photographer is
tends to carry out j this year, was
Collegiate News Happenin the basement of the Alumni October 4, 5, and 6. A committee, planned.
Mortar Board decided
gymnasium from 9 a. m. until 5 headed by Augusta Roberts and yesterday to assist O. D. K. with
ings on Various Campuses
Betty Boyd, will interview every
p. m. each day. All pictures must
To Be Presented Weekly
woman student on the campus. The the Union Building project. Also a
be taken before October 15. money
pledged by the students will budget for this year was drawn up.
The price is one dollar for the firft
Beginning with this issue. The
to
of
print and twentj-flv- p
cen? for be used W. carry on the work W.
Ker-ickKernel will present weekthe Y.
It enables the Y.
each additional t)rint.
ly to its readers a complete pictorial
C. A., on this campus to be a memreview of events that happen in the
ber of the National Student movecollege world In Collegiate Digest,
ment of the Y. W. C. A., and of the
includa rotogravure
World Student Christian federaCattle Judging Team Goes To ed with your section that is to this
subscription
tion. Nationally known speakers
To Attend
Iowa
newspaper.
are brought to the campus for the
Collegiate Digest will, present
Convention
Classes Open To Lexington benefit of all students. Other proeach week a complete review of
jects for women students are sponAdults Will Be Non-Cred- it
sored by the Y.
Phil Wilson, head of the Lex events that happen in the collegiate
A large portion of the women stulngton Dairy, addressed members work, and will keep the readers of
dents were members of the Y last of the Dairy club at their first The Kernel in touch with the imIf plans now under way in the year. All who join for the first meeting of the year, held Tuesday portant events that happen on
department of University Extension, time this year will be formally rec- at 7:30 p.m., in the Dairy building. every campus in the United States.
University of Kentucky, materialiCollegiate Digest will give every
ognized at a Recognition service to This club, which is a new organicourses, be held in Memorial hall October 12. zation on the campus, was organit
ze, a series of
student the opportunity of follow
open to adults in Lexington .and
The 24 girls working on the mem- ized the latter part of last semester ing educational, scientific, and stu
central Kentucky, will be offered In bership committee are given the for the purpose of bringing the dent activities that happen through
the evenings at the University of following groups to Interview:
dairymen In closer contact with out the United States, and will
Kentucky.
Kappa Kappa Gamma, Betty Ann some of the leading dairy owners; thereby give all students an op-- 1
No definite time and place for Penington;
Chio Omega Eleanor to snonsor a homecoming banauet portunity to compare their activi- the meetings of these proposed Dawson; Delta Delta Delta, Evelyn leach year for alumni of the dairy ties with those of other students in
classes in adult education have been Merrill; Delta Zeta, Virginia Mur- - department, and to aid in sponsor- - other institutions.
selected, but according to an out- rel; Alpha XI Delta, Sara DeLong; ing a dairy judging team each year.
line of tentative courses the Uni
(Continued en Page Four)
A judging team composed of Boyd
versity Extension departments preWheeler, Harlan county; Charles S.
sent plans include the following:
Bell, Mason county; Woodrow
W. 8.
by Prof.
Archaeology,
Coots, Logan county, and James C.
Webb; Secretarial Practice, by Prof.
Downing, Fayette county,
The leading article in the last
Elementary Ac
A. J. Lawrence;
Thursday for Waterloo, Iowa, where Issue of "The Indian Forest Reccounting, by Prof. R. D. Haun; '
IN
Dairy Cattle ords," a journal published at Delhi,
they will attend the
Money and Banking, by Prof. Rod
congress.
India, is by Dr. W. D. Funkhouser
man Sullivan.
Officers of the Dairy ' club are
stage sets for the forth
Unique
of a coming Guignol production, "When James C. Downing, president; Boyd of the University of Kentucky on
Following the completion
"Entomological
Investigations
on
definite schedule, the time and Ladies Meet," opening on October Wheeler,
and Clar
the Spike Disease of Sandal."
place of meeting for each class will 16, are rapidly taking definite form. ence a. ueu, secreiary-ireasure- r.
Sandalwood is one of the mast
be announced.
The first set calls for a small
important of the forest products of
porch of a modern New York apartIndia and Doctor Funkhouser has
ment. Alza Stratton, a student in
been successful in identifying a
Pre-Me- d
the art department under Miss
number of important insect pests
designed the modern mural
from the government forest near
-painting for the act. It Is a jungle
cancer, Its Nature and Effect Coorg. The paper describes and
green, and on the Bodv." will be the toDic of figures 27 species of which one
Inter - Collegiate Discussion scene done in silver,proper
gray to give it the
outdoor the lecture which will be given by genus and four species are new to
Will Be On Educational
effect. This set, in particular, is Dr E. S. Maxwell, at the first meet-muscience.
Problems in State
more elaborate than that ing of the Pryor
sowork was
Doctor Funkhouser's
production ciety, at 7.30 p. m. today, in the done at the request of the Forest
used in the New York
At the request of the Kentucky under John Golden
basement of the Museum. Gross Research Institute of India and the
association, the DeEducational
The stage crew, under the direcarticle was published by
partment of University Extension, tion of G. L. Crutcher, Is copying specimens and slides will be used the Government of India. order of
to Illustrate the lecture.
University of Kentucky, is formuthe movie set to be used for the
lating plans for the promotion of second. It represents a barn which
an intercollegiate discussion con- has been made over for entertain
test to debate some of the current ment purposes. For the past
educational problems in Kentucky, seasons, this department has been
and to be conducted on an eliminaundrt- Mr. Crutcher.
tion basis. The winner in each colAssisting Mr. Fowler In the direclege will represent his school at an tion of the season's opener is Miss
intercollegiate meeting, the winner Margaret Furr, who has been conwill receive the
and two runners-u- p
nected with Guignol activities for
By JOHN ST. JOHN
division of a $50 award, offered by some time. Virginia Boyd,
I could name a dozen young,
"College nan are making more
K. E. A.
of last season's prize play, and asoutstanding contributions to the outstanding newspapermen whose
According to the plans announced
sistant direcotr of several Guignol field of journalism and especially rise to Important posts in the last
by Dr. Wellington Patrick, director productions of
the past, is in charge to newspaper work now than ever few years is a result of intense work
of the University extension departproperties. Clarence Moore will before," was the opinion expressed on college papers.
The college
ment, the various colleges in the of
manage the lighting effects.
by C. O. Wagoner, Sunday editor of man has a broad outlook, a basic
state will be invited to hold school
The Detroit Times, in an interview knowledge that is necessary to one
debates on subjects to be announcwho is to go very far in the field,"
yesterday.
ed later by the extension departMr. Wagoner arrived in Lexington Mr. Wagoner said.
ment, and an Intercollegiate conSunday night, and left yesterday on
"The development of women retest will be held, probably at the
porters in college is extremely ima trip through the south.
University, following the college
Phi Beta, honorary music and
"The experience gained by stu- portant. Women still have their
contests, to which each school endramatic sorority, will ;ponsor a dents in work on campus news- own field in newspaper work which
tered will send a representative.
The $50 award will probably be program for the Juvenile McDowell papers, perhaps, has aided more frequently demands more than anydivided among the first three rank- club to be given Friday. October 6. than any other one thing. It is no thing else a tactful personality, and
longer necessary for graduates to ability to accustom themselves to
ing debaters at the finals, $25 going This is an annual affair, and acspend several years as cub reporters any situation," was the opinion of
to the winner, $15 to the one who cording to Elizabeth Hardin, presiproMr. Wagoner. "However, they are
before specializing," the distinguishfinishes second and (10 for third dent of the local chapter, will
constantly called upon to do every
ed newspaperman said.
place. D. Y. Dunn, president of bably be held at the Lexington Colfirmly believes that kind of reporting and therefore
Mr. Wagoner
K. E. A. and superintendent or Fay- lege of Music.
This program, given for the chil- textbooks and classes in journalism must be thoroughly trained," he adette county schools, has placed the
Lexington, will consist of can only lay a foundation, and ded.
arrangements for the contest in the dren of
"I am confident that journalism
department of University Extension. music and readings. Willie Hughes must be accompanied by actual
reporting taught by experiencThis contest Is similar to the one Smith has charge of the program, report lal work. It is because many andnewspapermen,
and supplementbeing sponsored by K. E. A. among for which final plans have not college newspapers are serving as ed
the only news organs In many cities ed by constant reportorial work will
school children of the state from been made.
produce the outstanding men In the
Phi Beta is continuing the ticket with the realization of responsibilthe sixth grade through high school,
and which the University extension sale for the Guignol productions ity that college editorial staffs are field tomorrow," concluded Mr.
Wagoner.
becoming more efficient.
for this season.
department Is sponsoring.

STAFF

I

HAVE YOUR ANNUAL
PICTURES MADE

OF

ch

We think we can assign to our
present areas about 50 cars, and we
plan to open a new area that will
hold another 50.
Naturally in attempting such an
undertaking of alloting space to
difficulties
unforeseen
500 cars,
have arisen, but we ask for you to
be patient until we can straighten
these difficulties out.

,

2

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, TUESDAY, OCTOBER 3, 1933

VOLUME XXIV

Editor-inChie-

W

PARKES CADMAN
WILL
Well-Know-

n

VISIT CITY
Lecturer, Author

and Traveler To Speak
From University
Studios

TO ADDRESS KY. WOMEN
Dr. S. Parkes Cadman, for more

than a quarter of a century pastor
of the Central Congregational
church of Brooklyn, N. Y., is scheduled to speak over the radio from
the University of Kentucky extension studios, October

10.

His sub

ject is to be "The Uses and Abuses
of the Imagination."

Brilliant Work of Kerchcval,
Murphy, and Wagner
Strengthens Team
By JACK ANTHONY
Playing a heady, Inspired game
of football, 'a fighting Sewanee
team outplayed Kentucky's Big Blue
team only to lose by a close 7 to 0
decision under the lights of Stoll
Although
field Saturday night.
making two fumbles, one of which
almost resulted In a touchdown for
Sewanee, the veteran "Pug" Bach
redeemed himself In the fourth
quarter by running a punt back 77
yards for the only touchdown of the
game.
Before a partisan crowd of 8,500
football fans which included Governor Ruby LaToon of Kentucky
and Dan Beard, scout executive, the
greatly
Sewanee
Tigers started off with a rush, completing two passes and flashing a
running attack that soon had the
Even after
Wildcats bewildered.
the lettermen were substituted for
but inexperiencthe highly-toute- d
ed sophomores, Sewanee still kept
up their superior game of football
which netted them four first downs
to Kentucky's three. The Tigers
also completed four passes for a
total of 49 yards while the 'Cats
completed only one and that resulted in a loss of three yards.
Kercheval's superb punting accompanied by brilliant defensive
play by two tackles, Murphy and
Wagner, bolstered up the Kentucky
team and were the salient factors
that kept the Tigers from scoring.
The Big Blue seemed to have considerable trouble in holding the ball
and fumbled constantly. Sewanee's
lighterweight linemen easily broke
through Kentucky's forward wall
time and again to hurry the passer
and break up the plays before they
were well started. The 'Cat linemen did the same thing when the
Wildcats were on defense so that
the outstanding defensive play of
both teams kept the game so close
that when the battle was over Kentucky had gained a total of only 85
yards to Sewanee's 81.
Sewanee, boasting the smallest
football squad in the south, showed
in its first game this season, which,
incidentally was the first football
contest of the newly formed Southeastern conference, that it has a
great football team, which many of
the fans who saw the game still do
not realize. Before the season is
over Sewanee will show the extent
of its strength by winning a majority of their games and some of
these will be from major opponents.
The fact that Kentucky did not
click so well may be due to
under-estimat-

While in Lexington, Dr. Cadman
is to be guest speaker for the October meeting of the Woman's club of
Central Kentucky.
Dr. Cadman is well known
throughout the world for his leadership in the Federal Council of
Churches of Christ In America. He
is also an author and traveler.
Born In Shropshire, England, he
attended Richmond college, Surrey,
from which he graduated with
honors in 1889. Since that time he
has been lecturer at a number of
educational institutions, including
Yale, Bangor Theological Seminary;
the
in
Hartford Seminary: Berkeley, Calif., Tigers whom they expected to take
and Vanderbilt University.
in stride, while pointing for the
Georgia Tech game next week.
The extent of the opposition that
the Wildcats faced Saturday night
can be better understood when one
realizes that outside of the individTwo of the outstanding matches ual play of the veterans Kercheval,
of the current Round Robin tennis
(Continued on Page Four)
tournament will be presented by
Coach Downing Wednesday afternoon on the University courts.
The first match will be played at
3 p. m. between the doubles combinations of Wilson-Yos- t,
and
-Elliott.
At 4 p. m. there will
be a singles match between David
Social Season To Be Opened
Randall and John St. John.
Saturday Night by Barn
Both matches are expected to be
hard fought as all the participants
Dance; Proceeds Go To
play a spectacular brand of tennis.
Grants and Aids Group
The public Is cordially invited to
attend, and it is hoped that many
A Barn dance will be given Saturwill avail themselves of this privilday night in the Alumni gymnasium
ege.
in honor of the Kentucky and
Georgia Tech football teams. The
Bushwackers and another popular
orchestra will furnish music for
the dance which will begin promptly at 8 p. m. General admission
Prof. Elmer G. Sulzer and Harris will be $1.00.
Proceeds from the dance will be
M. Sullivan are planning the bases
for four new radio listening centers, given to the Grants and Aids soand the changing of sets in four ciety, a newly organized committee
centers already established in the of which Dr. J. S. Chambers is
chairman. The purpose of thi.i
mountainous sections of the state.
There Is a possibility of centers committee is to secure means to
being placed at Dryhill and Elk offer financial assistance to athletes
Horn in Leslie county, in Breathitt and needy students who are workcounty near Quicksand, and at Lost ing their way through school. The
Creek.
Better sets will replace group which is sponsoring the event
those In operation at Wooton and is composed of faculty members and
Hyden in Leslie county, and at Cow students who are Interested In carCreek and Glen Eden, Owsley rying out the purpose of the Grants
and Aids society, and in making the
county.
Barn dance an annual affair.
Listening posts bring to the peoThe program of events of the
ple of these isolated communities
dance
the only chance they have for the square will include a grand march,
dances, round dances and
betterment of their education. The
two
dances.
Between
people have become dependent upa silver cup will be awarded
on these posts, and listen to each dances
to the best dressed couple in cosinprogram with
tume and also to the best modernly
terest, according to Professor Suldressed couple. Around the edge of
zer.
The Lions club of this city has the floor, fraternities of the campus
sponsor both depicting differdonated money for the establish- will types
ent
of life In Kentucky. At
ment of a new center.
intervals during the program, sororities and independent groups of
RADIO PROGRAMS 'STOPPED
girls will give original demonstraany radio pro- tions. A cup will also be given to
There will not be
gram broadcast from the Universithe winner of the best booth and
ty of Kentucky studios of Station the best demonstration act.
week because of the
The gymnasium will be decorated
WHAS this
to represent a barn, in accordance
world series baseball games, according to an announcement made by with the spirit of the dance. Dr. J.
Elmer G. Sulzer, director of the Holmes Martin is In charge of these
arrangements.
University radio publicity departChaperones for the occasion will
ment. The studio will go back on
the air at 12:45 p. m. Monday, Oc- be ail the Deans and assistant
deans and their wives.
tober 9.
ce

under-estimati-

Tennis Tournament
Starts Wednesday

DANCE TO HONOR

Bishop-

FOOTBALL MEN

Listening Centers

To Be Established

k'

* nest uopy
The Kentucky Kernel
published oh tumdays awd rmiDATa
afrmbar
National Collrt rraas Association
Krnturkj Intercollrf lata frsas Association
Luinftoo Board at Oommarea
of tha Major Oollria Fubli-rstion- s.
A. t. "orris HUI
" Tors: City; III
Co.. 168
W. Madlton at., Ohleaca: 1004 Ind Ava ,
Anfries; Call
Brattls; HO aCapla Aw.,
Bids, Ban Frsnclsea.
A

mmbr

mrsntd
C.
nd Bt.,

la

OFFICIAL

NEWSPAPER OF THE
OF THE UNIVERSITY OF

KENTUCKY,

S

LEXINGTON

Subscription $2.00 a Year. Entered
Lrxlnston, Kr., Poatofflca Al Second
Claaa MaU Matter

HERE 8HALL THE KERNEL ALL
STUDENTS RIGHTS MAINTAIN
WRSLIY

. CARTER

M)Htor-in-Ch-

EDITORS

ASSOCIATE

Jo

tt

Ifaaaataf Fdilor

J. FRANK ADAMS

Jana at Hamilton
Edwin rattsrtson

Rrlstar
John F. Dajr
.

EDITORS

ASSISTANT

Edward Watts
vir.mia Lm Moon
Woodson Knight
Jack Wild
Arthur Muth
JANE A. MATTHEWS
STARR MENDEL
JOHNNIE CR AD DOCK
ELIZABETH HARDIN
H. SMITH
WILLI

-

literary Editor

Fatr
Art

editor
IdKor
Society editor
4i(. tocMts Cdllor
Jtccksr
Fraocet Bush
Lucj Jean Anderson
SPECIAL

.

WRITERS

Lorraine Leper
John St. John

vir.lnls Roblnton

are the most important in the final
count. Are you strong enough to
face about and change, if you realize that you are striving for a
worthless goal? Are you even brave
enough to admit that it is the
wrong goal? If so, you have a
splendid chance to start with
fresh slate and make your future
inscriptions of the type which you
will be proud.
The senior year In high school Is
a splendid opportunity In which to
coast on previous laurels.
Either
one is, or one is not an officer In
various associations. If one is not,
there is no further chance, and
some interest in the project is lost
If one is, it is the last position to
which one will be elected. In either case, with or without the honor,
one is liable to slacken one's speed.
During the year one becomes accustomed to thinking of oneself as
permanently this, that or the other,
and stops working. College Is very
good for a "swelled head." You
may have been a star at dear old
Alma Mater high school, but now
you are the greenest of green things,
the most inane of inane things a
So start out to work,
freshman.
and start in the right direction.

age, height, weight, the major sub
ject, chief interests, activities, snij
experience of each graduate.
The book was planned by the
(acuity of the college and was executed and paid for by the das.
The graduating class was composed
of thU
of 56 members. Twenty-on- e
number had obtained positions prior
to the publication of the pamphlpf,
and a very large per cent of the
remaining 35 were located.
The
application was mailed to 405 concerns throughout the country and
was praised by a great many business executives as an exceedingly
Ingenious Idea,
This Idea which has been promoted by the members of the Commerce college cannot be praised too
highly. In this period of economic
depression we well know how extremely difficult It is for college
graduates to find any sort of Job
upon the completion of their course.
This united effort to secure positions for students In the business
world has Indicted the heart-fe- lt
Interest of the Commerce faculty In
the ultimate achievements of their
graduates and has already been at
tendant with considerable success.
Large business firms showed their
appreciation of this novel
tive scheme for obtaining employ
ment for the graduates by hiring
one or more applicants. Why dont
the other colleges of the University
make use of s similar plan to that
which has been Inaugurated and aid
their graduates in finding employ
ra

THE KENTUCKIAN
BUSINESS MANAGER
For the first time in recent years,
the selection of business manager
for the annual published by the
senior class, has been made by ap
pointment rather than by election
by the members of the class.
Undoubtedly, this step is in keeping with the prevalent tendency to
centralize responsibility, since the
business manager is responsible to
the editor of the yearbook who