xt7jdf6k3f3b https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jdf6k3f3b/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19700327  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, March 27, 1970 text The Kentucky Kernel, March 27, 1970 1970 2015 true xt7jdf6k3f3b section xt7jdf6k3f3b IE Kmtoceiy Kernel
Friday, March 27, 1970

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LXJ, No. 113

Asking For It

'

1

Satire On War, Draft
Attracts Draft Cards, Smiles
SDS

By

JIM FUDGE

Kernel Staff Writer
About 30 draft cards were given to the SDS
Thursday night before and after an SDS anti-draand anti-wa- r
program called "You Asked

ft

for

It."

According to Colten, the cards turned in will
be sent to the Philadelphia Resistance, a draft
resistance group. When Philadelphia Resistance
has 100,000 draft cards, they will send the cards
to the Senate Armed Services Committee.
Presented on a television game show format,
"You Asked for It" was a satirical, cynical commentary on the draft, the war and the country
in general. It featured, according to Lew Colten,
free prizes to persons holding lucky numbers,
which were given out at the door.
The program, presented to an audience of about
175 people, began when Colten introduced the
Master of Ceremonies, "Guy Himself," portrayed
by Sam Mason. Mason then explained the "rules
of the game" and later introduced his assistant.
Mason first called a person, who was participating in the program, up to the stage, and interviewed him. Identifying himself as "Arthur Quins-bury,- "
he said he was from England and had come
to America to "avoid conscription" and to be able
to "hold his own beliefs" about war. Mason
hustled the "radical" off stage, and proceeded to
begin to give away the free prizes.
'Free Vacation' Given
The"prizes" were given to people who had their
"lucky numbers" drawn from a box. The prizes
were free "vacations" for three years, including
food, shelter, transportation and clothing.

While Mason was trying to "give away" the
first vacation, a protestor was picketing in front
of the stage. The protestor was later "beaten up"
by two "policemen" who Mason interviewed
as representatives of the men "who protect us
and keep our country free."
A second number was drawn later to give away
a second vacation, and this time, the winner accepted gleefully, and was presented with a uniform, gun and a drill instructor.
One portion reminiscent of the TV program,
"Truth Or Consequences," was the reunion
of one of "last week's winners" with his mother,
"Carrie Nation." Mason promised that her "son"
would be arriving soon, and a few minutes later
a "body", draped in a United States flag, was
carried in on a stretcher and placed on a table
on the stage. The lights were dimmed and the
group that had carried the "body" in sang"Amer-ica- ,

Hi

r.

the Beautiful."
Explanations Given

Following "You Asked for

It," Colten went on

the stage again and told the audience why he had
turned in his draft card, read the names of others
who had turned theirs in, and invited those men
who had turned their cards in to explain their
reasons for doing so, if they wished. A few did
explain their decision to turn in their draft cards.
Part way through the reading of the names
of those turning in their cards, Frank Shannon
read a poem, composed by the 75th Infantry
Division in Vietnam, entitled "Napalm Sticks
To Kids." It was a long, cynical poem explaining
their feelings toward shooting women and children
and to dropping napalm on civilians.

Hitting The Trail

Patterson Hall was the scene last night of the first debate between
candidates for the various Student Government offices. This candidate was just one of several who spoke to a group of about 150
Students.

SG Hopefuls Discuss

Rules Of The Game
By JANE BROWN
Kernel Staff Writer

Vs.

L

I

Members of SDS carry the 'body'
anti-drasoldier into the group's anti-war,

ft

session,

"You Asked For It," Monday night. Thirty draft
cards were turned in before and after the meeting.

Bruce Carver, vice president
of the Student Government
Elections Board and about 40
r
of candidates
representatives
and their parties met Thursday
night in the Student Center to
discuss the newly written election "rules and regulations"
that will be in effect during the
Student Government Elections
to be held April 7 and 8.
Carver elaborated on the report, which covered everything
from where posters may be
placed to how much each candidate can spend on those posters
and other propaganda. The enlarged services offered by the
Elections Board and the budget of the board were included.
New Facets
The complete slate of 59
candidates and their supporting
parties was distributed along
with the campaign schedule.
The schedule included a new
facet of the election proceedings: Seven debates to be
sponsored by various campus

SG Candidates Launch Campaigns

TOM BOWDEN
Kernel Staff Writer
The spring Student Government campaign swung into Patterson Hall Thursday night at
the unlikely hour of 10:30 p.m.
A crowd estimated at 150
fired questions at the four candidates for SG president, but the
strict time limits on answers due
to the lateness of the hour
seemed to unsettle some of the
candidates and to amuse the
crowd.
Ched Jennings summarized
the goals of his presidential campaign in the slogan, "Unite the
campus."
"There are too many problems
common to all students for the
By

Student Government to be enmeshed" in factionalism and
Jennings explained.
Dawson Sjeaks
Presidential
candidate Bill
Dawson, who is running as a
representative of the Student
Issues Party, stressed that Student Government money "should
be spent for the students."
Dawson also mentioned communication between the students
and the University president and
the distribution of basketball and
football tickets as issues which
he would try to solve as president.
Candidate Steve Bright, who
is affiliated with the Action Coalition Party, said, "The most

important issue (in this campaign) is campus reorganization

and reorientation.
"We are finally beginning to
get some footholds in the University structure," Bright said.
"We can't allow the office (of
president) to be held by someone representing only a selective
group."
Jim Williams, an independent
candidate for the presidency, announced that his speech was impromptu and that he had prepared no remarks.
In response to a question
alx)ut the makeup of the cabinet
if he were elected, Williams responded: "I will appoint all my
friends."

Kernel Photo By Dick Ware

In addition to the debate between the presidential candicandates, the
didates and those students running for SG representatives were
presented to the assembly. The
hopefuls were
allowed to make short addresses.
Skip Althoff, who is Steve
Bright's running mate; Roger
Valentine, who is aligned with
Ched Jennings; and Don Wag-gene- r,
who is running with Bill
Dawson, addressed the meeting.
Another candidate for vice
president, John Stainback, is
running independently. I lis main
reason for running, Stainback
states, is that the other candi- Please Turn To Pare 3

organizations. These debates began last night and will culminate with an "All Campus Debate" on April 5.
Under the topic of "Campaign Expenditures" two new
were
regulations
presented.
Each
individual
presidential

and

candidate

will be allowed to spend $250.
The amount each representative
candidate may spend is $100.
Each candidate or their party
must submit a financial statement by April 10.
The other new procedure involving money is that each
candidate is required to pay a
$10 fee when he hies for
election. Carver assured the
group that if all campaign
material was removed by 10
p.m. on April 10 that the fee
would be returned. If party
material, not individual, was not
taken down by then, the campaign manager's $10 would be
retained.
There was another new
regulation involving campaign
material and where it could be
placed. So that the "campaign
will be taken out of the academic setting," no campaign
literature will be placed in classrooms. The Elections Board
would like to see posting limited
to bulletin boards. They asked
the candidates to limit the
placing of posters on painted
areas, too. "We can't say 'you
can't do it', but we're asking
you not to."
Maintenance Problems
When asked what the Board
was going to do about the
maintenance
tearing
people
down election material, Carver
replied that they had been
asked to stop but "they needed
instructed again." He
to I
added that painting sidewalks
and tearing clown opponents'
material would be in violation
of the Student Code and not
Please Turn To Pace

6

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Friday, March 27, 1070

ffif Comedy Opens At The Barn

OPEN EVERY NIGHTf

starts 7:30; adm. $1.50
A FRANKOVICH

OlWSTOnitR JONESRALPH
PAUL

iton

VARRONE
Arts Editor
The Barn's current production, The Owl and the Pussycat,
has to be classified a hit from
anyone's jKiint of view. The
play, the dinner, and the entire
dinner theater atmosphere all
Mended together for an excellent
entertainment. The
evening's
adult
play was a well-acte- d
comedy that treated some delicate subjects with remarkable
good taste. And the cast of two
never let the action drag.
The plot centers around a
brazen
very emotional prostitute and a young, logical, intellectual writer. The writer has
informed the landlord about the
girl's extracurricular activities
and she is thrown out of her
apartment as a result. She storms
into his place to give him a
piece of her mind and they begin a most curious relationship.
Each character is trying to
impress the other by what they
would like to be in reality. They
erect false fronts and try to disguise their real selves by changing their names. Hut they both
are looking for someone to believe in them as the ordinary
people they really are.
So far this may sound like
anything but a comedy. Actually, it is one of the funniest
productions that the Uarn has
ever presented. David Riowne-- I
loath as Felix Sherman brings

PRODUCTION
RICHARDSON

ROGtRS ANTHONY Hpf'WNSPlA

DtCERMARK

.ThQ

wssmm
Wntten l

n

IheXif

and Directed

by

fRANKWPlERSON

K4

Produced

on the bor
by
JOHN LeCARRE

2nd

TURNED-O-

,

yj

JOHN BOX

PANAVlSlON'from Columbia Pictures

.EASTMAN COLOR

by

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--

H

FEATURE

N

If.

is a mounlain or
creativity, as il 'QW
had been made
Dy a flower child!

4

....

::

-

,

-- William Wolf. CUE MAGAZINE

FIRST AREA SHOWING!

1
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in ms

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7sstT

A LEGEND

tHt

MALTCK

-

It!

MAM WMAIrttlON

wS

VtuHif.

.r;2.v

.,:

..

X

:

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and

Mary

taking "immoral and improper
a female child
liberties with
..
with the intent of arousing
. . gratifying the lust, passions

...

MOTHER MJVTBELLE

.

PEMIKS

.

THREE

rl

Pine
J

group

folk-singin- g

Yarrow, 32, was charged with

HIS MUSIC!
THE TENNESSEE

i

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-

i.MBt - jLj;P!i!'iijrkiord

IKJT
I TT
Whin I CACTVUrtAn

ksaj

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ityiTrn jOTirTP

TECHNICOLOR'

Handbook Prepares
For National Teach-i-

n

UOIl VARRONE

Arts Editor
Ecology has become the most
word in the world
recently. Now, a wry complete
book has been compiled to explain any and all the facets of
this growing problem in exacting detail. The book is titled
F.n irontnental
"The
simply
Handbook" and has been prepared especially lor the F.n- iionmental Teach-In- .
Apiil 22.

over-use-

d

The book is a series of slioit
articles and excerpts from many
authors and
of the
who are inconservationists
terested in preventing what may
be the end of the world. Fery
phase of polutiou is examined,
exhaust to
from automobile
pesticide, every environmentally
well-know-

n

dered Yarrow freed on personal

(AP)-Sin- ger

pleaded guilty Thursday in U.S.
District Court to taking immoral
liberties with a
gid
and was jailed briefly.

HIS WORLD

THE CARTER FAMILY CARL

each succeeds in stripping the
other of his facade. After contemplating double suicide as
their only recourse, they suddenly discover that they are the
answer to each other's needs.

dangerous act is probed, from
wildlife extermination
to the
dangers of the SST.
In addition
to information
about just what is happening in
the areas of ecology, the lxok
lists ways that the concerned
citien can help prevent environmental damage. It nanu s
organizations, clubs, and individuals who will help organize
lesistance mo einents. The bunk
has form letters to influential
politicians asking them to take
a strong stand on the issues of
pollution and ecology.
Aside from its informative
material the book is excellent
from another point of view. It
is enough to scare people into
believing that we will really be
one of the last generations to
exist on the planet Farth.

Folk Singer Guilty Of Morals Charge

j

WASHINGTON

MB OTUN

This battle of the sexes rises
and falls until the last act when

,

Peter Yarrow of the Peter, Paul

JUNE CARTER

exactly the right amount of intellectual wit to his role in an
excellent contrast with the crude
manners of Doris (Lee Schneider), lie constantly derides
her apparent stupidity and she
raises doubts about his masculinity as a counter-attac-

..."

recognizance. Yarrow spent about
four hours in a basement lockup
at the court louse.
No date was set for sentencing. The offense carries a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison.
According to a statement by
the girl read aloud by Curran,
the offense to which Yarrow
pleaded guilty took place last

Aug. 31 in a rexnn at a hotel
while Yarrow was in Washington for a series of concerts by
the
group.
The defense motion asking
the appellate court to free Yarrow said since the incident the
singer had been married and w as
now receiving psychiatric care.
Yarrow married Mary Beth McCarthy, a niece of Sen. Eugene
Oct. IS.
McCarthy,
folk-singin- g

and sexual desires
His plea came in a
hearing before Chief Judge Edward M. Curran, who abruptly
rejected a bid to release Yarrow
on bond pending sentencing.
Yarrow's lawyer, Robert X.
"Pciiy, fi'td ail iiiii.TCviVuiC appeal
with the U.S. Court of Appeals
which reversed Curran and or- -

Iehnel

The Kentucky
The

"'V

'i.mj

n

Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, LexSecond
ington, Kentucky
posture paid ul Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times wccKly during the
fcihool year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the hummer
session.
Published bv the Board of Student
Publications. UK Post Office Ilox A'Ji.6.
Hegun as the Cadet in 18U4 and
published continuously as the Kernel
bince 1815.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION

RATES

Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files
KERNEL

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TELEPHONES

Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk
Advertising, Business, Circulation

Times
Bargain Matinee
l:30-2:r- 0

All Seeh 75c
Except Sunday

IN

COLOR

IkJ--

2321
2320
2447
2319

Pictured above

is David Clayton-Thomalead sinffrr for Blood.
Sweat and Tears. BS&T, the group that swept this year's Crammy
nominations will be performing in person at Louisville's Freedom
Hall on April 13 at S p.m.
s.

x:

V

V

IX)U1S71LLE,

JTUCK7 i
ryyy

1

SJW?

IETY

I

ilXiOSiTiCH I CEI WEH

fssV..

-

'

1

1

i

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, March 27,

SG Candidates Debate

Cnntinii.'ri I'rnm PaRP One
dates would not disagree or
raise questions about tlie
of the president with
whom he ran for office.
Won't 15c Silent
"I hope that I ran provide
more than just a check" on the
activities of the president, Stain-hac- k
said. "I want to provide a
I will not
fly in the ointment.
he a silent vice president."
Also present at the debate
were Patt Mancy and Ruck
Pennington, who are engaged in
a battle to determine the proper
method of electing the Speaker
of the Assembly.
In the past, the Student Government Assembly has elected
the Speaker from among its
ranks, without a popular vote
from the campus.

Pennington, in attempting to
gain a popular mandate for himself for tlie office, maintains tliat,
due the power of the position,
its holder should be elected by
the people.
Maney says that in opposing
Pennington for the office, he is
not seeking a mandate from the
people, but rather an equal voice
in debate with Pennington in
order to tell the voters what he
thinks about the process.

We can't know where we're going
if

a Speakers' campaign during

the

regular campaign."
Referring to the tradition of
election by the Assembly itself,
Mancy says, "I find it hard to
understand how an individual
who does not respect the traditions or functioning structure of
the Assembly can be an effective
speaker."
Pennington states that the
tradition of allowing the Assembly to elect the Speaker is "the
type of tradition that is designed
to keep student involvement out
of the matter of Student Government. That is the kind of tradition I'm trying to overturn."

Mancy Seak
"It places all representatives
at an unfair disadvantage,"
Maney states, "to try and build

1970- -3

we don't know where we are.

CENSUS

CENSUS
DAY
IS APRIL

-

AM

o

U-

1

APRIL 13

Uj08I

YD Criticizes

Leadership
Don Mills, president of the
Kentucky
Young Democrats,
criticized the Democratic leadership in the Senate Thursday for
failure to support a party-reformeasure which had received
prior approval from the party's
Rules Committee.
The measure, House Rill 93,
was a special project of the
It would
Young Democrats.
have permitted any political
party in Kentucky to elect its
grassroots workers during the
May primary. The Democrats
currently select such workers at
special local party meetings in
December of a presidential-electio- n
year.
Mills said the bill was proposed as a progressive step to allow more party members an opportunity to participate in party
affairs.
HR 93 was passed in the
House 76-- 3 on Feb. 17, but was
tabled in the Senate Rules Committee after it was reported out
favorably by the Senate Elections and Constitutional Amendments Committee on March 12.

IN PERSON
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8 P.M.

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owing church is actively ietking new minister
who believe what w believe, All men are entitled
uvk truth their own
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wjy, whatever it may be o question diked. As 4
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mjr if.iijes, baptism, funerals and
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Serviced by Edger Sales, Inc.

* The Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

University of Kentucky

ernel

1894

FRIDAY, MARCH
Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.

James W. Miller,
Frank S. C(xts, Managing Editor
Holxrt Duncan, Advertising Manager
Chip Hutclieson, Sports Editor
Gwen Ranney, Women's rage Editor
Patrick Mathes,

27, 1970

Editor-in-Chi-

Mike Herndan, Editorial rage Editor
Dan Gossett, Associate Editor
Dob Varronc, Arts Editor
Don Rosa, Cartoonist

Jimmy Robertson, Circulation Manigcr
Bill Matthews,
Jeannie Leedoin,
Assistant Managing Editors

Jeannic St. Charles,

Jean Renaker

Possible Answer
The proposed Student Government committee plan to turn the
University Bookstore into a student-owne- d
cooperative has an appealing ring. Most students, who have
trouble keeping their feet out of the
financial graveyard, will welcome
any program which means even a
slight reduction in college expenses.
Committee chairman BruceCar-ve- r
says the only drawback to the
cooperative plan is that profit from
the bookstore has been u sed to reti re
the bond issue on the Student Center itself.
A

possible answer to this problem could come from the studies of

another Student Government committee. Research from the Student
Services Committee indicates that
students would like to see campus
grilles remain open for a longer
period each night. Perhaps the additional profit which would result
from this proposal could be transferred toward the Student Center
indebtedness. This would of course
free the bookstore to become a nonprofit organization.
The success or failure of such a
plan, however, would depend upon
the cooperation it receives from the
student body. It does little good to
extend grille hours if students refuse to patronize the places.

n4

Trthun

SyndtcaU

Fingerprinting Of Suspects Would Also Enable You
licarded Kooks To Prove
Your Innocence!"
Long-Haire-

Kernel Soapbox
that maybe you're crazy and actually
By J. DAVID HARDISON
P. S. Freshman
everybody else is sane. You don't think it
takes guts to live like that, fighting a war
This is a form of reply to James VV.
inside yourself just to keep your mind
Smith and his "poetry" that appeared
in Monday's Kernel.
together, because you're being told to do
I had a friend that was killed in Vietsomething that is wrong.
nam last week. But I'm not going to write
I'm one of the "Peace Boys." And
a poem to his memory. Words on paper
I'm not sitting in any "easy chair" either.
paix't replace his flesh and blood. NothYou say I don't know what it's like to
ing can. But I can at least try to do be in Vietnam. I worked at a U.S.
Army
something to make up for the stupidity
I
last
of his death. That's why I demonstrate hospital the summer, and saw and met
a lot of
guys who were lucky enough
and make vocal my opinion of the war to
get out of there with only disfigured
that killed him. That's all I can do right bodies and minds.
Guys in my own peer
now. I'm only one individual.
group. I think I've seen all the Vietnam
You would call me a coward. But if
I want to see. I know enough about war
I'm your kind of coward, I consider it a to know I don't
want any part of it, and
kind statement. I don't have to avenge
I don't want anybody else to have to be
friend's death or prove my own manmy
apart of it.
hood by picking up a gun and having
someone take me to Southeast Asia to
You also say that I'm the one who
kill somebody I don't know, and possibly
made you hear your buddy cry. I didn't
getting myself killed in the process. To tell him to go over there. You know who
me that's the easy way out of my dilemma
did though. If you want to hear some real
in choosing whether or not to be drafted.
crying, listen to my tears for your buddy.
That doesn't take guts. It takes guts to
Since you also seem to have the dedecide if you really believe war is wrong lusion that by dying in Vietnam, you're
and be able to stand up to the pressures dying for me, let me set you straight
of being disowned by your family, of going on that point. I don't want anybody
to jail or leaving your home country for dying for me. That's too much of a sacrithe rest of your life, and of being looked fice to ask of anybody. All you're going
at in contempt by people who are blind. to do is die.
Do you know what it's like to feel someI'm not returning the hate you have
times that you're the only sane person for me. I don't want any hate filling me
in the world, and actually knowing and up with bitterness. I can see what it's
believing it? But then you get the feeling already done to you.

d,

fifth column
By DALE MATTHEWS
I feel that the time has come for me
to make a public apology to those ad-

vocates of Women's Liberation whom
I have previously scorned in this column.
That women have been oppressed by our
society for too long has finally been
brought to my understanding.
When I read recently that women
were forbidden by state laws and by
federal laws to be telephone linemen,
coal miners and steel workers the severity of the situation struck home. We need
the labor that women can provide in these
and other areas. If these laws were done
away with, women and children (children
are protected by some of these laws as
well as women) could be put to good use
on the labor market and they would be of
great help to our economy for this reason:
Unemployment would go up and reduce
inflation. My friends, I ask you, is it
asking too much to expect women and
children to make a few personal sacrifices in order to combat inflation?
Of course we need to free the male
as well as the female. Imagine, if you
will, what a boon to mankind it would
be if only men were sitting in the chairs

Kernel Forum: the readers writet

n

Lamar Reflections
The incident at Lamar, South Carolina
Written after reading Time magazine for
March 16, 1970 (May be set to the tune
of Bonnets of Bonny Dundee)
To the twentieth century 'twas Lamar
that spoke,
"Ere we hold to your tenets there are
heads to be broke.
Our schools they are white and so must
remain
And we'll beat these black kids at their

uppity game."
Chorus:
Co swallow your reason, go lock up your

brain,

Co fix your axe handle, your brick and
your chain.
We'll wallop the niggers for being so free,
And hurrah for the bigots of Latnai, S. C.
The mob it went crazy, their weapons

they bared.

The school bus was broken, the kids they

were scared.
They smashed all the windows, they threw
all their stones,
Though the children were crying they
heard not their groans.
Thanks to the troopers who stood to their
posts.
And cheers for the drivers who held back
the host.
But what of the marshals who standing
around,
Would calmly let children be crushed to
the ground.
The bail it is set, the mob they go free,
Their cause it is wrong but their neighbors
show glee.
"Though they tried to kill children we're
proud don't you see
There's one law for niggers, another for
me.
To the followers of Best, here's a challenge
from me

To show a good cause why the blacks
shan't be free.
Mob of Lamar, though of rights you all

prate

You deny

these same rights to the people

you hate.

Though a case you might have, you dipped
it in shame:
You never can win at so violent a game.
The men you admire, both Stonewall and
Lee,
Would have spit on the crimewe attribute
to thee.
So burn your axe handles, go back to your
homes,
And pray that your god may whiten your
souls.
It's wrong to harm children, a sin and a
crime;
And shame to the bigots who think that
it's fine.
MICHAEL C. C. ADAMS
University of Sussex, England
Former UK Crad Student

now occupied by women telephone operators. Why there would be thousands
of women freed to work in the coal mines
where they would be happy and even
more useful than men. I say more useful
because women would have a longer life
in the mines than men do. It is a
provable fact that fewer women
die of black lung than men.
Another point that proponents of Women's Liberation expound is that the women
of our society have been stunted in their
creativity. This is very true. Look around,
how many women poets, painters, architects, and philosophers have there been?
The only logical explanation for this lack
of feminine talent can only be that men
have
these and many other
creative fields. God knows that men's
creativity in this society is not curbed
in the least. Men get to go to school
and sit in offices, very creative don't
you think?
It is high time that the battle of the
sexes takes up a new cry, MAKE LOVE
NOT WAR. We men need to see the
error of our ways and begin afresh, walking hand in hand with women in brotherly love, putting aside our pride and masculinity for theirs; they deserve it. Yes!
I can see a brave new world filled with
brotherly love, devoid of softness and
weakness. A world in which sex does
not play a part in your choice of public
rest rooms. A brave new world without
mothers and fathers, a virtual Utopia
where sex no longer has to mean something between a man and a woman.
A golden age of equality before the law
and in the mines!
It is all so beautiful now that I have
seen the light that I shudder to think
that I once wanted a woman who was
gentle and kind. A fool I must have been
to have wanted any but brotherly love.
What kind of man must it be that would
actually seek intelligence, compassion and
the ability to love in a woman when he
could have a good, strong-backehard
working coal miner? To think that I once
wanted a woman whom I could not
picture in useful, practical combat boots!
Never again will I compare thee to a
summer's day woman, fear no compliments from me and no more orders. I
have seen the light. It is time for women
to begin making decisions which have
been made for far too long by men. The
day of the segregated bathroom is over!
d

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday,

Afarcli 27, 1970- -5

FCC Proposes Media Ownership Cutback

WASHINGTON
(AD -- The
Federal Communieations Commission proposed Thursday that
newspapers and broadcasters he
forced to cut hack within five
years their ownership to only
one mass medium serving any
single community.
At the same time, the FCC issued a rule, taking effect imto block further
mediately,
concentration of brodacast station ownership in each market
area.
Owners who now have more
than one broadcasting station in
a single market can keep all

The deadline for announcements la
7:30 p.m. twa days prior to tho flrat
publication of Itcma In tola eolamn.

Today
Grave.

of
Forestry and Wood
School at Quicksand, Kentucky In Breathitt County, will be on
campus March 27th beginning at 10:00
a.m. In room 303 Breckinridge Hall to
talk with students who have completed one year of college and are
interested in entering the Forestry
and Wood Technology program.

the

two-ye-

Technology

Tomorrow
The India Association of UK presents "Dunla", a movie produced by
Amarjeet and directed by T. Prakash
Rao and starring Devanand and
It will be at 1:00 p.m. on
March 28 in the Student Center Theatre. Prices are $1.25 for members and
for

$1.75

Children

un-

der twelve free. Refreshment will be
there after movie In Room 206 In the
'Student Center.
The Easter celebration will begin at
11:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 28, with
the Lighting of the New Fire, the
Easter Eve Vigil, to be followed by
the Easter Eucharist.

Coming Up
On Easter Day. there will be celebration of the Holy Eucharist at 8:00
a.m. and 10:30 a.m. and Evensong at
5:30 p.m.
The Third Floor Theatre will pre-

sent the medieval morality play,
"Everyman," in a modern rendering.

-

Classified advertising will be accepted
on a ore-pai- d
bails only. Ads may be
In person Monday through
placed
Friday or by mail, payment Inclosed,
to THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Room

Journalism Bldf.
Kates are $1.25 for 30 words, $3.00
for three consecutive Insertions of the
same ad of 20 words, and $3.79 per
week, 20 words.
The deadline Is 11 a. m. the day
prior to publication. No advertisement
may cite race, rrllflon or national
orlfln as a qualification for renting
rooms or for employment.
111.

WANTED
Male graduate

ojfaduate
apart-

student to share
ment. Phone 2556608:00 a.m. to
5:00

23M27

j

p.m.

TWO FEMALE roommatesfieeded to
Rent
share house on AylesfortTPlace.
reasonable. Leased trfough August.
Call

I

9.

FOB BALK
GT

OPEL

1969

low

radio.

mileage;

;

Excellent-conditio-

red;

with

23M37

1.

FOR SALE: 1966 New Mooner. Mobile
H