xt7jdf6k3f63 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jdf6k3f63/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19620405  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  5, 1962 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  5, 1962 1962 2015 true xt7jdf6k3f63 section xt7jdf6k3f63 J4

Student Discusses

Party Unity;
See Page Four

O

o
Today's Weather:
Partly Cloudy, Mild;

University of Kentucky
Vol. LIII, No.

r

LEXINGTON,

9:

KV., THURSDAY,

APRIL

5,

I2

Eight Pages

Choate Is Top Independent Woman
1

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Hcttye Choate, of Ilerndon, Covington ; Esther Adams Award,
Doris Jeannine Haines, Lexingwas named outstanding indeton; Delta Delta Delta Scholarwoman of ship, Peggy McDonald, Louispendent upperclass
eta Tau Alpha Bonk
the year by Kappa Kappa ville;
Gamma last night at the annual Awards, Janet Lloyd, Lexington,
and Elizabeth Lee Will. Louis"Stars in the Night" program.
Service Award,
ville; YWCA
Irma Strache, Paducah.
Miss Patricia Patterson, assistant to the dean of women, was
Peggy S. Henry Memorial Award,
selected as outstanding woman of Loretta Faye Pinson, Matewan,
the year by Delta Zeta.
W. Va.; Phi Delta Kappa award,

Board: Brenda Booke, Miami, Fla.;
Bettye Choate, Heindon;
Joyce
Cunningham,
Indianapolis,
Ind.;
Daphne Dollar, Madisonville; Joan
Jameson. Ro.ssville, Tenn.; Ann
Todd Jefferies, Columbia; Barbara
and Diane
Johnson,
Ashland;
Marek. Clifton. 111.
Jane Mitchell. Campbells-vill- e;
Betty
Linda Mount, Romulus, N.
Y.; Patty Pringle, Columbia, S. C;
Carolyn Reid, Owensboro; Jerry
Sue Sanders,
Irma
Lancaster;
Strache, Paducah; Kathryn Roper
Jane Withers,
White, Jasper, Ga.;
Hardinsburg;
Margaret Ann
Brown, Ann Gordon Evans, Kitty
Hundley, Janet Lloyd, Vanda Mar-cuKay Shropshire, Sonia Smith,
all of Lexington.
The following sophomores were
for membership
selected
in
Links, junior women's honorary:
Allen, Borden, Ind.;
Cynthia
Bonnie Barnes, Scituate, R. I.;
Ann Combs, Hazard; Carole L.
Cosby, Cincinnati, Ohio; Susan
Endicott, Toledo, Ohio; Sue Ellen
Crannis, Aberdeen, Ohio; Martha Greenwood, Hopkinsville;
and Becky Groger, Erlanger.
Judy Hopkins, Calhoun; Gail
Continued on Page 5

Registrar Reports
On Grade Average

Carol Anne Harper, Madison ville;
Pi Beta Phi Freshman Woman
Award, Martha J. Minogue, Louisville; and Outstanding member
of Phi Beta, Linda Ruth Lietz, Oak
Park, 111.
Outstanding graduating seniors
in College of Education, Sandra
Tattershall Deitz, S. Ft. Mitchell,
and Eleanor Ann Piper, Russell-vill- e;
Phi Upsilon Omicron Cornell Award, Virginia Elizabeth
Newell, Bronston.
Theta Sigma Phi Outstanding
Women in Journalism
Awards,
June Gray, Morehead, and Beverly
Card well, Morgantown;
Alpha
Lambda Delta Senior Book Award,
Gertrude C. Webb, Lexington.
The following juniors were selected for membership in Mortar

The data was developed from
undergraduate on campus students

Students Approv
Increase In Fees

MISS BETTY E CHOATE

Thirty percent of the fulltime
University students did not obtain
a "C" average for the 1961 fall semester, the Office of the Registrar
reported this week.
--

carrying 12 or more credit hours
with incomplete and withdrawal
grades excluded.

The program which is sponsored by Associated Women Students, the women's administrative council, is held to honor
women students for scholarship,
leadership, and service.
Mortar Board, senior women's
honorary, presented service awards
to three nonmembers, Gypsy Barker, South Charleston, W. Va., who
was mistress of ceremonies at the
program; Sue Harrelson, Owens-borMISS PAT PATTERSON
and Mary Warner Ford, Lexington.
Panhellenic Council Spirit Awerd
was won by the Pi Beta Phi Sorority. The Council's scholarship
improvement award went to Alpha
Delta Pi.
Other women honored at the
program included:
44 percent of the freshmen did not
Kappa Alpha Theta Mothers'
make the "C" average; sophomores,
Club Award, Judith Moneyhon,
36 percent;
juniors, 26 percent;
Augusta; Lexington Business and
seniors, 13 percent. The college Professional Women's Club
average was 32 percent.
award, Mary Lou Hutchinson,

SC Underwriting

Vandenboscli Book

The percentage of freshmen who
did not have a "C" average for the
Student Congress is presently helping to underwrite a
fall semester was 41; sophomore,
book which will give a brief survey of world politics since 19 H.
25; junior, 22; and senior, 16.
In the College of Agriculture and The book is being compiled and keep down the selling price of the
Home Economics, 45 percent of the written by Dr. Amry Vandenboscli book.
freshmen did not make a "C" ave- and other faculty members from
Each of the 3,000 copies will cost
School of Diplomacy.
rage, and 25 percent of the soph- the Patterson
$1 to be printed and
distri"It will not be just a book of buted. Lane said the then
omores; 17 percent of the juniors,
committee
and 9 percent of the seniors did facts," Jim Daniel, president of hopes to sell the books at 25 cents
not make the required standing. Student Congress, said when the a copy.
The college average below a "C" project was instigated.
Monday night, Student Congress
was 27 percent.
"Dr. Vandenboscli and his staff
are writing it as an interpretation allocated $2,000 toward the pubof the freshForty-on- e
percent
of the events since World War II." lishing of the book. The University
men in the College of Arts and
Press has contributed their ser"Also, it will include a discus- vices free of
Sciences did not make the "C"
charge for the prosion of the significance of these
standing; sophomores, 22 percent; events in view of what may be ex- ject.
juniors, 21 percent; seniors, 13 perDr. Paul Street, director of the
to follow them plus various
cent; and the college average was pected
side problem areas involved," Dan- Bureau of School Services, said the
29 percent.
Bureau would help in distributing
iel said.
In the College of Commerce, 55 Raleigh Lane, chairman of the the books throughout the state.
Daniel said that if the book is
percent of the freshmen lacked Student Congress book committee,
the necessary "C" average; sopho- said the plans, at present, are to accepted by a national publishing
mores, 31 percent; Juniors, 31 per- distribute copies of the book to all company, the cost of each copy
would be cut considerably.
cent; seniors, 20 percent. The col- Kentucky high schools.
lege average was 37 percent.
"Many school libraries are not
Twenty-thre- e
percent of the stu- large," he emphasized. "Many high
dents in the College of Education school students are required to redid not make the "C" average. Of port on various aspects of world
the freshmen, 44 percent did not politics but the necessary material
make the average; sophomores, 16 is not available. Often, good interenpercent; juniors. 17 percent; and pretation in depth of events is
14 percent of the seniors did not tirely lacking."
Lane commented that because of
make the "C average.
high printing costs, the main probof Engineering. lem involved in the project was to
In the College

UK President Okays
Finances For Stylus
C

By PETER JONES, Kernel Staff Writer
"Hall, humbug," said Jim liculf when questioi ied abou t h
views on the increase in tuition starting this fall.
for drastic
announcer
chief
Reuff,
change from the foe now
WBKY, said the increase won't charged.
hurt him because he receives a
students
"It is the
grant, but, "It may be devest at ing who are hardest hit by the infor some people."
crease," said one student. "Even
Many other students, however, with the higher cost of tuition,
don't think the increase is partichowever, a I K education cannot
ularly troublesome. All agreed that be considered expensive. The
it is probably necessary.
many I'K students who come
from states in the Northeast tesThe increase, voted for by the
tify to that," he added.
Board of Trustees on Tuesday,
will mean that Kentucky resiThe one real note of criticism by
a few of the men students was the
dents will pay about $100 a semester while nonresidents will fact that the fees for Bowman,
be charged about $250 a semester
Kinkead, Breckinridge, and Brad-ly- e
Halls will now approach the
in enrollment fees.
The questioned students agreed fee charged for Donovan and Hag-gi- n
Halls.
unanimously that "no one likes to
Donovan and Haggin Halls are
pay more money," but as Ken
sociology much newer and the men believe
Blessinger,
sophomore
said, "They've got to get that equal fees for all the dormimajor,
money from somewhere if the state tories is unfair.
can't provide it."
The Kernel tried to get an exThe Kentucky residents were, of planation of this situation from
course, least concerned about the the Office of the Dean of Men, but
increase because it represents no the officials were not available.

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President Frank
Dickey has authorized the use of funds
for the payment of the printers' bill for the spring issue of
Stylus, campus literary magazine.
Due to a cut in the Student Con be printed on campus. The Kernel
gress budget, extra funds had to be
appropriated to pay the printing
bill, said Dr. John L. Cutler, faculty adviser of Stylus.
Because the money allotted is
state funds, the fall issue had to

Press did the work.
The spring issue, now in the
printing process, will also be done
by the Kernel Press, whereas before it had been done by the Keystone Press of Lexington, said Dr.
Cutler.

4 ft

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Dlstinniiislml Professor

Dr. Thomas It. Stroup, on the far rulit, along
with Dr. M. M. White, dean of the college of Arts
and Sciences, greet several students at a reception
following Dr. Slroup's luture on the shape of

week. Dr. Stroup was
named the distinguished Professor of the Year by
the College of Arts and Sciences,

the Elizabetbun'play this

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, April

2

5, 19M2

acAre Cain Awarded

National bcllOlarsllip

JackiV Cain, srnior biological science major lias been
National Defense Graduate Fellowship
awarded a three-yea- r
in microbiology by the U. S. Department of Health, Education,
and Welfare. She is from Independence, and has a 3.72 aver- all standing.
He
Microbiology
Department.
Miss Cain will be working toasked her if she was Interested
ward her doctoral degree next fall. in a fellowship.

v

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....

The fellowship provides for a payment of $2,000 for the first year of
study, $2,800 for the second, and
$2,400 for the third.
A $500 Increase is included for
a dependent if she should marry
within this time. Recently, she
was offered an assistantship at
Purdue University at a salary of
$2,300 wilh a $900 tuition dedurtion.
Slie applied for assistantships
at several colleges but this fellowship came as a surprise. One
d.iy she was told to see Pr.
Morris Scher.iRn, head of the

UK Contract
Henry County High School's debate tram won the regional debate
trials last week at the Northern Center in Covington. I'rom the
left, are Jarob Boyer, Sue Stivers; Paul Seliott, speech tournament manager; Sarah Prathrr and linger Tharp. Dixie Heights
won the regional speech festival with a total of 74 points. Simon
Kenton was second with G6 and Villa Madonna Academy was
third with 55.

CLASSIFIED
t

crnts pel
percent
4
Deadline f4 bear befare pabll-atladate. Vbene NICK POPE, KttM between I p.m. and 4 p.m. Maadaj
threat Friday.
ADVERTISING

RATI!

minimum; ti
wrd;7S If wilt rtlument rant
adre
4tieant

Cr

FOR SALE

Blazer Talk
Is Tonight

Dr. Carl Bode, English professor at the University of
Maryland, will speak at a
Blazer Lecture at 8 p.m. today in the Taylor Education
Building Auditorium.

FOK SALE 1955 Nash Statesman sedan.
Dr. Bode, who has served as
Standard
shift, overdrive, radio and
heater. Exceptional. Must sell quickly. cultural attache at the American
3A4t
Phone
INSl RANC

E

SENIORS Before you start your Life
Insurance Program see GENE CRAVENS
representing New York Life Insurance
Comp.-myAn organization with offices
in all 50 states and Canada. Phone
3A4t
or
FOR

Rf NT

FOR RENT Furnished Apartment. Spacious, 3 rooms, bath on first floor. Utilities paid. Near town and University.
Married couple preferred.
Apply 200
3A4t
S. Limestone.
LOST

at Sigma Nu
LOST Green
party Saturday night. Have one that is
4A3t
not mine. Phone 6136.
WANTED

Embassy in Great Britain and as
chairman of the U.S. Educational
Commission in the United Kingdom, will speak on "The Hidden
England."
A fellow of the International
Institute of Arts and Letters, he
received Ph.D. and M.A. degrees
from Northwestern University. He
is the author of several books on
American literature, and is a member of numerous professional societies.
He has served as visiting lecturer or faculty member at seven
universities.

Engineers9 Day
To Be April 27

TWO STUDENTS for sales work Hours
"Engineering in the Space Age"
to tit your schedule. Earnings $2.50 per
liour and up. Our company makes 11 is the theme for UK's annual EnAlso
scholarships available annually.
one to train for management position. gineers Day to be held April 27.
Mr. Van
Call Watkins Products,
A committee of students from
4A3t
Meter.
all
of
FOUND

FOUND
Cull

Woman's

gold

watch.
3A2t

MISCELLANEOUS

ALTERATIONS Dresses, coats, skirts.
348 Alyesford
Place, Phone
Mildred Cohen.
ISMlBt

the College of
departments
Engineering will be in charge of
setting up exhibits and arranging
displays.
The special day will signify
open house at the engineering college with the public invited.

HOUND TRIP by Greyhound Bus to Ft.
Lauderdale c:i6.00i and Daytona Beach
I $'10.00
.
Lodging $3 00 per night. Reservation deadline. Thursday
midnight.
or
Call
after 6 p.m. 3A3t

Holmes Hall was named for Mrs.
Sarah B. Holmes, appointed dean
of women emeritus in 1941.

i0WKhip

"That's when I began shaking."
jackie explained. "I just couldn't
btlirve it was real. I had to call
home to tell mv narents "
Miss Cain is a member of Alpha
Delta Pi, Alpha Lambda Delta,
Cwens, Links, Moitir Board,
Kappa D"lta Pi. and Phi Alpha
The! a. She serves as AFROTC
sponsor, sweetheart of Sima Nu.
and was an attendant to the March
Gras queen.

W. Beers was choby the Board of

Dr. Howard
sen Tuesday
Trustees as chief of party of the
University's contract team at Bo-go- r,
Indonesia.
Dr. Beers is a former UK faculty member who served as head
of the Departments of Sociology
and Rural Sociology and as rural
sociologist at the Experiment Station.
He left the University several
years ago to head Far East
projects of the Council of Economic and Cultural Affairs, a
privately endowed organization.
Dr. Beers will spend this summer in the United States before
returning to Indonesia to conduct
affairs of the contract team which
operates through the Agency for
International Development.
This agency is a branch of the
U. S. State Department. His duties
will include research and teaching
of classes.

EM ALI
PHONi
LAST

And His Band!

OVER!

3"

"SERGEANTS
TECHNICOLOR

STRAND J

Win your letters in style!

Sharpen up in
an airweight

SUMMER SUIT

The
jacket feels like a
breeze on your shoulders. Narrow Post-Gra- d
trousers are
tapered 'n terrific. You'll look
like the money but the whole
deal costs you peanuts. In washable Du Pont Dacron'polyester,
blended with Cotton, Mohair, or
Worsted. Also in 100 Cotton.
At stores that know the score
...$19.95 to $49.95.

THEATRE

..

2nd Week!

lYALKGUTiiS

Walt Disney'i

'PINOCCHIO"

17ILD

STARTS TOMORROW

6 Academy Award Nomi-

nations "Best Picture"

aw

PECK

"GUNS OF NAVARONE"
The Fiery Role Nominated
Sophia

et ....

iLwBiti'?i'"V.:

LAURENCE HARVEY CAPUCINE

Loren

I

JANE FONDA ANNE BAXTER

"TWO WOMEN"

BARBARA STANWYCK

FIRST OUTDOOR SHOWING!
ADM. 75c

f

it

(I

&
fl

7:00

ii MIS SHJGETA

On the Old Frankfort Pike

CHARLIE BISHOP

Lowman.
Lowman opposes Wilson Wyatt
for the Democratic nomination for
United States Senator.
Rice Is a member of Omicron
Delta Kappa, national leadership
fraternity. He is the Student
Congress representative for the
College of Law.
Rice was graduated from the University in 1957. He was vice president of Student Congress and
president of Phi Delta Theta. He
was also elected to membership
in Keys, sophomore men's honorary; Lances, junior men's honorary; and Lamp and Cross, senior
men's honoraiy.
Rice and his wife and son live
in Cooperstown.

Frank Sinatra
Dean Martin
Peter Lawford
Sammy Davis, Jr.
Joey Bishop

R. E. Shaver, dean of the College
of Engineering, was named chairman of the nominating committee
for the Engineers Council for Pro
fessional Development.
The council's executive commit
tee met In New York early last
week.
Dean Shaver is a member of
the executive committee and
chairman of the education committee of the National Council
of State Boards of Engineering
Examiners, one of the engineering societies which supports the
development council.
He Is also a member of a committee which is engaged In coordinating all studies now being
made In the engineering field.
session, the
During the two-da- y
executive
all
group discussed
of the development group's
phases
activities.

NOW

DAY

GREGORY

"Chip" Rice, a law

3RD BIG WEEK

Elected
Chairman

TOMORROW NIGHT
FOLLOW THE CROWD TO

...

H. Hamilton

student from Lexington, has been
named University chairman of the
Student Volunteers for Harry King

HELD

STARTS

TWIST to

For Lownmn

Parly Chief Shaver
Chosen

"Best Actress"

Largest crowd in New York rachistory turned out on Memorial
are available for ing 1960
MUSIC
at Aqueduct. There were
Spring Social Events. This combo places Day,
2UM12e 70,992 paid admissions.
emphasis on variety. Call

Replying, "Yes," she filled out a
card and asked what she had to
do next. Dr. Scherago informed
her that everything had been taken
care of, meaning she had the fel- -

cJailcA

Ulv Ciuurniaii'

JUANIM

KKKtiCTMj

mtoshi

HAU

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PLUS 1ST RUN SHOCKER
Dorthy Danrose is tawny dynamite in

"MALAGA"
Coming Soon!

COUPLES ONLY

1
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f- -i

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Ini-i--s
IHiHHMEHHniHHaHiEa
toft't Mivy H i t. ..
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* TIIC KENTUCKY

"

Social Activities

TV Eyes Babies

'

be elected at this p.m. today in Room 128 of the
Student Union Building.
Young Republicans
I.KI) Costume Committee
St'B Personnel Committee
The Young Republicans Club
The costume committee for the
The Student Union Board Per- Little
will meet at 7 p.m. today in the
Kentucky Derby will nu"t
sonnel Committee will meet at 3 at 3 p.m. today in Room 204 cf
Student Union Building.
the Student Union Building. k
Yf. State Day
Delta Zeta Moronity held its annual State Day last Saturday in
the Ballroom of the Student Union
Building.
Present were Alpha Theta chapter from UK, Beta Gamma chapter from the University of Louisville, and alumnae groups from
both chapters.
Dr. Cleo Dawson Smith, was the
Riie.st speaker. She pave a dramatic
review of one of Tennessee Williams' plays.
Recognition was given to actives and alumnae of both chapters for contributions
to Delta
Zeta this past year.
Progress reports were also given.
Sl'B Publicity Committee
The Student Union Board Publicity Committee will meet at 2
p.m. todav in Room 128 of the
.(A "in
.
Student Union Building.
Dutch Lunch Club
Friends, Romans, And Brothers . . .
The Dutch Lunch Club will meet
Morton Walker, professor of English at the I'niversity of Louisat noon today in Room 20") of thu
ville, was gurst speaker at the annual Phi Kappa Tau Parents'
Student Union Building.
held last Saturday at the Campbell House. Walker
Day Banquet
Dr. Jesse DeBoer, professor of
is a Phi Tau alumni of the I K chapter, and was one of the
philosophy, will be the guest sak- founders of the Phi Tau chapter at 1. of L.
Officers
meeting.

Meetings

l2-- 3

KERNEL, TliiiivLiy, Apiil 5,

will

Hasn't Failed Yet

MEMPHIS M') The ultramodern
maternity wing at Baptist Hosfirst
pital claims .the nation's
closed-circu- it
television system for
new mothers.
.
A mother can flip on the TV
and watch her infant in the nursery. She also can observe husband
and relatives getting their first
look at the newcomer. Each of the
five nurseries also includes a rocking chair.

SALINA, Kan. (A') Thirty-seve- n
years ago Mrs. O. A. Grinae found
a recipe ior a "never fail" chocolate cake in the Sahna Journal.
In 1942 her daughter, now Mrs.
Earl Madison Jr. of Salina, won
a school baking contest with it.
Now her granddaughter.
Susfii
Madison, has won a blue ribbon
for a cake from the same recipe in
Fair.
the

f1

Li

i

Engagcments
Debbie Brooks, freshman Arts
and Sciences student from Lexington, to Jim Lynch, a freshman
commerce student from Lexington.

&

KEEP YO'Jrt HAIR NEAT ALL DAY WlinUUI uKlAit!
LETVITALIS
the
Keep the oil in the can. In your hair, use Vitalis with
greaselcss grooming discovery. Fights embarrassing dandruff,
your ha;r neat all day without grease.
prevents dryness-kee- ps

Fold cantaloupe balls into
ge-flavored
gelatin after the
gelatin has been chilled and has
thickened slightly.

3

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Fashion & Campus News

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Alpha sorority

The Mother's Club of Zeta Tau
recently elected
officers. They include, seated from the left, Mrs. Clarence Wade,
Mrs. L. K. Bobbins, past treasurer. Standing, Mrs. M. F.
treasurer;
Goff, vice president; Mrs. Raymond Lawrence, secretary; and
Mrs. E. W. Schultz, president.

BANLON CARDIGAN

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JULIE WARDRUP
Alpha Delta Pi

it

Sweater Shiit
Call it a sweater. Call
it a shirt. Either way,
you'll call it your favorite item of summer
sports wear.

Julie poses at the Coliseum pool. She is
often seen here since she is a member of
Blue Marlins. As a swimmer, Julie is particularly careful about the swimsuits that
she selects.

Last week we saw a bathing suit
rather incongruous setting Today we see one with the normal
background. Julie looks as if she
were ready to plunge right in the
water.
From Hymson's large selection cf
swimsuits, she chose a black knit
fashioned by Catalina. It is styled
with a prissy flounce which adds a
feminine touch to this otherwise
streamlined suit. The bodice is cut
LOW in the back.
In addition to Blue Marlins, Julie
is a cheerleader and a member cf
the AFROTC Sponsor Corps. She
has been selected Mardi Gras Queen
and first attendant to the Homecoming and Military Ball Queens.
She is a junior majoring in speech
in a

therapy.

sinAnd speaking of therapy,
cerely believe that all of you oil deserve the therapy of a vacation in
Florida. Forget all those things ycu
had planned to catch up on and jcin
the annual migration to the spring
.and
vacation home of thousands
I

.

thousands .
and thousands cf
American college students.
And, if you are going to Florida,
of course there are many things thcr
must have. A crazy
you
Leach hat and a respectable pair cf
shades are necessities. A new pair
of tennis shoes in some shocking
shade like magenta would als3 be ,
nice. Then you'll have to replenish
your wardrobe of bathing suits and
Bermuda shorts and shirts.
Of course, the place to get ell cf
j
these necessary items is Hymson s.
.

Mail
Cornflower Blu

Sea Green
Maroon

by Sue McCauley

Bronx

co-ed-

Black

MENS WEAR

120 SOUTH UPPER

fottleenl

* The Kentucky Kernel
Entrrrd

University Soapbox
.

Fight, Then Unite

University of Kentucky

the pout office at Lexington, Kentucky
necond clam mutter under the Act of March S. 187.
Published four timet a week during the regular school year exrept during holiday! and exami.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR
At

Ed Van Hook, Editor

Kerry Powell, Managing Editor
Ben Fitzpatrick, Sports Editor
Dick Wallace, Advertising Manager
Bill Molton, Circulation Manager

Wayne Gregory, Camptis Editor
Jean Schwartz, Society Editor
Susy McllrcH, Cartoonist
Bobbie Mason, Arts Editor

THURSDAY NEWS STAFF
Mike Fbarinc, News Editor

Carl

Modecki, Sports

Kyra IIackley, Associate

The Race Is On!

Now that some of us are about
to embark on that annual crusade to
the sunny shores of Florida, a word
to the wise may be sufficient.
Early this week five coeds from
Duke University were killed in an
automobile accident while returning
to school.
It seems almost impossible that
of the tens of thousands of students
who go to Florida, all will return to

school in one piece. But we hope that
all students will drive safely and
soberly on their trip.
Also, it behooves each individual
to remember that he is a representative of the University of Kentucky
and his conduct will reflect not only
on his own intelligence, but also the
reputation of the school. Have fun,
but take it easy.

Theater Project Is Appreciated

A Lexington theater's experiment
to see if the Lexington community
can or will support an "art theater"
is a commendable project. We hope
the experiment is a success and that
attendance at showings of the "art
films" will merit a continuation of
the program.
We are in favor of such a venture
and feel that it will be an asset to
the cultural growth of Lexington and
the University.
A university education should be

more than mere book work and rote
memorization. It is through participation in all aspects of a community's
cultural atmosphere that an addition
is made to "higher education" in the
student's college career. With the
opening of the "art films" scries, students are being given an opportunity
to expand their cultural outlook.
If support is not given the "art
theater," it probably will not survive
past this semester.

Congrats To The 'Stars'

Honors for scholarship, leadership,
and service achievements were given
approximately 200 women last night
at the annual "Stars in the Night"
program. To these recipients, we extend heartiest congratulations.
These University women are recognized by their associates as those
persons who have reflected outstanding qualities in their academic and
campus activities for both participation and achievement.

Too often, we as students are
eager to heap ridicule in a teasing
way, perhaps on the various awards
and titles that are given throughout
the school year, but acceptance for

membership in "Stars in the Night" is
truly an achievement that every University woman should strive for.
If college life has any tradition
left, such events as "Stars in the
Night" should be a definite part of it.
Again, to those who were honored last
night, may the Kernel add its congratulations.

Kernels
Credit is not merely a term in business; it is a condition of human relationships. It binds the future to the
present by the confidence we have in
the integrity of those with whom we
deal.
James T. Shotwcll.

By WILLIAM G. KENTON
To The Editor:
I would like to take this space to
congratulate the Kernel staff on their
persuance of objective reporting of
the Young Democrats Club meeting
held on Thursday, March 22.
Concerning my recent activities in
the Young Democrats Clufb, I would
like to affirm that I have always been
a faithful and consistent supporter
of the Democratic Party and its various clubs and organizations.
Beginning in 1956, when I helped
found and became a charter member
of the Young Democrats Club in Mason County, Kentucky, I have been
extremely interested in the activities
of the various Young Democrats
clubs. While I was an active member
of the Young Democrats Club in Mason County, I served as the club's
vice president, president, and later as
a member of the board of directors.
May I say that while I served in
an official capacity with the Mason
County club we had many successful
rallies and dinners urging the support of the Democratic Party and all
of its candidates. Later, while I was
a student for two years at the University of Virginia, I was active in
the Young Democrats Club there.
I agreed to serve as Robert Cato's
campaign manager with the understanding that he stood for an active
Young Democrats Club.
In view of the events that led up to
the meeting on March 22, Mr. Cato
asked me to protest the March 22
meeting, which I did.
May I say that I think, if nothing
else comes from the events leading up

to the March 22 meeting, and the
meeting itself, that it has provided
a very vital revitalization of interest
in the club. It has long been a rule
of thumb in Kentucky politics to

battle among ourselves then unite to
carry forth the principles of our great
national party. Therefore, it is my
contention that the supporters of Mr.
Cato and Mr. Schneider should come
together and unite in the University
of Kentucky's Young Democrats Club
in the best traditions of the Democratic Party of this Commonwealth.

Kernels
Rumor has it that a majority of
University students are planning a
spring vacation in the Margaret I.
King Library.

Campus Parable
around him lies

By DON LEAK

Director, YMCA
In "Cat On a Hot Tin Roof," Tennessee Williams has Margaret ask a
of extreme importance:
question
"What's the victory of a cat on a hot
tin roof? I wish I knew . . . Just
staying on it, I guess, as long as she
can. . .
As midterm reports become available this question also may be of
value to college students. What's the
victory of a young person when all

the scores of tests
mastered and books
inadequately
filled with material he fails to comprehend?
With Margaret he may answer
that victory lies in staying on the
roof as long as he can. But if this is
the case, he also must share with
Margaret the dream of new life
through the love of another person.
And if being alive is more important
than mute survival, true victory possibly lies in being released from the
"hot tin roof."

The Readers' Forum:

Views On Haggin Appeal, Campus Politics
that this

Congratulates Hajjgin
Assembly

To The Editor:
I would like to congratulate the
Haggin Hall Assembly on their outstanding courage in standing up to
the Men's Residence Hall administration and demanding that the screws
and latches to the doors of their
rest room stalls be returned. Keep
up the good work, assembly!
We, at the "Cave" (officially
known as Bradley Hall), sympathize
with you one hundred percent. Of
course, we don't have such things as
doors on our stalls but we can imagine the annoyance and embarrassment of having a red door hanging
ajar.
Perhaps it is the faidt of the Quadrangle Assembly that your screws and
latches have not been Returned. After
all, we have been annoying the administration with trivial things such

is the reason why your problem has been pushed aside.
But don't give up the fight! Don't
take excuses! The Quadrangle was
told that pencil sharpeners would not
be installed because the men in Donovan and Haggin Halls keep tearing
theirs down. That is the same excuse
that was given for the removal of the
latches. I can't believe those nice
fellows over there would do such a
thing.
Get on the ball, administration,
and save Haggin's modesty. Restore
to them the PRIVACY OF THEIR
STALLS. If you really want to show
how sorry yon are, put in charcoal
black screws instead of chrome-plateones. I think that chrome and red
clash, don't you?
d

three-quarte-

as pencil sharpeners in the halls, stoppers for the sinks, hooks to hang
clothes on in the shower rooms, three
men living in
rooms, and
many more silly things. I realize now
two-me- n

Supportingly

yours,

Alex Sallvstio
1st Floor Representative
Bradley Hall

Clarifies Statement
To The Editor:
I was recently quoted in the press
as having said that "Politics has permeated the University of Kentucky."
I was referring to the student body,
and it did not occur to me at the
time that my statement might be
considered as a criticism. I wish to
add that in my opinion UK students
should be active in politics in both
parties and all factions, and jn purely
campus politics as well.
I was delighted by the interest
shown by Young Democrats at UK
on Thursday, March 22. I am aware
of no corrupt practices by either side.
I am sure both sides to the controversy will get together to promote the
interests of their party and its candidates. I hope the Young Republicans will do likewise.
J. E. Reeves
Associate Professor
Department of Political Science

* KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Thursday, Aj.iil 5.

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