xt7jh98zcp1v https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jh98zcp1v/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690211  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 11, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 11, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7jh98zcp1v section xt7jh98zcp1v IE ECmtocecy
Tuesday Evening, Feb. 11, 19G9

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Vol. LX, No. 93

New York Bank Says

Maine Chance Sale
Normal Transaction
By The Associated Press
The Bank of New York began efforts Monday to show

r.

its

s.

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IMS

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i

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1967

sale of Maine Chance Farm to the University of Kentucky Research
Foundation was a normal transaction.
Th ree of its officers testified
in defense of a
of the late Elizabeth Arden Graantitrust suit filed in U.S. District ham made sale of the farm here
Court against the bank and two necessary.
other defendants contesting the
He said taxes owed by the essale.
tate totaled about $15 million
They told of events leading up and Mrs. Graham left cash legto the sale and of the bank's ac- acies totaling another $11 milceptance of the University offer. lion. Funds to pay these were
Joseph A. Hannan Jr., execuneeded, he added.
tive vice president of the bank,
Bliss said the executors met
explained that bank policy might in New York June 12, 1967, and
e
farm
permit disclosure of an oral bid decided to sell the
while written bids would be con- near Lexington, asking $2.5 milfidential.
lion, setting $1.75 million as the
Dr. Arnold Pessin of Lexingfigure below which they would
ton, and Rex Ellsworth of Chino, not go and $2 million as an acCalif., charge in their suit that ceptable price.
their bid was given to the UniThe bank of New York, as
versity before it made its offer. one of three
of Mrs.
Earlier testimony bears this Graham's estate, handled the sale
out, although the information of the farm.
was passed to the University beThe will, read in part to the
fore a written bid from Ellsthe exBliss,
worth and Pessin arrived in New jury by consult suggested
with Lexington
ecutors
York.
Mohney in reattorney
In fact, their written bid lation to Gaylesale of Mrs. Graany
wasn't received by bank officers ham's
racing stock.
until after the University offer
Bliss' appearance on the witwas accepted. In real estate dealness stand came after the Uniings of this kind, oral bids have
versity foundation interrupted
no value.
the offer is in writing, we presentation of its defense to
"If
out of town witnesses to
do not disclose it," Hannan told
testify immediately.
the federal court jury." We would
The University brought a prolose our reputation of fair dealfessor from the University of Tening."
The suit also charges Pessin nessee today to testify about simand Ellsworth were promised ilar conditions in the two schools'
research programs
they would be notified if their agricultural
and land holdings.
bid were topped and would be
Charles Hobbs said it was his
given a chance to rebid. They
said they were not.
opinion that the University
Charles M. Bliss, former board needed Maine Chance Farm to
chairman of the bank, explained solidify its agricultural research
that liabilities against the estate land into one segment.
$30-milli-

On the first day of their vigil, the UK Emergency Committee on
Nigeria and Biafra passed out leaflets at the Student Center. Members said the vigils would continue until the
a
civil
war is ended.
Kernel Photo by Howard Mason

'Relief Noiv

Biafra-Nigeri-

721-acr-

sAA-lo-

UK Students Hold

Biafran 'VigiV

ties between the two organizations, the UK committee is
d
modeled on the New
Committee ConEmergency
cerned about Nigeria and Biafra.
Judy Schroeder, another UK
student active in the campus
committee, said one of the group's
aims is to "write letters to congressmen, senators and the President . . . asking that the U. S.
leaders support a policy whereby
America would use its influence
to end arms shipment to both
sides
She added that the letters
also would appeal for "a cease
fire and negotiations" andforthe
provision of relief agencies with
"the aircraft and food needed to
end the starvation."
Miss Schroeder noted, "There
have been groups throughout the
nation that have been writing
(such) letters, and there is presently a bloc of congressmen who
are responding."
The students also are planning
to fast for 24 hours Wednesday.

By RICHARD FALKNOR

Kernel Staff Writer
A group of about 20 UK students has formed the Emergency
Committee on Nigeria and Biafra and plans to hold daily vigils
at the Student Center from 11
a.m. to 1 p.m. until the Nigerian
civil war has ended.
The "emergency committee"
was formed, members said, in
reaction to the reported starvation of hundreds of thousands of
a
persons living in secessionist
and Nigerian territories. r
The UK committee began the
vigils Monday by using the Student Center as a base for distributing leaflets and displaying
placards relating to the Biafran
situation.
Rebecca Westerfield, a committee member, said the vigils
are being held "in order to make
other students aware of the situation in Biafra and Nigeria and to
(encourage them to) offer some

York-base-

Bia-.fr-

..."

alternatives."

Although there are no official

One participant explained the
proposed fast as "a personal thing
for each of us. It will reinforce
our enthusiasm and earnestness."
A botany graduate assistant,
Paul Pak, said he became involved with the committee because it "is a pure humane concern for other people."
Explaining why she is working for the committee, Anita Jones
said, "I am doing it partly because there is a great need and we
have some hope of fulfilling it.
But I am doing it because I also
feel it is my duty. It is a matter
of conscience."
Ronnie Lundy, one of the
members at Monday's vigil,
stated that the committee would
welcome anyone willing to participate in either the vigils or the
fast.
One member remarked that
the group had received a "negative reaction" from a few individuals, but so far had not met
any organized opposition.

Berkeley Strike: Another San Francisco State?
By

PHIL SEMAS

BERKELEY, Calif. (CPS)-- If it weren't such a bad
pun, one would be tempted to suggest that the similarity
between the University of California now and San
Francisco State College a couple of months ago is
striking.
On Nov. 6, the Third World Liberation Front, a
coalition of
student groups,
began a student strike at San Francisco State. On Jan.
22, a group of the same name began a strike at Berkeley.
In both cases the strike calls were followed by
students marching through the campus, chanting "On
strike, shut it down," disrupting classes and battling
with police. At San Francisco State the cycle of confrontation and violence escalated until hardly a day
went by without a battle between students and police.
The violence has also been escalating at Berkeley, but
it is not yet clear whether it will reach the level of San
Francisco State.
The most violent day so far was Feb. 4 when several
fights broke out between strikers and students trying
to get through a stationary picket line at the main
campus entrance. Police were called ond a series of
confrontations occurred in which 20 persons were arrested
and several police, strikers, and other students j.yere
injured.
newly-forme- d

non-whi-

te

'Emergency' Declared
Cov. Ronald Reagan may have pushed Berkeley
closer to a crisis the following day when he declared
"a state of extreme emergency" on the campus at
the request of Alameda County Sheriff Frank Madigan
and University President Charles J. Hitch in order to
make state highway patrolmen available on a continuous
basis to help maintain "law and order."
Reagan seemed to view his decision as a new crackdown on campus disorders. He said he wanted to "clearly
indicate that the State of California is determined to

maintain law and order on the campuses of its university
as well as all other educational institutions."
Ironically, the declaration came at the end of a fairly
quiet day on the campus. And the day following the
declaration the campus was also relatively peaceful. On
both days about 500 students marched around the campus
chanting "On strike, shut it down" and "Power to the
People" and made no attempt to confront the more than
100 police stationed on the campus.
The campus newspaper, the Daily Califomian, put it
bluntly: "Yesterday our idiot Governor declared a state
of extreme emergency, and immediately there was one."
Third World leaders said they didn't think Reagan's
declaration would make much difference.

Third World control over all programs involving
people;
amnesty for strikers.
The response of President Hitch, Chancellor Heyns,
and the faculty to these demands has also been very
similar to response at San Francisco State. They have
asserted that they are already doing as much as possible about ethnic studies and recruitment of
faculty and students. They also say that the demands
will have to be processed through normal university
channels.
Before the strike began Heyns said the demands
"in no sense warrant a strike."
The faculty senate recently tabled a motion to approve in principle a college of ethnic studies to be
'Want Victory
planned by
faculty and students.
It was a similar attitude on the part of the San
Strike leaders urged their followers to exert
in dealing with the police. "We don't want Francisco State administration that kept the strike
a confrontation and mass arrests," said Jim Nabors of going there.
PoDce Controlled
Student Union. "We want a victory."
the
Strike leaders asserted that all violence so far has been
There are some differences between the two strikes.
students defending themselves against the police.
The Berkeley administration has so far exercised more
Although it has been charged that the strikers are control over the use of police than did the administraincreasing the violence to try to bring more police on tion at San Francisco State, although that may change
the campus and thus build more student support for the under Reagan's state of emergency. The larger physical
size and student population at Berkeley make it harder
strike, Jim Soliz, a leader of the
Student Confederation, told a strike meeting, "The to organize an effective strike, and faculty support for
issueis not 'pigs off campus.' The issue is the demands." the strikers is not as strong at Berkeley as it has been
The demands are very similar to those at San Fran- at San Francisco State.
cisco State. They include:
There also seems to be less unity among
creation of a third world college, containing departstudent groups at Berkeley. Last fall when NASC called
ments of Black, Asian, and
Studies, a strike to demand that the university support the grape
e
students and faculty; boycott, they received no support from black students.
under the control of
e
recruitment of more
university employees The Third World Liberation Front's demands were
at all levels from chancellors to janitors;
revised several times during discussions among its three
"admission, financial aid, and academic assistance constituent groups.
to any Third World student with potential to learn and
It is there differences which will determine whether
contribute as assessed by Third World people";
Berkeley becomes another San Francisco State.
non-whit- e

non-whi-

non-whi-

te

te

Afro-Americ- an

Mexican-America-

n

non-whi-

Mexican-America-

non-whit-

non-whit-

n

te

* KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Fcl. II,

I9

Space Odyssey9 Wins Kernel Film Poll

''A

The vote totals reflect only
By LARRY G. KELLEY
the opinions of those persons
Kernel Arts Editor-Ustudents sending in bal- submitting ballots, and are in
lots in tho first annual pop no way intended to be repremusic and film poll chose "2001: sentative of UK student opinion
A Space Odyssey" best film of in general.
1968 and Stanley Kubrick, diSEX SYMBOL MALE
30
rector of "2001," Best Director. Paul Newman
Mike Nichols and his 1907 Jim Morrison
27

smash "The Graduate" took
honors in Iwth categories. The Beatles' "Yellow
Submarine' finished a distant
third, perhaps because it came
to Lexington much later than
the others.
Steve McQueen edged Dustin
Hoffman in the Best Actor category, while Mia Farrow walked
away with Best Actress for her
in
"Rosemary's
performance
Baby." In the
categories, there were fights between movie stars and
singers in both male
and female categories. Paul
Newman topped actor Steve
McQueen and singers Morrison, Jagger and Ilendrix. A sign
that times are changing: Joe
Namath, Tiny Tim and Dustin
Hoffman tied at 4 votes each.
Raquel Welch had competition from rock star Janis Joplin
but finished on top. The results
of the music categories of the
poll were printed in the Kernel
Feb. 7.
secon-

d-place

"Sex-Symbo-

l"

rock-and-ro-

ll

20

Steve McQueen
Jimi Hendrix
Mick Jagger
Joe Namath
Tiny Tim
Dustin Hoffman
Mike Hall
Omar Sharif
Clark Gable
Warren Beatty
Jeff Beck
Frank Zappa
Franco Nero
Sean Connery
Jimmy Brown
Dean Martin
Pat Paulsen
SEX

SYMBOL

10
11

4
4
4
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
2
FEMALE

42
33

Raquel Welch
Janis Joplin
Grace Slick
Jane Fonda
Sophia Loren
Ursula Andress
Ann-Margr-

14
8
8
3
3
2
2

et

Faye Dunaway
Catherine Deneuve
Vanessa Redgrave

2

2
2
2

Nancy Sinatra
Barbara Parkins
Brigitte Bardot
BEST FILM Or 19G8
2001: A Space Odysccy ....
The Graduate
Yellow Submarine
Rosemary's Baby
Bullitt
Camclot
Heart is a Lonely Hunter ..
Belle de Jour
Rachel, Rachel
Candy
Chitty-ChittBang, Bang
Thomas Crown Affair
Elvira Madigan
BEST ACTOR
Steve McQueen
Dustin Hoffman
Richard Burton
Paul Newman
Alan Arkin
Richard Harris
H.A.L
Oskar Werner
Keir Dullea
Clint Eastwood
Lee Marvin
David Hemmings
Rod Steiger
Sidney Poitier
BEST ACTRESS
Mia Farrow
Faye Dunaway
Joanne Woodward
y,

44

30
13
9
0
5
5
4
4
3
3
3
3
19
18
14
14
9
9
7
4
4
4
4
4
4
4
18
12
12

Anne Bancroft
Julie Christie
Katharine Ross
Vanessa Redgrave
Catherine Deneuve
Jane Fonda
Katharine Hepburn
Sophia Loren
Raquel Welch
Elizabeth Taylor
Audrey Hepburn
Natalie Wood
Pat Ncal
BEST DIRECTOR
Stanley Kubrick
Mike Nichols
Paul Newman
John Cassavetes
Otto Premingcr
Andy Warhol
Brunei
Jean-Lu- c
Goddard
Antonioni
Fellini
Carlo Ponti

8
8
8

7
0
0
G

5
3
3
3
3
3

37
30
13
7
0
5
4
3
3
3
3

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following poem was handed in to a
teacher in Regina, Saskatchewan,
by a 12th grade student. Although
it is not known if he actually
wrote the poem himself, it is
known that he committed suicide
a few weeks later. The poem,
furnished to the Kernel by CPS,
originally appeared in Generation, a Saskatoon-based

POEM
He always wanted to explain
things.
But no one cared.
So he drew.
Sometimes he would draw and it
wasn't anything.
He wanted to carve it in stone or
write it in the sky.
He would lie out on the grass and
look up in the sky.
And it would be only him and the
sky and the things inside him
that needed saying.
And it was after that he drew the
picture.
It was a beautiful picture.
He kept it under his pillow and
would let no one see it.
And he would look at it every
night and think about it.
And when it was dark, and his
eyes were closed, he could still
see it.

And it was all of him.
And he loved it.
When he started school he
brought it with him.
Not to show anyone, but just to
have with him like a friend.
It was funny about school.
He sat in a square, brown desk
Like all the other square, brown
desks
And he thought it should be red.
And his room was a square brown
room.

Like all the other rooms.
And it was tight and close.
And stiff.
He hated to hold the pencil and
chalk.
With his arm stiff and his feet
flat on the floor.
Stiff,

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Ask around. You'll find that when it comes to anticipating change, Western Electric is way out, in front.
And we make every effort to keep our engineers there
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A lot of study, and hard work, never hurt anyone.
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With the teacher watching and
watching.
The teacher came and spoke to
him.
She told him to wear a tie like all
the other boys.
He said he didn't like them.
And she said it didn't matter!
After that they drew.
And he drew all yellow and it was
the way he felt about morning.
And it was beautiful.
The teacher came and smiled at
him.
'What's this?' she said. 'Why
don't you draw something like
Ken's drawing? Isn't that

beautifuP'

After that his mother bought him
a tie.
And he. always drew airplanes
and rocket ships like everyone
else.

And he threw the old picture
away.
Anfl when he lay alone looking
at the sky,
It was big and blue and all of
everything,
But he wasn't anymore.
He was square inside
And brown,
And his hands were stiff.
And he was like everyone else.
And the things inside him that
needed saying didn't need it
anymore.
It had stopped pushing.
It was crushed.
Stiff.
Like everything else.
ATTEND THE CHURCH OF YOUR
CHOICE EACH

SUNDAY

The Kentucky

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five Umes weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4tt6.
Begun as the Cadet In 1894 and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1915.
Advertising published herein la Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
9.27
Yearly, by mail
Per copy, from files
9. 10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
2321
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
2320
Associate Editors, Sports
News Desk
2447
Advertising, Business, Circulation 2319

* .

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Feb.

l9-- 3

11,

TET: Festival Is As Old As Vietnam Itself
By THAN VAN DINII

College Press Service
The brilliant NLF offensive
at the end of January 19G8 put
in the headlines of newspapers
all over the world the word
TET the Vietnamese New Year.
This year, despite the fact
that the
Paris Conference on Vietnam is being held,
the U.S. Command in South Vietnam is preparing for another NLF
general attack on TET, which
falls on February 17.
Attack or no attack, the Niet
namese people both North and
South are making preparations
for the most ancient, important
and cherished of all festivals of
the year.
"TET is a distortion of
"tier (festival), and its full and
correct name is TET NGUYEN
DAN (Festival of the First Morning). TET embodies in its ceremony as well as in its essence
the whole spectrum of Vietnamese mythology the concept of
man and his place in his family
and in the universe, his relations
with the dead and the spirits.
It is a fascinating mixture of
Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism, the three currents of
religion and philosophy which
have conditioned the behavior
and thinking of the Vietnamese
since the beginning of the Christian era. TET is a yearly burst
of the latest and deep Vietnamese
and
romanticism
partiotism
nurtured in a rugged and beautiful land over centuries of hard
and bloody fighting.
A Vietnamese could be a Marxist, an existentialist, a socialist, an anarchist for the rest of
the year, but whn TET comes,
he is back to his Vietnamese
nature. TET is an occasion for
the Vietnamese to immerse themselves in their traditional andna-tional milieu, to refill themselves
with spiritual energies, to face a
year of struggle ahead.
Old As Vietnam
The historical records of Vietnam did not mention the exact
date when TET was first celebrated, but it is accepted that
it is as old as the Vietnamese
nation itself. Under Imperial
Vietnam, TET was observed by
emperors and commoners alike.
The same rituals have been observed since by all Vietnamese
monarchs until August 1945 when
the last Emperor, Bao Dai of the
Nguyen Dynasty abdicated in favor of President Ho Chi Minh
four-part- y

of the Democratic Republic of
Vietnam.
On the 23rd day of the 12th
month, a ceremony is held in
honor of Tao Quan, the gods
of the kitchen. Offerings to Tao
Quan include fruits and food,
paper, models of a stork, ahorse,
a carp which eventually will
transform itself into a dragon,
a pair of mandarin boots, and a
ceremony dress.
Tao Quan is now all set to
return to the Kingdom ofHeaven
to make his report on the state
of the earth to the Emperor of
Jade. He is due back on earth
on the eve of the New Year.
In the Vietnamese homes, the
kitchen, in its simplicity, has a
tripod in clay or metal representing the three gods known as Tao
Quan.
With Tao Quan off for a week
long journey to heaven and their
homes without protection, the
Vietnamese are looking for ways
to guard themselves against the
invasion of bad spirits. A "Cay
Neu" (signal tree) is erected in
front of the house. It is a 5-- to
bamboo pole at the
top of which are a "khanh"
(sonorous table of clay) and a
piece of yellow cloth.
The story behind this institution goes back to the time of
the birth of Vietnam. The Vietnamese were then constantly
threatened by malevolent spirits.
Lord Buddha took them into compassion and one day he descended
from Nirvana to visit them. Immediately Lord Buddha was surrounded by all kinds of devils.
He calmly explained to them
that what he wanted was to exchange precious stones and gold
and silver (which he instantly
produced by a miraculous gesture
of his hand) for a small piece
of land.
The devils, fascinated by all
the treasure lavished in front
of them, asked Lord Buddha:
"How large would be the piece
of land you ask?" "As large as
my frock," Lord Buddha answered. The devils agreed, thinking they had a very good bargain; they also promised never
to disturb Buddha's land. When
Lord Buddha dropped his frock,
it spread as wide as the territory
ofVietnam.
The devils were angered, but
business is business. To the Vietnamese, now delivered from the
devils, Lord Buddha advised " At
the end of the year, when you

invite your ancestors to your
home for TET, the devils may
mingle among them. Therefore
you must plant in front of your
house a high bamboo pole with
sonorous clay and my emblem
drawn on a piece of yellow cloth.
The devils will not dare to disturb you."
Worries Forgotten
The first day of the year is
reserved for the worshiping of ancestors already invited back from
heaven on the New Year Eve with
due ceremonials and delicious
meals. They are now all assembled on an illuminated altar,
enjoying the perfume of burning
santal incense and "thuy tien"
(fairy of water), a kind of narcissus which blossoms at New
Year time. At midnight of the last
day of the old year, all human
problems, all earthly worries are
left behind.
A general truce is declared
temporarily, of course among
human beings and spirits. All
acts performed, all events which
take place in the first day of the
year, exert favorable or unfavorable influence over the whole
year.
The people try to detect the
first noise they can hear. A cock
crows? Sign of hard work and bad
harvest roosters will eat up the

buffalo bleats? Surely
A dog
barks? A year of confidence and
trust. Worst of all is the cry of
an owl it is surely the warning
of coming epidemic and calamity
for the whole community.
The future of a person, of a
family, can be decided yearly. But
what about the future of the nation, of the" mountain sand rivers
of the beloved fatherland?" It
is decided by cycles of 12 years
each, each year being represented
by an animal (Rat, Buffalo, Tiger,
Cat, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Ram,
Monkey, Chicken, Dog, Pig), old
people, even in the enchanting
and happy moments of TET, remember with a mixture of sadness and hope the prophecy made
in the 16th century by Trang
Trinh (real name Nguyen Binh
Khiem). Trang Trinh, the great
scholar, was known for the last
four centuries in Vietnam as an
unsurpassed poet and prophet.
He had made several predictions
which came true in the past.
One of his most remembered
prophecies warned that:
grains.

A

a year of sweat and toil.

the tail of the Dragon (end
of the year of the dragon)
and at the head of the Snake
(beginning of the year of the
snake)
People would suffer and die from
warfare
At

Clashes of armies would take
place everywhere.
When theHorse(yearofthe horse)
gallops in and the Ram (year
of the Ram) appears,
Heroes would die
Then peace will return in the
years of the Monkey and the
Chicken.
In the most recent past, the
year of the Dragon was 1964
when the U.S. began to escalate
its intervention in Vietnam. The
year of the Snake was 1965 when
the U.S. bombed North Vietnam.
The year of the Horse was 1966
during which the number of U. S.
troops climbed to 400,000; 1967
was the year of the Ram. The
years of the Monkey and the
Chicken are 1968 and 1969 when
a ray of hope appears in the Paris
conference.

BIG WEEK

at the

Fireplace
825 Euclid
Tuesday:

THE SOUL LIFTERS
Wednesday:
THE HOUSEROCKERS
Thursday:
THE LOVE MACHINE
&

Saturday:
THE HOUSEROCKE Vs

Friday

TGIF
JAM SESSION

Friday

4--

7

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vfef

Hickel, Nixon And The Future Of Nature
There are some things in this
world that are more important than
commercial interests, and one of
these is the preservation of parts
of our nation in their natural state.
It will have to be one of the tragedies of the Nixon administration
that this has not been recognized.
Theoretically the Department
of the Interior serves a function
of conserving wildlife by protecting
our waters and maintaining our
natural forests. Often this is done
at the expense of capitalistic interests which see trees only in
terms of lumber, streams only in
terms of sewers, mountains only
in terms of the minerals that lie
beneath them in general, nature
in terms of the profits it will produce.
Nixon's appointment of Walter
J. Hick el, former governor of Alaska,
to the head of the Interior Department is a negation of the traditional interests of the conservationist.

Hick el, who did few favors for the

natural resources of his state, has
shown little understanding of the
conservation problems in the nation, and has even been quoted as
saying he does not believe in "conservation for conservation's sake."
He has borne out this philosophy
in his lenient dealings with the oil
companies pumping oil from the
coast off Santa Barbara and thereby covering the sea for miles around '
with black sludge. He has shown

No other institutions in this country
place as little value on human life as

Watt has represented as a
lobbyist the big oil interests and has gone on record
opposing federal water pollution
control and federal intervention in
land.
the reclamation of strip-mine-d
about which
There is little doubt
side he will represent in Hickel's
department.
con-igressio-

It is impossible in these days

The Kentucky

Iernel

University of Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

TUESDAY, FEB. 11, 1969

1894

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Lee B. Becker, Editor-in-ChiDarrell Rice, Editorial Page
III, Managing Editor
Tom Derr, Business Manager
Jim Miller, Associate
Howard Mason, Photography Editor
Chip Hutcheson, Sports
Jack Lyne and Larry Kelley, Arts Editors
Frank Coots,
Dana Ewell,
Janice
Terry Dunham,
Larry Dale Keeling,
Assistant Managing Editors
ef

Guy M. Mendes

By

EDITOR'S NOTE: The opinions expressed in this regular column are those
of its author and do not necessarily represent the opinions of the Kernel.

his views again by hiring James
Watt as a top department adviser.

Editor
Editor
Editor
Barber

to estimate the future value of our
remaining resources. Cities are
sprawling unleashed, grabbing up
good land and polluting fresh
streams as they go. Our rivers and
lakes are fast becoming huge cesspools. There is little hope these
natural bodies can ever be restored
to their original state.
Kentucky has witnessed much
of this natural destruction. Her
mountains have been raped, her
streams filled with refuge and her
people oppressed by strip mining.
Sections of this once beautiful state
are now nothing but barren tokens
of the past.
It is difficult to say just what
people can do to stop this destruction while there is still time. You
might join the Sierra Club or other
conservation groups, or at least
express your opinion to your congressmen. Capitalistic interests are
depriving young people of a future
to which they have a right.

SCOTT WENDELSDORF

do the military establishment and the
vile host of annchair hawks that surround it. What is worse is that the individual services seem locked in a perpetual battle to determine which one
can show the least respect for men and
the most for tradition and "honor." After

Ivory Tower, University of Minnesota

'Those Niggers Are So Destructive. They Make Me So
Mad I Could Put My Fist Right Through This Set.'

e
an embarrassing period of
performance, the United States Navy, momentarily at least, has taken a commanding
lead.
The kick that has propelled the Navy
ahead of everyone else in this grisly
race is, of course, the Bucher "trial."
For those who are not familiar with the
situation, it seems that five admirals
sitting in their air conditioned officer's
clubs could not understand why Commander Bucher sitting in an
virtually unarmed ship surrounded by
armed patrol boats and having no chance
of escape did not fight and
thus preserving
secrets. Of course if Bucher had
Navy
fought, his crew would have been slaughtered and the Pueblo most likely sunk.
In the relatively shallow water, the North
Koreans could have easily salvaged the
ship and its secrets anyway, but at least
the crew would have been dead and isn't
that what really counts?
Human life is not as valuable as
honor. This was the verdict of Admiral
Arleigh Burke (Retired) in an ABC interview of Feb. 4, and it is the guiding
credo of the vultures now picking the
Commander's bones clean. Bucher' s critics
range from the admirals to the rank and
file hawk (a hawk, by the way, is someone who feels so. strongly about the
Communist menace that he is willing
to send you to fight it), which automatically classifies a vast majority of
the country as
(shall we
saythat Bucherism is that strange.be- last-plac-

ic

lief that 84 human beings are worth
more than several thousand tons of rusting metal?)
It is one thing to balance lives against
lives, but when the choice becomes one
between men and ships, men and honor,
or men and tradition, the sane man will
see no choice at all. Inherent in the
statement that human life is not as valuable as honor is an abysmal ignorance
of the meaning of life, let alone honor.
Those who sit in judgment of Commander Bucher labor under mores that simply
no longer apply. No ship, no tradition,
no "honor" is worth the life of one
human being.

It is, no less immoral to subordinate
a man to a suppressive government than
it is to subordinate him to an inflexible
tradition. It is supposed to be the hallmark of Western civilization that human
life is precious.
We have fought the Fascists and Communists of the world because of what
those systems supposedly do to the individual, because of the abandon with
which they use human beings to meet
national ends. How are those who criticize Commander Bucher any different
from these systems they say they abhor?
They are not.

Commander Bucher drew the line.
He realized that human life is more
valuable, infinitely more valuable, than
lienor or tradition. It is time that we
learn the same.
.
..

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Feb.

11,

19G9-

-5

Ohio Students Protest Out Of State Student Cutback
ATHENS, Ohio

would drop

(CPS)-F- or

thcirout-of-stat-

sub-

e

the first time in memory, stu- sidies, too.
dents at all of Ohio's 10 state
In recent years Ohio has exuniversities and colleges have ported slightly more students
Joined to fight their state govern-