xt7jm61bm404 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jm61bm404/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19580923  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 23, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 23, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7jm61bm404 section xt7jm61bm404 29400

New "Students On Gampps
;

Enxollxrent for classes at UK
reached 7.104 yesterday, and climbed toward the 1957 record enrollment of 7,297 students on the main
campus.
Included In the figures released
yesterday was a freshman class of
1,751, a pain of approximately 200
over the class that entered In the

UK president Frank O Dickef
opened the Wekome Week
by delivering an addresi t
over 2.4H) new students in th

.

fall of

ii

Coltseum.

C.1

b.

The convocation wjm the
ginning of a four day orientation
program. The new studfnM included 1.879 freshmen and 51)

I

1S57.

transfer .students.

Official predictions were that
the total student enrollment for
the University would be about
equal to the 1957-5- 3
figure. The
final enrcllment for all divisions
of the University last fall was
8.731, a figure which did not include students taking correspondent courses at home, extension
classes which were held throughout
the state, or persons taking part

in short courses.

In his address Dr. Oirkry emphasized that UK Was "a store-houof ideas for your asking." Hi
added. "The best we ran do ii t
provide an environment in which
the .student may learn"
The new students were guide J
through a schedule which included
classification test, general tours
of the rampit. meetings and phn
tonraphie sittings. The final staso
of their orientation began o
Thursday with registration
The Welcome Week program wat
headed by John Proffltt. assistant
to the dean of men. Sityons
students served as guides during
the program.
During the evening several
social programs were held. Thesa
included a street dance on Monday, organization nisht on Tuesday and College Niht on Wednesday. On Thursday nixht the movia
Carousel'' was presented in tlu
se

.

College enrollments, as released
by the Registrar's Office were as
follows: Arts and Sciences 2.021;
Agriculture and Home Economics
641; Commerce 1.024; Education
837; Engineering 1322; Graduate
School C9; Law 124 and Phar-

macy

ICG.

No estimates had been received

yesterday from the Covington
Center which last year enrolled
720 students or the Ashland Center
which had 445 students.
The opening of Holmes Hall,
new women's dormitory, took some
of the pressure off the housing
wannnm i. inn iMniminiiiwii
"i iiniiVi'inruiininiiii iini.inrni iiimbu
aiwau. a
uiiiiMwMiiiijwujwiLjiiiiuMji.iiiwwijwiiiii.j
u' ji
shortage for' co-ethis fall but
all University dormitories and the
"This Is Your University"
housing facilities of both Coopers-tow- n
and Shawneetown were re- Welcome Week for new students began September 15 with an address from President Dickey In the
Coliseum. Over 2,400 freshmen enrolled in the University.
ported full, with waiting lists for
vacancies.
"

Coliseum.

i

Many new students were
busy on Thursday as the

ds

Telephone Service
Undergoing Changes
Vol. L

alo

10-d-

ay

IPC and Panhellenlc rush program
began. UK fraternities and sororities will be holding rush all thU
week.

K IE

To ease the overloading of its telephone facilities, UK has' added

a new switchboard to its telephone system.
According to Miss Carole Reeves, assistant operator and secretary,
the new switchboard will be used on a trial basis, but Is certain to

permanent since "Holmes
Hall has been added to the
women's dormitories.
Peterson reports
the"recent additions cost a total
of $3,000. Mr. Peterson explained
the cost is determined on a rental
basis by the telephone company.
The system at UK which was
initiated Sept. 6, 1949. is now
operated cn a twenty-fou- r
hour
basis. The switchboards are operated by Miss Betty Swope. Chief
Operator, and her crew; two of
which are cn duty until five p.m.,
two until eleven p.m., and one
through the rest of the night.
The telephone system at UK
now includes seventy, phones in
the men's dormitories and seventy-fou- r
in the women's dorms as well
as 360 office phones.
One switchboard is being added
to the University telephone
tern's-pres- ent
four and to the
present 30 outside lines there will
be four additions.
reterson nas disclosed that the University has
authorized the telephone company
to order two "satellite boards."
satellite boards will
These
be located in one of the men's
dormitories and in one of the
women's dormitories. They will
provide faster phone service for
calls in and out of the residence
halls. This will take a little time
and will cost between $10,000 and

m

pro-pra-

University of Kentucky, Lexington. Ky., Tuesday, Sept.

1M,

Number

W58

I

become

Vice-Preside-

nt

.sys-UricCol$4-

Vice-Preside-

50

nt

so-call-

ed

$12,000.

Board Of Trustees Accepts
$87,468 In Gifts For UK
Gifts totaling $87,463, including
$43,000 from the Grayson Founda- tion for research in equine virus
abortion, were accepted for the
of Kentucky by the
of Trustees at their meeting
last week.
gifts include:
Donors and their
Air Filter Foundation,
$2500 for scholarships in engineer- ing; H. J. Hosea and Sons, New- port. 4160 to the Northern Center
Seholarshin Fund: Western Elee- for a scholarship in
electrical engineering: Schlumber- ger Foundation. $1000 as the
Collegiate Award for
1958-5-

9.

Publishing Co.. $100 as
scholarship in journalism: Na- tional Plant Food Institute, $2000
the Experiment Station for a re- search project in the optimum
time of applying fertilizer to grass- legume and small grains; Bakelite
Co., Union Carbide Corp., $1250 to
the Experiment Station for support
of a project on the use of films
from polyethyleme for
control of weeds and the forcing

and irrigation of vegetables.
Owen R. Meredith. Peeble Beach,
Cal.; $500 to be added, to the prin- cipal of the Willard Rigjrs Mere- dith Memorial Award; Lexington
Herald-LeadCo., $200 to be used
cover fees and books for two
to
students for the
first semester at the rate of $100
Per semester; Robert VV. Willmott.
Lexington, $500 for the Millmott
Physics Scholarship Fund.
American Potash Institute. S2000
for use-iresearch in soil fertility
and soil chemistry; Kroger Co..
$1000 for continuation of the Kro--n- d
ger Scholarship Program in agrl- culture and home economics; Ken- tucky Artificial Breeding Associa- tion, $7000 for continuation of sup- port of the research program in
dairying; Charles Pflzer and Co.,
$2000 for continuation of a grant- In support of projects rela- tive to the use of hormones, anti- biotics and tranquilizers in beef
production.
Foundry Educational Founda- Icn, $500 to the College of Engl- neering for its foundry educational
er

pre-journali-

n

in-a- id

funeral is He la Jt or rrotessor

Funeral services for Prof. Ezra
L Gillis, 91, registrar emeritus of
the University who died Thursday
night, were conducted yesterday
morning at the W. R. Milwad

Mortuary, Southland. The Rev.
Leslie R. Smith officiated.
A large crowd of representatives from the University faculty
and stafr heard- - the Rev. Smith
present inspirational readings and
give - anecdotes - concerning Prof
Glllls and Illustrating his philosophy of life.
One of these anecdotes suggested
Prof. Gillis attitude toward critics.
When he was a boy younj Ezra
often rode into town ia a road

-

Adams Quits
While House
Aide's Job

with his, father. At one
house they passed there was a dog
which always raced to the road
and barked loudly at the passing wagon. Finally young Ezra
could take no more and he vowed
to get the dog.
piling out of the. wagon, h
chased the dog over a hill and out
of sight. Later as young Ezra
climbed back Into the wagon his
rather- - remarkecL',Son,- - you - are
never going to get anywhere chasing barking dogs."
Prof. Gillis was a native of
Anderson County. He joined the
University staff in 1907 and became the first registrar for the
wagon

program; General Electric Educa tional and Charitable Fund; $30
for., the 1958 corporate alumnus
program; Cincinnati Milling
chine Co., $1000 for two engineer-Boar- d
ing scholarships; Harry O. Wyse.
Lexington, $5(W for a scholarship
in engineering; Allen Co.,
chester$500 for an engineering
scholarship: .
Harlan Mining Institute, $1000
in support of its scholarship fund
in engineering; Plantmix Asphalt
Industry of Kentucky. $500 for
.
i
engineering scnoiarsnips; rannie
John Hertz Engineering
arship Foundation. $275 for an
engineering scholarship; South-Ashlan- d
East Coal Co., $600 for a scholar-- a
ship in engineering; International
Nickel Co., $963 for the engineer-t- o
ing scholarship fund,
Inland Steel Co., $500 for two
scholarships for the first semester;
k
Foundation. $3050
scholarship program in
for the
agriculture; Charles Pfizer and
Co., $2000 to the Experiment
tion for research on the effect of
Continued en Pate 7
Win-Americ-

.

an

.

Schol-Schlumberg-

er

Sears-Roebuc-

Sta-produc-

LriUis

ftx--K

ed

;v
;

WASHINGTON,

Sept.

22

shrrmm Adims Prpsidriit

AP
Fmen-

-

bower's rteht hand man and Bernard Goldfine's long time friend,
resigned under fire tonight.
ha
"... I have done no wrong." apsaid in a dramatic
pearance broadcast across the nation. But he added 'T must givo
full consideration to the effect
of my continuing presence on tha
public scene."
acknowledged thres
Adams
TV-rad- io

tiiuiinio

wi

is

limb

i iu

nvvrpru vxivi

favors from Goldfine, a Boston
textile magnate, at a time when
Goldfine was having trouble wltU
federal regulatory agencies. He
denied uslngany Influence in
Goldfine's behalf. I
But pressure for his departure
has been building up. It reached
a new peak after the Republicans
took a thorough licking in tha
Sept; 8 Maine election. GOP candidates in many states complained
that Adams, the austere former
governor of New Hampshire, had
become a political liability.

egistrar

Honorary bearers were Oovernor
welton Court: two daughters, Mrs.
Gillis Hester, registrar at A. B. Chandler. University of KenMurray State College, and Mrs. tucky President Frank O. Dickey,
Arthur W. Huckle, Rock Hill. S. C; Dr. H. I Donovan. W. H. Town-sen- d.
Wtldon Shouse, Dr. Champ
three grandchildren, Miss Betty
Huckle, Rock Hill. 8. C. Mr. Vic- Llgon, Dr. Leo Chamberlain.
tor Murdaugh. Birmingham, Ala.. Fl ank D. Peterson. .Pr.of. H. ' H.
and Robert Hester, Los Angeles. Downing. Dean D. V, Terrell. CoL
Calif.; a sister, Mrs. Thomas James H. Oraham. Prof. J. 3.
Shouse, Taylorsvllle; a brother, Horine. Dr. John 8. Chambers. C.
the Rev. Herman Olllls. Golden, B. Fan is, Dr. Thomas D. Clark.
111., and six
Dr. J. D. Farrls, David Prewlti,
Burial was In Lexington Ceme- Dean P. P. Boyd. Prof. W. 3.
tery.
Kebb. Ernest Miller. 8. A. Boles.
Bearers were Paul McBrayer. Dr. Carl Fortune. W. B. Orifgs.
zen.
Robert Glllls Hester, Arthur Oillis. Dr. W. C. Bower, Dean Edward
Survivors are his wife. Mrs. Harold Richardson. Charles W. Weist. Dr. L. L. Dantzler and
Sallie Sullivan GlllU, of 110 Mat- - Grace and June McKittrtck.
James Wilmore Klrfclaud,

In 1910. Ftr 27 years Tie
served in this capacity and was
recognized nationally for his work.
He received a change-of-wor- k
status in 1937 and founded the
Bureau of Source Materials in
Higher Education. He directed this
bureau for 20 years.
Honored twice by the University,
Prof. Gillis received the first
award for meritorious service by a
member of the University staff in
1945. and in 1950 be was awarded
the University's Sullivan Medallion as the state's outstanding citischool

Cleo

great-grandchildr-

en.

* 2 -- 'llin KFN IUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday,

19."ft

Sept.;-23- ;

Students 'May Now Apply IBM 650, UKW;New Com
For Marsh allScho larsh ips To Be In Operation By Oct
,

The British Government Is call-- .
ing for applications for Its 1959
Marshall Scholarship Awards.
Students arc being urged to Ret
their applications In before October 31, when the lists close.
Requirements for these two-yestudy Rrants, twelve of which
are awarded each year, are liberal.
Any American student (including
Inhabitants of Hawaii and Puerto
Itlco of either sex. married or
single, may apply provided he or
she has earned a first degree at a
recognized university, and Is under
the age of 26 on October 1, 1959.
Attention Is given both to
character and scholastic ability, In
the judging.
This Is done In the first Instance by one of four regional
ar

Argentine Display
Now In Library
The gaucho epic of Jose Hernandez. "Martin Fierro" and "The
Return of Martin Fierro," Is Included In an exhibit of Argentine
cowboy literature now on display
in the main foyer of the Margaret
I. King Library.
According to Dr. Lawrence S.
Thompson, director of University
libraries, Hernandez' epic is generally acknowledged as the most
Important piece of creative literature composed in the Americas in
any language.
' The epic was published by the
Assigos del Arte of Buenos Aires
in 1930, and acquired by the University library on exchange from
the library of Congress last year.
Another book displayed is William Henry Hudson's "Far Away
and Long Ago." in a calfskin binding. The display also includes sev
eral essays by Edward Larocque
Tinker, critic, collector and student
of guacho literature.
The exhibit will remain in the
foyer until December, Dr. Thompson said.

For the Best

Part-Tim-

e

Job In Lexington
See Mr. Hickey
or
Mr. Blevins

,ot
Lexington
Herald-Lead-

from

er

$100-- $

Co..
150 a month

committers, on rach of which four
Americans, distinguished In public
life or education, sit under the
chairmanship of the local British
Consul-Oenera- l.
Applications are
sifted then the names of finalists are forwarded to the British
Embassy in Washington, and then
to London where a final review
is made by n commission of leading British educators and businessmen headed by Lord Coleralne.
Winners are announced the fol-

UK's new electronic computer is
expeeted to be in full operation
by Oct. 1.
That Is the prediction of Dr.
John W. Hamblen, director of the

University Computing Center. Hamblen assumed
his duties Sept. 1.
The machine, officially known as
IBM 630 and described as a magnetic drum data processing machine, is being installed in the
basement of McVey Hall. It will
be used as a research tool and as
an instrument for instruction in
the operation of computing machines.
Hamblen said his staff of three
e
workand two part-tim- e
ers would be on the Job by Sept.
15. The machine will be rented for
approximately $5,000 per month, 60
per cent of which will be paid
through an educational contribution from the International Business Machine Co.
Two years of preparation have
preceded the installation of the
machine. Hamblen said about 75
other universities had similar instruments.
A course on operation of the
machine will be offered in the College of Commerce, and a series of
short courses will be conducted
continuously. The short courses
will be open to any interested persons at no cost, but enrollment in
each course will be limited to a
newly-organiz-

lowing April.

Each award is worth around
year, for two (and occasionally three) years, plus tuition
at a United Kingdom university,
if possible of the applicant's choice.
This is estimated to be sufficient
for student life in Britain Passage to and from the United Kingdom is paid. Married men get an
extra allowance.
Applications should be made to
the British Consul-Generin one
of the following cities: Chicago,
New York, New Orleans, San Fran$1,400 a

'

,

Scholars to date
have done exceptionally well in
their British finals, An alumni association is in process of being
formed and this is expected to
have 100 per cent membership.
The Marshall Scholarship
Scheme was begun in 1953. It is
intended to express Britain's gratitude for Marshall Aid.

Excavation Began
At Barkley Daw

O ACROSS

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1

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UK.

FROM

rv

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Electronic Brain
Dr. John W. Hamblen, left, Director of the 'Unlverslti Computet;
Center, demonstrates the University's new computing machine to Mr.
Carl Shier, manager of customer engineering at IBM in Lexington.

small number of persons.
Hamblen said the machine
would be used 16 solve complex
research problems. It produces
solutions to problems fed into the
machine by a series of IBM cards.
The new director will be. an as

sociate professor - of statistics in
the College of Gommerqp - in ad
dition to his duties in the: computing center. He came here front
Oklahoma State University, where
he was an associate, professor oC
Continued on Page 7

,

MEMORIAL

ON

HALL

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CO

Welcome Back to

1.

LIMESTONE

SOUTH

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of K !

to

to..

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Welcome

Address, Since 1919. of the
Very Best in

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LU
;

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LU

Preliminary excavation for prehistoric materials in the Barkley H
tO
Dam reservoir has been started by LU
a team of anthropologists from
A. $2,500 grant to the Kentucky
Research Foundation from ' the
National Park Service will finance
the work.
Dr. Douglas W. Schwartz, associate professor of anthropology at
the University, will direct the project, which is being carried on to
preserve archaeological materials
which will be flooded as a result
of th eadm.
Schwartz said a preliminary survey made last year revealed the
presence of materials dating from
5000 B.C. to 1500 A.D. Th6 park
service made the funds available
for excavation and preservation of
these materials after the survey
report was presented.
The project director said about
six sites in Lyon and Trigg Coun- ties would be excavated.

ed

full-tim-

al

cisco.
All Marshall

J

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The Prescription Center

LU

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CASH and CARRY

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Prescriptions

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fountain

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Men's Toiletries

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Dry Cleaning

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Laundry

- Hug

Cleaning

LU

REAR OF STORE

to
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FOltFREE

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FROM

MEMORIAL

Repairs

O

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Water Repelling!
Butters Replaced!

O

(Come In! We'll Sew It, Free!)

HALL

ON

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to

O

"One of the South's Great
Cleaning Plants!"

B

o

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'II111

o
m
m

4-0-

f

FXTRA COST . : . ;

X
m

Magic Number;- -

ON REQUEST DY UK
STUDENTS AT NO

Z

SOUTH

to

H
O

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m

LIMESTONE O

1

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuodjy, .Vpt.

LITTLE MAN ON.CAMPUS

- sz

a UK Journalism
from last sprtna. left j
New York on Sept. 4 for Edinburgh
University In Scotland.
Mills was awarded a Rotary!
Foundation scholarship last spring.
He was one of 113 students from 30
countries selected for the foreign
study fellowships.
Mills arrived in Liverpool on
Sept. 11 and from there he went
to London. He was scheduled to ro
rt
to the Brussels World's Fair
traveling to Edinburgh for the
beginning of classes early in October,
The UK graduate Is to be a
guest of Rotary clubs in Great t
Britain and mana curing the;
year.
Mills,

Don

Slain
By Algiers Rebels

AP
AtiOIERS. Sept. 22
French army headquarter announced tonight the discovery of
200 to 300 bodies tn a deae moun
tain forest 100 miles east of Al-- ;

r

graduate

S

j

,

j

giers.
i
An army spokesman told a
conference all the dead appeare 1
to be Moslems of neighboring villages and said French troops
d
found leaflets distributed by
rebels savin the mas-- ,
killing was carried out as punish-- ;
mcnt for treason.

nt

Na-jtioiuh- st

be-fo-

reported

The

mas graveyard

was near Stdl-Aie- h
in the Orani
Kabllyie area, one of the major
strongholds of the rebel.

V

J

'

E

t
j

DOS' MILLS

. .. . .
.. .
4
T
nunarra
u.ivc rriu. run
da-- h
to srt a new UK fresh-- I
yard
man mark in 1936.
-

$

Welcome Students
YCXI CAN'T TAK

tilZlXH

AS

Jklll!

FULFILLMENT OP YOU.

Fellowships Are Given
By Tennessee Eastman
)
Ii

The Tennessee Eastman Company announced today the awarding of eight fellowships for advanced study in chemistry and engineering- at Southern colleges
and universities during the 1959-6- 0

ern colleges and universities also
have received direct grants from
the Eastman Kodak: Company, of
which Tennessee Eastman is a
division. Kodak's
program is a continuing plan
which this year amounts to more

academic year.
Eight privately supported South- - than $600,000.
Receiving fellowships for Ph.D.
degree study in chemistry are
Centrol Kentucky's Largest Dulce University, Georgia
Institute
USED BOOK STORE
of Technology, the University of
Kentucky, the University of North
(Other Than Text)
Carolina, and the University of
Tennessee. Three Institutions to
receive fellowships for persons
studying for the Master of Science
Near 3rd degree in engineering will be an257 N. Lime
nounced at a later date.

T04.EXINGT0N AND

ill

I

MM AN UAL BAPTIST
CHURCH

H. B. Kuhnte

Keith Mee

Wm. Lowe

Bill Bonner

Pastor

Minister of Education

Minister of Music

Youth Director

WEDNESDAY

SUNDAY SERVICES
Early Worship
8:45 a.m.
Sunday School
9:45 a.m.
1

1

Morning Worship

:00 a.m.

5:30
6:00
7:15
8:00

p.m.
p m.

p.m.

Youth
Choir
Youth
Praise

Choir Supper
Rehearsal
Discussion Group
and Prayer Hour

p.m.
Training Union
6:15 p.m.
Evening Worship
7:30 p.m.
Bus transportation is provided both Sunday morning and Sunday evenings.
A chartered city bus comes to the dorms at" 9: 30 a.m. and our church bus
at 6:00 p.m.

IMMANUAL BAPTIST CHURCH

DENNIS
BOOKSTORE

East High

at Woodland Avenue

"Teaching The Truth To A Thousand"

HUSAKIS

iK

USl

IF

A

1

1

i

r

0
v

--

-

-

SKI;

A

m THE CUMTH

IF

-

200 Moslems

Don Mills Begins Study
On Rotary Scholarship

Liable J

25. 1938

TIKI

Ay

f- t-

M

o

* The Kentucky Kernel
lit.Tnl

ill i)v Vtrt
I iiSIkIh-i- I

Umvi rmiv

f)Uir

Kentucky hi
mutter nnclrr thr Ad of M.r 1i 1,
lxilul.i
iluruiit tin- - rvunlur mIiimi!
anil e.imv
MX HOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

ill

lour liint

Anuy Kithison, Chief

We Made It!

of Kfnti ckv
h-a- !

wii--

Sas

Jint I f amptov,
Lilitor

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

Lauhy Van Hoose, Chief Sport it Editor
Ass Itnnt:nTS, Society Editor
I'tuHY Ashi.fy, Rttsiness Munager
Nohman McMci.liv, Advertising Manager
John Mitciii i.!., Staff Thotonraphcr
Marilyn I y vers and Judy IYnnobaKcr, Proofreader
--

TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Dan Mili.ott, Editor
Ai.kt. lWnnixr., Assoeiatc Editor

Paul Scott, Sports Editor

Wanted: 800 Ashtrays
I.ADIIS of the lirsliiiKin

)il

name. You'd he surprised how ft list of
freshman girls, when matched with some
sort of dateability index, can catapult
some gills to immediate campus fame. It
ako can have its adverse effects on those
ol you wly didn't get a parljculatly good

cl.iss:

ive your name to
a yun man w1n
ymr clorui the
first el.iy
u arrived .it UK and asked if
vou'e! like lo fi.iw. free, an aslitrav with"
the University seal thereon?
m

to

li.ipjx--

isiu-e- l

And

hae yu lia n

wondering.

rating.
The enterprising "ashtray

er-li.ii- s,

why vour aslnray is slill unclcliv-(re- d
'Ih'ii you ate positive the vmuiij;
in. in look your name and room number

"

who visited your dorm sort of preempted the Sigma Nil's long standing privilege ol getting jour names, but there
weie enough of vou to provide plenty of
names lor all concerned.
We have but two comments on what
we think is a rather clever maneuver on
the part of the men concerned:
First, from the number of 'TV, or
"really sharp" girls who appeared on the
list. we saw. it seems that Kentucky need
not worry about losing its reputation as,
a land of beautiful women.
And. secondly, keep thjs thing under
your hats, won't you? There'll be another
crop of freshman women next year, you
know.

without error?
II so, it is our solemn duly as guardian
of Mudt ills' rights to inform you that vou
u duped. Hoaxed. Taken in.
You see, there are no suth ashtrays.
I urthc rinorc, you, mustn't feel that you
are the only victims of what has bet rune
a traditional UK joke. You are inertly

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the latest.
You probably noticed soon after you
arrived on campus that the Sima Xir
house is located on the main atli between your dorm and the Coliseum. And
the men who live in that house discovered, j ears "o. that freshmen would sin
their names to almost anything alter a
lew clays of orientation-weerosters, forms

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k

and

.sue

Anyone charging the University
with favoritism or discrimination
would have a hard time proving it hy
its. At registration last week the Kernel editor had to pay a dollar for a
subscription to the paper, just like

h.

So, they set up a table on the sidewalk,
in Iront of their house and request that
you sin up lor some sort of free article
or register for some appealing eausc. You,

and many of your predecessors, didn't
lealie that all they wanted was your

everyone else.

A n Import ant Mes s age
It is a privilege to welcome you to
the University of Kentucky, some of
you as new students and others who
are returning for a new year.
I believe there is no major problem
in the world today that is not old in'
substance, even if it appears toJhe
new in form. For example, the prob- JV

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The problem of poverty has beset the
kingdoms of this earth from the earliest recorded history. Ignorance and
superstition have for ages held people
to fatal courses. Pride! arrogance, and
greed are deadly sins whose record is
inscribed in the first writings which
have come down to us.
. The atomic lxmb appears to be a
relatively new problem, but it is only
a new manifestation of an age-ol- d
problem how to balance offensive
might with defensive power. Even in
its modern form the problem is at
least as old as gunpowder. It will do
you no gocxl to be deceived by the
new envelopes in which old problems
are hidden.
If, therefore, you have come to the
anUniversity seeking ready-mad- e
swers to the riddles of the world, you
have come to the wrong place. I certainly know no better place than this
institution, but no educational institution has all the answers lior has any
other institution or agency.
.i
I
l
r
r
Jt any or you nave come nere
that the most important thing is

,

poses as well as good.
There can be only one justification
for the existence of this center of
learning or for your coming to it.
Here you may make the acquaintance
of ideas. If I were to name a single
characteristic which is essential to the
life not to say the greatness of a university, it would be hospitality toward
worthwhile ideas.
A university is a storehouse of ideas.
, They are here for your asking. This
University offers the opportunity for
an education, but we can give no warranty that you will automatically profit from the University's programs. The
answer actually Tests in your hands.
You are investing some of your
money ancj a great deal of the state's
money in your educational program.
The manner in which you plan, study,
and work will in large measure determine the dividends which your investment will pav to vou and society.
Your parents, your friends, and you
will want to be proud of the record
which vou make here.
Every university has some persons
.

along with Louisiana State, Virginia
and North Carolina universities.
We realize that to some of you this
merely means your registration fee
was a dollar more this "semester; others, we hope, will share our enthusiasm for the daily Kernel and what
it will mean for UK.
The University's enrollment this semester will be just under 10,(MH) students. On the campus itself are some
200 departments and administrative
offices' and another 130 student or-

ganizations. It doesn't take many calculations to sev that a weekly newspaper has a difficult time covering
events among such a diversified group
of people and activities, but with four
editions a week we shall be able to
do a much better job. 'Equally im-- .
portai it, we now can report new s day
by. day", keeping you informed of the
latest developments as they happen.
Kernel readers are going to find
several changes in our news content.
We intend to keep our coverage, as in
the past, on the University level, but
we have added a numlx'r of features
not seen in past Kernels, including
the Associated Press leased wire.
Among these are weekly book and
women's pages, a more complete society page and several columnists
writing on a multitude of subjects.
From time to time we plan to have
photographic features on various campus departments and events.

The only editorial change you'll
find, however, is in the typography of
the editorial page. It has been redesigned to a width of four columns
instead of the usual five, making it
more distinctive and easier to read.
Pol
we liave made no
changes. News prominence and coverage still will be determined by its
importance and relevance tp the University community. WV have (hiever
politaken sides in any
tical issues, and this will continue to
'
be our policy.
Editorially, the Kernel has, no sacred cows nor will we ever" set up
straw men and crow victoriously: as
we beat them to death
comments. We shall bestow pcafsfj
on those who deserve it with the
same impartiality that we criticize
those we think are in error. Our criticisms, when they come, 'will 'be
based on the belief that we arc serving the best interests of the Univericy-wis- e,

non-camp-

us

"

-

with-vitijpcra-tiv-

e

sity by making them.
We are only human and are subject to the same mistakes in judgment
as every one else, however accurately
we try to we igh the facts before making comment on them. We do not
claim to represent the only possible
viewpoint, and for that reason our letters column is always open for readers
to express their own views. The only
requirement for letters to be published is that they be within tbe
bounds of decencv and that thev be
signed. We will withhold the writer s
name upon request, of course.
We feel the daily Kernel is one of
several significant milestones ia the
University's road to a brighter future.
We sincerely hope that we can contribute something to that future. .
With your support, We will.
--

-

From The Preside n t

to learn how to make a living, I hope
that you will broaden the area of your
vision. If anyone thinks that by becoming the world's greatest expert in
any particular field he is certain to
make a worthwhile contribution to
the world, he is deceiving himself, for
these tremendous powers of knowl- edge-eatt-- be
unleasltecf-fo- r
evil pur- -

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When the first copy of today's Kernel came olf the press last night, the
excited cluster of people in thr pressroom brentlicd a collective sigh of relief and broke out into pleased grins.
"Well," someone said, "wc made it!"
And make it we have, for today UK
became only tlie fourth university in
the South to have a daily newspaper

who are not able to complete their surnrised how m:rnv' students Pft the
entire four years, but we are striving impression that they can come to cob
to have fewer, and. fewer, drop-outlege and just attend classes when it
We sincerely hope that we shall have seems convenient. This is certaiuly a
the privilege of seeing each one of you 'false impression.
at a commencement program not too
Finally, let me urge you to become
...
many years in the future.
a part orf il
nus IT..!.
cuter 1.
uinversuy. T?.... imu
I would remind .yoit' that the
activities (yet I would. urge you to'
s.

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Uni-"Tersity-

Kentucky-isn- ot

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actory-whic-

of

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takes high school graduates as
raw material and processes them into
scientists, engineers, farmers, businessmen, or teachers. - The best we
can do is to provide an environment
in which the student may learn. This
we are striving to do;- - however, I
would emphasize that the real effort
which product's learning must come
from the learner.
We are most fortunate in having a
myriad of excellent .facilities on our
campus which go into the building of
this environment for learning. Our
staff has a most genuine interest in
our students and in their hopes,
dreams, and desires. Our facilities, our
staff, and our traditions are available
to each of ottr students for the asking.
To those who come earnestly seeking
know ledge and wisdom, no door will
be closed.
.Get off to a good start in all of your
classes, be regular in attendance and
be punctual for your classes and other
appointments. Prepare well for each
class. These are pointers which may
seem useless to you, but y ou. would be

use-moderat-

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versity at every opportunity. We are
in this business of education together
and we have an institution of which
'
.
.
we can oe justly prouct. ir is "my nope
that each one of you will make a record here at the University, of which
all can be proud.
Newcomer