xt7jm61bm44g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jm61bm44g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581121  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 21, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 21, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7jm61bm44g section xt7jm61bm44g Cats Aim For 16th Win Against Tennessee
By SCOTTIE IIELT

The annual battle for the beer keg, the Kentucky
Tennessee game, will be played at 2 p.m. tomorrow at
field.
Knoxville's Shlelds-WatkiThis could well prove to be the most Interesting of
the South 's games tomorrow. Kentucky is aiming for its
series and a bid to the Blue
16th win in the
Grass Bowl in Louisville.
Despite the unusually Ion; appearance of Indian.
Summrr, the tilt shapes up as a typical Wildcat-Voluntemeeting, with colder weather predicted, an even-Stevprediction by oddsmakers and migration of an
expected 10,000 Kentuckians to the scene of the encounter.
In past years, this game has served as a make or
bowl
break game since either foe aimed for a
trip or a
Conference finish. This season
neither club has been a ball of fire as Tennessee stands
fifth in the SEC rundown and the Cats ninth.
This doesn't however mean that there is nothing at
stake in the outcome of the battle. Although Tennessee
is 5 overall, they are 2 in the league with the possible chance of still finishing as high as third in the
Conference heap. Kentucky has a
record.
Both trams have come back after slow starts against
tough opponents crippled their chance to give sophomore-studde- d
teams an opportunity to develop into experienced hands. The Cats have not lost in three weeks as
they have petted wins over Mississippi State and Xavier
2
by
and 20-- 6 scores and tied Vanderbilt
ns

53-ga-

er

en

post-seas-

on

top-ranki- ng

3--

3--

-1

-

33-1-

0-- 0.

Coach Hoyden Hyatt's Vols came bark from an apoet
defeat inflicted by Chattanooga two weeks ago to shock
the Southeastern Confrrrnre by trimming Mkslwippl,
The Cats lost to Ole Miss, 27-On the basis on common foes and comparative scores,
the Kentucky crew ranks as a solid favorite. Both teams
beat Mississippi State. Kentucky by 2 and Tennessee
13-while the Engineers
UK downed Oeorgia Tech, 13-of the Vols, 21-and the Cats lost to
took the toll
Tennessee. 13-Auburn by but a single touchdown,
g
style of play was given a lift
The UT single-winlast weekend when sophomore Gene Etter came through
for the injured Billy Majors to carry the rrew to victory.
Etter gave the Tennesseeans a two-dee- p
attack from the
tailback slot that could prove to give Kentucky's quarterback duo, Lowell Hughes and Jerry Eisaman, a real
contest.
End Murray Armstrong has been the number one
receiver of Etter and Major passes as the 6 seniors
has pulled down 12 for 157 yards and eightth place in the
league.
Slated to get the starting call for the host squad will
be Armstrong and Mike LaSorsa at ends. Bo Shafer and
C
Joe Shaffer at tackles,
candidate Bobby Urbano
and Joe Lukowski at guards, Ray Brann at center, Jim
Cartwright at blocking back, Bobby Sandiin at wing-bacCarl Smith at fullback and probably Etter at the
tailback position.
The Kentucky starting backfield should remain pretty
18-1-

6.

6.

33-1-

8.

0.

7;

8--

0.

9;

.6--

all-SE-

k,

much the tame as In the pat irvrral weeks with f1ghe
and FUaman fighting it out for the quarterback slot,
Bobby Cravens and Glenn Ed Shaw slated for the halfback ririt-teanod and either Rich Wright or Uyd
Hodge starting at fullback.
Cravens, currently number five In Conference running figures, was the Wildcat that coupled with All
America Lou Michaels to engineer, the u;et 20-- 6 setback the Colliermen handed the visitors here la.it fall.
The tough Owensboro hallback , racked up a bet Us
rushing total than the entire Tennessee crew. Michael
g
gave an exhibition of
blocking and tackling that led directly to two UK scores.
Slated also to see a good deal of action In the Ken
tucky backfield Is Calvin Bird who leads the loop both
in scoring and In pass receiving. The Corbln speedster
ranks fourth nationally in scoringr
d
The
forward wall of the Cats will
probably see Dickie Mueller and Tom Rodgrn at ends.
Bob Lindon and Cullcn Wikon at tackles. Bob Talamlnl
and Jimmy Johns at guards and
Tascal Benson at renter.
Nine Kentucky seniors will be performing In their
last regular season contest for the school. They are
Doug Shively and Bob Lindon. halfback
Bobby Cravens and Cliff Tribble. fullback Waymond
Morris, centers Dick Blocker and Bill Living-- guard Jim
Miller and tackle Jim Cambron.
Both Tennessee and Kentucky bands are to preseuD
halftime shows at Knoxville.
m

bone-Jarrin-

youth-dominate-

guard-turned-cent-

er

,

Ar

7

H

H

A

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY., FRIDAY, NOV. 21, l!)38

Vol. L

Jul

r'
.

(

.

f

'

;l

,

'

v

-

,

' Wildcat Express

"Red" Calkin; vice president of Sigma Fhi Epsilon, drives the
tractor that served yesterday as a "Wildcat Express." The Sig Eps
carried students to and from classes on the decorated tractor. It
was intended to give students the idea that they should "get on
the band wagon and push the team on to victory."

Newspapers on occasions fail to whether Dr.
Gladys Kammerer
"We Just overlooked the value of
give prominence to UK press re- - was passed over for a salary raise the change." Dr. WiUard said, "or
we would have had a story pre- leases on matters the school con- because of political activity.
2. The controversial "closing"
siders important, Dr. Frank Dickey,
paied and sent out."
or chanee of method of operation
UK president, said Wednesday.
Dr. Dirkry said that the Kam-n.rr- er
of the UK Rehabilitation Center.
incident was handled as it
Dr. Dickey
made this remark
3. A change of policy in
the
during UK's annual newspaper-radio-televisi(Yontinurd On Pa ire 2
dinner while com- requirements for medical examinations for new students.
by

Paul H. Douglas
To Be On Panel

of
Senator Paul H. Douglas
Illinois and three top Washington
correspondents will be featured in
the Coliseum at 8:15 p. m. Tues- day.
They will appear on a panel pro- gram titled "Break the News."
The Washington newsmen in- elude Kenneth G. Crawford, News- week Magazine Bureau Chief and
Senior Editor for National Affairs;
Frank lloleman, Washington, cor- respondent for the New York Daily
News; and John C. Metcalfe, editor of "Brackground", a Washington newsletter on world and na- tional affairs.

WUS Goal
Falls Short
Of $1,000
Slightly over $300 has been given

to the World University Service.
said
Fred Strache
yesterday.
As indicated by the thermometer
scale by the library, this Is far
short of the $1000 goal.
. Organizations" that have contributed $25 or more are Patterson
Hall, Chi Omega, Sigma Alpha,
Epsilon,
Alpha
Gamma Rho,
an

CounCwens, YMCA, Inter-Fait- h
cil. Pi Kappa Alpha, and Lambda

Chi Alpha.
The drive for WUS, which is

an

international

among university communities in
43 countries, has
been extended
Wednesday. Conthrough next
tributions can be" made in either"
the YMCA office or the Student
Congress, Room 127 in the SUB.

3G

Dickey Thinks .'Press,
UK Differ Oh News

'

'

No.

on

designed to
The program is
story in a one- break a front-pag- e
hour unrehearsed presentation fol- lowed by a question and answer
period, it will cover areas or great- est current news Interest in both
national and world affairs.
Douglas, an Illinois
senator
Democrat, has been in Congress
Since November, 1948. An author of

many books on economic subjects.
Ccontinued On Tage

2

menting on complaints
Graydon
4. The recurring question, ap- Hambriek, Lexington Leader re
porter, that Hambriek met with Prently now settled.- of whether
weun. on leave as a
"secrecy" in trying to report uv.
TVA director, w. 11 return to UK
some UK news.
Dr DickeVf when asked by re as agriculture dean.
Dr- Dickey gave his view
on
did not immediately recall
of ,he points, and Dr. Wil- Specific instances when important three
UK stories had been Diayed down liam R. Willard. Chandler Medical
...
or so a, he hid Center director, said he was re- sponsible for the handling of the
commented.
examinations situation.
Hambriek, who rovers UK for medical
(News of the change first was rethe Lexington Leader, eited four ported in a medical journal.).
examples where he met with what
he considered "secrecy in seeking
news at UK". They were:
1. A committee investigation
of
-

n.mnu

Ami Landers To Talk
At Guignol Dec. 10

)Vff

Kentucky" Stuns

Large "Yea Kentucky" Sign
obtainrd by SuKy
have been
for I'K studrnt-- i making
the
trip to Knoxville this weekend.
The signs are suitable for rear
car window. door, etc., and
will be distributed all day today
at the information desk, Grand
Hall. Sl'U.

i:

--

students at Guignol Theatre on
Ann Landers, the lovelorn col- - Dec 10
umnist, will speaK to university
Miss Landers' visit to Lexingby the
ton is being
Kernel and The Lexington Herald.
The columnist offers advice on
everyday problems in real life.
She advises her readers about datprobing, marriage and
lems, social relationships and "just
plain problems."
Her column appears regularly in
The Herald and Sunday Herald-Leade- r.

I

A

)

0

'V

)

in-la- w

r--

i

She will also speak at a public
meeting at 8 p, m. Dec. 10 at the
Henry Clay High School Auditorium.
Miss Landers, who Is Mrs. Jules
Lederer, wife of a Chicago industrialist, and mother of a teen-ag- e
daughter, will speak and conduct
question-answperiods at both
UK and Henry Clay Auditorium,
-- The program at UK will be open
to University students and faculty
members only.
er

ANN LANDERS

Calm He fore The Storm

Toblanna Walden, Chi Omega pledge, warms up with an apparent-l- y
placid cow for the milking contest at Block and Bridle's Fall
Festival tonight at 7:20 p. m. in the Livestock Pavilion. A few seconds after the pastoral scene wa photographed, the cow cut
loose with one of the kick for which the specie is famous. TobUn-n- a
,
escaped injury, but may approach the event with more cau-opponent.
tion than some of her

* 2

-- THE KCNTrCKV KERNEL,

riiilay,

Nov. 21. 1938

Dickcv Thinks School,
Press Differ On News

Student CAP Cadet Tells

Of Sunimei Flight To Italy
I

arry Akers, freshman

rhemlH-ti- y

major from Louisville, refers
to hi trip to Italy this summer,
"a onec in a lifetime experienee
which will stick with me forever."
vM.ivj.wj

On the way down the mountain
Venice.
Naples, Akers stayed the power failed and the cadets
at the Italian Air Academy and spent an hour hanging; over a
visited the near-b- y
cities of Pom- - 1.000 foot drop.
peii and Sorrento.
While in Rome they saw Pope
At Pompeii. Alters sn id, "The lava Pius XII.
irom eruptions oi vesuvious uaa
Larrv saH .'Tjie most flmusine
r)orn r rnred nwav. W rnulil kpp
.u.t r
'
muni
n.i nMro. r nn. saw Italian restaurants advertis
on the walls of the buildings."
ing American pizza.'
Commenting on his stay
in
Florence, Akers pointed out that
ihf. modern, buildinirs surprised
hlm. An interpreter told the cadets
that tllP
Italian War College,
whfrf thfy were staying, was built
by Mussolini,
in
art work of the Cathedral
Santa Maria tlei Fiore its beli
The University Placement Serv- tower and the Baptistry of St.
ice has announced the interviews
john impressed me as being the
for the week of the 24th and for
outstanding
most
features of
the week following Thanksgiving
Florentine
architecture," Akers

islands

Ilv JAN UliKKYMAX

w

officer for the Lexington Cadet
Squadron of Civil Air Patrol, was
along with 145 other
Mlccted
cadets to take the six- American
week tour. He was chosen after
passing seven aviation qualifica- Hon tests and appearing before-reviewing board in Louisville.
"I racked up 70 hours flying time
in the months of July and August.
We flew from Washington, D. C,
stopping in Newfoundland, Scot- land, and Germany before reaching
our destination." Akers added.
Home base during the trip was
Rome but DC-3- 's
transported the
cadets to other cities of interest
jn Italy.
In Venice the cadets were guests
of honor at the International Air
Show. They also toured the main
a

While

the
school was responsible for
clean's repeated failures to comcom- - ment on his plans.
was lirrause a trustee-facult- y
rnittce rrquested the "minimum of
Concerning the changes in the
publicity" and that he frit the
body's report should be given to center that were made effective
newsthe faculty ' before being released Feb. 1, and did not reach the
papers until late in the month
to the public.
all affected per
Concerning Dr. Widen, he said the president said and
indicated
were notified
sons
,u- i
i
i
u .i
J.
to the news value of
..
doubt
as.cd, that the dean would re- developments.
turn, adding he. did not feel the
Dr. Dickey commented that it
seemed to him at times that I K
activities achieved news prominence because reporters sought them
Continued From

n round

In

v.

vacation.

said.
MONDAY. NOV. 24
The group went by bus to Cour- mayeur in the Italian Alps near the .Martin Co., T.V.A.
the French
border. Cableways rview engineers.
TUESDAY, NOV. 25
took them up the mountain across
also Interview
today
the border.

u-n-

U. S.

Steel,

will inte- T.V.A. will

the

and

Applied Science Div. of I.B.M. will
interview M.S. and Ph.D. level stu- dents in physics, chemistry, math,
engineering and
geology. Devoe
and Reynolds Co. will interview
students at all levels in chemistry,
The B. F. Goodrich Co. will be
SCeing M S chemists and chemical
uiiu
engineers. ine
Indiana Highway Dept.
view civil engineers.
WEDNESDAY,
NOV. 26 The
National Cash Register Co. will be
looking for M.S. and Ph.D. chem-

CoilelFTrThls native "Wisconsin,
Continued From Page I
has rnvptpri pvpnts frnm thp nrn
he has been an active member of hibitIon battles of the .20s to D.
Banking and Currency Comr nnv in
whpn hP
ti,P
mittee and of the Labor and Public first tj. s. correspondent ashore

i

metalurgists, aerodynamicists, phy- sicists, and chemical, mechanical
and electrical engineers. Elemen- tary and high school teachers will
be interviewed by the New Rich- mond Ohio School,
FRIDAY. DEC. 5 The Ohio Oil
Co. and the California Co. will be
seeking engineers.
SATURDAY, DEC. 6 The Na
tional Security Agency Profession
al Qualification Test will be ad- '
UK Testing
ministered by the
Service. This test is required of
except Engineers
all applicants,
and Scientists.. Applications for
the test must be in the hands of
the National Security Agency be- &v.
iore

io.

will-rflter-t-

s

Welfare Committee
at Omaha Beach in Normandy.
Crawford, a graduate of Beloit
Holetr.an, a past president
of
the National Press Club, has cover- ists and metaiurgical, chemical,
ed the White
House,
Capitol, mechanical and electrical engigovernment agencies and national neers.
3 Tile
DEC."
WEDNESDAY.
events for the Daily News since
Columbia-Souther- n
Chemical Corp.
1942
for thrP. vpr
n tu
be Interviewing chemical, me- Arrr.y. A native of North Carolina,
he accompanied
Vice President hanlc. electrical, civil, and
on his African tour Iast.?us,tnal m8ineers: chemists and
business administration majors.
spring.
THURSDAY. DEC. 4 The Cen- Metcalfe, an extensive traveler,
tral Research Dept. of Air Reduc- has had
columns
syndicated
throughout the world. A Notre tion Co- - vvi11 be seeking chemists.
(Including
Dame graduate, he was the first
reporter to focus national atten- tion to subversive activities.-Con-- ;
sequently, he has testified many!
times before House and Senate
committees in the prosecution of
alien agents.

Aj'

school received only a paragraph or
two coverage, and indicated it
was a matter of who felt what was

important.

tV"l ill

ITiIl.
NOV.

SAT.

FRI.

1

21-2-

WIDl
VISION
SCRltN

2

"GUNMAN'S.. WALK"
(Color)

Van Heflin - Tab Hunter
ALSO

"WINCHESTER 73"

(Color)
Shelly Winters

James Stewart

STARTS SUNDAY
(Color)

Tab Hunter - Gwenn Verdon
ALSO

Triple
Play 'Banko' Tonight
Eye-Opn-

.

"DESERT HELL"

er

Barbara Hale - Brian Keith

"SIERRA BARON"

ernt

C&C Brain Keith

"THE FLY"

in-Nix- on

'r'rw

out through questions rather than
because of basic worth.
He then made his comment that
at times stories sent out by the

"DAMN YANKEE"

a Swingline

bigger than a
pack of gum!

1

Placement Bureau
Sets Up Interviews

Senator Paul Douglas,
Newsmen To Talk Here

Stapler no

I?e

C&C V. Price-H- .
Marshall
, ' Horrifying

"20 MILLION

MILES

FROM EARTH"

'Monster from Space

TODAY And SAT.

i

j

NOW

SWINGLINE "TOT"
Millions now in use. Unconditionally guarantee Makes book
covers, fastens papers, arts and
crafts, mends, tacks, etc. Available at your college bookstore.
SWINGLINE

'"Cub" Sopler $1.29

INC.
YORK.

N. V.

GUN HAD!

MOVIE GUIDE

Chicago

ASHLAND "Winchester 73" - 2:10
5:30. 8:45.
"Gunman's Walk" - 3:40. 7:00,

in

the

thirties!

--

"Sierra Baron" -

5 ACADEMY AWARDS

Marlon Brando Vivien Leigh
Karl Maiden

"A STREETCAR NAMED
DESIRE"
ALSO

"FLAMING FRONTIER"

"20 Million
10:37.

Miles to

Big, Bold

Best-Sell-

er

Lili St. Cry

STARTS

SUNDAY

Harrison & Kay Kendall

"THE RELUCTANT
DEBUTANTE"
(Color)

BARBARA

lARC

STARTS SUNDAY

NOW

try.
STARS AND NEW

LOVES

frtdMltw tl

'IfTi
i

At Your Northern Beltline Outdoor Theatres!

Mm

The 'Sadie Hawkins
Day' f High Society

IN THE ROLE
THAT FITS HIM
LIKE A GUN
FITS A
HOLSTER

rinn--

DfAD"
Rex

COREY ALLEN

SUNDAY ENTERTAINMENT

colorScope

"WHITE SQUAW"

I SMITH

U

DOM

UZyAH ?W0UCTiC

Adm.
65c

iv

I'JESF

VJA

Plus Bill Williams iff
"LEGION OF DOOMED"
SOON

I

Rex
HARRISON

SHlRLEy MLAINE BW. FDRD

WED. NOV. 26
One Day Only

THE

'V

f"
.

i

'

Of

2?

THE NAKED AND THE
ALSO

2nd HIT

STRAND "Party Girl" - 12:00.
2:00. 4:00. 6:00. 8:00, 10:00.

GNU

Youth in Love and Wy!
Raymond Massey
Aldo Ray

TARZAN

LEE J.

;

"MAN OF THE WEST"

Open 6 p. m. Admission 63c
NOW & SATURDAY

CORDON SCOTT

JOHN IRELAND
REN

Earth" -

STARTS SUNDAY
Gary Cooper in
(Color)

CY0

IN LOVE AND IVAR 4

"ROCKETS ROAR"

'

ROBERT

!

JERRY WALD'S

"Banko"
"The Fly" - 9:02.

RHiTrcnuFE

PLUS

MftlJOCOlO

NEW

m

Ul
,

TAYLORCHARISSE-COB- B

rrs

'Hk

- 8:27.

The Sensational Picture That
Bolted Brando To Stardom!

i

Wmmm-i-

tv
y
vVx
f

707.
ELECTRIC
r'
HEATERS
Open 6 p. m. price 65c
NOW SATURDAY

KtMTUCKT

rjX Lk

3

BEN ALI "Love 8c War" - 1:03.
3:11. 5:19. 7:27. 9:35.
CIRCLE 25 "A Streetcar Named
Desire" - 7:00, 11:00.
"Flaming Frontier" - 9:35.
KENTUCKY Tarzan's Fight fo
Life" - 2:3oToTl0, 9:45.
"Dunkirk" - 12:40, 4:15. 7:50.

LEXINGTON

'in-ca-

HXIMGTOH

GIRL MAD!

10:10.

IONO ISLAND CITY. NEW

f

'l

rJA
Kay

BALLET

1

A

KANK ORGANIZATION
PRESENTATION

Filmed in
London in
EASTMAN COLOR

KENDALL

'The Reluctant
Debutante4
Plus Howard Duff in
"SIERRA STRANGER"

AN INDOOR THEATRE AUDITORIUM AT CIRCLE 25!

TWO PERFORMANCES
Ar 2:3?
8:30 p. m.
Buy rickety now at Bex Office
Sale Limited To Theatre Capacity

"d

* TNT KLMKKV KrUNTI.

GFs Are More Fearless
At Dice Than Collegians
Columbus. Ohio (AD
Three
ccllrge faculty members who ran
r scientific floating dice game say
Joe College is more cautious at
traps than GI Joe.
To gather information 'for the
Air Force on making risky decisions, the research."? from Ohio State
University began the experiment in
Albuquerque. N. M., with 28 airmen from Kirtland AFB and eight
fummcr students at the University of New Mexico.
The rest of the study was conducted at Ohio State with 26 students from an introductory psy- -

lege men generally avoided bets
which allowed them to win frequently, though payoffs were
small, the report
said, adding:
Certainly, it is credible to
expect this kind of talue orientation to be more prevalent in a

middle class population."
As a tentative
explanation for

ymzavfZieor
fCXZ

'

COiAG

COWB3C
rv

holojfy course.

VC,

IN

it

A

The 28 Air Force enlisted men
between 18 and 38, the 34
college men between 18 and 35.
Each got $10 and rolled the dice
0 times.
Those who managed to
held cn to the $10 kept a dollar-p- lus
half of any money they won.
Those who wound up with less
thin $10 kept 10 per cent of what
they had left.
Winning seemed more important to the collegians, researchers
l.oted. Afraid of failure, the col
.are

)

N,n. 21.

Iii.l.n.

Konnie Bullcr Leclures
Feature Writing Class

Konnie Hutler.
foin.cr Kernel
editor now with
the Associated
the collegians' taking
moderate Tress In
gave some poinrisks, the researchers
offered: ters on
feature witting todav to
"Their value system derowatrs
failure and places high premium Dr. William Moore's feature writing class in the Knoi h Clrehan
on success, but success
must be
Journalism building.
small. Small successes not only
Two
enable them to avoid failure but writing,prime requisites for fraturr
Iiutlrr said. are to like
insure a certain feeling of safe-ne- people
and to be at ease with
or lack of defiance."
them, lie also added that, to obWhile college
men are more tain the brsi possible story, the
conservative in derisions
under feature writer must be able
to
conditions of risks.
there Is no put the person lie interviews t
apparent relation between intrlli-Rrne- e ease and gain his confidence.
and
the report
Hutlcr said that newspaper feacontinued.
ture wntinR. the writer should be
Alvin ' Scodel and
Phllburn able to tell every interesting aspect
Ratoosh. associate professors of of his story and still hold it under
psychology, and J. $;iycr Minas. 500 words.
Hutler thinks there will be plent)
in philosophy.
instructor
conducted the
study. Their report of local topics in the near future
was prepared for the Behavioral for aspiring frature writers.
He
I'niversitv's
Science Division of the U. S. Air cited the
school as a fine source for many
Force Otfice of. .Scientific
whk-supported the study
under contact
with Ohio State
Tr;ir i:.is 'bombs make a humUniversity's research foundation.
diiii tr t;f a plaything.

fraturr stories in the future.

risk-takin-

destre Iri the futuir, Hutler Iwlirwv
He stated that the prospective feature writej- - would do wrll to haw
a good backginund in science, if
he hopos to rt ahead In his fVM.

Church Of Christ
(UNIVERSITY

HEIGHTS)

328 Clifton Ave.
WELCOME TO ALL SERVICES

g,

SUNDAY:

9:45 a m. Bible Classes
10:45 a.m. Morning WonSip
3:15 p.m. University SfwdcMl
Study

Bibl

6:00 p.m. Evening Worship
MONDAY:

7:30 p.m. Men's Training Class

in-di.-

He-searc-

h,

WEDNESDAY:

10:00 a.m. tibia Study
7:30 p.m. Bible SfuJy

-

Library Schedule
Close

2(5

Nov.

Nov.

Sprat could eat no i.it. hi;
wife could cat no lean. It made no
difference: they were vegetarians.

288:30
298:30

a.

ONE BLOCK FROM ROSE ST.
ON CLIFTON

THE 'SADDLE
m.--

l

&

p. in.

a. in. 12 noon

SPUR'

Music by the

--

Closed

CLEFMEN

Kcsumc regular

1

or

p. in.

Closed

Nov. 30
Dee.

5

Evanqitt

BARNEY KEITH,

Telephone

J;w k

Nov. 27

FRIDAY & SATURDAY NIGHTS

Lb

For Reservations

Opposite Esplanade
East Main

He that is of the opinion that
money will do everything may well
be suspected of doing everything
for money.
Franklin, Poor Rich-

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Here's how to cut your travel
expenses. Sheraton Hotel.? havu'
special low rates' for students,
faculty', ami all other college personnel during weekends, vacations, and summer. Rates even
lower with two or more people in
the same room. Group rates are
also available for clubs, teams,
and other organizations.
Arrangements may be mado
for credit privileges at Sheraton
Hotels. The Sheraton Student-Facult- y
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Sheraton Hotels in 39 cities in the
U. S. A. and in Canada.

You must present your I.D.
card whin you rc;Ltor at the
hotel to bo eligible for these
special discounts.

'M

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PAT

A

GREEN

College Relations Department
Sheraton Building

Phone

ClS
2-62-

Store Hours: 9 to 5 Daily

470 Atlantic Avenue
Boston 17, Massachusetts

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127 W. Main

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BOHMER FLYING SERVICE
Phone

Blue Grass Field
(InccpcrattcJ)

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4-51-

* The Kentucky Kernel

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University of Kentucky

fimtm4

th Foot Off if at Liinirton, Kentucky at ttxmd clmi matter tinrley tt Act of March 3, 1870.
Pwblmhcd four timet a werk during the regular Khool year etcept bolidayt and ciama.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL TEAR

Jim Hampton, EditoMn-Chie- f
Labrt Van IIoose, Chief Sports Edltot
ErrinsoN, Chief News Editor
Akdt
Ann Roberts, Society Editor
Fxnry Arhxit, Business Manager
Norman McMulun, Advertising Manager
John Mitchell, Staff rhotogropfier
Marilyn Lyvcw and Judy Fennebaker, Proofreaders
FRIDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Dill Hammons, Editor
Scottii IIelt

Jane Harrison, Associate Editor

Sports Editor

An Important Decision
Monday night Student Congress
fell a fraction short of placing itself
on record as favoring the University's
joining of the National Student Association.
of the SC asA vote of

no concrete
charges have ever been made against
NSA which could be said to be tangible proof of the organization's
objectionable features.
It should also be mentioned that

sembly this week would have placed
the "question on the ballot in the
December SC election.
Although the measure failed to get
the necessary
it will have
a second chance Monday when once
again the matter will come on w'le
floor.
We, of course, have gone on record
as favoring a UK membership in
NSA, and in view of this we think it
not necessary to enumerate the pros
and cons once again.

national Panhellenic's attitude is
quite the opxsite from the national
1FC, and the national deans of men
and deans of women's groups. It is
also noteworthy that college and university officials throughout the country are generally in high praise of
NSA and its work.
One jxjint that was not brought
discussions Monday was
pu in the-Sthe fact that WUS, a world service
organization for students which has
become such a regular part of the UK
routine, is an agency of NSA.
We feel that UK's voice must be
heard nationally and only through
an organization such as NSA can this
,be satisfactorily obtained.
SC's action of not passing on NSA
this week will not be a tragedy if
positive action is taken on Monday.
Certainly any concrete reasons for not
joining should have been forthcoming
before now. We hope the SC assembly
will consider - only the concrete and
not the rumor when it votes again

two-third- s

two-third-

s,

One thing iscertaihTIiowever. The
students must not allow such a proposal to be defeated by heaTsay about
the quality and purposes of the organization.
Surprisingly enough the only group
on the national level which seems to
have strong objections to NSA is the
National Panhellenic Council. This
group, made up of alumni and not
undergraduate members of sororities,
has put forth many statements about
NSA which tend to reflect badly upon
the national student group.

Oddly, however,

Bit More Freedom

Quietly and without fanfare, a
small revolution has taken place

letter made out in
triplicate with her room reservation.
All her mother had to do was sign,
send one to her
daughter's head
resident, one to the clean of women
and keep the remaining one.
Ily doing so, she told the authorities that she and her daughter had
talked about weekend trips and had
come to an agreement on places to
go, things to do and modes of trans
Mrtation to be used by the girl.
Resides the elimination of a rather
and soniewiat messy
cumbersome
one-paragrap-

privileges given UK coeds.
Hefore this semester, to obtain
for overnight trips on weekends, women's dorm residents had to
have on file with their head resident
a rather bulky cardboard form, signed
by their parent or guardian, with
various permissions
checked
or
vetoed.
er-missi-

This form

h

was the cause of some
inconvenience and expense, especially when girls wished to take a trip "system Dean Seward has succeeded in
not provided for on the card. Long- giving UK women a sirongef voice

distance calls, involving discussions
with Mamma and finally, sjxiken confirmation by her to the head resident,

in their personal alfairs without materially limiting the prnvcr of the
University.
Under the new system, a coed may
stand on her right to go to any reputable place for the weekend, as long
as she has her mother's permission to

were necessary.

so-call- ed

For girls living some distance from
the University, it was an exjensive
process. So, even though the trip was
legitimate and the girl knew it would
have her mother's approval, she signed out to one place and went to
another. The majority of the girls
did this not because they wanted to
do something wrong, but to avoid the
questioning and telephone calls.
Last summer each girl received a

do so.
We hope UK women will not abuse
this new freedom for freedom implies a sense of responsibility. If the
liberty is abused, there could be serious consequences; if taken seriously,
with the sense of responsibility will
be developed a deeper maturity.

C

Monday.

The Readers' Forum
cheering section) that anything else to
stimulate that spirit would- be like whipped cream on icing. We'd be smothered
in the stulf.
wc already have one tradi. Remember,
tion in connection with the Tennessee
game: losing it. As there is, as yet, no
indication that this year will be an exception, why all the commotion to start
another tradition to replace the now g
one?
Win or lose, we lose, as usual.

Thanks, Faculty

-

To The Editor:

We have been denied the chance for
a
the holiday's additional day with
victory over Tennessee.
I am sure that one day, in the spirit of
the students, will be compensated for by
going to one or two classes.
Thank you, faculty, for a
decision. Lead us in a couple of cheers
that ought to make up fo rit.
"A University is a way of life."
lots of
- Yeah, and so is San Quentin
San Quentin.
spirit, in
"Rah" and all that for you, faculty.
thing.
Lectures are a
wise-as-hec- k

cx-istm-

Nancy Caeot

many-splendore- d

"Happy" Cawood

University Soapbox

Beat Tennessee. Get nothing.

Fie On Holidays!
To The Editor:
Thank you for your fine support of a

SuKy And Homecoming
It seems that a good bit of contro- ersry has come up over the problem
of next year's Homecoming.
Many
were dissatisfied with the festivities of
this year's Homecoming, others felt that
they were up to par with previous years,
and still others felt that many major improvements could be made.
Various Student Gmgress representatives sensed this general feeling of dissatisfaction among students, and SC pro
ceeded to set up a committee to evaluate
the entire Homecoming program.
The main difficulty with Homecoming,
as the committee saw it, was that it was
sponsored by an
organization namely
SuKy which consisted solely of volunteer
members and was not truly representative
cf campus opinion. It also was recommended by the committee that a steering committee, similar
to the one which worked so effectively in
the Little Kentucky Derby, be established,
and that this committee-consi- st
of
of the major campus organisations, thus encompassing a cross section
of the student body. This recommendation provided for the representation, on
an equal basis, of SuKy. Inter fraternity
Council, l'anhellenic, Student Congress,
and the K Club.
All groups concerned, with the exception of SuKy, have given endoiseineut
and hearty approval to the steeling committee ielea. A meeting of