xt7jq23qvx9d https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jq23qvx9d/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19231005  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  5, 1923 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  5, 1923 1923 2012 true xt7jq23qvx9d section xt7jq23qvx9d The Kentucky Kernel
UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY..

VOL XIV

EXPECTS

BEST YEARJF HISTORY

OPERMlNCr ROOM 1

Extension Schools, Correspondence Schools in Every Part
of State
12

No. 2

5, 1923

YOU'RE NEXT

EXTENSION DEPARTMENT
OF UNIVERSITY

OCTOBER

I

NEW LITTLE THEATRE ON

WINSLOW STREET TO BE

MX

'

BEST EQUIPMENT

Space is Big
to De-

Metropolitan

Be

The work on the Romany Theatre
Winslow
street is progrsfcing
by November. Elaborate decorations
nicely and is expected to be completed
are now in progress. It is asked that
the public not judge the theatre by its
exterior as the promoters have not
a large sum of money and as the thea
tre will have to be moved from its
present site in three years, everything
is being put into equipment and appointments.
The decorations, architecture and details are following the
Romany ideas suggested by the var
ious countries through which the Gypsies habitually wandered.
There are some original features in
the equipment. The foot lights are
in the ceiling and throw the light directly over a silver reflector between
the curtain and the front of the stage
which directs a diffused light upon
the actors eliminating the hard shadows and sharp lines. There will be
a
border lif lights, mak
ing- a sky line of 26 feet, which will
do away with cloth borders for the
ceiling of the stage. The stage of the
theatre is 40 feet wide which assures
rapid scene changes and makes possi- on

n

;

semi-indire-

(Continued on page 4)

(Continued on

K-

DEMOCRATIC

USED

Season

Extension
of
Department
The
which has charge of the correspond
encc courses given by the University
and the extension schools controllc
by the University in all pi.'ts of ihe
State, is expecting a larger prog'a-durng tlv coming year Last yea!
numler of enrollments by ror
respondencc and in extension classes
aggregated seven hundred. This year
it is expected that the work of last
year will be considerably exceeded.
The department is opening exten
sion classes this year in the follow
Lexington
cities:
ing Kentucky
Dry
Ashland, Paris, Nicholasville,
Ridge, Covington, Walton, George
town, Frankfort, Winchester, Stur
gis, Corbin, and calls have been made
from other cities where the organiza
tion of the work is pending. The di
rector of the University extension
states that the department is finding
it difficult this year to supply service
to all cities that ask for the work, ow
ing to the fact that the number of per
sons on the staff available for exten
sion instruction is limited. Calls have
been made by Midway, and by the
county teachers of Jefferson county
The department of Home Economics
--

NOV.

Talent Will
Presented During

partment

t'.--

BY

Romany Theatre is Name Given
To New

CITIES HAVE CLASSES

Crowded Office
Drawback

COMPLETED

--

MIR

MILITARY

ORGANIZED ON CAMPUS
Will Invite Prominent Speakers
To Address U. of K.

Students

A crowd, estimated in three figures,
met in the University chapel Tuesday
evening, and effected a permanent
Democratic organization on the University campus. The organization
will be known as the Democratic Club
of the University of Kentucky.
from every conRepresentatives
gressional district in the State were
present, and much enthusiasm was
Several speeches were
prevalent.
were made and officers were elected.
A speakers bureau was organized and
will assist the Democratic organization at the University and also thru-othe State in the present gubernatorial campaign.
Arrangements are being made for
several prominent Democratic speakers to address the students at the
University.
The following officers were elected
and committees appointed: President,
F. P. Bell, fourth district:
dent, J. D. Moore, sixth district;
secretaries, Astor Hogg, sixth district,
and C P. King, eighth district; treasurer, Ilowen Nelson, first district;
scrgcant-at-arinT. G. Smith.
Publicity committee: Taylor Mum-forchairman; Ryan Ringo, Z. T.
Shirley, B. Frost, B. I. Perry, Joe T.
Harris, Mary Patterson, Annelle Kel-lcLouise Council, Lelia Stroker,
Martha Pate and Mattie limits.
vice-pre- si

s,

d,

y,

HAS
NOTICE TO CAR OWNERS

NOTICE!
All Republicans are urgently
requested to meet in Little
Theatre, 7:30, Monday night,
Oct. 8th. Important business.
--

K-

YEARLING TEAM OPENS
SEASON HERE SATURDAY
Eastern Normal Team Opposes
Kittens in First
Game

The University of Kentucky Fresh
man football team will open its sea- sou on Stoll Field Saturday when it
meets the strong Eastern State Normal eleven. From all indications the
Richmond lads have a well balanced
team and will give the Kittens a hard
struggle.
The yearlings are still working
hard and with daily scrimmages
among themselves, and at times with
the varsity, they are rapidly rounding
into midseasou form. The game Saturday will serve as a pointer to
Coaches Uuchheit and Hurnliam as to
the selection of the first team.
Lexington Hich School attain looms
up in freshman athletics as it is rep- -'

(Continued on pnqe

N.)

All students
who are interested in Intercollegiate Debate
Work will please attend a sihort
meeting in the Little Thsr.re,
Monday afternoon, Oct. 8, at
4:30.
Prof. Sullivan.

DEPARTMPNT

FULL

REGIMENT

NOTICE!

The following important communication should be carefully
read and its admonition taken
seriously by every driver or
owner of an automobile who
uses the campus roads:
Mr. Raymond Kirk,
Editor, The Kernel,
University of Kentucky.
My Dear Mr .Kirk:
The congestion of automobile
traffic on the campus has reached such a point that it will be
necessary to maintain regulations
concerning it. The driving at
high speeds through the campus
is bound to result in very serious
accidents. There will be posted
in the near future, regulations
regarding automobile traffic and
every owner of an automobile
is requested to observe them to
the letter. Unless we do this it
will be necessary to resort to the
exclusion of automobiles from
the campus. These regulations
will he reasonable and fair, but
in order to avoid the confusion
that arises it will be necessary
to obey them fully.
I trust that I may have the
cooperation of all the students
who use automobiles.
Sincerely,
Frank L. McVey,
President.

A

pa?

K-

NEW FACULTY MEMBERS
ELECTED

BY

TRUSTEES

College of Arts and Sciences Has
Twelve New

Nine Companies Make Formation of Three Battalions
Possible.
The Military Department
of the
University of Kentucky announced
Wednesday
the completion of its
plans for the formation of a full regiment to consist of three battalions,
composed of five freshman and four
sophomore compaies. The freshman
companies will be A, B, C, E and F,
and the sophomore G, I. K. and L.
Officers to command the regiment
will be appointed by the department
as soon as possible. The formation
of a full regiment was made possible
by the large freshman reg'St'ation,
and comes as the fulfillment of desires long entertained by the officers
in charge of the military instruction.
The officers are putting fortlt every
effort to make the Kentucky unit the
best in the Fifth Corps area and inci
dentally to make Kentucky an honor
school, a mark of distinction which
.w narrowly missed last year.

The following list comprises the
new faculty members who have been
elected by the hoard of trustees for
the College of Arts and Sciences:
Economics and Sociology Department Paul P. Cooper, instructor, received his A. R. and M. A. degrees
from the University of Kentucky.
Geology Department Arthur Crane
McFarlan, associate professor of Geology, received his B. A. degree from
PLEDGING
the University of Cincinnati in 1919
ind his Ph. D. degree from the UniTriangle
fraternity, with chapter
versity of Chicago in 1922.
Since
June, 1922, he has been engaged in house at 121 Warren court, announces
field work in Kentucky for the New the pledging of Carter F. Farrington,
of Paducah; Prentice Barnes, of BenDominion Oil and Gas Company.
ton, Ky., and Loran H. Griffith, of
Lexington,
(Continued to Page 81

* jm

-

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page Two

Alumni Notes
Editor Alumni Secretary

Comparative Figures by Classes

1
;

!
The campus campaign for the stadium fund last May resulted in the class
of 1923 subscribing a total of $5,228, representing 79 per cent of the clasi, and
tiring the graduates of this year a clear lead over all other classes in amount
contributed to the fund. Figures compiled in the alumni office, including all
contributions up to September 29, show that, the 1923 graduates excluded, the
class of '16 is leading in amount subscribed with a total of $3,731, while the
class of '20 is second with $3,095. The class of '98 leads in the percentage column 38.8 per cent of ithc graduates of that year having contributed.

Class
1896-8-

9

No.
Living
Secretary
39
Dr. A. M. Peter
8
'90--C.
R. Brock
-5
'91 Prof. V. K. Muncey9
'92V. S. Page
11
'93
Prof. J. R. Johnson
17
'94 Mrs. L. K. Keshcimer
17
ary
Didlakc
.Dr. H. A. Davidson
- 11
"96
26
97 J. O. H. Simrall
18
T. l. Campbell
'98
.'M
'00A. J. Vance
27
00- -L.
K. Frankcl
39
DauKhcrty
rank
42
T. J. Bar,r
rof.
R. T. Whittinghill
- 41
03
- 71
'04
James H. Gardner
53
05-- .H.
G. Edwards
60
06
L. C. Brown
07- -L.
- 68
E. Hillenmcyer
82
'08- -J.
R. Battaile
- 62
'09 T. C. Carroll
. 88
D. V. Terrell
79
11 Mrs. R. C. Wilson
92
12 J. R. Duncan
112
13 G. C. Lewis
'
118
'14 R. C Dabney
164
15 C. W. Bailey
145
16-B. Heller
133
rank
Crum 97
'18- -R.
A. Hunt
101
19 C. E. Planch
140
'20-- G.
H. Creech
154
21 R. J. Ratble
214
'22 C. V. Watson
215
23- -C.
D. Graham
Acting Secretary.
Resigned.

No.

Sub
5
1
1

13
12.5

20

2

18.2
17.7

3
3

35.3
27.2

4
7

38.8

6

15.7

6
8

25

7

17.8

11

26.2

5

12.2

18

'02-P-

25.2
20.8
20.7
33.8
23.2
39.5
21.6

11

13

23
19
19
21
12

'10-Pr- of.

20
33
27
38
51

Elsie

33
26
33

'17-F-

Aint.
Sub.
$ 510.00
1500.00
200.00

0

-

o

Percent

0

'01-F-

o

'

51

39
52

29.6

15.3

21.8
29.5
32.5
23.2
35.2
24.8
26.8
32.6
36.4
25.3
24.3

170

o

AN URGENT CALL TO U. K. ALUMNI

79

60.00
1200.00
1225.00
375.00
425.00
745.00
485.00
1125.00
1390.00
730.00
485.00
1270.00
1020.00
1230.00
2820.00
1935.00
1565.00
1520.00
2125.00
1640.00
2705.00
1955.00
3073.00
3731.00
2218.00
262.50
905.00
3095.00
2165.00
2781.00
5228.00

Plant Rally Day
Brooklyn, N. Y., Sept. 29, 1923,
Kentucky Alumni:
Now that vacations are over and the
Wildcats are hard at it on Stoll Field
getting in shape for the first game,
don't you think it is about time we
talking
together and
were getting
things over?
Anyway, Reuben Taylor, the President of the Alumni Club, has designated Tuesday, October 9, 1923 as the
day for our rally day which will take
the form of a stag luncheon.
There will be present several members of last year's class who will have
cast their lot with us and they will expect you to be there to welcome them.
Event 1st Stag Luncheon.
Place 'Cafe Savarin, basement of
Equitable building 120 Broadway, N.
Y. C.

Time
Price

October 9, at 12:30 sharp.
Table D'Hote $1.75.
Be There.
Thanks,
D. L. Thornton, Jr., '22,
Secretary.

Betwixt Us

was reported on the 'lost' lilt. I keard
that he is married and it managing a
plantation out from Tllahissee.
"I had hoped to get home this summer but my vacation could not be arranged early enough to get there.
"I a mplanning to get away
early next summer and be there for
commencement haven't been back
for one since I graduated.
"I was made assistant manager the
first of last December in addition to
my duties as field superintendent.
I
hadn't expected
anything quite s
good in such a short time.
"I am glad to see that Kentucky is
taking the step for a bigger and better University and the one way to accomplish that is to get the interest of
the alumni.
Here's to success."
'W. Kenneth Clore, Compania Aiuca-rer- a
Oriente, "Central Oriente,"
Cuba.

'09

'17

'07

ex-'0-

Robson-Prichar-

d

e,

Marion U. Couditt, who has been a
student at the University of Edinburg,
Scotland, since 1920, received the Ph.
D. degree from that
institution in
July. He returned to this country
early last spring and is pastor of the
First Presbyterian
Church, Marion,
Ky.
College of Law,
Felix Renick
is a lecturerer with the National In- -'
'10
stitute, inc., with headquarters at 27
Edward H. Lewis was married to
Williams street, New York City.
Miss Delia McDougall, September 9,
1923.
Mr. Lewis is assistant engineer
'18
maintenance of way department with
S. S. Elam, who received his B. A.
the Illinois Central Railroad Comdegree in '18 and M. A. in '19, is edipany ,at McComb, Miss., where they
tor of the Kentucky School News, at
will make their home in future. MailFrankfort, Ky,
He married Miss
ing address, p. o. box 320.
Brenda Davis, December 21, 1907, and
p. .coil
-- ..;,
XT nation
in
.'
.
they have five children Roberta, Ed
ant mechanical engineer with the Lou- -'
ward, Miriam, Norman Walter and
isville Railway Company.
His wife
They are living at
Elizabeth Ann.
was formerly
Miss Mary Bennett
418 Logan street.
Middletowiv,
Ky.
Fisher, of North
They reside at 302 S. Peterson Ave.,
'19
Louisille.
John J. Leman, of Pineville ,and
Cincinnati, was a recent visitor in the
'11
Alumni office. Mr. Leman entered the
John Campbell has been manager em,,ov of tle Warren-WebstCom-o- f
the National Electric Service
of Indianapolis immediately
Morgantown, W. Va., since ter receiving his degree, and remained
1920.
He wa selectrical engineer with with thcm until 1921. For a year he
the Consolidation Coal Company, of was connected with Watt &
W. Va., for several years panV( of pievillcf sales engineer of
previous to that time. His address is niming suppHcs. He is now sales
Walnut St.
gincer with the Southeastern Coal Co.,
offices at 908 Union Central Build- 12
ing, Cincinnati, O. He asks that' his
Jake II. Gaiscr, life member of the Kernel be sent to his Cincinnati
Association, went with the dress, but his permanent
address is
Carrier Air Conditioning
Company Pineville, Ky. He is one of the mem-soo- n
after he received his B. M. E. J)ers of the "live alumni club" of Bell
In 1915 he entered the employ of the county.
Booth-FeCompany, of Brooklyn, N.
V., remaining there until the latter
'20
part of 1922, acting as rccretary-treas- "1 am writing to see if you have the
urer of the company since .1919. He is adlircss Df thc firm in Harrisburg, Pa.,
now secretary-treasurof the Fels dealing in stationery and
dividing
Parts Company. 351 Jay St., Brooklyn orofits with the Alumni Association.
His residence address is 34 Butler I ha dit last year but seem to have lost
Place.
it and would greatly appreciate your
sending it to me.
'13
"I am waiting more or less impaSylvan Stewart Price has been con- tiently 'for the first edition of the Ker
nected with the oil industry in Okla- - nel so I can keep in touch with what
homa for several years. He is now Kentucky is doing. Approximately
geologist with the Dixie Oil Com - 800o students have registered, here
pany, 604 First National Bank Bldg., and we expect a fine year. Our staTulsa. He married Miss Ruth Croft, dium, seating 55,000 people will be
June 14, 1919. They have a little opened November 3 with the
daughter, Helen, aged two years.
game." Frank W. Tuttle.
instructor of Economics, University
'14
of Illinois, Urbana, 111. Mailing ad- Leo King has
practiced law in dress 905 West Nevada Street.
Henderson, Ky., ever since graduating
except for the period of the World
21
War when he was in the service of
William R. Wilson, was a visitor
his country.
He is now County At- on the campus during his recent vacatorney of Henderson county, with of- tion and called in the Alumni office to
fices in the Ohio Valley Bank Bldg.
make sure that he would receive the
Kernel for the coming year. Since
15
September, 1922, he has been a medi"Enclosed you will find my check cal student at Jothns Hopkins .Unifor two dollars for the Kentucky Kerversity and says he has yet another
nel for the coming year. Please see year of hard work. He reports an .eninthat I get my Kernel. For your
thusiastic Kentucky group at Johns
formation and for the Directory, I Hopkins but the hard work and the
am not married yet, hut have hopes. uncertain hours, make the organizaUnitl further notice my address will tion of an alumni club there impose
be R. Brooks Taylor, New Franklin sible. His mailing address is 606 N.
Hotel, St. Marys, Pa., and business, Broadway, Baltimore, Md.
Speer Carbon Company." Mr. Taylor is assistant acting superintendent
'32
Company,
of the National Carbon
S. Duerson Fendley
spent several
with headquarters at Cleveland, O., days around the campus last week and
and is now making a study of plant aid ha was so glad to be home again
conditions for his company.
that "even the trees looked good to
"I noticed in the last issue of the kin." As secretary of the alumni
Kernel in June that Ray Mathews '13
(Continued on Page 6)
last year while in St. Petersburg, Fla.

Holtou Cook, who for several years
was in a real estate development company at Morganfield, Ky., m njw county road engineer, M'ngo county, Williamson, W. Va. He married Marie
C. Kuykendall,
December 28, 19i5.
They have two children, Elizabeth, six
years old, and Thomas Edward, 'hiee

ex-1- 7,

The closing of the Stadium Campaign and making up the Directory
has swamped this office. 1 want every
alumnus to fill up the space marked
for your contributions and send in to
us for this column. You are all associate editors during the emergency.
We need your help at all times. It
comes as a life saver just now.
Mrs. Nell H. Turner.
'95

John W. Wihnott, 'whose record as
an active member of the Alumni Associations sihows few lapses, received
hisA . B. at the University of Ken
tucky in '95 and his LL.B. at the Uni
versity of Michigan a few years later.
He has been practicing law in Oklahoma for many years and is now sentt
ior member of the law firm of
& Roberts at Wewoka. ' During
the last year he has moved his family
California, but still
to San Diego,
maintains his law office at Wewoka
and spends part of his time there. He
married. Miss Irene E. Cruce in December, 1905. They .have a family of
eight children, four boys and four!
girls. On his information 'sheet are!
these words, "Can you beat this?" a!
challenge to other U. K. former students to send in such a record. Thei
residence address is 4202 Jackdaw
street, San Diego, Cal.
Wil-.mo-

Towards those members of the University of Kentucky who have not yet
sent in their contributions to the stadium fund the Kernel points no scornful
finger. We are not peeved that they have delayed so long. We are not even
organization of men and
worried. We understand that every one of
women who became brothers and sisters here in the halls of the University has
his or her own problems and reasons for delaying so long. Some of them are
far away, some of them are too busy to know how urgent the call is, some of
them are obligated to spend the'r moey elsewhere, and sonic of them are
broke just plain broke.
'02
But that spirit, that love for the blue and white of Kentucky is patient.
Way down deep it tugs at the heartstrings, it raises cain intermittently until
Mr. and Mrs. Howard A. Hoeing
it gets what it wants. When that happens, Al just naiturally goes out the next visited Mr. Hoeing' s relatives in Lexmorning a little happier, a little prouder he came to Kentucky, a little more ington recently and were pleasant callanxious for homecoming day. If you don't believe it, try.
Mr. Hoeing
ers in the Alumni office.
has been in government engineering
service practically ever since receiving
his degree and was in active service
TEAR OUT AND MAIL THIS TO ALUMNI OFFICE
during the world war. His business
address is U. S. Engineers' Office,
Filled With News and Views.
7
S. Dearborn street,
Room
Hoeing was
Mrs.
Chicago, 111.
They are living
Olivia Sweeney
Olive Avenue.
at
Uohert E. Moorman, who lias been
connected with the American Tobacco Company at Owensboro, Ky., since
1917, has been transferred to the offices of that company at Wilson, N. C.
Matt M. Clay, who was connected
with the Interstate Commerce Commission for several years, is a memBuilders
ber of the firm,
Supply Company, 347 E. Main St.,
Lexington, Ky. Mrs. Clay was form-:rl- y
Miss Florence B. Ingels, of Lexington. They have two sons, Matt M.
Jr.. and Evans. They reside at 216
Market Street.
that-grea- t

Perrin Rule received his B. If. E. in
'07 and his M. E. in '12. He went with
the Iroquois Iron Company shortly after graduating and in 1915 became
of blast furnaces with
this company. While in this work he
designed and built the most perfect fly
Since 1920
wheel ever constructed.
Mr. Rule has been assistant manager,
Blast Furnace Tube Company of
America, formerly the Iroquois Iron
Company. His office is at 94th St.
and Keeter Ave.
is assistant to
Edgar Poe Rice
Island Creek Coal
the
Company and Pond Creek Pocahontas Company, offices at 713
W. Va.
Bid., Huntington,
lie married Miss Nellie G. Millis July
10. 1922. They
have a son, Robert
Harvey, born June 17, 173. The family resides st 1212 Seventh Street.

1201-53-

ex-0-

Clay-Ingel- s,

'06
Geo. C. Montgomery is a salesman
Lumber Company,
with the Long-Be- ll
1413
Conway Bldg., Chicago, 111.
Shortly after graduating he became
g
connected with the American
Company and its allied companies, the Federal and Georgia, and
was located at Brunswick, Ga., until
1920.
Mr. Montgomery married Miss
Hazel W. Thornton in 1910. They
have two children, Nell, aged eelvea,
and George Carter, Jr., aged six.
Creo-sotiu-

r

Com-jpan-

y,

I

en-2-

lt

Illinois-Chicag-

.

o

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Page Three

Her Dad "Do Englishmen underat Patterson Hall, in honor of thee
Rastus 'Ah can't get this off'n yo'
Regular Fellow
new mcmlbcrs of the faculty. The hall stand our American slang?"
trousers."
Totn "How arc you getting along
in
was decorated with garden flowers
Another Dad "Some of them do,
Studc "Have you tried gasoline?" since your wife went away?"
baskets of ferns. A musical program why?"
Rastus "Yas, Suh."
Jim Fine, I've reached the highest
of vocal numbers was given by Mrs
Her Dad 'My daughter is to be
Studc "Have you tried amonia?" point of efficiency, I can put on my
Dantzlcr, and of piano selections by married in London and the carl has
Rasitus "No suh, but I'm almost so from cither end."
Mrs. Hutson.
Refreshments of ice, cabled me to come across.
sure they'll fit"
Bison.
cake and coffee, were served and the
2,

Society

Friday, Oct. S Chi Omega
in the ball room of Phoenix hostesses and guests numbered about
200.
Hotel.
lllliHftffifiW(ifftfifiiiiiiiifMiiwWiiMii(iiii
Saturday, Oct. 6 Bid day for girls'
Dr. William B. Smith, biographer
sororities at University.
ot Dr. James K, Patterson, has re
The following women's fraternities ccntly returned to Lexington, after a
on the University campus have en- stay in Baltimore and other eastern
tertained with rushing parties during cities.
K
the past week in honor of some of the
Y. W. C. A. NOTES
girls:
freshmen
Delta Zcta, Alpha Gamma Delta,
Last Sunday night at the regular
Kappa Delta, Kappa Kappa Gamma,
Phi Alpha Thcta, Sigma Beta Upsilon, Y. W. C. A. services held in Patter
Dean of
Delta Delta Delta, Alpha Xi Delta, son hall, Mrs. Harmon,
Hamilton, spoke. Her talk centered
Chi Omega and Omega Rho.
around the Sabbath, and how this day,
above all others, should be set aside,
Delta Chi Dinner at Shakertown
and observed in a quiet and spiritual
The members of Delta Chi fraterniway. During the course of her ad
of the University of Kentucky enty
dress, Mrs. Harmon gave vivid illustertained Saturday night with a charmtrations, making it extremely intering dinner at Shakertown Inn.
esting and holding the attention of
Covers were laid for Misses Eliza- all throughout her entire talk. Spebeth Shropshire, Amanda Gordon, cial music, furnished by Josephine
Martha Duncan, Marie Bcckner, EleaFrazier, added greatly to the pro
nor Tapp, Virginia Shively, Kathleen gram.
Edwards, Annellc Kclley, Mary
Next Sunday night Dr. Fortune will
Lurline Bronaugh, Ava Camwood, speak.
Alphonsine Stewart, Mary Luxon,
Friday, October 19, the Y. W. C. A.
Regina Bryant, Louise Mayers, Anna
will give a Hallowe'en party at PatSingleton, Miss Rebard, ElizaLouise'
terson Hall. Eeryone is cordially inbeth Cromwell and the chaperones, ked, and urged to come and enjoy the
Miss Marguerite McLaughlin, Mrs. fun.
Mary Williams and Mrs. W. E. Nich
The membership drive which was
ols.
launched during this week, according
Messrs. P. K.
T.he host swerc:
to the latest reports made, has been
Stewart, Sam Martin, Tyler Mum-for- a huge success. Everyone is showing
Percy Beard, Hcggie Dent,, Hara great interest in the Y. W. and its
ry Chidscy, Robert Embry, Walter work, and all things are pointing toHall, Joseph Johnson, Ryan Ringo, wards a big year for the organization.
A. W.
David Mclntyre,
K
Thompson, Roscoe Cross, Bowen Neliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiy
HEAR YE, ALL!
son, James Pearson, Marion Gorman
and Gus Leech.
Hear the University of Kentucky
Quartette at the Auditorium Sunday
Kappa Alpha Pledges
Pi
night at 7:30 o'clock. This is the
Duawrd Williams, Frank Smith,
company of singers in the state.
Edger, best
Clarksdale, Miss.;, William
They have .refused to ting on the
Versailles, Ky.; Otto Lawson, Sedalia, Chautauqua platforms,
but they are to
Ky., William Watkins, Lexington; sing
for us without cost Everybody
Dean Miller, Cynthiana, Ky.; Irvine invited.
Carter, Louisville, Ky.; A. J. Gleen,
K
Shelby villc, Ky.; Carl Lewis, Harlan,
FOR SALE OR RENT Upright
Ky.
Piano with duet bench. Phone 3255.
K
Kappa Alpha Pledget
Now we know why so many spend
'Kappa Alpha fraternity announces the winter in Cuba.
the following pledges: Guthrie Bright,
Shelbyville; Walker Robinson, Lancaster; William Burkes, Cave City;
Grant
Downer Bramc, Louisville;
Willis Versailles; Harry Melton, Man-guJOSEPH HENRY
Okla.; William Walto nand John
FOUNTAIN PEN INK
r,
Chenault, Jr., Lexington; James
bell
Born at Albany, N. Y., where
Midway; Judy S. Jones, Bowling
he became teacher of matheWill Improve the Action
Green; Wellington Scott, Jr., Little
matics and physics in Albany
world,
of Any
Academy. Leading American
Rock, Ark.
physicist of his time. First
em mmm
Fountain
director of the Smithsonian
Presbyterian Party
Institution.
Pen
Presbyterian students in Lexington
of
will be guests at a party given by the
Sunday school of the First PresbyterCOLORS
Mill street,
Friday
ian Church on
electro-magn- et
night, October 5, at 8 p. m. All students of Presbyterian families, whethSIZES
iron.
er niepibers of the church or not, are
cerdially invited.
Tea-Danc- e,

We are Now in Our New Home

Army Goods Headquarters
Main and Mill Sts.

Next to Woolworth't 5 and 10 Cent Store
Special Discount Given to University Men on

Armv Shoes

....

Russett Shoes
$2.95 to $5.75 1
Officers Shoes . . . $2.95 to $4.95
Officers Leather Puttees $3.95 and up

Hel-bur- n,

Make Your Selections from the most complete stock
in the city at 25 per cent saving

Army Goods Headquarters

d,

Phone 4792

John-Elkin-

Main and Mill

When Henry
rang the bell

SAN FORD'S

If any

Co-ge-

was ever heard around the
Joseph Henry rang it In his

famous experiment at the Albany
Academy. The amazing development

the electrical industry traces back
to this schoolmaster's coil of insulated
wire and his
that lifted
a ton of

lSi

The Woman's Club of the University entertained Tuesday evening, Oct.

"The Ink That Made
The Fountain Pen Possible'

Four years later when Morse used
to invent the
Henry's electro-magn- et
telegraph, Henry congratulated him

iMIIMIIIHIIMHItlHIMIHIHHHMIIIIIIIIIIIIIH

Inn

Tip-To- e
FOR GOOD HOME
COOKED MEALS

warmly and unselfishly.
The work that was began
by pioneers like Joseph
Henry is being carried on
by the scientists in the Research Laboratories of the
General Electric Company.

Lunch 50c.

They are constantly searching for fundamental principles in order that electrlc-it- y
may be of greater
service to mankind.

Dinner 75c

PARRISH & BROMLEY
DRY
152 S.

CLEANING AND PRESSING
Limwtone St.
Phone
QUALITY AND SERVICE

1550-- Y

The principle of Henry's coil of wire is
utilized by the General Electric Company in motors and generators that
light cities, drive railroad trains, do
away with household drudgery and
perform the work of millions of men.

GENERAL ELECTRIC

g

* THE KENTUCKY

Page Four

KERNEL

The Kentucky Kernel

,ic ca.npus at a speed titat d.srcgards
the safety of others in the fust place,

I'uMiahcd every Friday tliroitRhout tlie College
year ly tlic ntudcnt body of the
University
of Kentucky

the lawns and parked on them with wc learn that inquiries
have come
.he same criminal disregard for com-.u- o front every scot on of the country rc

PARAORAPHl

jtut these same cars arc driven over

The Kentucky Kernel Is the official newspaper
of the students am' Itminl of the University
of Kentucky
Subscription
One Dollar and Fifty Cents
Year Five Cents the Copy
Kn tercel

at

Lexington PcstofTice
class mail matter

as

sreon

f

162 J

RAYMOND L. KIRK '24
Phones

L. Hickncll

'24

SPORTS EDITOR
Eugene

It Moore

'25

Assistant Sport Editors
Tom Duncan
Robert VanPclt '26

'25

NEWS EDITOR
Betty Barbour '25
SOCIETY EDITOR
Helen King '25
BUSINESS MANAGER
William Tate
4234 Phones 2117-- y
Assistant Business Manager
William Blanton '24
ADVERTISING MANAGER
Richard Jones, '26
CIRCULATION

MANAGER
Clifton Thompson '26

REPORTERS:
Curtis Uuehlcr '26
Orine Martin '24
Frances Lee '26
Louise Burks '25
Virginia Kelley '26
Eugenia O'Hara '26
Charles Wheeler 'H
Judith Yungblut '24
t. R. McClure '25
i.mmctt Milward 4b
Margaret VanMeter '24 Kobt. Mitcneii
'26
Thos. Armstrc-nRachelle
Shacklet'25
Mary Catherine

Gormlcy

'24

'
Press of Commercial Printing Company

KEEPING THE CAMPUS
For many years rules have been
made by the various bodies in the
University who have the power to
make, if not enforce rules, 'to be followed by students. One of the rules that
appears in nearly every set of rules
published is that one which attempts
to prevnt students cutting across the
campus, making paths, and in gen
oral, destroying the appearance of our
grounds. So far none of these rules
lias been successful in that which they
set out to do.
There are several reasons why this
particular rule has not been effective.
The main reason is that those who
have the authority and power to enforce this rule continue to break it
themselves. It is well understood that
walk
will not
the
underclassmen
across any of the paths on the campus but stay on the walks provided.
These underclassmen are compelled
to comply with this. It is not at their
door that we can lay this fault, but
at the doors of the upper classmen
and the girls. There is apparently no
organization to strike fear into the
hearts of these arch offenders. The
girls fear no court or orders from such
court. They do this with that feeling
of security that conies only to those
who know that no one will think of
calling them to account for their acts.
True it is that the ancient rite of the
cannon cannot be carried out when
the women are concerned. The only
remedy for this is to appeal to the
feminine love for the beautiful and
thru their senses of fairness. If the
girls will not
in this the
campus might just as well be turned
into a network of paths and the idea
of beautiful perspective abandoned.
The seniors also forget that it is
one of their bodies that continues to
stress this rule. They walk across the
paths with all their dignity and the
air of daring anyone to question their
rights.
We do not mean to cast any ridicule upon the dignity and rights of
the seniors but we do hope to impress upon them the only remedy for
this evil is for them to regard it with
the same spirit of willingness that they
require of the freshmen.
Another practice that is detrimental
to the beauty of the campus is the
careless driving and parking of cars
This has never been taken up by any
organization that had the power to1
'top it. Cars are often driven thru..

Students who cannot express their
loyalty to the football team through
any other medium than betting will
welcome the incoming season with extended arms and open pockctbooks.
Sonic day, when University officials
will have become sufficiently moderngeneration,
ized by the supporting
Saturday football games will be the
scene of a