xt7jsx64551g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jsx64551g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19170223  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 23, 1917 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 23, 1917 1917 2012 true xt7jsx64551g section xt7jsx64551g THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, FEB. 23, 1917.

VOL IX
MEMORY OF WASHINGTON IMPORTANCE
HONORED BY STUDENTS

DISCUSSED

OF FAITH
BY SPEAKER

Dr. Wiley, of Washington, 300 Students Hear Talk By
W. C. Erdman, Korean
Delivers Address on
Missionary
Patriotism
STANLEY

i

IS SPEAKER COLLEGIANS

"If the horrible event, which now
seems inevitable, comes, I am willing
to do what I can, and If necessary will
walk in the ranks, altho I am 73 years
old and slightly above the military
age prescribed as a standard," said
Dr. Harvey W. Wiley, of Washington,
D. C, in his address at the exercises
in chapel yesterday morning in honor
of Washington's birthday. Dr. Wiley's
subject was "True Patriotism."
There should be no diversity in
opinion in this country at the present
time, he said. Unarmed citizens have
Been ruthlessly killed on the high
seas; foreign nations have prescribed
where our ships shall sail, how they
shall be painted and from what part
of the ship the Stars and Stripes shall
wave. We have believed in peace, we
have been patient, but now we have
come. to the breaking point and. it is
the duty of the people of the United
States to support the President, the
speaker said. Party lines have now
been forgotten, there are no organized
parties but organized patriotism.
'Dr. Wiley defined patriotism as the
love for one's birthplace. No one who
ever forgets the place of his birth,
Ills father and mother and his childhood companions, can ever rise to the
dignity of a true patriot. Love for
one's birthplace is the fundamental
principle of patriotism.
It is not a
matter of area, of wealth or of population, but the incident of birth where
one first saw the light that arouses
our patriotism.
When one looks with disdain upon
Ms birthplace and upon his parents,
Dr. Wiley said that the only prophesy
'he had to make was that that man
w'ould be a failure.
The next step in the development
of patriotism is tho love for one's native State. Then comes the love for
our country. When the final crisis of
our allegiance conies, we must be
able to say that wo owe ourselves to
our country and bo willing to dio in
her defense.
In telling why ho loves his country,
the speaker said It was not because of
her largo bank deposits, her railways,
her great mineral wealth, her oil, her
forests or her farms, altho all these
are of the utmost importance, but because our government embraces the
Immortal principles typified in tho life
of Georgo Washington, and bocauso it
is tho land of liberty and education.
Washington was tho man of tho
hour during tho Revolutionary struggle, ho was tho leading figure ut tho
end of tho war and continues to bo
such. Wo love those things which typify his lifo.
Tho tost of patriotism according to
(Contlnutd on

Pt

Flv)

NARROW

"No man can come faco to face with
Jesus Christ without receiving a challenge," said Walter C. Erdman, of Korea, when he addressed the students
of the University
in chapel Friday
morning. 'Everyone who knows His
doctrine is morally bound to go out
and impart it to others."
The message does not have to be
sent by preachers and missionaries.
It is worth while oven when it comes
from the mouths of professional men
and engineers. He told that it was
thru an engineer that the Christian
faith had obtained such a foothold in
Africa.
The speaker cited four things that
are derived from faith in the Lord.
Only by true faith in Jesus Christ will
you have God. Unless you have a
spiritual dynamo in your soul, your
life will be a failure as far as God is
concerned. Faith in Him gives us
power in our lives. The third gift of
faith is the work which it gives us to
do; "As the Father has sent me into
the world, even so I send you." You
will never escape the opportunity of
bringing Jesus to bear on fellow be
ings. Mr. Erdman said that college
communities are provincial, that our
eyes only take in narrow circles of
things which are immediately inter
esting. Faith in Jesus Christ gives us
a world vision.
Altho man is much sought after in
these days of turmoil and interest in
education invoked by the cries of
war and civilization the call of Christ
is greater than every other call to
man. The world does not owe every
man a living, but every man owes the
world a life.

DEAN MILLER WILL
ADDRESS AG. SOCIETY CATSMEETTIGERS AND
Professor A. M. Miller, dean of tho
College of Arts and Science, will deliver an illustrated lecture beforo tho
Agricultural Society at 7:30 o'clock
Monday night in tho Horticulture Lecture room of the Ag. Building. Tho
subject of Professor Miller's talk has
not been announced, but thoso who
heard him address tho society last
year will vouch for tho prophecy that
it will bo highly interesting and in
structive. Every student is cordially
invited to attend whether a member
of tho society or not. The members
of all the literary societies on the
campus are extended special invita
tions to attend.

S

society mot in tho
Tho
rooms of Dr. Pryor in tho Sclonco
nuildlng Monday evening, Fobruary
12, and elocted tho following officers
for this somostor: R. Peai'iman, president; Georgo Park, vice president; L.
Tho
T. Hector, secretary-treasurenoxt mooting of tho society will bo
hold March 5. At tho meeting on
that dato. addrosses will bo made by
Dr. Pryor and Mossrs. Borkman, L. T.
Hector and L. F. Hush.

32-1- 8

DUTCH

AGAIN

STARS CAST

Revenge is sweet. Kentucky wiped
out the blemish on her early season
record by defeating tho Georgetown
College quintet Wednesday night 32
to 18. The game, aggressively contested, was featured by the superior
goal shooting, passing, and teamwork
of the Wildcats.

one-side-

SCORE

Eliza Piggott.)

The lady Wildcats had their first
game of the season
last Saturday night, when they journeyed to Danville and defeated the
team of Kentucky College for Women
The game does not sound as interesting as it really was, for at the end
of the first half the score stood
Between halves the
for Kentucky.
Kentucky girls must have discovered
the source of Wildcat spirit, for they
came back on the floor with "pep" redoubled. Then ensued a combat which
resembled somewhat the Kentucky-Ros- e
Polytechnic game. With true
Wildcat spirit the blue and white girls
came to the front and in the last few
minutes of play made most of their
twenty points.
7

K. C. W.
U. of Ky.
Heed (4)
Crano (0)
Asbury (2)
Ellwaugor (10)
Forwards.
Long
Cregor (4)
Contor.
Bucknor
Innes (2)
Haydon (2)
Loech (2)
Guards.
Fouls Crano, 4 out of 7; Asbury, 2
out of 7.
King.
Hoforoo
Monday night tho girls' team will
play Kentucky Wesloyan, whom they
In Winchester.
dofeated hero
35-1-

1917

STROLLERS'

PLAY

I

First

(By

MARCH 10 IS DATE OF

Hot TTT Revenge Our Boys Conflict Makes Change of
For T
Announced Time
win juasc uame on
Local Floor
Necessary

d

us pray!" With
some 300 men
their heads while
exorcises invoked

ELECT
2ND TERM OFFICERS

PRE-MEDIC-

GAME IS OURS

As a Mazda makes better light than
lamps and perfect
brilliant
K. C. W. FALLS
tallow candles, so did Dutch Schrader,
in his
playing, outshine his
teammates and the ferocious Tigers
TO
from the nearby college. His passing
was accurate and well done, and at
times
University Girls Come Back double.he made the Georgetonlans see
Strong After Bad
Campbell, during the course of the
Half
argument, threw five baskets which counted two points each.
IS 28 TO 10
His efforts swelled the score greatly.

Spectacular goals from the middle
these sacred
of the floor featured the game. The
and women
work of Miss Ellwanger at forward,
the speaker
deserves especial commendation. Miss
tho common
Crane, also at forward, was responsiGod.
ble for much of the sensational shootSecretary Johnson, of tho Univer- ing.
Tho defensive work of Misses
sity Y. M. C. A., introduced .Mr. ErdMiss
Innes and Haydon was good.
man and also announced that the Cregor,
at center, was somewhat hamspeaker for next Tuesday morning
pered in her work by tho jumping
would bo Professor Snoddy, of Tranability of her K. C. W. opporent, who
sylvania College.
played a splendid gamo for tho homo
team. The result follows:
"Let
words,
bowed
of the

No. 20

;Boo Ireland
did
excellent work
against Wohbold, the premier Georgetown guard, and was very solicitous
for the ease and comfort of his man,
inquiring every now and then how he
liked the brand of basketball displayed by the Wildcats.
The position within the circle was
filled by Thompson and Longsworth.
No, Mabel, not at the same time.
When Thompson went out, after play-- l
ing eight minutes (a very good eight
minutes, too), Pug replaced him.
was Longsworth's
Three
contribution.
field-goal- s

Six minutes before the end of the
final half Rodes, at guard, was taken
out because of tho personal foul
clause. Bart Peak, substitute, went in,
shot one goal and lasted the game out.
Tho performance of Taylor, even
tho he shot one goal, the liko of which
is seldom seen, was not up to the
standard he usually sets. Wohbold,
for the Scott County lads was star on
tho defense.
With sincere regret did the spectators and followers of University athletics seo tho finish of tho Georgetown-Kentucky
game, tho last to bo
played on tho local floor this season.
and summary:
The line-u-

Georgetown.

Kentucky.
Ireland (4)

Campbell (10)

Somers (Capt.) (S)
Forward.
Henderson (2) and
Anderson (2)
Forward.

Thompson (2) and
Longsworth (C)
Center.

Taylor (4)

Adams (2)
Guard.
Hodos and Peak (2)
Wohbold
Guard.
Fouls Schrader, 4 out of 10; Somers, 2 out of 4; Adams, 0 out of 2.
Heforeo Littick, of Centro.

Schrader (S)

WORKING

FINE

The Strollers' annual show, "Tho
Lion and the Mouse,", will bo presented at the Lexington Opera House on
tho night of Saturday, March 10, instead of March 9, as was announced
last week. It was found necessary to
change the date of the performance
on account of a conflict.
Rehearsals have already been in
progress for more than a month and
it is believed that this year's performance will measure up to the high
standard set by the Stroller sTTows of
previous seasons. The two weeks remaining before the performance will
be spent in polishing up the rough
places and a finished production jnay
be expected on the night of March 10.
Each year the annual Stroller show
occupies a more and more important
place In the University social calendar, until it is now one of the premier
functions of the entire year. New students who are not yet familiar with
U. of K. traditions would do well to
make their plans without delay. In
other words, make that date.
The cast as finally selected is even
ly balanced in every particular. "Gus"
Gay, a late entry In the part of Jefferson Ryder, is proving to be a "And,"
and it is certain that he will give his
Emery Frazier aod Miss Ma
mie Woods, a close run for the honors. This part requires acting of the
most difficult kind and a number of
men were tried out before one was
found who measured up to the high
standard set by those in charge of rehearsals. "Gus" had the lead in the
Lexington High School play, "Higbee
of Harvard," last year.
There are a number of parts in
"The Lion and tho Mouse" which do
not have a great many lines, but all
of which give opportunity for excellent acting in character portrayal. Tho
Strollers were fortunate
in having
about sixty people try out for parts
in tills year's play, and from this number it was possible to select actors
for these small parts who are temperamentally suited for the parts. Tho
part of Judge Rossmoro has been entrusted to Herndon Evans, another
lato entry, and ho Is making the most
of the part of tho pathetic old man,
who Is broken In health and spirit, because ho "stands falsoly accused of
nccopting bribes."
Tato Bird, as
Judgo Stott, Is doing an excellent
ploco of acting as tho close friond and
counsol of tho accused judgo. Miss
Martha Huckmau, as tho wifo of John
Burkott Ryder, the "Lion," and Miss
Freda Lomon, as tho wife of Judgo
Rossmoro, aro showing tliomsolvos
to bo capablo nctrossos in parts which
depict almost directly opposite typos.
"Bill" Shinnlck, in tho part of tho
Hon. Fitzroy Bagloy, don't you know,

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.
MEET ME AT

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THE ORPHEUM THEATRE

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Pirat Class in Every Appointment

BEN AU
THEATRE

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"If a Laugh wasworth $1, You'd Leave Here Rich"

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This is a'Special Purchase
and you must act quickly

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Jorkins, butler in the Ryder home
BOOKKEEPING Grover Creech.
Buslness.Phonography
Expressman W. C. Draddy.
TYPEWRITING and

TELEGRAPHY

R.tU T IIUSINEtS C0LLEIE
8ktr.utr.Cii.rttUt'IlM.KT. CIirTtI.

Then It Happened.
She: "What do you suppose Harold
tiIinter
meant by sending me thoso flowers?"
WILbUH R. SMITH, UxltidtoB. Ky.
Also She: "Ho probably meant to
imply that you wore a dead one."
Jack o'Lantern.
4

It President, his yean ot experience in Mercantile and
Banking busincu, sUo 40 year educating 20,000 young
men and women for lueccu.
now, PhOM. Writt.
College 159
Main St., near Peat Office, ofipoilte Depot.

Addttu

will bear the brunt of the comedy
work in the play, but be Is ably as
sisted by a group of actors in the first
act who are to start the show off with
a laugh. Roy Barnhill, as the Rev.
Pontifox Deetle, Miss Vennie Duley,
as his sister Jane Deetle, and Miss
Peggy Wilkinson as Miss Nesbitt,
"the banker's daughter," are a trio of
comedians who deliver the goods.
Miss Eliza Spurrier as Eudoxia, the
in the Rossmore
home, and W. C. Draddy, an express
man, work their parts for all the
laughs they contain.
In somewhat larger parts are Preston Cherry as Senator Roberts, Ryder's henchman, and his daughter,
Kate Roberts, played by Miss Angela
Morancy. Kate is in love with Bag-leand engaged to Jefferson Ryder,
which of course gives possibility for
complicajtdons.
University's
The
"darling of the screen," Mary Turner,
has only a small part as Thurza, Shirley Rossmore's maid, but Mary gives
an excellent demonstration
of bow
much can be gotten out of a small
part. Grover Creech will be Jorklns,
the pompous butler in the Ryder
home.
The complete cast is as follows:
John Burkett Ryder, the "Lion"
Emery Frazier.
Shirley? Rossmore, the "Mouse"
Mamie Miller Woods.
Jefferson Ryder, son of Ryder
Augustus Gay.
Hon. Fitzroy Bagley, secretary to
Ryder William Shinnick.
Senator Roberts, Ryder's right-hanman Preston Cherry.
Kate Roberts, his daughter Angela
Morancy.
Mrs. John Burkett Ryder Martha
Buckman.
Judge Rossmore, impeached Federal
Judge Herndon Evans.
Judge Stott, Rossmore's counsel
Tate Bird.
Mrs. Rossmore Freda Lemon.
Rev. Pontifex Deetle Roy Barnhill
Jane Deetle, sister to Pontifex
Vennie Duley.
Miss Nesbitt, "the banker's daughter" Peggy Wilkinson.
Eudoxia, maid in the Rossmore
home Eliza Spurrier.
Thurza, maid to Shirley Mary
d

$16.50

&

3550

y

and

I

Boxes

k

WEEK

SPECIAL RATES TO
University Students

OPEN

AT THE ADA MEADE.
to 10:30 P. M' KAPPA ALPHAS AND
Admission
mat Ziegflold's Follies Is to tho
of
Ton
KAPPA SIGMAS WIN patrons
Woolfolk's Junior Follies is to
Cents

Beat Pi Kaps and S. A. E.

Prices

Admission 5c and 10c

FREE TICKET WITH EACH ONE PURCHASED."

A

CHIS

FORFEIT

o

patrons. Mr. Woolfolk's show is
patterned aftor tho larger organization, being a rovuo and tho title Junior
Follies was appropriated on account
of tho company being composed of
juvenile performers.
Among tho specialties is Tho Danco
of tho Cities, whioh was such a sensation last season which in itself represents an Investment of nearly twice
as much as an ordinary musical comedy. Tho Junior Follies will open at
tho Ada Meade, starting Monday,
February 26.
"Around the Town," tho latest tabloid production of E. P. Churchill,
will be seen at tho Ada Meade Theatre commencing Thursday, March 12,
for three days.
"Around the Town" is presented in
five scenes which are said to be the
most beautiful from a scenic standpoint yet offered in a vaudeville theatre. The book and lyrics were writ
ten by David M. Wolff, while the
music all of which has been specially
written for this production is by Ray
Peabody, a composer, who has many
song hits to Ill's credit. The cast is
headed by Earl S. Dewey and Mabel
Among the other
"Billlo" Rogers.
players may be mentioned
Mr. Bruce Richardson, Mr. Hans Herbert, Miss Emily Clark and the usual
Churchill beauty chorus. Call 612 for
seats as all will be reserved.

Tho opening games of the fraternity
basketball league were played in tho
gym last . Saturday afternoon, with
Kappa Sigma and Kappa Alpha coming out victorious over Sigma Alpha
Epsilon and Pi Kappa Alpha, respectively. Sigma Chi failed to put a
team on tho floor when time was called and the game was forfeited to Alpha Tau Omega.
The score in the Kappa Sig S. A.
E. game was 12 to 10, and in the K. A.
Pi Kap game 8 to 6. Both contests
were tied at the end of the regular
extension of
period and a
time had to be given. The playing
thruout was clean and snappy, and
few fouls were called.
s
were as follows:
The
Kappa Sigma Archer (4) and Randall (4), forwards; Berckman (2),
center; Brittain, F. Shinnick (2), and
W. Shinnick, guards.
(4),
Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fields
and Strahm (4), forwards; Dempsey,
center; Hines (2) and Fogg, guards.
Kappa Alpha Ford (6) and Wright,
forwards; Harbison (2), center; Mellon, Brunson and Parker, guards.
Pi Kappa Alpha Faulkner (4), J.
Rawlings and Triplett, forwards; ColThere's a Reason.
"Say, Jones, how are you going to
lins, center; Newman (2) and Hernsell your new novel in book form?"
don, guards.
"No, I'm going to call it 'Grape-nutThe second round will be played in
Sigma
and sell it as a serial." Princethe gym Saturday afternoon.
Chi and Kappa Alpha will attempt to ton Tiger.
draw each other's blood, Pi Kappa
Alpha and Kappa Sigma will mix it
up, and Sigma Alpha Epsilon will attempt to take Sigma Nu into camp.
line-up-

tho Go's Cm

Go Wktr

Personally Picked

well-know- n

s'

A. M. TO lliOO P. M.

10K

SEE "INTOLERANCE"
o
In "Intolerance," which will
engagement at tho Opera
an
House next Monday night, tho Princess Beloved, adored of Belshazaar the
magnificent, in the Babylonian episode, wears a creation of jewels and
ostrich plumes that cost $7,000 and at
that all of tho jewels are imitations.
Tho skirt of tho costume is made
mainly of ostrich, plumes, 145 of them
to bo oxact in count, all dyed by hand
in tho variegated colors of tho Orient.
Ropes of oxquisito Imitation pearls,
sapphires, rubles and emeralds supplemented by wristlets, anklets, necklaces and a headpiece, make up the
garment.
balance of this
Some of the metal work is solid silver, part of it Is plated In gold. Over
Thoy do
5,000 jewels were used.
things with royal munificence in Mr.
Griffith's studio.
Another instance of Mr. Griffith's
effort to realize Babylonian opulence
is the trailing cape worn by the Princess Beloved. Sixty yards of chiffon
velvet went into the making of this
cape on which were embrolded solid
gold butterflies measuring three feet
from wing to wing tip. Only one woman could do this embroidery at one
time and it took this woman Ave
months to complete her task. The
total cost of the cape was $940.
The sale of seats will open Friday
morning at the iBen All Theatre.
Advertisement.
com-menc-

g

Patronize Our Advertisers
WANTED.
Typewriting to do.
THESES a SPECIAL- TY. J. O. S. Box 585.

"Lexington's Bigger and Better Men's Store''

UNION LIT. SOCIETY
HAS MEDAL CONTEST
The annual declamatory contest of
the Union Literary Society was held
in the chapel last evening at 8 o'clock.
gold medal, presented
A twenty-dolla- r
to the society by President Barker,
was awarded to the winner.
A feature of the evening's entertainment was a short musical program,
consisting of a vocal solo, violin solo
and selections by a male quartet.
Chalkley and
Professors Dantzler,
Rowe acted as judges.
Owing to the fact that the Kernel
make-uwas completed before tho
contest was held, the winner cannot
be announced in this issue.
"The ModThe program follows:
McBrayer;
ern Paradox,"
J. J.
"Mother," L. F. Bisohof; "American
Spirit," T. L. Creekmoro; "The Ideal
"America for
Man," E. E. Hardin;
Americans," Roy Barnhill.

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"TJiis is a hard world," said the
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Joo M. Robinson has accepted a position as spocial agent of the New
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His
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207 W. Short St.

(PHOENIX BLOCK)

Frederick Yeigh Talks To Benefits of Agricultural
Mechanicals Last
Education Landed
Thursday
By Students

Shoes that

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TALK IS INTERESTING MARKETS

WEAR RIGHT

Tans for the Cadets a specialty

Frederick Yeigh, of tho Department
of Education, Bureau of Commercial
Economics, of Washington, D. 0 addressed the Seniors and lower class-meof the College of Mechanical and
lilcctrical Engineering last Thursday
afternoon. His subject was "A
of Canada," Illustrated with
slides and moving pictures.
Tho lecturo was a raro treat. Mr.
Yeigh with liis command of English
and his knowledge of tho commercial
and national resources of Canada,
made a strong appeal for our northern
neighbors. With scientific agriculture,
tho vast plains of the Canadian West
are being developed into tho greatest
region of America, ho
said.
The water power of Canada is sufficient to supply her entire needs and
offers a broad field for
development. The engineer and agriculturist have the full powers' of nature at their command.
a newspaper
Mr. Yeigh, formerly
man, author and historian, has converted his entire efforts to bringing
Canada into prominence. He has traveled extensively in that country and
has prepared several authentic histories which are standard the world
over. Many of his works have been
published by the Canadian government, under whose direction he is now
making a tour of this country.

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Bell (4)

(2)

BEAT

CENTER TOSSERS

Forward.
Tate (5)

Thompson

CATS ON THEIR

Center.

FLOOR

Diddle (10)

Shrader (10)
Guard.

Early Lead Cut Down By
Fast Work of Danville Boys
SCHRADER

IS

stop-watc-

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liuo-up-

McDowell

Peak

(4) and

Bruner
Guard.

ACTIVE RESOLUTIONS VOTED
BY MINING SOCIETY ENGLISH CLUB MEETS

Centre College on Its own lloor,
walloped the Wildcats for the lirst
time In seven years last Friday night.
The score was 28 to 24, the fighting
hard and playing rough. The tangled
to look like
teams caused the mix-uanybody's game until the last few
minutes of play.
Kentucky started off with a bang,
and when the neutral timekeeper,
after having nonchalantly examined
and noticed that as
his
much as five minutes had flown by,
carelessly glanced up at the scoreboard, ho saw the following defiantly
looking down at him: Kentucky, 8;
ontro, 3. But alas! The second hand
started to roll off that fatal sixth
minute. The tables began to turn and
those dandy Danvillltes came to the
surface like a bar of that famous
inliospltable
floating soap.
Tills
spurt of the lads who were acting
as hosts caused the first half to end
17 to 13 In their favor.
The Wildcats kept plugging along,
lead which their
after the
opponents had gained in the first half.
It was to no avail, however, for the
Centre aggregation did not lot up until the referee's whistle tooted the
grand finale. The scoro of the second
period was Kentucky, 11; Centre, 11.
Schrader and Ireland did the stellar
work for Kentucky, giving excellent
exhibitions of fioor work and basket
Montgomery and Diddle
tossing.
Btarrod for Centre.
Victory over the Wildcats probably
means Uiat the Danville quintet will
have little or no trouble in defeating
the other aspirants for the
of the State.
:
The
Kontucky.
Centre.
Position.
LiongBworth (4)
and Campbell (C) . .Montgomery (4)
Forward.
p

Rodes (2) and

c

At the February meeting of the
Kentucky Mining Society of tho College of Mines and Metallurgy, held
February 12, the following resolutions
were adopted:
Whereas, Frank It. Grainger, who
was a valued member of this society
and one of its former officers, passed
from tho present life to tho new 'life
in the dawn of Monday, the first day
of February, 1917, bo it resolved
That in his death the society has
lost one of its most loyal and most
beloved members; one whose active
interest in its affairs has been an invaluable help and incentive to the society.
That we shall cherish his memory
as one whose earnest endeavors as a
student and whose Integrity as a man
rendered him an exemplar for the
members of this society.
That, deeply deploring the loss of
this follow member, we extend to the
bereaved family our sincere sympathy.
That these resolutions be entered
upon the records of the society and
a copy of them be sent to the family.
LOUIS WARE,
J. C. MILLER,
PROF. T. J. BARR,
Commltteo.

DICKER ADDRESSES
SOPH. MECHANICALS

WITH PROF. DANTZLER
The English Club met Monday afternoon in the recitation room of Professor Dantzler with Miss Jane DickAfter the
ey, president, presiding.
business of the club toad been transacted, invitations from Miss Frances
Jewell and the Library Club were considered and accepted.
Miss Jewell invited the members of
the club to meet at her home the
third Monday of March. The representative from the Library Club invited them to attend a joint meeting
of the two clubs Thursday afternoon
to hear an address by Professor
Dantzler.
The third Monday of every month
was decided on as the date for the
club to hold Its regular meetings. A
suggestion was made by John Price
that cards announcing tho time of
meeting should be sent to each member from this time on.
SALLEE GOES TO SOMERSET.
W. M. Sallee, a former University
studont, has accopted a position in
and circulation de
tho advertising
partments
of tho Somerset
News.
For several months
Salleo has boon omployed In a similar
capacity by The Lexington Herald.

Serai-Weokl- y

REV.

Joe Dicker addressed tho Westing-liousSociety last Saturday morning
on tho subject, "Machine Shop," in
which ho gave many practical suggestions to tho young ongineors. At an
earlier meeting, tho election of officers was hold, which resulted in tho
of those who hold office
tho first Bomostor.

o

Patronize Our Advertisers.

GILLESPIE TO ADDRESS
Y. M. C. A. SUNDAY

NIGHT.

Tho Rev. R. T. Gillespie of the Maxwell Presbyterian Church, will bo tho
speaker at tho Y. M. C. A. services
next Sunday evening in tho Y. rooms.
Tho Rov. Mr. Gillospio is considered
ono of tho strongest speakers in the
Southern Presbyterian Church, and a
good, talk is assured.
Music will bo
furnished by tho male quartet.

DISCUSSED

McGURK'S
Where All it Well and Good
HHotlChocolate,

Candy

.Home-mad- e

and Ices.

Talks by some of the older members featured tho meeting of tho Agricultural Society Monday night In
regular weekly session in tho Agriculture Building.

SAM GULLO

Prog reiaive Sho Repairing Shop
140 S. Limestone
Lexington, Ky.
Tho program was opened by a talk
Rubber Heels and Solea a Specialty
on tho growing of dark tobacco by
Jesse Tapp, who handled his subject
as ono "who had been there." Juno
Lewis discussed tho marketing of potatoes and covered tho handling,
grading, packing and marketing of
SUITS PRESSED I5G
this crop, which ho stated should bo
We agree to press five suits a month
one of tho most important crops of
for four months for $3.00 to anyone
the farmer, tho there are farmers in joining same, starting Feb. 1, 1917,
overy section of tho State who do not and ending June 1, 1917. We guarans
tee
work and prompt delivoven raise enough for their own con- ery from now on. Remember, that we
only take In this club one hundred
sumption.
members, so come In early and sign
John P. Rickotts was due for a talk up. This is the time of the year to
look good and to do so you clothes
on "What
tho Agricultural Course must be well pressed.
Has Meant to Me," but as he was not
REGULAR PRICES:
present on time, impromptu talks, on Suits Pressed
25c
that subject, mostly reminiscences of Cleaned and Pressed
$1.00
Cor. Lime & High Sts.
their college life, were made by Ivan Phone 621-Clay Graddy, who was called on by
BECKER DRY CLEANING CO
the president and introduced as a
C. R. McGAUCHEY Prop.
journalist of note, A. L. Cole and W.
W. Owsley.

BIG PRESSING CLUB

RATE STARTING

first-clas-

Mr. Graddy stated that no matter
what is presented to you it is the manner in which you assimilate it which
counts. The greatest benefit of his
Freshman year was that he found out
that he was in the wrong course and
changed to agriculture.

Mr. Owsley emphasized the fact
that the agricultural course was not
strictly a fanner boy's course, but is
of value as well to the city boy.

Metropolitan
The Place for

Good

Restaurant
Things

to

Eat

DENTIST
For any kind of dental service call on

T. Slaton
Dr. J.CHEAPSIDE
1ST
Office

hours 8 a. m. 6 p. ra.

Phone

8M--

Mr. Ricketts then strolled in and
gave his side of what the agricultural
B.
course has meant to him by contrast- W.
ing his experiences, knowledge and
SHOP
enjoyment of life before and since he
The Closest Shop to University
has been in college. He had at one
15c
HAIR CUT
time very little idea of ever entering
Shave
10c
great decollege, he said, as his one
15c
Shampoo
sire was to be able to drive a
Glover's Shampoo. .35c
mule In the row without having to
Lexington, Ky.
bother with lines. He built many air- - 153 S. Limestone St.
castles which have since been thrown
down, but have been replaced with a
D. PURCELL CO.
broader knowledge of life and of the
activities of the world in general.
West Main Street
Mr. Ricketts digressed greatly from
LEXINGTON, KY.
the subject assigned him by giving a
great real of inside dope on his life, RUBBER
50c
but not quite all of it.
iMr. Nance ended the program by
JUST THE THIN6 FOR USE
telling some of his experiences and
IN THE LABORATORIES
then said that he wasn't so sure that
he had obtained so very much knowledge, but that he now knew just
where he could get it and that he had
it "kinda" classified. He is sure, however, that he will make a better farmer because of his college course
than he would have if he had not
JJ
South Limestone
taken it.
Business of tho society was next
Most State Men Know Us
taken up and the minutes of the
previous mooting were read by tho
Let us meet you
Meal Tickets
secretary, Miss Grant. It was voted
on to strike from the rolls all those
who have not paid their dues entitling
Uiem to membership.
The constituJosef
tional revision committee was given
more time to make necessary changes
The Photographer in your Town
in tho constitution.
Has pleased the exacting
An appeal for more material for
student and the best peoTho Rural Kontuckian, the official
ple generally for fifteen
paper of the society, was mado by I.
years. Can ho show you?
C. Graddy, tho editor.

Martin's Barber

one-eye-

J.

328--3- 30

APRONS

Martin & Stockwell's
Restaurant

Franz

311 W. Main Si.

Patronize Our Advertisers.

Spengler

Phone 1092--

y

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL.

Pare 4

In

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FOOD

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