xt7jsx64566z https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jsx64566z/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky. Libraries Lexington, Kentucky University of Kentucky Alumni Association 1990 journals  English University of Kentucky Alumni Association Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky alumnus Kentucky Alumnus, 1990, no. 2 text images Kentucky Alumnus, 1990, no. 2 1990 2012 true xt7jsx64566z section xt7jsx64566z $2      
i #    `;»    
’   X
X  ». E
        ‘`V' V   \
' \
  L_   ‘    ’   ·    
il ___r
 `
Q
I!
{   .  *

 Qt
_}
UK F()()TBAI,l,  
 Q
W EEKENDS ARE it l
` Gr
SPECIAL AT   -
• 195 Clean and comfortable
rooms. Special rates for Ul<
Alumni /=
: • Entertainment nightly in the I
Springtide Lounge
. 7 Y - •..5
C ` I ~ / • Eat in our award—vvinning dining
A 4/) rOOm
Y \,; " I} • Join us for our cookout before
. "I' each home game y
• Special "Beat Indiana" weekend .
on September 15th includes
j' / dancing to the music of the
I Trendells immediately following
. 4% the game
  li llf? l
l
`l
pl`l llQS ll ll “
5 n 5 A
  §
\ we ARE outv 2% ivuués Fnoiyi corylryioNvvi;ALtH st/-xoiuiyi
2020 l-larrodsburg road • Lexington, Ky. 40503
505/277-5751 • Toll Free: 800-3549503
ln KY; soo-432,0775

 gt. Q`? jo Lf  
f /
  A 7a .?   ..;r·.t
  ··;'l,I I   ‘   it
4   {   {S  [LTL
Qgii    S yl; I 
L I it?   _   '=  
I r   I  
It Greenhouse Roses
QI 1990-2
1/ 1990 OFFICERS »
‘ _
PRESIDENT
{ y Bruce Davis '7l    
[ Franktort 2
I I>REsIDENt-EIEcr UDd¤t€ Ott CGFUIDUS FIGWS I
  Richard Bean '69
I Iiiimr AY BRUMFTELD
I Mrs. Joe E. Morris '38 J
I I · . . .
I SEEQIQLEEQY Alumni director retires I 5
I Jay Brumfield '48  
I Lexington
I ASSOGATION STAFF: HASTEN THE ROSE
_ · ·
I Rapid growth In the greenhouse I
{ DIRECTOR  
I Jay Brumtield `48
I »~S$¤¤·~E FARM RELATED IN URIES
I DIRECTOR 'I O
  B°b C‘E;`1l;g’;€' 58 Working to prevent them I
I Liz Howard '68  
I ASST. EDITOR
I •<¤t Iohmn ·8<» LEAVING THE CORPORATION
MARKETING!
I MEMBERSHIP Eloise l\/lcl_v R L.   V, x w `  
  .et.s  ,_     N errrs  
  ».~.   ..... . ....   .....   . E 3 . ‘ .     .2   ~. .   -—·t-.‘ A .-_.¤”—’    
 -     ..;.. L es,  . .  
The Greet Teochers for 199O ore pictured with Suson Mountioy, choirmon of the Greot Teocher
Committee. They ore; lomes Force ond Wilford Bloden, both from the Lexington compus; Denis
Morrow, Elizobethtown Community College; Chorles Howes, Ashlcind Community College, ond
Kevin Felton of Hopkinsville Community College. Greot Teocher Avvords hove been presented
t onnuolly by the Associotion since l9ol .
llk 4

  
    xg g V,
 ' ;    .     } / /
  ,  4 ‘
l I      4
. [ /· /   ,1    ·     Dzrector ef
  _;_  j-;. -’_·=   V r   1 Alumnz A_H'Zurs
        ·’   _   Retzres
/ j j Vvii _   t ; ·A__,; ._ V *   A.A» August 31
    u ‘‘ 1 i T iu ‘ i 1 l   t
  :·:v   ` r
  ‘‘`‘ . __uv t 9.   e .  uuu  a —v»_;‘ . 4 t   i
A ·   _     -  _,;.    ” _ `ir
_ ~   ,, ~.·>*·" . ·· ' '·** '  J j vv  _ gg ;   “
E jay Bfumfiéld will f€til`€ Augl1SI 31, 1990 E15 development program were already active in alumni affairs.”
director of the UK National Alumni Association Many alumni who take leadership roles in the Association
t • hiwiflg served Khff Association Bild thi? UHiV€fSiIy migrate to leadership roles with the Development program.
with loyalty and dedication for over 25 years. In 1971 the role ofthe Association shifted toward service to
He came as associate director in 1966, becoming director graduates and to building memberships. With that shift in
three years later when Helen King retired. emphasis came an increase in activities, and the growth of
Always focusing on communication with alumni, and in an alumni clubs, both inside and outside of the Commonwealth.
effort to keep all alumni in touch with UK, one of his first john Nichols, the first co-chairman of the jefferson County
projects was to establish a newsletter, the Open Door. Today Club remembers that the club was dormant for a few years
the Open Door is an eight-page quarterly tabloid sent to all before reorganizing in 1966 under Brumfield’s guidance. The
alumni, over 105,000 households. Hank Thompson, chairman first event after reorganization was a basketball banquet
of the Association’s publications committee, said, “Today the attended by 300 alumni. Coach Adolph Rupp was the
Open Door continues to hold a unique position in the featured speaker. Nichols remarked, “Brumfield would
University community as the only regular communication encourage other clubs saying, ‘whether you become a large
with alumni.” club or stay small, follow the actions ofjefferson County and
The UK National Alumni Association is one of the few you will have a successful club.’ We now have over 2,400
associations in the country to publish both a newspaper and a members, making it the largest UK alumni club."
membership magazine for alumni. The clubs, now about 65 nationwide, host popular events
_ While many alumni associations have been accused of that have become tradition——Derby parties, alumni tours,
  being only boosters for the athletics program, Brumfield has game parties with trips to Lexington, TV watch parties, and
concentrated on providing a well—rounded program for special speakers for club dinners. Club scholarship support
`_ alumni. The board of directors became a much more has grown from less than $2,500 to over $50,000 in the past
representative organization and was expanded from a core 10 years. The Alumni Association, through its alumni clubs,
group of only 10 people selected by the director to a 57- was the first to sponsor a higher education awareness rally
member body elected by geographic region. prior to the 1986 legislative session when severe budget cuts
Early in his tenure the decision was made for the Alumni for higher education were a real threat to the University`s
Association to give up fundraising, so that the Office of future. ·
Development could be established with the full-time Brumfield has always kept an eye on finances and one of
responsibility for raising private dollars. Paul Nickell recalled his major goals was to provide solid management of the
that Brumfield led the Association in the vital role of Association’s growing investment fund that helps support
launching the success of UK’s current development program. alumni projects. The $2 million Life Membership Investment
He said “The people the University needed for the Fund began with just a few thousand dollars in 1971.
5 t»<

 t
_ l
A native of Nicholasville, Brumfield has an extensive admissions, and remained there until he joined the UK
background in higher education and alumni relations. After Alumni Association.
three years of duty with the Army Corps of Engineers during In recognition of his work in alumni affairs, Brumfield was
World War 11, Brumiield returned to UK in 1946 to finish his presented with an Alumni Service Award in 1977. He was
education. He eamed his bachelor and master degrees in initiated into Omicron Delta Kappa, the national leadership
1948 and 1949. honor society in 1978. tl
11e taught public school in Fayette County until 1953, He has been ma1Tied to the former Mary Beale Mylor, a `
taking a year out lor graduate work at Louisiana State 1948 UK graduate since 1952. She has been an active partner
University. From 1953 to 1958, he was assistant director of with Brumfield in many alumni activities, and was so
student allairs at Auhum University. Then, from 1958 until recognized in 1985 when she, too, was honored with an `
1961, he server} as dean of students at Lynchburg College in Alumni Service Award.
Virginia. He retumed to Aubum University as director of They will be missed.
    `  - . ,,,_ X  
. ° tf _ — *  e $§f¥§-lA   _...»» s  
i    ?` i.        i·     1 i
` ¤   t F9   ?L      
.,5 . _, {4 ·   ,.. t   j
I » t   ’`» 4*     i ~
E    ,    
-  ll    k·•§»
    .»—.,- · *-» t   ee`` s to   »
F l s t   I!.  t_ ii- ·   X     X Q l
· Vit i”             ·  ’ ~ - "`H   . 
. 1 9 ~ =t"    ~ >sT?»  t».»     .· if V   " "i``:`‘ ` 8 it i`ei‘  
¤ { §~¤·· sx;        _.—.   A __,.     —..  ·. `~—~   ...t  
l` " 1 it  ·»         .t    =`»   _   .
  se,   _., ; ;.   ;_ , ><  a  U   S ..7   Y  
i  ,— ‘r · /;>  _  I `,     .     , __``·- , . ._.- ,  
s *’  (   t Ye         . — /*’‘’
 “ 1 V       ·. 3   1`` `   —··
"*i¤ _ ‘ .      _ .,*` * i“° Z``   i     _’ *·§ .   _ "
  Q    t,,.=.,,..._ —     = ` TA ` i .·-_ ; E ``‘' 2- .5:} ‘‘'  *~ i it
  K;] · »       ‘‘`‘  ·   ..    er .``.      ·»..·   b` ’ ~
. _ _              . *·``             `  
  _ I  l" _  T?; "_§. ,._,_ 1 »=,     __   Q  .\\\ \   y-  
X ,4     V .:38-* { »» \_   ;_ ._,_       _   .  
js   3 Joy Brumlield, right, believed in o "honds-on" style ol leodership. l·le
X _; · ~- ` ~ A _ eg ond other stoll members, including ossociote director, Bob V\/hitoker,
& J ·   .>» left, tqkg gore of detoils ot o goll outing for the OlliC€ of
’—• `N- ‘ Development.
J\l>ove; like ull teotltes, Adolph Rupp,
Ielt, wits ti populrtt snooker on the olumni
ttnuit. lou Hiunilieltl, iight, who lteord   _; E
nionv ol those spoetlios, ron tell ci    
nunilwet ol Rupp stones using tin iniitotion ` ` ·.
lstitisttn tlrttwi tts gttotl Us Rttpp.5 ,
otttttnttl q_» Q, ` —» ,,
llittltl; llio Soitlnsttttttes, o group ol lctlr a _ , i 9 kt   _
vnlotl slutlonts lvont the College ol line t ,J» °   *
t\it·._ petlonnetl ot nionv olumnt lunctions   · i
lroni |*’8o to 1*788. toth student re,   — A    
tviteti ti srliolotslwp lrom the UK Nor       .g `¥:
tional t\lutnni #\ssoctot¤on. Unlortunotely_ T' ` ` ` » » » °‘  
tlto expenses ol sponsoring ei touring mu- ` · A-   I `
g.tr.·il slwnw group like the Soplttsltoitles €\ _A J _
t t~t~tlt~tl tlto otttlowoti lunds oxtotloble. J t _
— `··;.
’“` E •  
i   ~   .i.i       _,:i .. ,.t  
l \ ·"

  
E. jay and Mary Brumfield
i Scholarship in the School of Music
  4.   . 5%
y V L QQ         _;
·   =V_ · »     F - w #
    it caso (   esa,   ¤• S
    5* a   a   t   s r a
  4_VV-l.¤ 2         .  
   t ;   `‘'— ·‘   »~·~     "   v¢»»   S  4
M ‘ v W    °   =.» if   I  
  °‘‘’    ,sV.  is _     fr      S
 -? ? { ` $`>" '-i i-L  A  f} i ____.   . ,    
V. ‘ » ~ 5; *  _—;*· lm ‘,—  
· • '   ¤ e\ * I ii; · · · ·  
js" · .(>§_ K   ;§0·." _"  
;`· f   \ §4· L}‘.;i`; ` f§f> 
“·';*`  §=·‘· .·    
._   ‘§Z¥;‘* **4
. ~*> 
  that we want to try to grow   at q     ·    
  ei. pai   ‘   I Q .  
usin   77l€th0d ”    A   oho ig  {  l. · ¥   
gl • Q.,   ··v=- ij,   aj- i
1 Robert Anderson .~ »   »¤»··— ~ r -  
l Anderson’s technique uses high intensity lights, much like cut down on labor costs,” he said.
those found in modern parking lots, and a considerable Today’s greenhouse business is capital intensive, instead of
amount of carbon dioxide, which the roses convert to sugars labor intensive. A modem greenhouse costs more than a half
for continued growth. million dollars per acre. With that kind of initial outlay,
“Basically, the technique gives the roses the best businessmen need to make sure they remain competitive.
environment for total growth possible,” Anderson said. Anderson’s production techniques are an outgrowth of
Anderson starts with cuttings, with one leaf from the rose other research conducted by the UK College of Agriculture,
plants—so far hybrid tea varieties. He dips the 2 to 2 1/ 2 inch using coal mine air as a source for heating a greenhouse and
stems in rooting hormones for about five seconds before as a source of carbon dioxide.
“planting” them in a growing medium of peat moss, perlite “The earlier research into using mine shaft air showed that
and vermiculite. The cuttings are then put on a mist bench it was a feasible process,” he said.
where they are misted every three minutes during daylight Currently, the greenhouse industry includes about 75 acres
hours. The temperature is kept at a constant 75 degrees of production houses, but the potential is substantially larger.
Fahrenheit until they are rooted. “Kentucky produces only about 25 percent of the cut
Once the rose plants have roots, they are then moved to flowers sold in the state; the rest are brought in from other
ebb-flood benches in a greenhouse, where they are grown states and countries. We think this technique can help
under high intensity lights. They are bathed throughout the increase Kentucky production of not just roses but other cut
day with a nutrient solution. flowers, too,” he said.
“We baby these plants because they need to grow quickly Anderson said that he and Dan Fought, a graduate student
and produce a blossom in the shortest time possible,” who works with him, have outlined a list of plants that could
Anderson said. be grown successfully using the technique. Some of the plants
Once stems are one-to-a-pot plants, they bloom in about six are already produced in greenhouses and could be produced
to eight weeks. Early experiments showed that more than 65 faster using the technique. Others, such as yarrow, goldenrod
percent of the crop was ready to harvest 35 days after it was and blue salvia are not grown in greenhouses now, but have
rooted and 80 percent was ready in 45 days, although the the potential to be grown successfully using Anderson’s
time from stem to bloom appears to vary from one hybrid to technique.
the next. “All in all, we have about 150 plants that we want to try to
“We have tried several roses, including Sonia, Royalty, and grow using the method,” he said.
Samantha, all of which are greenhouse varieties. Each has its Anderson and Fought are enthusiastic about one—the satin
own peculiarities, but all were produced successfully using flower—they have experimented with.
the technique,” Anderson said. “The satin flower is a California wildflower with unique
The short time from stem to bloom means that a grower flowers that are absolutely magnificient. The first
could produce twice—and maybe five times as many— experiments in the greenhouse show great promise,”
marketable flowers for special high demand occasions, such Anderson said.
as Valentine’s Day or Mother’s Day. Anderson hopes that he can see his technique widespread
Anderson, whose job as Extension horticulturist is to work in the next couple of years for roses. He said he hopes that
with the Kentucky greenhouse industry to modernize and producers will look at other plants as possible cut flower types
_ keep it competitive and profitable, already is working with using the technique.
one commercial greenhouse in “field testing” the technique. “Of course, we plan to continue to experiment with the
Carl Driesbach, Inc. of Louisville has supplied part of the technique to make refinements in it,” he said.
research funds for the project and is working with Anderson Anderson, a native of Northern Minnesota, holds a BS
to try it in a commercial operation. degree and an MS degree from the University of Minnesota
“We depend on progressive industry people to help us not and a PhD in botany from the University of Florida. He has
only fund our research but also to help us try it out in a been with the UK College of Agriculture for the past 15 years.
commercial setting,” the horticulturist said.
Anderson has developed his technique so that it will be
compatible with robotic technology that is being introduced R“”d}' W“k”l”” 76 if a '”’m" wuh Hm UK
into the greenhouse industry. Cdlgge 'fAg"“‘l"‘"’·
"If Kentucky greenhouse owners are to be competitive
with other producers, they need to incorporate the latest
technologies of production. That means automation to help
Q u•<

 H ¢ W / ¤ ` { _
5*   { ?  A`·· =  /  
  I; II  ’ . ,_   '   " - I
 V "v·•¤., III -· I €'I,I I `= A ,   ’   V III
i   '     -   »' w   . Y ’   H N
  *50 Vg  "   .‘.‘’   i       »2;
, Q- * "       ..$i<>;Y  ; M A  ` ¢ '
  ,€‘:‘.w¢· V·•- I:  .       . E
.... I I.·     ‘    *v in  my  ». `*¤5`  ~
·   ,. _I  II  —,__     I,II    .   2
~       A’ .—»·  ` §??¤   . .,.».’=  ~  III       ",»·»     _
- ’ `     3  wx W1 —   \— y   . .. `    . . __`·~ \>*={`   "   ````-         “ ·` .  
E     »     QT     .      =      .I 
»     M   ‘ ..     ` ``»``    =  ‘`    ··=~     `  ._ ‘ .»=;           ‘
Q I I I   ‘ `    {   I           I     5          
M   `·‘` = .· ` MS 4     #     ~ `~»~    Q     
· ~. · a     r~,`— M   =  `*`  »..‘·-- `   ‘   ~.     =»_  
.—·;,       .       `   ``     .       ....   . .      ..   
· 4*     :,45; I4 I   » v    = ~I   * =I `   ~ . I     ,__  < ·   ‘       *··    
·`  . / ¤ . `  · . ¤ 6 , ». 3:. *5% ;;    =· —— ‘ §_ , ’`—_ i. >   5    `-    ..`, = ...... \    
·    .¢ I =·¤      `’ »       ··=‘ >·  ‘·=~ »  * · ` 3       ·· ·
»  L J   *· I; Va ..  · " AI. _,,,,,,·>   I k wg.: I °` A * I » IIII _ I I,      ____s  
“  — V .‘‘» -   . ,.  "   ~ * ’g¢.@¤1 .   if` ..     . ~        ·  » . ·  <   ‘ ‘ ··  
V »  , , . . .,,»~ _ - A _ Q ._..   .  , W _ __I , I
· U  ~" " Q Y   ` [iii  "   `. ` `   "   ` ¢
`  / ··    > . ,£~-   *  _ ` ‘   .,_‘   i?’      <   _   .  ,  _ . f .  
  .   .        ..».