xt7jsx645j6g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jsx645j6g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19581118  newspapers sn89058402 English  Copyright is retained by the publisher. http://www.kykernel.com The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, November 18, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, November 18, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7jsx645j6g section xt7jsx645j6g On Page 3,

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.

U

Candidate List

iiKY Discussed

On Editorial Page

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY
LEXINGTON, KY.. TUESDAY. NOV.

Vol. L

No. M

18. I9VS

34 Candidates Seeking Nomination

In Tomorrow's Party Primaries
12 Candidates Seeking Five
Nominations In CP Primary
The Campus Party primary race
in Arts and Science has three candidates seeking nomination. Ed
Angus, Charlotte Bailey and Lynna
Chase are in the contest.
The CP race in Commerce rinds
Lynn Buckner, Steve Clark and
Taylor Jones contesting the nomination there.
The Campus race in Commerce
is expected to draw considerable
interest. This observation is made
in .view of the party's strength
there last spring.
In Education there are three CP
members contesting the party nod.
Phil Cox, Wayne Wilson and Betty
Greene are in the race. The nominee in Education will be running
for the seat now held by Donna
Lawson of the Students' Party.
Miss Lawson is not seeking reelection.
The Engineering race has three
Campusites seeking two nominations. John Bailey, Harold Hicks
and Dick Watkins are the three
in the race.
The two seats in Engineering
week.
up this fall are presently held by
With this decision by Stepp. no two Campus representatives in SC.
incumbents are entered in either Neither Tom King or Bob Adams
party primary.
(Continued on Page 2)
Tomorrow's Campus Party primary will feature races in four
colleges as 12 candidates are entered.
Two CP candidates, Maitland
nt
Rice in Agriculture and Dick
in Law, are without opposition in tomorrow's primary and
are definite candidates for the
December SC election.
The CP has the maximum oi
three candidates allowed by the
party's piimary rules in four colleges. The four colleges where the
party will have contests tomorrow
are Arts and Science, Commerce,
Education and Engineering.
In the College of Engineering
there will be two nominations made
from a field of three candidates.
In the other three colleges one
Campus Party nominee will be
chosen in each.
A report early last week that
Ed Stepp (C) would seek
in the Commerce College
never materialized when filing
closed Thursday. The present Commerce representative in SC decided
not to seek another term late last

VOTING PLACES

dale

IN TOMORROWS

ELECTION
Agriculture - Aj Building
Home Ec Home Ec Ruikling
A & S Journalism Building
Commerce - White Hall
Education Taylor Etl Illrig.
Engineering - Anderson Hall
Law Laffcrty Hall
Polls will be open from 9

Vi-mo-

Field In A&S
Is Feature Of SP Primary
6-Candi-

a. m. to 4 p. m. Voting will
be by II) cards.

Twenty-tw- o
candidates will be
seeking seven nominations in tomorrow's Students' Party primary.
Those nominated tomorrow will
face the winners in the Campus
Party primary in the SC election
in December.
Tomorrow's primary will find
contests in six of the seven colleges where SC assembly seats are
at stake this fall. Only in the
Graduate School will the SP not

Mixed OpinionsFollow

now.

The field consists of Roue Mary
Billings. Kay Evans. Tom Jarboe.

HomecomingProposal
have followed organization.
recomPete Perlman. SC president, said
mendation thai Student Congress Student Congress would accept
responsibility for Homecoming if
regulate Homecoming activities.
The governing body made its tne measure met with favorable
recommendation after Chi Omega, campus opinion. He expressed the
winner of the decoration contest, view that a steering committee,
sorority division, was accused of composed of members of various
using professional help to build campus organizations, should be
established. Such a group, he said,
portions of its display.
would not be controlled by any
KerLetters sent to SC and the
nel pointed out weaknesses in the campus organization.
Continued on Page 8
SuKy, student pep
program of
Mixed opinions

the Panhellenic

Council

Weekend A Musical Variety At UK
By Judy Pennebaker

variety of musical entertainment was available to UK students
this weekend. Groups, appearing in
Lexington within a three-da- y
period, included the Kai Winding
Septet, Stan Kenton and his orchestra, Fred Waring and tha
Pennsylvanians. and seven chamquartets.
pion baiber-sho- p
TTomfccniit Kai Winding and his
septet appeared in a
performance at Joyland Thursday
night. Featured in the progressive
jazz cencert was "Trombone Panorama' a composition ' tracing
trombone development to its bres- ent-da- y
foim. The group concluded
one of
v.ith "The Preacher"
Winding's biggest recordings.
A choice of entertainment was
available Friday evening: as Fred
"Waring appeared at the Coliseum
A

pre-weeke-

nd

Choral selections included medleys
of college and holiday music.
Additional variety was provided
by pantomimist Peter Dean, who
presented a "Beetlebaum" number.
The audience howled as another
Pennsylvania!!, accompanied by the
percussion section.,; gave a mock
lecture on "Jungle Drums."
In contrast, progressive ' jazz
pioneer Stan Kenton and his orchestra provid.ed music for a crowd
of Joyland dancers. Kenton, who
does most of his own arrangements, was featured in several
piano solos.
mu-bi- e
Saturday night, barber-sho- p
fans flocked to-tColiseum,
where seven international champion quartets performed.
The
three-hou- r
show was sponsored
jointly by the Versailles C hapter
of the Society for the Preservation and Encouragement of Barber

and Joyland featured Stan Kenton. Many University students
combined the events for an evening of musical enjoyment.
Variety was the word as Fred
Waring and the Pennsylvania-ientertained with everything from
jazz to spirituals. Appearing in the
Central Kentucky Concert and
Lecture Series, Waring presented
his newest musicale, "HiFi Holiday." Six
speakers
were installed in the Coliseum to
s

high-fideli-

produce

a

ty

"three-dimensiona-

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sound effect.
Humor and musical ability were
successfully combined throughout

' the-- e

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ceremonies, Waring added "color"
to an already humorous show.
Instrumental and vocal soloists
performed everything from
's
"Swan Lake" to the ballad, "On Top of Old Smokey."
Tehai-kowsky-

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Shop Quartet Sinking in America
and ODK.
The Versailles chapter chorus?
directed by Russ Rabe. opened and
closed the program.
The Schmidt Brothers. 19.il
champions from Two Rivers. Wis.,
seemed to be the audience favorite.
Deviating from the traditional
barbir-sho- p
style, their .numbers
included the spiritual. "Standing
in the Need cf Prayer,." and
Brahms' "Cradle Song." sung in
Four
German. The
Chicago, complete with
from
guitars, presented several numbers
style.
jn modified y
Mid-Stat-

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Colin

Lewis .and

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Thomas are entered in the race,
lewis and Thomas were both candidates in the SP primary last
April.

The Students" Party also hxs a
two man race in Law School where
Robert Hunt and Bob Manchester
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Little Ky. Derby Films To Be Shown In Gnignol Today At 11 r. m., II and i p. in.
Steering Committee To Discuss Purpose 01 ''Derby" And Scholarship Program
--

an.

are seeking the nomination. A
Kit?
ciT hln- frit a. ii av rjrt tr4 iiiri nun
w
v
v
s
"
Other quarters appearing were contest since Dick Vimont of tho
the Confederates of Memphis, Campus Party has no opposition
Tenn.; the Four Hearsemen of tomorrow.
Whayne Priest, SC elections
Amarillo, Tex.; the Vikings cf Rock
(Continued on Page 2)
Inland, 111.; and the Pittaburgers
Pittsburgh.
of

doo o o

r.t

Brit Kirwan. Judy Schrim and
Garryl Sipple.
The Ag and Home F.c race finds
four candidates in a contest for
the one SP nomination. Leroy
Billy Joe Mitchell. Jim
Ragland and Georgia Ann Walker
are all working for the nomination in the Colleae. The first three)
candidates are in Agriculture while
Miss Walker is in Home Ec.
A heavy SP vote is expected in
Ag and Home Fc in view of no
opposition for Campus Party candidate. .Maitland Kice.
The Students" J.irty race in Com-meiwill have three candidates
Mvkiiv; the party imd there. Bob
Bi:rett. Bill Hanlev and Terry
Kueter are seeking the SP Commerce nomination tomorrow.
In Fd.iration Be'.ty Jo Kin?,
Jo Mover and Eelvn Steele are
candidate:-- for the $p nomination.
The SP primary in Kngineering
Hill find four candidates seeking
two nominations. The two seats are
now held by CP representative in
SC. Robert lee Bolin, (arleton

hill-bill-

J

Si

have a rare tomorrow.
Party chairman Dun MilloU
said the SP would name a candidate in Graduate School before
the December SC election.
The Students' Party race in Arfci
and Science has a group of six candidates seeking one nomination.
This representative post Ls presently held by Whayne Priest S,
SC elections chairman, who Ls not
seeking
this fall.
A heavy vote U expected in thU
tlx candidate race with no candidate having a decided edge as (

4

.

* If

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IT8

2 -'- KHi: KENTUCKY KERNEL. Tucvt.iv, Nov. 18,

Students'' Party
Continued From I'aKf 1
chairman, announced that votinc
will b by II) card. Thr voter must
riu,.'--t the ballot of tlie party
piimary he wants to vote in.
It was also announrrrl that a
otrr may vote in only one party
primary.
Ton.orrow's primary Mill mark
the first time in campus history
that both political parties have
the primary to name candidates for sturirnt jrovernment. The
polls will he open from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. and the elections committee will begin counting; the vote
immediately after the polls close.
Priest said the counting will be
done in Room 218 of the SUH with
t he results in both primaries being
posted hourly in tki hall of the
building.

Commerce (rouj
To AUriiclMrHinjj'
College of Commerce
faculty
members will partk Amte In the
"Vsociatlon
Southern
meeting in Atlanta. trf'ov.
AttendinK are Dr. Hubert H.
St roup, who will present a paper
on '"Capital Accumulation iti Kentucky" and W. W. Ilaynes. who
will present a paper on. "Two
Studies in Reorganization."
Martin King, will criticize a
paper on "Changed Retailing in
the .Sou tii" and J. I.. Massie, will
lead an informal discussion on
"Managemenf Curricnlar."
Frank Coolsen. will discuss a
paper on "The South as an Industrial Market."
Dr. L. II. Carter, Dr. Carl Cabe
and visiting lecturer Dr. Ptter
Vandome will also attend.
Et-o-

21-2- 2.

D or in Men El ec t
er
As Governing Council Head
I Ioffin i

Larry Hoffmeir was elected
president of the Men's Residence
Halls Governing Council on Thursday. Nov. 13.
Hoffmeir, a sophomore" Atj major, defeated Dave Bauer 336 to
124 for the presidency.
George

r'
Electric
Heaters
open 6 p. m. price 65c
5 ACADEMY AWARDS
'in-co-

Ganter defeated Bob Scott

236

for Vice President.'
Tom Cherry was elected secretary, and Arthur Cox defeated
A. V. Hash for chief justice of the
Council.
Willis Haws, student adviser to
the Council said that they had a
good turnout as 477 out of a possible 815 votes were cast. This Is
an increase of 170 over last year.
Haws feels the reason for the
heavier vote as due to good
to

"231

weather which enabled the placing
of the voting booth In the .center
of the quadrangle.
Saturday night the Dorm Council will sponsor a dance at Bowp.m. Little
man Hall from
Enos and the Tabble Toppers will
be the main attraction.

Tennessee Williams

penned it!
Elia Kazan
produced it!
Marlon Brando -

8--

Vivien Leigh

12

Honesty is the best policy. And
remember, the person who cheats
is the person who makes the best
grades.

Karl Maiden Kim Hunter
"A STREETCAR NAMED
DESIRE"

Courl Tram
Leaves For Mod
Wool

High Schoolers To Visit
UIC For Opportunity .Day
Thursday is 'Opportunity Day"
at UK for hish .school seniors
throiiRhout Kentucky.
The purpose of the program,
.sponsored by the College of
and Home Economics, is to
provide high school seniors and
their parents with information
about career opportunities.
Ir. Frank CI. Dickey will open
the program with a formal welcoming:, after which Dean Frank
J. Welch of the College of Agriculture and Home Economics will
speak on "You Are Needed in
Agriculture and Home Economics.'
Following the initial welcoming.?
there will be a panel discussion
for young men. The topic of the
discussion will be' "Making the
Aml-cultu-

re

Harper. VMCA director, and a faculty advisers rom the College of
Agriculture and Home Economics.
The program will close with
tours and conferences for parents
and students. There will be opportunities for personal visits with
faculty members and business representatives to further discuss
career opportunities in agriculture
and home economics.

Campus Parly
Continued From Page,

The UK moot court team leaves
today for the regional round of
the National Moot Court Competition in St. Louis Nov.
Linza 13. Inabnit
and Gross
C. Lindsay, third year law students, will represent the University. They will argue in the fir.st
round against the University of
Kansas City, Missouri team.
The regional round is sponsored
by the St. Louis Bar Association
and Washington University of St.
Louis.. The national competition Is
sponsored by the 'New York, City
Bar Association.
19-2- 1.

1

sought renomination this time.
The Campus Party has no primary race in Graduate School. The
Most of A College Educatioiu"-Member- s party plans to name a candidate
of the panel are gradu- here before the filing deadline for
ates of Agriculture and Home Eco- the SC election next month. There
nomics and representatives of busi- is no seat at stake in Pharmacy
ness, agricultural industries and. this fall.
research as well as agricultural
wiot- professions and production. '
VISIOh
Supporting the student's view on
the panel will be Klein Shipp,
CatiMMi lra 2 PM
agriculture major.
TUES.
NOV. 18
At the same time, a similar discussion will be held concerning
"ANDY HARDY COMES
opportunities in home economics
HOME"
for women. In addition to the panel
discussion a style .show is planned. Mickey Rooney - Patricia Breslin
For parents, a panel discussion
on the topics, "Meeting our reALSO
sponsibilities to Students,"
Is
"THE HUNTERS"
scheduled. Serving on this panel
Robert Mirchum - Robert Wagner
will be Dean Doris M. Seward,
Dean Leslie Martin, Kenneth

Smipsoii Nametl
Pi Kap Proitlent

.Mike

Mike Simpson was elected president of Pi Kappa Alpha recently.
Other new officers are Dave May,
vice president;
Mike Vaughan,
secretary; and Dan Salter,

BLUE
IC

mw: Special!
And
A BEEF BARBECUE
For Only

38c'

Home of the College Folks

Tues.

& Wed. Only
NOV. 18rh . 19rh

683 S. Broadway

Phone

4-43-

73

BLUE K
MR. AND MRS. JOHN INNES, Proprietors

2nd feature
"FLAMING FRONTIER"
(Cinemascope)

RESTAURANT

Private Rooms for Parties
Reasonable Prices
"High Fidelity Music for Your Dining Pleasure"

,

ii

A DELICOUS MILKSHAKE

on So. Lime across from

the Administration

BWg.

Scoop-- See

first color filmization

of Cape Canavero Launch-

-

TODAY And WED.

m9"ROCKETS ROAR"
(9:30 oniy)

r

mmsm

K

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'

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High-score- rs

Admission 65c
The daring best seller that electriYouth in
fied 7 million.
Lore and War
Aldo Ray - Raymond Masscy

after the game
from Arrow

OPEN 6 p. m.

STL .

V

j-ff-l

fv'ir

...

Lili St. Cry

colorScope

"THE NAKED AND THE
v

DEAD"
2nd feature

David Brian - May Wynn

"WHITE SQUAW"
(9:25 only)

THE

-

Jl1

'

You'll be proud as a coach with a
new star halfback when you take
the wraps off this new Arrow
sports wear. That's a Twin Tartan
shirt on the man at the left a
time-save- r
in cotton wash and
wear. Another twin idea the pullover knit shirts on the man at the
right and his date. The sweater?

VJSMS

f'

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f

Coming Nov. 26th
"THE BOLSHOI BALLET'

V

FTHaiiaMCffiCq
f

IIXINCTON-KINTUC-

im

IIV

last
II. iu

TIMES TODAY

a. m.,

1

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model.
Knit shirt, $5.00 up; other shirt,
A

AT

2:05, 5:15, 940
:

BIG .COUNTHY"

smart new

urn

crew-nec- k

$5J)Qu p; swea tf r.

duett,

$7-.-

up.- -

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!i

SNEAK PREVIEW TONIGHT At 7:30
Two Great Stars In A Hit You'll Love And Rave
About. See The Sneak At 7:50 p.'m. plus
"BIG COUNTRY" at 5:05 or 9:40 p. m.

wow
Young Stars

first m fashion

AS

A--

1
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Shirts for any date
. . .while you wait

B

Young Love In The Happy Talk of War
WeVe a storeful of Arrow wash-an- d
wear
shirts. All the newest collar styles in oxfords

and broadcloths, white, solid colors and
patterns, French and regular cuffs. Look in
soon and see them for yourself.
Wagner VYvnter Hunter
nam una mi.i

im

djllman hosih iiukoi:

COLOR

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1333

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Mir
777 IT--

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MUM!,

Southern Unions End
RcgtQiia J Mee I inir Here

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weekend conference of delegates from 2,i Southern schools was
held at lK this weekend. ...The Saturday session, pictured above,
narred the host school for the next year's session and selected the
regional officers for next year.
A

CANDIDATES IN TOMORROW'S PRIMARY
Ar

Home Ec

a )1

STl DKNTS' r.HTY
I.rroy S. Vi Muil.in
B. !'

.Too

K,iy

Eans

Engineering

(2

Robert" Lee Bolin

seats)

C.irleton

Godsey

Colin Lewis
Ed Thomas

Graduate

i

yn i Buckner
Steve C!.irk
Tdyirr Jones
Wavno Wilson
Phil Cox
Ectty Greene
John Bailey
Dick Watkins
Harold Hicks

Terry Kuestcr
Ectty Jo King
Jo Mover
Evelyn Steele

j)

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kh.f

NO PRIMARY RACES

Robert K. Hunt
Robert Manchester

s

al-.-

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Education

PAHTY

Fi Ant us
Charlotte Bniley
Lynn.i Chase

Thimns J.rboe
Hr:t Kirw.ni
Judy Schrini
Garrl S.pple
Rrbcrt Barrett

Commerce

S

Rice'

.Mitchell

Jair.cs n.eji.tnd
Gecr;i.T Ar.n W.ilkcr
iii'c "VT.iry Billinss

A&S

AMPI

C

M,nti.-i!i-

Dick Vimont

Pharmacy
NO SEAT AT STAKE
Candidate unopposed in primary: nominated for general election in December.

MALE'

Vote Tomorrow

.

This CHRISTMAS Give The
Personal Gift - The Gift That

E.

Prescriptions
Fountain
o Cosmetics
o Men's Toiletries
FREE PARKING

STUDENTS'

PAKTY PRIMARY

O

SPENGLER STUDIO
N.

PHARMACY
The Prescription Center
915 S. Lime
Near Rose

Only You Can Give
Your PORTRAIT

Cor. Main & Lime

Phone 26672

ASK FOR THE SP BALLOT
These Candidates
Will Be Your Nominees- -

REAR OF STORE

Merit Rather Than Affiliation

Open 7 a.m. to 10 p.m.

A CITIZENSHIP AWARD

Founded 1956

for

-

Outstanding
IS

Air-Ag-

e

Citizenship
If you're out on a limb abou t
choosing your cigarette, remember this: more people

ANNOUNCED

smoke Camels than any
other brand today. The costly Camel blend has never
been equalled for rich flavor

It will be awarded annually to the Air Science II Cadet
who in the opinion of his, classmates exemplifies this

quality.

and easygoing mildness. The
best tobacco makes the best,
smoke.

The Archie L. Roberts Agency, represented locally by
the men who's picture appear below, takes great pride

Escape from fads

in sponsoring this award.

and fancy stuff

Have a real

rv

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Archis L. Roberts
General Agent

Jesse Noble
Special Agent

oi.V

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tnr
.

,

j.

.

j

Jimmie Younj
Special Agent

Representing

It might not
Agency

Office--- !

193 Indian Mound

be the

final solution,
but a Camel would help!"

ndianapolis Life Insurance Co.

,0 A

49621
I

7

..

.

cigarette -have a CAMEL

I

7

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.

10 .1.)

-

i

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Soutlierii co-- . into the Futme." iven by C Shaw MKN I
bnr and W.n.'I.: '1.
ronoludrrl t linr Smith. iec.tnal adi-or- .
refened to
7 1!. :M4
- 'P. i
TiTtini: ot student the oer:'ioW(!inc of the school,
ninth anniT
CI KIT K Ji - A Stre-icjN tr
m krncl.
ui.ions at UrT "ilus
and t'oe difficult ta.'ij in store foi
Pe- ire." 7 Oil. 11 (M).
A total (if 110 delegates took p.nt tlii- student unions in opip.u with
'
I Miur.c
ont ter." ; :t
in the theme of the conference, them.
FAMILY
The Naked ;itn tl
"A Look Into The Future."
UIv Vice President Hr. No M.
4" 10 IS
l)e;u!."
The feature of tho two-d.i- y
Chamberlain, f 111 flier elal)ontit".';
uro"White S'.m.iw." 0 2
gram was a series of 12 topics dis- upon the theme, welcomed the stuKI N II'CKY ' Pesirr? Pn.'er fi e
cussed in poup sessions Friday. dents and
that more
7 '!. ;) J7
i":ns." J 11. ;m. 4.
The topics, selected by student emphasis be placed on students TKANI)
'
Ibe Ilu Co'
union directors, included tho value woikue; and p.nini; then- own
oa. a o,, 0 40
II 11.
of student opinions, and student wajs fhioii:rli college.
" .."it
ii ak
v
interest polls. The workshops also
covered role' of the college union
on a collccr campus, and the value
of expanding the union program
LET WINTER CATCH
with unusual ideas ami ' uimmicks"
for publicity and decoration.
YOU. WITH SLICK TIRES
The purpose of the conicrrnce
was to exchange, ideas be i ween coj.
Hove them recapped in ONE DAY at
h'ac unions,
programs
bPtwrrn unir.ns and sUir.ulatc inLEXINGTON US TIRE CO., 131 Midland tel. 2 3020
terests in college student union
Some warrantee on retreads as on new tires. 14" and 15" firps recorped
activities. Study philor-ophicof
Also new U. S. Royal regular and winter frcad.
collepe union programs and improved opeiations of the regional
organisation were
covered.
Saturday's business meeting elecChoose the tire best suited to your rcedj
ted its olficcrs for next year's conand the value best suited to your
ference to be held at North Caropocketbook.
lina State. The new chairman is
........
Woody Norcork of Davidson College and the vice chairman is:
1
Richard Mashburn of Florida
A and M.
I
U'LO
The keynote address. "A Look

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momi: (;rmi:

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* The Kentucky Kernel
atr4

Univfrsity of Kentucky
th Port Office at I iinjrtofl, Kentucky at
c1m mailer under the Art of Marrh 3, 1870.
FuMmhed four timrT wrrk during the regular athnol year etcrpt bolide yt and eiama.
SIX DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

Jim Hampton,

Editor-in-Chi-

ef

Larry Van 1 loose,

Anbt ErrEBsoN, Chief Sews Editor

Chief Sports Editvt

Ann Roberts, Society Editor

rMrr Ashlet,

Business Manager

Norman McMullin, Adcertising Manager

John Mitchell, Staff Photographer
Marilyn Lyvew and Judy Tennebaker, Proofreaders

If.

TUESDAY'S NEWS STAFF

Dan

Aijck

Millott,

Editor

Faul Scott,

fl fDniNC, Associate Editor.

Sports Editor

The University Kariio

VfIItF

Superlative Sounds
Towering above McVey Hall is a
radio antenna from which are trans
rru'tted, seven days a week, a series

of musical and cultural programs
whose excellence is not even approached by any other station in
the Bluegrass.
WBKY
From the University's
studios in McVey, a staff of 22 radio
experiarts students gain
ence while bringing to Central Kentucky an exceptionally rewarding experience in listening. They broadcast
from 4:59 to 10:05 p.m. daily.
For the listener whose nerves have
become frayed to the limit of their
endurance by a constant barrage of
commercials, insipid soap operas and
boiler-factor- y
I be
bellowing frequently masquerading as music nowadays, peace is but a flick of the dial
-

on-the-a-

ir

and Donizetti's The Elixir of Love-- in
addition to Oklahoma! and Sew
Girl in Town from the Broadway
stage.
Among the classical music on
WBKY's schedule are works by a
score of the world's great and near-grecomposers, present and past.
In addition, they also feature regular
roundtable discussions, reports on
campus events and news, all student-produce-

M

The Readers9 Forum

at

d.

An Offer Of Help
To The Editor:

May we oiler our assistance in your
Unfortunately, there is a built-iconstruction of a catapult? Since this
fly in the WBKY ointment. It is an
requires more intelligence than shootFM station, broadcasting on a freing paper wads, yon will undoubtedly
quency of 91.3 megacycles. Conse- need technical assistance. Therefore,
quently, it is impossible to receive in the interest of good sportsmanship,
the station on an ordinary AM radio we offer the services of as many of our
receiver. For those who do not have freshman engineers as you may rea combination AM-Freceiver or an quire in the building of your catapult.
FM tuner, yet who would like to
We await and anticipate the comaway.
take advantage of the superb propletion of the project. With the exOn the one hand, WBKY has no grams offered, there is little else to
pert engineering aid we are offering
commercials because it is a Unido but borrow, buy or build on FM you, we
expect the first batch of pudversity facility; on the other, its protuner.
ding before the first snow. We hope
grams are selected to be concomitant
We understand , that WBKY has the quality of this pudding is higher
with the University's aim of providhopes of converting to AM transmisthan that of the
ing an atmosphere of cultural growth sion, although this is not immediately Kernel.
and emphasis.
foreseen. For one thing, it is expenIncidentally, during our recent raid
In both instances, it has succeeded sive; for another, it requires a frewonderfully.
quency allocation from the Federal
During November, for instance, Communications Commission
a
some of WBKVs
presenrather complicated process in itself.
MidBe that as it may, the station's
tations include Shakespeare's A
summer Night's Dream; the French staff members are to be congratuSartre's No lated on the excellence of. radio enexistentialist Jean-PaBy ED CREAGII
Exit; readings of their own works by tertainment they are offering to CenWASHINGTON (AP)-W- hat
ever beDylan Thomas and William Faulktral Kentucky listeners. We hope the
ner; scenes from Cyrano tie Bergerac, day isn't too far off when they will be came of that old prejudice against professors in politics?
and Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesable to transmit on regular broadcast
Tinie was and not too long a"o
man.
frequencies so AM set owners will be xvhen a cap and gown was like a skeleton
The station already has presented able to enjoy what we believe to be in the closet of a man
to
aspiring
Puccini's La Boheme, and upcoming among the best programming
public oliice. "Practical" men, not theare Offenbach's The Tales of Hoffman
orists, were what the voters wanted
n

ul

-

or so the legend went.
But more and more professors
are
proving themselves practical indeed xvhen
it conies to getting elected.

Coosaw Goes Modern
BEAUFORT, S. C. (AP)-T- he
twentieth century has reached Coosaw
Island. The horseless raiiiae has nr.
lived.
This was made possible by a powered ferry boat, built to cany passengers and one automobile. It recently
made its maiden voyage between
Coosaw Island and Sam's Point on
nearby Eary's Island. '
No automobile had ever been on
the island before then, except for
load building machinery which prepared the rough gound lor streets
;md highxvaxs. A semblance ol roads
in the past xveie made by ox carts.
was purchased by

Coosaw Society, an
oiganiatiou, like the island lesidents
for the last centiuv.
Coosaw Island once was a plantation glowing high quality cotton.
rhe island now has about 10 lamilics
all-Negr-

4

Bob Adajws
-

Dan IIoltzclaw
David Crock Err

Henry Canxrell
Lionel Frais
Norman Cravens
(You may be

experts at building
catapults, gentlemen, but the only
type of paper you are qualified to
judge is that which comes in handy
rolls of about 1,000 tissues each.

THE EDITOR)

Professors In Politics

non-music- al

the

Ronald Stewart

M

Tour-tissues-a-wee-

The leity boat

on the " Tower of Babble," we noticed
that the Journalism Building is seiv-in- g
no useful purpose. Therefore, we
suggest that it be com cited to an
engineering labomtory that would aid
the progress oi civilization (instead of
hindering it).

o

Three, o: thelG men ncwlyilettcd

who fish, work in sea food factories
as civilian'" workers on Parris Island,
and as farm hands. They keep their
cars on Sam's Point. On the island are
some marsh tacky ponies, a lexv cattle
and about 2i) oxen, used in hauling
and ploxving. In addition to the lew
houses or cabins, there is a thurclrand
a school.
All traxol heretofore between Sam's
Point and the island has been by
means of
bateaux. As often
as not the bateaux haxe been propelled by the use of Hal boards, "skulling"
in the use of which many of the isoar-pulle- d

landers are expert.
A tegular schedule

and rate of
fates haxe not xct been established
for the powered ferry boat.
In the past, with no regular schedule lot bateaux, the tare asked- was
"whatexer you think it tight, boss."
Negto commuters paid 10 cents and
xisitors paid
to 50 cents.
-

to- -

the Senate come from college backgrounds; Democrats Eugene J. McCarthy
of Minnesota, who used to teach economics and sociology at St. Thomas
College in St. Paul; Gale McGce of
Wyoming, now a history professor at the
state unixcTsiiy; and Jennings Randolph
of West Virginia, who has been on the
faculties of Daxis and Elkins College and
Southeastern I'nixersity.
They won't be lonesome in (he Senate
if tluy craxe some academic shop (alk.
Elexcn piesent Senators admit to past
or present links xsith college lacullies,
namclx:
Eulbiight ol Aikansas,
J. William
Rhode's scholar who Used to be piesi-elen- t
of the I'nixcisity ol Aikansas.
Paul Douglas of Illinois, hfi 1M xeais
a I'liiMi sily of Chicago economics
pio-lesso-

r.

Oregon Eaxv School.

.Thomas E. Maitin of Iowa, onetime
teacher at the University of Iowa.
Mike Mansfield of Montana, for 10
v
years a history
piofessor at the
of Montana.
Theodore F. Green ol Rhode Island,
who once taught Roman law at Brown.
Karl E. Munch of South Dakota, who
taught speech and social science at the
State Normal School in Madison, S. D.
Uni-xersit-

who

Ralph W..Yarborough

did a stint of lecturing at the University of Texas Eaw School.
Thomas E. Hennings ol Missouri, an
at Washington I'nixersity and
Benton College ol Eaxv.
Sules Bridges of New Hampshire, once
on the extension stall of the Unixersity
of New Hampshire.
This adds up to an egghead brigade of
11 in the next Senate, and that doesn't
tell the xvhole story.
A number ot other Senators are entitled to wear the Phi Beta kappa key,
K'serxcd
lor the biainicst ol college
students. Among them: Eistcr Hill and
John J. Spaikman of Alabama,
John
Sicnnis oi Mississippi, liancis Can- of
South Dakota, Mike Monioney ol Oklahoma. Spessaiel Holland of I loi ida and
A. Willis Robcitsou ol Virginia.
-

Then

the i c is

John

F.

kennc-d-

of

Massachusetts, a cum lauele graduate of
Harvaicl, a Pulitei
author
and the holdei of moie houotaiv
than ou can .shake a diploma at.
It so happens 'that all 11 of the pic-suor burner college tcachci
aie
Demoouts, w ith the exception of Mai tin,
Munch and Biidgcs.
,
Piie-winnin-

ele-gie-

n
Humphrey of Minnesota, who
once taught political science at Macahs-tc- i
College.
Wax no Moise ol Oicgon, loimei
lessen and clean el . the. L'niuiiit) - ol
1

1

I

c

1

1

it

* nic

UK Men

KENTUCKY KERNEL.

Tucby.

Nov. 18, IT,S-

-1

Wliite Tie Evenings

Like "7"
In Women

for and about WoFJIGFl

Ball Gowns Glow

By ROGER R, FORT IN
What type of personality does a
man look for in a woman?
By keeping our ear to the
ground, nose to the wheel, and
eyes open; and tlien trying to
work in that contorted position;
we heard the following opinions
voiced around campus.
Men want a woman who is talkative enough to hold up her end
of a conversation, but the men
prefer that she be intelligent
enough to know what she is talk-

ing about. She should have an
inquiring mind, interested in all
things, including her date.
The men particularly like a con- federate woman. She should realize
that he does everything for a reason, and rather than fighting his
decisions she tries to understand
his reasons.
Frank expression of opinions is
a very good quality in a woman
but she should discuss her views
rather than argue them.
When a man is thinking seriously about a woman, he considers
it important to discuss frankly
inch subjects as ambition, religion,
tcx, and finances; in order to discover how many things they actually have in common. At this
time a woman should be honest
and sincere.
The woman who makes a man
feel that she needs his moral and

In Gleaming Color
toy MARY WINN LEAKE

Ball gowns glow in gleaming color amid the luxury of poli.vhed
floors, crystal, captivating music and beautiful chandeliers.
At the University of