xt7jsx646309 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jsx646309/data/mets.xml   Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station. 1929 journals kaes_circulars_236_annual_report_1929 English Lexington : The Service, 1913-1958. Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station Circular (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n. 236 text Circular (Kentucky Agricultural Experiment Station) n. 236 1929 2014 true xt7jsx646309 section xt7jsx646309 1 1
ing _
` ``i`` S1TY OF KE
,\`»l, 1 UNIVER NTUCKY
bc 1
,,,,,1 COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
11 :1 . . . .
mh EXYBIRSIOII DlV1S1OIl
111:11 THOMAS P. COOPER, Dean and Director
111i1\
11`111
11111 CIRCULAR NO. 236
1 110
111 1
FOR THE
11113;. 1
11 111 YEAR ENDED DECEMBER 31, 1929
111111 ·
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11x1‘11 l 4-H Club boys iitting zi dairy heifer for show.
¥l)1`111 1
Lexington, Ky.
1, I g Published in connection with the agricultural extension Work Caffiéd
[S11!)  1 °“_bY €00D€1‘0.ti0n of the College of Agriculture, University 0f Kentucky,
with thé U. S. Department of Agriculture, and distributed in fu1‘lh€F3¤¢€
blvuk ' °Y me Work provided for in the Act of Congress of May 8, 1914.

 Letters 0f Transmittal
Lexington, Kentucky.
January 3, 1930. A
President Frank L. l\lcVey,  
University of Ke11tucky.
My dear President MeV ey:
I ll2lV€ the honor to present the Ellllllltll report of the .
Division of Agricultural Extension of the College of Agricul. . wl
tu1·e, University of Kentucky, for the year e11ded Decembe1·31,  · l‘l‘
1929. In this report will be found a statement of the varicus  L wl
activities of tl1e past year, a list of publications, and a finaiiuitil   llllf
Sl.'lJC<‘lH(}11t of receipts and expenditures.  .  
 l lll
Respectfully,   ‘lll
 _ am
'l`11oM.xs Coorniz, Dean and Director.   llll
j las
· Lexington, Kentucky. _l ll"
January 10, 1930. lll
Honorable Flem D. Sampson, L (sh
Governor of Kentucky. · (__)
Sir; 11<
l
In accordance with an act of the Legislature of the SW6    
of Kentucky, approved March 15, 1916, l lierewith sub111it thc , N,
annual report. ot the Division of Agricultural Extension of the ; Z1
College of Agriculture, University of Kentucky, for the yea? . in
e11ded December 31, 1929.  — P,
l Respectfully, l ; ,,
  sr
FRANK L. MOVEv, President.   k~
 L al

 CIRCULAR NO. 236
l ’
mg lit of counties that had sultered most from the flood, made appro-
Tk priatioiis of their ovvn in order to continue eounty agents with-
ud I out interruption.
An encoura·r‘in¤· feature of the situation with count a¤·ents
  c~ an y c>
HQ , is the reduced number of changes in personnel, Frequent
ut Q elmuge in personnel is a demoralizing influence on any organiza-
_ tion. lt is gratifying to report a reduction in number of changes
. in this or<>·anization des iite the constant tem itation of hi ‘her
et- ·’ "
0_ salaries elsewhere.
QS ’ . ,
.,  , Au analvsis ot the records shows that altho countv agent
U ` . . . “ ° .
g work as a protession, is comparatively new and many counties
have started it o11ly in the last three years, the average period
, of service for a county agent is 4.94 years, and the agents average
Q 3.TS years’ service in their present counties.
hc t The >rinei>al statistics of the work of count agents for
I O
M J 1929 are as follows;
er  
0}.  _ N0. counties with agents ___....................................,.................... . ........... 98 -
F11` N0. communities building extension programs ............................ 841
ty - No, community leaders in community-built programs ....._.._..._... 6,972
in. No. demonstrations by county agents and community leaders.. 20,615
HE No, result demonstrations carried thru year ___________..__,____,,__._...... 13,221
_ I   No. farm visits made by gents ............................................................ 57,453
R ‘ N0. farms visited .._......._.,___,.__.__.......,,................................................ 24,463
` N0. h0ll1€ Visits made by agents ____________._..,__,.,......_.,.,..................,___. 2,805
ty _ No. homes visited ____....______________________...__,,,_.,._......................................... 1,607
` ’ ffice ........................................ 76,979
Ht . N0. off' ll l t' · O v
jb , 106 Ca S re a ive to woik telephone   53,656 H
‘ ;_ N0- individual letters written ....______________________________,_________....._....,..... 64,536
HC- g
'0 I  2
l- .  Meetings Held
ill-  5 . . _
I 1 N0- lmiilllls meetings for local leaders ........................................ 630
IC   AHGITQHIICG of local leaders, ____,,_____________,_________________________________._____,__,, 5,272
IS   N0- demonstration meetings held __________________________________________,_________ 4,099
  Aftenclance .....___.___,___________________________________________________________________________________ 81,168
, “ 

 6 Kentucky Extension Cn·cula2· N0. 236 E
No_ farmers’ institutes and ShO1`t COL11‘S€S ...... . ............................... 12] 6 but]
Attendance ........................................ - ------------------------------------··-------------.... 8,128 PTO
Junior club camps assisted ............................-...----.-----------·------......... 12 othe
Total attendance (including adults) ................................................ 13,68s hibi
Other meetings ..................................-------- - ...-----------------------.-·-------.----.... 6,705 Tho
Attendance ................................................ . ..--.--.......-··-.............---------.--.... 466,005 hon)
_ ot s
Miscellaneous _
No, breed associations organized, dairy cattle ............................ 3 V
No, breed associations organized, other stock ................................ 15 —
No, cow testing associations organized ........................................ 12 _ hav
No, cows in such associations .............................. l ............................. 281 ,
i No. farms terracing .............................................................................. 145 ;  
Acres terraced ...................................................................................... 2,110 ·`   
No, farms installing drainage systems ................... L ........................ 332 ‘  
Acres drained ...................................».................................................... 2,814 i  
No. water systems insalled ................................................................ 37    
' No. lighting system installed ............................................................ 17  
No, farms clearing land ........................................................................ 330  
Acres of land cleared ............................................................................ 1,670 V  i
HOME DEMONSTRATION      
At present, 26 counties employ home demonstration agents.  
The work in each county is carried on under the leadership of _  
the home clemonstration agent, thru an organization known as ‘ l 
the "County Homemakers’ Association," which had made pos-
sible the development of 1·ural women by offering opportunity _
for their participation in many activities outside of the routine 1
of houskceping. The home demonstration agent is given help in
organization, methods and subject matter by supervisors and ,
specialists from the College of Agriculture.  ·
" oil s
PROGRAM OF WORK  ,
.... {  i1
Program undertaken in any county is based upon the Pak *1 {ll
. . . 1 0
ticular needs and interests of the hornemakers in that county HS  _ my
determined by community surveys, discussions, questionnairési  l Thr
  (N
etc. After the necessary information has been obtained, tht  v Cm
leaders representing the various communities within the county,  

  .
Axnmtctl Report for 1929 7
[21 build the annual county prog‘ram of work. In addition to this
{28 pi·Ogi·iiiii each community homemakers’ club selects a number of
12 other activities such as community improvement, recreation, ex-
ist hihits, fairs, tours, picnics, ete., as part of its local program.
705 These extra activities have done much to widen the vision of the i
N5 hoineinaker, to develop her latent talents and to foster a spirit
ot service.
» HOBIE IMPROVEMENT
1; As a result of the home improvement work 422 women now
12 have attractive, convenient, and well ordered kitchens. These
281 . _ _ _.... .   _. »»ie   - · _
145   o...    · $
110 i         _.  ,
332 i   iiier   —.=».e   . at - ~»ti V o · i  ..   ...s 5  /
B14   t»—»    .i.._    i ~»~   -  i»     —·it i=·· ·t   .,.    ``‘‘`;    
37 r ` :___ i~..»—’i~7`~i`<;M/Ir; J V ` V ` }  ’’*'‘ bil ` - & _¢ §` ;>§,> :;,w;: .j*‘~".. · t ' ‘
   ‘ ‘‘‘      c  -· M l ‘‘‘‘’“   ‘‘l‘`’·"f  
330   ~~‘;;,.      —     .».’ U   "  ‘
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670   i.*=                ,l‘· . .  
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 »     V ·‘·=.—·—·    ..  .,._ Y      ·
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ity _   ·   _ .¤ ‘i'i   _,   '::_·"` ~»   .—\~ *2 
ine - ‘ . ‘   ``‘‘       ; .·s..   `¤i= -  i    ’ le  
. `  ` - A I 2} €`f.. » `»‘‘* "·       #    
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ind ·   . » ae  s.   , .
i   r.“   —   —· i "   Q, E
-=-»»   ’ ··  Us .._i   . ·> =.
_ Note the convenient arrangement of this remodeled kitchen, also the
011 stove and kitchen sink. "
me , lllllwovetl kitchens have saved steps, backs and CliSp0sltlOHS.
_ aq Most of the improvements were made with a very small eXp€11Cl1·
res lH1‘€ of money. One woman made 78 improvements for less
HN; than $5.00. Many hoinemakers have learned to manage m01‘G
ty E Qfllcloiitly and are saving inueh time and energy in doing Sllfill
1 i

 8 Kcoztuc/.*y Extetizsiooz C7;7'ClIZ(l)` N0. 236 1
routine tasks as (1lSll\\'2lSlll11g', bed 11121l\\`tll 11t t11*111 lllll>€('l(*S. ll2ll'(1 11011*3%. ])lll'(* 111111111 I
2:1111 Sl(‘$ll1}' lll‘l'\’l‘S 211111 that the diet 1111 2111 the 111e111111·1·s 01* t111· .
family 1·1111t21i11s tl111s1· things 111~11ess:11*y i!()1' g*1*11111 (11g(_’S11()111, l)l‘0p(‘1'  
e1i111i1121t11111. l`t_‘SlSl2lllt‘(‘ to i11t1·eti1111 211111 21 g*1·111·1*211 e0111liti1111 111 _
g11111l heultli. lt is with these points 111 11111111 that the food tlllll
11ut1*iti1111 \\`(1l'l{ was ]>l2lllllO(1. 1)lll'lllQj the past _\'(‘2ll' 3.113 l1111111·- _
lll2tl{(‘l'S .lil'()]ll 169 (iOllllIll1]lll`l(‘S l’(‘|)Ol'l`(’(1 10,064 lIll1)1‘0\'(‘(1 p1*:1e·
tiees 111 lll(‘l`ll()l1S of t’1>1111 p1*epu1*uti1111. `
A 1'(l(>l>(‘l‘éll'lV(‘ l)I'0j<‘(tl' with the 11()l'1l(‘l1lll1l'tl1 1)t‘p2“tl'llllQIll 1
te111·l11·s the ll(1lll(‘lllHl{Ol'S the 1*1g*l1t \'Z\l'l(*l`l<‘S 11t’ seeds 211111 small ]
fruits 10`]U1H1l1 uml (‘2ll'C l’01· 111 the {I2ll'(1(*ll 111 O1'(lC1‘ 10 get tl1e best 1, 
results. 211111 110w t0 pltlll C2lll1lll'lQ` 211111 storage budgets so {1510  
be assured that lll(‘l1‘ families will 11e well fed 11111*111g the winteir 1. 
The 1110st popular X\`01'1{ has been that relating t0 the r111t1*i·  ?
tion et tl1e family. The \VOlll(3ll have asked for studies of sucll  I

 Y
Ammal Report for 1929 9
se subjects as feeding the young child and adolescent child,
re vitianiins, essential niinerals for growth and health, calories,
re, acid forining foods, digestion, reducing and gaining diets.
id, They have learned to plan meals systematically and scientifically.
to Special emphasis has been placed on methods of teaching chil-
<~· dren to eat new foods.
’C7
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uci]  z A "wiIe Sil\'ll1§,` kiLehe11."

 10 Kentucky Eaptension Oireulavr N0. 236 1
Cnornnve. th
Work in clothing during 1929 included, (1) Dressmaking ad
made easy, (2) The costume complete, (3) Renovation and re.
modeling, (4) Dress decoration, (5) Millinery, (6) Children’s
clothing and (7) Tailoring.
' th
DRESSMAKING Mann. Easy Q C0
Dressmaking has always been a popular subject with the T
groups carrying the work. To be right, a dress must tit cor- ·
rectly, appear well-tailored and be comfortable, serviceable and Z
becoming. Woiiieii are taught how to use patterns and to cut and Sh
make dresses so as to avoid mistakes and unnecessary work and T is
at the same time achieve desired results. * H,
  th
V THE COSTUME COMPLETE  . H,
This program is planned for the purpose of demonstrating   w`
the value of thinking of clothes in terms of complete units, and H?
so, discourage haphazard buying. Each woman taking part as- , U
semblcs an outtit suitable for spring or summer wear. The dress. * m
which is the essential item, generally is made as a part of the Q M
class project, tho this is not required. The amount to spend.   H
clothes on hand that may be used, the purpose of the outfit, and
various phases of suitability are taken into consideration both  .
in planning and buying. The need and value of this work is
shown by the enthusiasm ot those taking part. One thousand. if
two hundred and twelve women reported improved practices ill L W
wardrobe planning as a result of this work. I ai
 · Q
RnNov.vrioN AND RnMoDEL1No. E H
In every county in which this program has been conduc’f<*d· i 
large numbers of discarded outer garments in good condition  
have been brought to class for discussion and suggestions for ,2 H
1ll2llil11§1` over. Most of these have been cleaned, dyed, and1‘¢   ti
paired according to the need, and made into useful and atT1‘¤l?‘   s·
tive garments, thereby affecting valuable savings. Ont   l:

 Anmml Report for 1929 11
. thousand, one hundred and seventy-nine women reported having
W A adopted improved practices in renovation and remodeling.
 
  CHILDREN ’s CLOTHING
This has included the layette, clothes for the little girl and
· the little boy, and decoration of children’s clothing. Hygiene,
I comfort, attractiveness and suitability have been emphasized.
  i Mimimnay
ud Z Because hats no longer have stiff foundations to give them
ml shape but must be molded to tit the head, the use of a hat block
ml = is essential to the simplest sort of millinery work. To meet this
` need, women have been taught to make inexpensive hat blocks
3 that are in every way satisfactory. One hundred seventy-five of
 g these were made in the State during the year. By their use
ng , women have been enabled to clean, dye, stiifen and reshape felt
vnd V and straw hats satisfactorily at home, as well as to make attrac-
3* _ tive fabric hats. A number of women have made their pin
   . money by renovating hats for their neighbors. One woman in
the · Madison County reports 39 hats made, using her block, within
nd. a period of ten months. Nine of these were dyed and 12 washed.
uid I -
oth  '. LANDSCAPE GARDENING
iis if Thru the cooperation of specialists in horticulture, the in-
ml- ` terest in beautification of the farm home grounds has become
ill] \\‘idespread. Twelve hundred women were enrolled in this proj-
p eat. As a result, 205 homes were repainted and 915 home
f  grounds were improved by additional plantings of shrubs, trees
. and tlowers.
my . (lOMMUNI'l‘Y Aoiriviriris p
'l"“  i The activities outside of the regular program of home-
fm   111Hl£·r»:j' *'¤ ,.2 i·;F°}‘q_  E3;   " '?;,, »  —,»—·M,  2,  ·· 4 i f    i P]
W ·** ¤=s饷·¥"  it ·.E-»    ’¥l— ~@ .     i.     ei—  r  .i V
. L, ,_._ iv  , ’   H  W ·r ~· \' ,    A ‘,~,.».,; ·   V- ` V;.  fg
'    l*     ’?¥   T”€“·*r;    .   ., gi _ or
.     "’ **51]-    ,     "    ,.·-   .i,· [ .i·.._   ‘ ¢3<""; /,,»  
{ ·· r#¤*·’él · I    sl      si.      ‘ hz
  ''ii   = ‘i`° /*7     “  ·l"     ‘        
. . ..``   { ·i,i “`¥ * ‘      M No at   ‘‘·   i s ,.i_   Yi i irii     iléts i ml
· L Qf ’i °—¢r  ’;_ 2-up   ‘ `     {-·¢’ __     L  4 Z     i 2
. .     A `/   o·‘‘·‘’  .1:`Y"?/ ~· = ss; ’ ·i»;_ , . VV—·     ’·o’;    ’·»  ,,  · ~-.. fx V
  w e   .  { QI _m,%:¤i,§;. ge,. , .  i °’ s   ·
V xs"' _~   · ‘   ~ ·‘ M o , xv
n  y. _ ;_ ‘ `T "  , .     l ).
’ ,. .  ‘ ` ~   { pi
I   ' ` d1
The main object of home iniprovenient inspection tours is to disseminate V m
valuable information but there are other pleasant features.
(‘(
REoRE.vr1oN i *>i
_ M Ul
Those who play together can work together to much bettn i
advantage. It is a well—l· devoted to recreation i11 the form of music, games, stunts,
1- 1 drainaties, etc. In addition to this tl1e clubs are given assistance
Jl ju earryiiig 011 1‘ee1‘eElti01i€ll activities for the entire community,
vd Que county ea1‘1‘ie(l 011 a eelility play contest. One county re-
*¥ . ported 17 clubs having parties for the community. Jefferson
County ll2lS taken the lead in recreation. Every club has given
_7 at least two 1'€C1’Cl·lTiO1121l ];)1`Og1'tl111S. These took the form of
. plays, lawn parties, white Cl()pl1Zl11lQ sales, fish fries, minstrels,
· picnics. In Jefferson County alone, 4,890 persons attended these
  programs.
  The appreciation of better 111usie has been encouraged
    tuuong the club meinbers for several years. As a result music
" 4 has become a deiinite part of the club program. Homemakers
i -1  enjoy and intelligeiitly appreciate bette1· music, singing, more
  P and better songs, and they sing together very well. Three
{   _ thousand, 0110 i1lllltll'C(T Zllltl twenty homes reported improved
4; 1   p1·actii·es i11 recreation this year.
      lIo11n1r.x1~:1;1lIl(*1ll2ll{L*1'S. vacation camps have been car1·ied 011 i11 Ken-
   _ lucky for ti years. ln 1929 the camps were held by districts, _
  ’  · where women froni several counties came together for a weekls
f i`  , progizun of 1'(‘Ul't*Elil(\11, rest, (j1'2l.iil'Sl1l2illSlll1) and inspiration. The
 i vamp is sponsored b_v the TI0lllGl112ll{Ql'S7 Assoeiatioii. No chil-
e? T