xt7jsx647b0p https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jsx647b0p/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680228  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 28, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 28, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7jsx647b0p section xt7jsx647b0p Tie Kentucky Kernel
The South's Outstanding College Daily

Wednesday Evening, Feb. 28,

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

19G8

Vol. LIX, No. 108

MSM:r Not Known If Fee Increase
in
To
Affect Summer Session

The question of whether or not the recently
increased
student tuition fees will
go into effect for the coming summer school
session seems to be still up in the air.
out-of-sta-

"I really don't know whether the increased
tuition for summer school will go into effect
this summer or not," said Mr. Ray Cumberledge,
Registrar's office, Tuesday night.
"We've already sent out a lot of publicity
about summer school, and I believe that it would
be difficult to get in touch with the people
concerned about an increase," he continued.

iVeu?

Dr. Don Clapp, from the office of the executive
vice president, agreed with Mr. Cumberledge
about the difficulty of getting in touch with
prospective summer school students and added,
"The decision on increased tuition was only
made yesterday, and it wasn't specific about
when the rates for summer school would be

Tutorial Bus

The Lexington Tutorial Program's "new" bus is not exactly new.
It was bought used about a month ago with help from the University YMCA. The bus is used to transport the tutors to their
working areas and for the program's activities.

raised."

-

in

S.

Orangeburg,

C, three

weeks ago were trying to kill
(lies eland Sellers, a leader of
Cothe Student
ordinating Committee.
Those Negro leaders are also
convinced
that the incident
which occurred at South Carolina State College is a preview
of what is to come at many
other black campuses. Some
leaders are urging black students to be ready to defend
themselves against police in
case riots break out on their
campuses.
Sellers, 23, was the only person arrested following the clash
between students and police in
He was one of
Orangeburg.
more than 30 persons who were
wounded when police opened
fire on protesting students on
the college campus.
Stanley Wise, another SNCC
leader, told a group of black
students at a meeting last weekend that the "whole episode"
at South Carolina State "was an
attempt by police to kill Cleveland Sellers."
Non-Viole-

11

Wise said at least two of the
students killed were
dressed like Sellers and had the
same hair style. The shootings
occurred at night. Sellers ducked behind a trash can when
police opened fire on the students, Wise added, and "that
trash can had 30 bullet holes
in it."

Dr. Thomas said National
Guardsmen
and police were
hiding in the yard of a friend
of his who lives across the street
from the campus. He said his
friend heard the command given
for police to fire. "The command was given to fire when
Cleveland Sellers appeared on
the scene," he said.
South Carolina State officials
and local police maintain that
no order to fire was even given.
However, Dr. Thomas said in
the radio interview that several

persons reported hearing a verbal command and a whistle prior
to the shooting and right after
Sellers appeared in the front
line of students.
The Southern Regional Council, a highly respected civil
rights group here, said in a
report on the Orangeburg incident, which was released Sunday, that many persons "said a whistle was blown
prior to the shooting and just
before the gunfire ceased."
The SRC's report also says
that "some of the most respectable adult Negro leaders were
in the aftermath of the shootings giving serious consideration
to a theory that a deliberate effort was made to shoot Sellers.
They cited as circumstantial
evidence similarities in size,
clothing or hair style to those
characteristics of Sellers among
the three fatalities."
42-pa-

15-1-

Dr. Glen wood L. Creech, vice
president for university relations,
said some 400 tickets will be
offered for sale to students under
a plan developed by the UK
Student Government.

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Fly A Kile

Ramsey Taylor, who headed the AIK study,
said the main factor in Kentucky's education
problems is "one of too much reliance on state

support."
State legislators
low"

have said the state's
fees constituted a
subsidy by Kentucky taxpayers.
te

The bill increasing nonresident tuition fees is
designed to limit the percentage of
students at a state university to 12 by 1972.
The percentage of nonresident students at
UK now is 23.

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Kernel I'hoto by Dick Ware

The increases came after a study by the Associated Industries of Kentucky (AIK), among other
groups, recommended the changes.

Republican congressman says a
proposal to make possession of
LSD a crime "is absolutely unenforceable." He said indications are that nearly two million students use the drug.
Rep. Tim Lee Carter of Kentucky made the comment to a
reporter Monday after a House
Commerce
subcommittee
on
which he sits heard Commissioner James L. Goddard of the
Food and Drug Administration support the administration bill. Mr. Goddard added,
however that he personally disagrees with possession penalties.
"I wouldn't propose that section if it were to 1h under my
jurisdiction," Mr. Goddard said,
expressing doubts alxnit the effect of such a penalty as a
deterrent. Administration law
enforcement
officials said it
would help them crack down
on use of the hallucinogens and
other dangerous drugs.
Rep. Carter said surveys on
LSD usage indicated that per- -

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if

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students are to remain the

Rep. Carter Charges
LSD Criminal Law
Is Not Enforceable

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All fees for
same as before.

WASHINGTON (AP)

NCAA Sells Out
The NCAA Mid-Earegional
basketball
tournament, sche6
duled for March
in Lexington, is a complete sellout.
It has been sold out for over
a week, but that did not dawn
on many Kcntuckians until eady
Tuesday, shortly alter the Wildcats clinched a berth in the tourney by nailing down the Southeastern Conference title with a
Monday night win over Aulmm.
That's when the UK ticket
office was swamped with calls
from would-l- e ticket buyers.
The latecomers found that the
last of the 8,600 tickets allotted
for public sale had disappeared
a week earlier, on February 20.

IK

I

three

Dr. Charles Thomas, president of the Orangeburg NAACP
and an instructor at South Carolina State, also has indicated
that the police were trying to
kill Sellers. His comments were
made in an interview broadcast
on Atlanta's Negro radio station, WOAK.

te

te

The increases ordered Monday by the council On Public Higher Education are to go into
effect no later than Sept. 1, 1968, but individual

Police At SCSC Charged
As Trying To Kill Sellers
GRANT
Hy WALTER
ATLANTA (CPS)
Many
Negro leaders in the South are
convinced that police who shot
and killed three black students

schools are left with the option of applying the
raises for the coming summer session.
Summer fees for
students at UK
were raised from $220 to $245. Tuition for the
full academic year was increased from $820to$9S0.

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haps 1.6. million high school and
300,000 college students use
the hallucinogen.
"How can we imprison 1.9
million students in the United
States?" Rep Carter asked.
Enforcement of the admmi
t rat ion's proposal would he ..
the Justice Department. A companion proposal would trau.sh-the Narcotics Rureau to the Jn
tice Department from the Tre.t-i-ur,

Department.
Rep. Carter appeared to he
in a minority in opposing the
administration proposal to make
LSD possession a misdemeanor
punishable by up to one year
in prison.
Rep. Paul G. Rogers
subcommittee
chairman, said he expects the
recommendation to be approved.
There is strong agreement on
the remainder of the bill, which
would stiffen penalties against
manufacture, sale, distribution
and possession for sale or distribution of hallucinogenic stimulant and depressant drugs.
(D-Fla.- ),

acting

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That was what students in a University art class were told to do Tuesday afternoon. Maybe that sounds like a snap course, but just think how well you would
do if you had to fly a kite you had made yourself. That was part of the class
assignment too. There are courses that are hard to get off the ground with, but
this has to be the ultimate.

-

--

-4

* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Teh. 28, 19f8

.

Queen City Brings
Talent To Oasis
By CHUCK KOEIILER
There may have been a few cheers from Monday night's game
still IxHincinn around Memorial Coliseum last night, hut it is
almost certain that no one present heard them.
For last night's audience was intent on the artistry' of two
virtuosos the individual talent of violin soloist Edith Peincmann
n
Cincinnati Symphony
and the fused talents of the

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The CSO (as it is commonly referred to) makes its trip to UK
at least once a year and impresses Central Kentucky with the fact
that the Queen City still maintains one of the country's top notch
orchestras.
Assistant Conductor
Unfortunately, conductor Max Rudolph was not on the podium
last night. Instead, assistant conductor Erich Krmzel filled the
maestro's absence.
With the youthful Kunzel at the reins, the CSO first performed
the "Seven Studies on Themes of Paul Klee" by the contemporary
composer, Gunther Schuller.
The CSO has a policy of putting at least one "modern" selection on each program. This practice keeps the orchestra on its
toes.
Personally, I think this is necessary. We need more recognition
for modem music. Not that we should discard the old masters,
but music (like art and literature) always has new things to say
and new ways to say them.
Anyway, suffice it to say that the Schuller piece with its basic
background and staccato "jabs" and its weird harmonics was
superbly performed. The audience, of course, received it rather
coldly in deference to the older "war horses."
Mrs. Peinemann and the orchestra then played Mendelssohn's
Violin Concerto in E minor. The soloist gavea flawless performance
and was particularly effective in the gypsyish third movement.
4th Symphony
His violin concerto, like many others, is subject to a famous
classification: in the first movement the artist shows what she can
do; in the second, how she feels; and, in the third, how glad she
is it's all over.
The second half of the program was devoted to Tchaikovsky's
Fourth Symphony, the first of his famous last three.
The lengthy first movement centers around a "fate motive."
(How many times has this label fallen on a symphonist?) It always
seemed to me that Tchaikovsky was finally proving to the world
that he was a symphonist as well as a lyricist and song writer.
A pastoral second movement gives way to the scherzo which
is played pizzicato throughout, save in the "marching" trio. The
fourth movement sees "Fate" shoved into oblivion, the return of
happiness and
Conductor Kunzel and the CSO did. a fine job, especially on
the bombastic finale. However, the brass section still needs improvement and there were a couple of "sore thumbs" in the first
s.

movement.
But these are fine points. The CKCLS sponsored another tint
concert and I'm sure it will continue to bring some of the world's
best musical talent to this cultural oasis.

The Department of Theater Arts Presents
PANTAGLEIZE
A

force To Make You Sad

By MICHEL

Guignol Theater
8:30 p.m.

DE GHELDERODE

Feb.

28-Marc-

3

h

FOR RESERVATIONS CALL 2929
TICKETS $2.00

$1.00 with Student ID

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MUlMMltlMal

CINCINNATI ORCHESTRA

100-MA- N

The Graduate' Is Terrifying

By DAVID HOLWERK
Analyst" is too complicated to
There is a very funny movie explain fully, but it is enough to
in town at the moment, "The say that a noted psychiatrist finds
Graduate."
"The President's himself with the job oftakingthe
Analyst" which just left town load off of the President of the
and is in Louisville also regis- United States and in so doing
tered high on my entertainment becomes a target for innumerchart.
able espionage organizations, in-

Both were highly satiric,

cellently photographed

cluding two of ours.

ex-

and

"The Graduate," in comparison, is much tamer, much less
frantic, in its plot line. Honors
graduate Benjamin Brannock
finds himself in an affair with
the wife of his father's law partner, finds that he loves her daughter, and after a wild chase finally
escapes with her.

casted, and deal with the difficulty of freedom in the modern
age. But where "The President's
Analyst" is merely clever, "The
Graduate" is brilliant, and the
reasons for this difference seem
to be highly important.
The plot of "The President's

Sonata Recital Set Feb. 29
and
the

Violinist Bruce Freifeld
UK
pianist James Bonn, of
Department of Music faculty, will present a Sonata Recital 8:15 p.m.
Feb. 29 in the Agricultural Science Auditorium.
The program will include Mozart's "Sonata in B Flat Major,
K. 455"; Copland's "Sonata", and Faure's "Sonata in A, Opus 13".

Robertson Recital
Dorrisa Kate Robertson, a student at the University, will present
her Senior Organ Recital 8:15 p.m. March 2 at Central Christian
Church in Lexington.
Her program will be Cabezon's "Diferencias sob re el Canto
del Caballero"; Santa Maria's "Clausulas-Fir- st
Tone, Eighth
Tone"; Cabanilles' "Tiento lleno por B cuadrado"; Bach's "Two
Chorale Preludes" and "Prelude and Fugue in A Minor", and
DupreV'Four Settings 'Ave Maris Stella' "
She is a student of Arnold Blackburn.
"A CROWD PLEASING

NOW!

1st OUTDOOR SHOWING!

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ELECTRIC

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HEATERS

himself free from: money, sex
without love, plastics,
achievement.
There are no great world
powers infringing upon Benjamin's freedom. Rather, small
individuals are suppressing it,
and it is here that "The Grad-

uate" and "The President's
Analyst" part.
In the end of "The President's Analyst" the phone company head is found to be a robot;

apparently alive though metallic
when plugged in; and dead, but
made of flesh when unplugged.
The question is, of course, which
is human, and the answer is
neither. The enemy may be
but at the top it is not
man-mad- e,

man himself.
The people in "The Graduate" cannot be unplugged, however. Where t he whole telephone
complex could be destroyed, no
dest nation of society is possible.
"The Graduate" is infinitely
more terrifying, for it shows very
clearly whom we have to worry

alout rather than the government or the phone company.
Clearly, we are the enemy.

All Sent

I
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But the embelleshments to
the plot are what makes the
movie, for "The Graduate" clearly shows what Ben cannot get

HOc

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The Kentucky

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second clasa
pobtage paid at Lexington. Kentucky.
Mailed five timed weekly during the
chool year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
session.
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Publications. UK 1'ost Office Dox 4KU8.
as the Cadet in IBM and
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since 1915.
herein is InAdvertising
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the reader buy. Any
or misleading advertising should
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EditorialManaging
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Associate Editors. Sport
1330
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t41
Advertising, Lusinesa, Circulation Xil9

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Feb.

28,

l8-- 3

Scanning College News
Northwest cm University

Chemical Co. representative was
recruiting, members of the campus Young Americans for Freehere after two months of tension dom (YAF) released a statement
concerning a massive student pro- condemning SDS. The YAF's also
test against Dow Chemical Co. sent a letter to the university
administration urging that none
recruitment on campus.
Over 500 students who joined of the nine students be allowed
the protest marched peacefully to participate in "activities and
throughout the day. Maintaining protests on the campus."
that what they were protesting
Yale
against was "university involveThree Yale students were arment in the war," the students rested and one of them beaten
roamed to another part of the
h
by police while distributing
campus to find the president
Africa literature at a New
of the university. After chanting Haven
high school. A travelogue
in vain, "We want Miller" (the and fashion show directed by the
president), the students finally South African Tourist Corporagained an audience with the
tion was in progress when 15
who promised a review
protestors began passing out the
of university policy.
literature. Police asked the demKansas University
onstrators to leave the meeting
but a scuffle developed in which
ROTC students at this university were asked to leave a police used mace on several of
mathematics class by an assis- the students. One student was
tant professor. The professor, beaten badly and consequently
Mark Mandelker, says he asked hospitalized. The students stated
the students to leave "because they had not resisted police athe believes it is immoral to teach tempts to arrest them.
students something they can use
Louisiana State University
in killing people." One of the
Student Covemment presithree ROTC students to transfer dent
is leading stuout of Mandelker's class said dent Roger Ogden
forces against a proposed
that he thought Mandelker had
levying of a two percent city
a "right to say what he believes
sales tax on purchases made in
as long as he didn't infringe on the
university book store. A local
the right ofhis students to leam." merchant earlier submitted a pe-- ,
Last semester Mandelker re- -'
tition asking for the tax on stuquested that ROTC students not dents to the City Council.
's
wear their uniforms to his class.
strategy to defeat the tax
University of Colorado
consists mainly of scuttling it
After ten members of Students into the city council's executive
for a Democratic Society (SDS) committee, where he hopes the
marched on the university place- matter will be stalled at least
ment office here where a Dow a month.

Fears of a second St. Valentine's Day Massacre vanished

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What End?

Tlircc years ago the first American combat units were dispatched to
Vietnam, with the announced purpose of defending United States bases.
Their arrival boosted the numlx?r of American military personnel in
Vietnam to 27,000.
United States had 185,000 troops
the end of that year -1- 965-the
in Vietnam, and they had taken over the brunt of the fighting from
the South Vietnamese.
Hy

''''

Nearly two years and 300,000 additional American fighting men
later, Gen. William C. Westmoreland came home from Saigon last fall
to report that the enemy was on the run and that he expected the
United States to begin to "phase out" its operation in Vietnam within
two years. He expressed himself as content with the ceiling of 525,000
troops President Johnson promised him by next June.

fJ.

This weekend the chairman of the Joint Chief of Staff, Gen. Earle
G. Wheeler, is in Vietnam to review the most critical situation the
United States has faced in that ravaged land. He is being pressed for
more troops, well beyond the 525,000 limit, to shore up thinly spread
allied forces. In anticipation of that call, the Joint Chiefs are reported
drawing up plans for partial mobilization of National Guard and Reserve
ground forces.

Given the precarious predicament of the American forces now in
Southeast Asia and the dangerous deterioration of the strategic ready '
reserve at home, both the dispatch of more troops to Vietnam and the
mobilization of reserves are inescapable. Such is the grim compulsion of a policy that has mired this country ever deeper in a land
war in Asia against longstanding expert military advice.
The time has come for Americans and their leaders to recognize
that the policy itself is illogical; that it entraps the United States in
a war without visible limits, despite all official optimism; that it will
continue to make insatiable demands on American manpower, resources
and energy far beyond the worth of any conceivable gains. The only
sound policy is to move from the battlefield to the negotiating table
with fullest speed.
The Souths Outstanding College Daily
The search for a road to a negotiated settlement must start with a
bombing halt. The risks in such a pause are obviously far less than
University of Kentucky
WEDNESDAY, FEB.
those in the boundless escalation on which Washington is embarked, ESTABLISHED 1894
since United Nations Secretary General Thant reported yesterEditorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
especially
day his belief that meaningful negotiations would begin "perhaps withJohn Richard Kimmins, Editor
in a few days" if American planes stopped bombing North Vietnam.
Robert F. Brandt, Managing Editor
New York Times

The Kentucky

Iernel

"Kernel Forum: the readers write
To the Editor of the Kernel:
Well, here we are near the end of the
1967-6- 8
basketball season, and the Kats
seem to be having a typical Kentucky
basketball year.
In the February 23rd issue of the
n
editorial
Kernel, there was a
by Jim Miller comparing the 1965-6- 6 team
with this season's NCAA tournament-boun- d
squad.
Isn't it funny how when things are'
fine, there is nothing but praise for the
Baron of Basketball. Adolph Rupp can do
no wrong. Just let the team slump to a
0
season (1964-65-),
or a 3 season
(1966-67and the Kernel will be screaming about Coach Rupp's recniiting policy,
his age, his handling of disciplinary cases,
or more recently, his opinion of the Bill
of Rights.
Coach Rupp was lured 38 years ago,
and as Jim Miller put it, he has done
"one helluva coaching job." Let's have
no more of this kicking a man when
he's down. If you want to take a swing
at Coach Rupp, swing now while he's
standing tall.
Kenny Wolin
Arts & Sciences Senior
well-writte-

13-1-

15-1-

),

To the Editor of the Kernel:
As a student of Morehead I can be
thankful that through some quirk of fate
we have
of Mr. Kenneth Vance's
caliber of teaching on our camiMis, sltort
lived as it may be. The need for intellectual stimulation on Morehead's campus
is amazing. The administration and most
of the faculty are so caught up in their
own little authoritarian worlds that the
student becomes secondary.
An outstanding example of this was
your article "Morehead Faces 'Freedom'
Issue" (Feb. 19, 1968). Where would Indie most logical place for an article of
this nature? In a newspaper of another
uuiersity some eighty miles away? No,
at home where it can be read hy tliose
diicctly involved. Rut could it appear
in the Trail lllucr (Mort head's yes sir
newspaper, to Pres. A. Do ran and followers), not by a long stick h of one's
imagination. Instead we aie told of Mig- e

non Do run's lutest women's club meeting,
where it was dicided that a blue bouquet
rather than a yellow bouquet would be
better us u center piece for the next
meeting. I think that's something we
should all know and discuss frequently
around the campus.
If the current trend continues, I think
the Kernel, as well us other newspupers,
cun look forwurd to many more articles
on "A changing Morehead."
Thank you, Dr. Doran, for creating
such a stagnant image of Morehead to
those not confined within our hallowed
halls.
DeWayne R. R. Stewart

Junior
Morehead State University
To the Editor of the Kernel:
Please forward my compliments to Ali
L.E. Bonne for his fastidious insult of
my past stream of letters to the Kernel.
Even though his letter (Kernel 19) managed to combine a short length with
verbosity I will have to tender my praises
on his vocabulary which indicates either
long pedagogic study of the English language or years of watching television.
I will admit my letters to the Kernel
have been profuse, if you could convert
all the paper they have taken up into
energy via some effecient device, you
would have enough energy to run the
Vietnam war for a week, and I apologize
to you who have plowed through my
verbosity without finding anything worth
reading (not necessarily because there w as
nothing there). As for "santimonious"
I don't know what to say Ixcause the
word isn't is the dictionary (unless it
is a derivative of santims, a small coin
meanused in Latavia between 1922-4ing my letters are ictty and obscure, to
which I can only reply by asking for some
letters
examples of
in the Kernel.). And if the word "statistical double-talis used sagaciously, there
is none in any of the past letters.
Seriously; to conclude, I realize my
letters must be somewhat Itorcing by now
(but you'll have to admit even writing
by suc h nu n as Steinbec k, Tolstoy, Shaw ,

Shakespheare, Goethe, and
Drew Pearson becomes borcing
if you read too much of it in a short
time period, and on the other handwriting
by the likes of Ali L.E. Bonne and compatriots are interesting if you read only
one or two short examples) so in the
future I intend to please many Kernel
readers, and myself through increased
study time (Oh yes, and more time to
think about girls, too!), by writing less
often but thinking more before I do.
This isn't complete retirement like
Cal Woodward's but a
Perhaps some new blood will take over.
John Lansdalc
Graduate Student
Economics
Ibsen,

28. 1968

i

First, she mentioned that the University Administration had not as yet decided
if sophomores would be forced to live
in the dorms. (Mrs. Lynley, head of the
Housing Office, however, says that sophomores will be forced into dorms, according to Representative (Joe) White. Does
that imply that Mrs. Lynley let the cat
out, and that administrators, up to their
usual backhanded tricks, had planned to
spring the news of a two year plan at a
more "opportune" time, for example,
when students would be too busy studying
for finals to object?)
Mrs. Palmer also mentioned that
Creeks were in no danger from the Administration (I?) and that Creek sophomores would be able to choose between
fraternity housing and dorms. (This
tliat independent students would
not be given any choice, and would,
therefore, be forced into dorms.) Mrs.
Palmer, having done her administrative
policy job (apparently forgotten that she
is adviser to Student Government i.e.,
adviser to students best interests) a vote
was called.
im-pl-

To the Editor of the Kernel:
I was extremely pleased to see the
Kernel give front page coverage to the
ombudsman bill, one of Student Government's few achievements this year. I was
equally displeased to see little or nothing
about other Student Government business,
such as, a bill of extreme importance
which was also voted on last Thursday

night.

A bill

calling for President (Steve)
Cook to request a nullification of any
two, three or four year dormitory housing
policy from the Board of Trustees was
presented and defeated. This bill demonstrated in clear language that such a policy
is not in the best interest of independents
and Creeks, and is in violation of the
rights of the citizens of this State. What
took place when voting and discussion
occurred was far more newsworthy than
the Kernel's pet ombudsman bill.
The bill was attacked on its language,
and on whether the University really
means to do harm to the Creeks. Attempts
to avoid an
xsition
was a main reason for the objections to
the language of the bill. As for harming
Greeks, Mrs. Palmer, policy administrator
for the Office of Student Affairs and
adviser for Student Government, gave
two bits of administrative new s.

Tire vote demonstrates several rather
interesting phenomena. First, there were
twelve representatives missing. Second,
Panhellenic voted for and I.F.C. voted
against. (Maybe Panhellenic should give
I.F.C. the real facts.)

Finally, with elections coming up,
it should be noted tliat You ngman, Davidson (the twins), Abrams and Westerfield
(outside VP hopefuls) voted against, obviously not caring about dorm and off
camiHis people and their votes, knowing
(or hoping) that their houses will carry
them through. It should also be noted
that the leader in the as yet secret race,
O.K.Curry, easily out maneuvered these as
yet unskilled
camrMis ixliticians by
holding tightly to his views, the middle
trail of the straddled feme, abstainted.
Thorn Pat Juul
Senior

History

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Tcl.

28. 1908

-- 5

Student Says Guaranteed Income Eliminates Drudgery
As for Dr. Littner's figures:
I will not dispute them as long

as I do not know his definition
of "overtly emotional ill" and
"concealed disorder". However,
I do know, as does anyone who
has ever lieen or worked with or
talked with the poor, that 100
percent of the poor are emotionally disturbed 100 percent of the
time because their very physical
existence is constantly threatened. How a guaranteed annual
income could make that situation
any worse is beyond me.
As was pointed out, Profs.
Calloway and Kisher gave proof
to my assertions that a Guaranteed Annual Income (GAI)
would encourage men to stop
working. I regret, though, that

EDITOR'S NOTE; This is the
last section of a
letter
by John Junot.
two-pa- rt

did not nuke a distinction between "work" and "drudgery."
Drudgery is any work a man
wouldn't do unless he was getting paid for it. A GAI would
eventually eliminate drudgery.
Men would continue doing work
they enjoy whether that be
painting, writing, gardening,
I

fishing, making chairs or even
working on an assembly line.
I should have clarified my
ideas for implementing a GAI.
By first giving it to the poor,
I mean