xt7jws8hfc6j https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jws8hfc6j/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19180411  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April 11, 1918 text The Kentucky Kernel, April 11, 1918 1918 2012 true xt7jws8hfc6j section xt7jws8hfc6j 1

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
University of Kentucky
FOUR PAGES TODAY
No. 25

LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY, APRIL 11, 1918

VOL, X

ACTORS HONORED BY
"MICE AND MEN" CAST

ORATORICAL CONTEST
BETWEEN SOCIETIES

GATS TAKE FIRST GAME

Mr. Foxhall Daingerfleld and Mr.
Tho Union Literary Society will
BY LOUISVILLE SUPT.
Maurice Bumaugh, prominent actors,
hold its annual oratorical contest
will bo honor guests at a banquet to
Tuesday evening at 8:00 o'clock in tho
Bondage of Great be given Saturday evening at 8
University chapel. Tho winner of this "The
Zerfoss and Propps
o'clock at tho Phoenix Hotel by tho
contest will compete with the wlnn,or
Deeds" is Subject of
the Infield Positions
cast of "Mice and Men." Mr. Leo
Df the Patterson Society's contest to
Saturday
Talk
stage manager will preside as
decide whom will represent this school
All members of tho
McCLELLAN IS PITCHER in the Kentucky Intercollegiate Ora- SPIRIT OF JEAN D'ARC
Strollers who have made casts in pretorical Contest. The following men
Superintendent O. L. Reid, of the vious years will be welcome. See
In a ragged game last Saturday, the have signified their intention to comWildcats
defeated
the Tigers of pete: Hardin, Dlschol, Harry Smith, Louisville Public Schools, made tho either Mr. Augsberg or Miss Berkele
Georgetown, by a score of 12 to 5.
Barnes, Dabney, Mitchell and Ralble. chapel address Tuesday on "The by Friday noon.
Bondage of Great Deeds." SuperinGeorgetown started off in the game
tendent Reid spoke of many heroes
with a whir of bats and pounded
and heroines of tho past who were
arm for five scores in one
T held in the bondage of great deeds, MINERS' SHORT COURSE
and a half innings. The enemy was
when their hearts longed for freedom
given aid and comfort thru
PROVES POPULAR HERE
UNDER WAY to return to their home, friends and
errors, but when the second PLANS NOW
quiet life. He especially praised the
of the second inning came around
half
spirit of the Maid of Orleans, which is
the Wildcats sharpened their claws
Especially Designed For
and waded in. It looked like town Arrival of New Superin- leading the men of France today in
Men Who Have Worked
tendent Hastens
every Wildcat getting
their struggle with the Huns, and of
ball for a time,
in Mines
Matter
the brave American boys who have
a trip to the plate. This rally acgone into the same bondage.
counted for eight runs.
28 MINERS ENROLLED
Mr. Reid said in part:
Kentucky seems to have a splendid NEW HEATING PLANT
"The sons and daughters of men
team and after a few more games,
Twenty-eigh- t
miners from the east
With the arrival of A. O. Whipple, have
been dying for things as far
when the excitement of being in the
ern part of the State, are here attending
new superintendent of buildings and
back as we know anything about men.
public eye has worn off and left them
a short course in Mining Engineergrounds of the University, Tuesday,
The matter of dying for something is
cool and collected, they will be hard
ing. The course began last week and
definite steps are being taken tpr a process in
The
to defeat. McGlellan refused Saturthe immediate improvement of the Christ multiplied Himself by twelve, will continue for eight weeks.
day to allow his sore arm to interfere
The course is along practical lines
buildings and grounds of the Univerand the twelve by thousands. The
with his usual good work and never
sity and the erection of new buildings. nnoatlnn wo trv tn snlvo in plmnalnf and is designed for men who served
accepted a chance at aviation when
in mines and desire Ap improve their
Mr. Whipple, who arrived Tuesday
V
a life work is how to best multiply the
his support was a bit weak. He is a
knowledge of the work. It is given pri-from North Dakota, has already as- powers within us.
box star, and ably seconded by Derap-sey- ,
jmarlly for mine foremen, superintend
sumed his duties and at present is
"A teacher is one set aside by sowho pegs straight to the mark.
ents, and miners, but any one who
office in the
located in the business
ciety to help society multiply in itself
Wildcat inflelders acquitted themwishes to know something about minMain Building.
the things it thinks worthwhile, and
selves as nobly as the Tigers would
ing may take the work. Miners who
Armsted Brothers, noted architects to eliminate the undesirable things.)
allow. Every ball knocked to the inaspire to positions of mine foremen
field received the proper attention and and designers, of Brookshire, Mass., There can be no greater patriotic servwill find the course fits them with
usually
in have already made a survey and study ice than this, short of service in the
found safe lodgment
technical qualifications that are replans and improvements for beauti- trenches.
Gregg's glove at first. Zerfoss and of
quired of
mine forePropps are staring on a bright career, fying the campus by planting trees,
"We are sending our boys and girls ' men. The course also gives a great
if Saturday's game may be taken as shrubbery, flowers and for the erec- into a bondage of great deeds to save deal ppacUce fa wrU,ng gQ that stu.
tion of new buildings and the renovat- our national soul. We know that we
an indication.
able to clearly express
ing of old ones Jno. C. Armsted visited must all give to the uttermost of serv - ' dents will be
The summary follows:
themselvea on paperi
the University Saturday and Jacob ice and money in this crusade. We,
KENTUCKY
The schedule lncludea ln8truction
Stoll, of the Armsted Brothers' Arm too, have heard 'voices,' and tho we
AB. R. H. PO A. E.
Jn tne fo,iowlng subjects:
made observation of the campus Mon- come late, we are willing to pay dou- 1
02
Propps, 3b. ....3 3
Arithmetic, Coal Mining. Ventila- day, taking pictures of it and of a ble price because of our tardiness. We
10
. ...r.4
MinIng MachInery,
Dralnage
Gregg, lb
Uonf
portion of the buildings. The firm will are determined to see this thing thru;
3
Safety Lamps and
Mme
Gase8(
Zerfoss, ss ... .5
submit definite plans to the commit- we glory in this bondage of great
3
TeaUng
Expi08lona, Mlne
Fires,
Cambron, 2b . .5
tee on improvements in the near fu- deeds."
2
2
Kohn, If
Rescue and Relief, Surveying and Map

F

Star at

toast-maste-

several-Wildca-

t

I

1

t

.

i

Bastin, rf
Dempsey, c
Thomas, c
Muth, cf
McClellan, p

3

1

...3

4

0

2

ture.
President McVey has appointed a

committee consisting of D. H. Peak,
Dean Thomas P. Cooper, Dean P. Paul
3
3
Anderson, Dean P. P. Boyd and Dr. P.
0
...4
E. Tuttle, whose purpose it is to prepare a summary of what is most need7
8 27 10
32 13
Totals
ed in the way of repairs and construcGEORGETOWN
tion work at the University.
AB. R. H. PO. A. E.
Doctor McVey suggested nine im
1
1
4
5
Deane, ss
portant matters that would be of great
1
0
1
Sullivan, p ....2
benefit, and has asked the committee
1
0
4
0
Ogden, 2b
to consider them with any recommen4
0
Henderson, 3b .5 0
As no
dations it might make.
1
2
1
a
Duvall, rf
money will be available from the new
1.
0
2
0
Nash, cf
tax before December, it seems desir1
1
4
1
Bauer, If
able to put the present buildings and
3
0
4
I
Porter, c
plants into best condition possible,,
1
1
8
Jennings, lb ...4
leaving the question of the erection of
more permanent buildings to the folC
5
24
35
Totals
lowing year. Doctor McVey assures
Score by Innings.
the committee of tho help and coGeorgetown
operation of everyone on the campus.
Kentucky
23110000 x 12 His suggestions are:
Hits McClellan, Jennings.
1.
The possible erection of a
(Continued on Pago Three)
on Page Two.)

1400000005

Two-bas-

e

Drawing, Kentucky Mining Law.

GIANTS VS. INDIANS
PLAY ON STOLL FIELD

Those enrolled for the work are: T,
Harris, Fleming; L. W. Carter, Lex
jington; H, P. Suthard, London; Dewey
The first big league game to be Freeman, John Powell, Wofford; W. B.
played in Lexington in years will be jsk( Fleming; T. M. Trosper,
here Saturday afternoon on iey; Geo. Silas McGoffee, Tlnsley; W.
Stoll Field between the New York M. Lewis, Hellier; W. A. Llndle,
Giants and the Cleveland Indians.
S. M. Taylor, Lookout; WalThis will be the last game played ter Shelby, Packard; Evan Thomas,
before they start their regular season. Midland; J. W. Roe, Saxton; J. W.
stars of both Gordon, Harlan; D. H. Disney, BalAll the
teams will participate in the game. kan; H. B. Clotfelter, Brodel; T. A.
"Major" P. C. Learning says he has Codwallenbr, Midland; J. W. Rainseating facilities for approximately water, Gotliff; N. A. Morgan, Bond
Jellico; Richard Stringer, Gotliff; E.
2,000 people.
University students will be admitted J. Bray, Gotliff; H. S. Mason, Drakes-boro- ;
W. LaFayett Funkhouser, Proat half price if they present their athvidence; W. F. Smith, Hazard; A. J.
the gates.
letic tickets at
Hawkins, Hazard; C. L. Lynch,
Russell Collins, Balkan.
MORTON HIGH DANCE
,

R-

-

(

Tins-playe- d

well-know- n

Yer-kle-

Morton
announce
bo given
afternoon

High School Club wishes to
SENATE MEETING
that its dance will postlvely
Called meeting of Senate this afterin Buell Armory Saturday
noon at 3:45.
ut 3:30 o'clock.

GREETS STROLLER PLAY

Amateurs Have Little Trouble With Difficult
Roles
COSTUMES ELABORATE
Topping productions of the Strollers in all around success, "Mice ami
Men," was presented to a large and appreciative audience of University and
townspeople at the Lexington Opera
House last Friday night. The entire
cast, from Mark Embury to that sniveling,
little orphan girl
last in line.furnlshed a revelation of
unbelievable correctness in amateur
character interpretation.
Costumes used in the play were
elaborately gorgeous In the striking
colors of the time, and what is equally
commendable, they were remarkable
fits. The scenery, also characteristic
of the eighteenth century, was all that
could be desired.
Anne Molloy, Gus Gay, Milton
and Eliza Spurrier had the leading parts and can probably lay claim
to the lion's share of honors.
polka-dotte-

Re-ve- ll

Miss Molloy Much Admired
From the first appearance of "Miss
Molloy behind the footlights in "Mice
and Men" as "Little Britain," a , pretty, vivacious and mischievous little
"orphan brat," until with a camouflage
kiss, Captain Lovell claimed her his
own as Peggy, a sweet and demure
young woman, at the last curtain,
every male heart in the audience was
grappled in the shackles of her loveliness. Slle was exceedingly graceful
tho the dance was deleted by Dean
Hamilton and Professor Melcher, and
it can be reasonably supposed that she
tripped over the heath with' that fairylike movement for which she is noted
In the ballroom;, That she was not
acting but was just herself Peggy,
Little Britain, and Anne are one is
the highest tribute that can be paid
her.
And Gus Gay knew how to make
love with all the confidence of the
successful man who knows not the
meaning of the word "reverse" in connection with his 'affaires d'amour.' Tall
strikingly handand
some with his iron gray hair and
lined face, Gus was the star of the
play. Depicted as a strong well bred,
educated landowner of England's romantic class, he was the master of
situation, no matter how complex.
Gay shows rare promise if the stage is
chosen as his vocation.

The Reckless Redcoat.
dashing, reckless, red coated
The
Captain Lovell of tho British army
was played by Milton Rovell, so gallant and bravo that he was- thrown
into many an ugly situation for tho
reason that ho could not clear himself if in so doing he would embarrass
any woman. In interpreting tho character of Captain Lovell, Rovell was at
(Continued on Pago Three)
-

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL,

The Kentucky Kernel

4
SQUIRREL FOOD

Published every Thursday throughout the College year by tho Bludont body
of the University of Kentucky, for tho benefit of the Btudcnts,
alumni and faculty of the institution.
THE KENTUCKY KERNEL is tho official newspaper of the University.
It is Issued with a view of furnishing to its subscribers all the college news
of Kentucky, together with a digest of items of interest concerning the
Universities of other States and Canada.
SUBSCRIPTION, ONE DOLLAR PER YEAR. FIVE CENTS PER COPY
Entered at Lexington Postofflce as second-clasmail matter.
s

EDITORIAL STAFF
THORNTON CONNELL
MiM Eliea M. Plggott -Miss Ellsa Spurrier
Miss Mildred Graham
Charles Planck
Frederick Jackson
Sam Morton
Lee McLean
Miss Austin Lilly
John J. Letnan
Virgil Chapman
Miss Virginia Helm Milner
Miss Elizabeth Murphey
Miss Louise Will

EDITOR-IN-CHIE-

Managing Edlter
"Squirrel Food"
"Co-ed"it-

Sporting Editor
Feature Editor
Agriculture
.Home Economics
Engineering
Literary Societies
Patterson Hall
Exchange Editor
Phllosophian

REPORTERS.
Jt. J. Ralble, Miss Bessie Conkright, W. S. Sherwood
BUSINESS STAFF.
"Edwin T. Tapscott

J. P. Barnes

.Business Manager
Assistant Business Manager

THE DAY OF THE YOUNG WOMAN.
For the reason that selective and voluntary service
for America and humanity is claiming many and may

SIGMA NITS HAVE 25
YOUR FIFTY DOLLAR
STAR SERVICE FLAG THIRD LIBERTY BOND

Gamma Iota Chapter of the Sigma
It will protect 1,000 Boldlers from
fraternity has on display in its smallpox and 666 from typhoid. It
chapter houso a service flag with 25 will assure tho safety of 139 wounded
LYKELLE POEM NO. 21.
stars.
soldiers from lockjaw, tho germs of
In her new spring hat
The flag Is an extremely handsome which swarm In Belgian soil.
And her new spring coat
lIece of work, being about six by four It will render painless 400 opera-fee- t
She chilly Bteps,
with a red satin border eight Hons, supply 2 miles of bandages
While the snow flakes float.
Inches wide, the top of which contains enough to bandage 556 wounds,
Says she: "I feel no storm
in silk handiwork the Greek letters
It will care for 160 injuries In the
My pride will keep me warm."
packets."
Sigma Nu. These letters are in black way of "first-aiand gold, the national colors of the
It will furnish adhesive plaster and
Sounds Like Panhellenlc
fraternity. The background is of white surgical gauze enough to benefit thou
In the minutes of a recent Y. W. C silk with the stars in blue, forming a sands of wounded soldiers,
A. cabinet meeting was the statement perfect five pointed Btar, the Sigma
Every purchaser of a Liberty Loan
that Miss "So and So," led the "emo- Nu emblem. Twenty stars make up Dond performs a distinct individual
tional" exercises. Of course she meant the center emblem with the five re- - service to his country and to our boys
devotional but she didn't say so.
maining stars scattered in the cor- - fighting in France.
ners. in the lower right hand corner
Campus Novelties
of the white background the Greek
Campus Improvements
The arboretum.
letters Gamma Iota are also In black
(Continue! from Page One.)
The fountain of youth.
and gold silk.
The sunken garden.
The following Is a list of the
who are now serving their Dorary heating plant sufficient to take
care of the needs of Mechanical Hall,
country:
New Time.
now 8erved h other p,ant8' and thoBe
Captains Keeling G. Pulllam, Jr.,
The mess hall freshman said to me
n
aviation; George Bain Morrison and buildings that are served by the
"My sorrow is never done,
BBl'
Th,s wou,d make !t
F. Auxler, Infantry; First Lieu- - tral Plant
For when the clock is striking 12,
tenants Herbert F. Nagle, Albert B. ble to Temove the present plant.
My stomach is striking one."
2. The rejuvenation of both dorml-tie- s
Goodln, James A. Reed, John M. Gib
by putting In them new plumbing,
son, Charles J. Haydon, Infantry;
PRIVATE PROPERTY
new floors and giving them new paint.
and
Astronomy Teacher, "And how" Is James W. Atkins, engineers,
' 3. The possible use of the lower
George H. Wilson, medical; Second
time governed?"
dormitory for a dinLieutenants Carroll Taylor, aviation; floor of the old
Ignorant One "By Uncle Sam."
ing room.
Henry M. Skillman, J. Collis Ringo,
4. The conversion of the present
George D. Aaron, and Murry M. Mont
The Journalism freshman says that
pubgomery, infantry;
Sergeant Major dining hall Into a laboratory for
Ada Meade received quite an innova
lic health work.
Jerrie O. Sullivan, Sergeants Charles
tion Tuesday .night.
5. The erection of a gymnasium for
H. Matherly and Winston Skillman;
girls, sufficiently large to take
C. Morrie J. Crutcher, the
Third O. R. T.
If a body ask a body
some time.
Homer B. Combest and Woodson care of the needs for
To buy a little stamp
6. The possible addition of anothVaughn; Naval Cadet Flyers Floyd
Won't a body help a body.
story to the rear part of Patterson
H. Wright, Harold A. Pulllam, David er
Put out Wilhelm's lamp?
P. Campbell and Sylvester D. J, Hall.
7. The repairing of the old ChemO'Sullivan, Mechanical Department
This week's pathetic, sight the real Naval Aviation, Morris E. Pendleton. istry Building.
8. The erection
of a temporary
baseball fan who has taken a girl to
stock judging pavillion.
her first game.
SINGING TOMORROW
9. Rooms for the Domestic Science
The community singing in chapel Department in the basement of the
Get This?
Charlie "Did you know that Ada will be resumed tomorrow after a two Natural Science building.
The committee has made a report to
Meade is at the Opera House this weeks' rest, Professor Cover hopes
that; a large per cent, of boys will be the President in which it approves
week?
present to add volume to the sweet of several of the above suggestions
Archie "S'matter? A fire?"
warbles which usually proceed from and makes recommendations of equal
Nu

d

cen-Joh-

claim all of the young men of the country, leading them
from peaceful to warlike paths, service by women in civil and business life is being rendered thruout all the
United States. In various sections of the country
where such service has been given trial, women have
given satisfaction, perhaps in a proportion greater than
that reflected by men. Many newspapers, perceiving
the fact that men on their editorial and reportorial
staffs will sooner or later be called into service, have
engaged women, some of whom have been students in
the Department of Journalism of this very University,
with the intention of training them to do work now being done by men of draft age.
Never in the history of the country has there been
a time more opportune for women to choose and pursue
careers. Every day, thruout the United States, comes Were you ever in love with an actor?
the call for women to occupy positions made vacant by Did you think him "gone on you" too?
men. In all the professions, in all the sciences, in the Did you think every glance o'er the
business world there' are now places for the trained wofootlights
man. Heretofore men have been preferred, possibly Was sent a love message to you?
more because of custom and precedence than anything Did. you envy his leading lady?
else. Custom and precedent are being broken because Nay heartily wish she were dead.
there is no other course for the employer to follow. Then find he had a dear little baby
The woman who gets the job and "makes good," if the And by wife was devotedly lead?
reader will pardon the venacular of the business world,
need have no fear that she will "lose out" after the war
"STROLLER DAY" IS
has ended and the boys and men have returned.
This paper, by means of this editorial, purposes to OBSERVED IN CHAPEL
lay before the young women of the University the adStroller Day, with usual Stroller
visability of training themselves as thoroly as opporsuccess, was observed in chapel
tunities here at the University afford. To do so is a
t
filial, personal and patriotic duty. The Kernel is of the March 5, with a clever
opinion that a few, if not all the young women who do skit, "The Coming Champion," to take
us the honor, come here with the idea and intention of the first trench.
Grover Creech and Fred Augsberg
fitting themselves for what they have styled a career.
Opportunity that has never before presented itself so pulled the stunt in real vodvll fashboxing match.
extensively to women of Kentucky is present today. ion, even to a
At least, it would have been
Let the young woman make the most of it!

the place on Friday mornings.

High Class Tailoring

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Moderate Prices
White Carnation

We Fit You

Disdain.

Heliotrope

Devotion

Rose

Love

Pansy

Thoughts

White Lily

Justrigtit Tailor-

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Sweetness

Yellow Lily

Gayety

Hyacinth

Friendship

Get them From

MICHLER BROS.
UNIVERSITY REPRESENTATIVE
H. L. MILWARD

"

so Director

STROLLER PLAY A SUCCESS.
As the student publication of the University of
Kentucky, the Kernel desires to congratulate the Stroller organization, and more specifically those Strollers
who took an active part, for the success, heretofore
in University theatricals, that accompanied
the production of "Mice and Men."
The Kernel notes with regret that other publications of the city, commenting on the 1918 play, overlooked Lee McClain, stage manager for the Strollers, in
their expressions of praise for the good work done by
the cast. McClain's work was exceptionally good and
resulted in his being able to write the 1918 production
high in the annals of Stroller history for stage excellence and finish of performance.
ed

McClain declared,
had not the actors been involved in a
previous scrimmage which resulted
disastrously.
As a drawing card for the evening
performance of "Mice and Men," the
sketch waB a winner.
The cast of "Mice and Men" was
shown off to a great advantage by
"Spieler"
Stage Director
Planck.
Lee McClain, outlined the story of the
play and gave in brief the history of
the Stroller organization. Appreciation
of the Invaluable services of Miss
Hopkins, Mr. Dalngerfleld and Prof.
Enoch Grehan In presenting the play
was expressed by Mr. McClain.

MRS. J. TANDY HUGHES
Member of A. N. A, M. of D.
106 N. UPPER ST.
Classes Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday evenings.
It is the aim of this school to teach dancing as it
should be, advocating at all times proper
positions and decorous actions
Music

Piano, Saxophone, Violin, Trap Drum

* f HE KENTUCKY KERNEL.
Home of Paramount Artcraft Goldwyn Pictures.
High-clas- s
that's why they cost more.

Open from 10:00 A. M. to 11:00 P. M.

STRAND

Prices 5 Cents and 10 Cents.
Afternsen and Evenlnf.

YOUNG MEN

BY SENIOR

The program of the Y. W. C. A.
held Sunday evening nt Patterson
Hall was devoted to the Eight Week
Club, a branch of the Y. W. C. A. that
Is conducted by college students dur-- (
ing the summer months. The Eight
Week Club work comes under the Social Service Department and Miss
Mary Dealt, chairman of this commit'
tee led the meeting Sunday evening,'

HART, SGHAFFNER & MARX
Clothes For Style and Value.
can't ind better ones; they're made right and priced right;
styles are the latest Ideas In
sport suits and orereoftts,
tie
You

d

anything you want

we see

Professor Dantzler gave an address

HOME ECS.

on the subject, "Some Forgotten

House on Harrison Avenue
Managed By

Students

-'

regular sacks or full skirted overcoats
lhat you get It.

WAR POETS SUBJECT
OF DANTZLER'S TALK

SUMMER CLUB WORK
PRACTICE HOUSE KEPT
DISCUST AT Y. W. C. A.

DECORATIONS

PRETTY

As an extension of the Home EconoDepartment
Practice
"The
mics
introducing the girls who conducted
House" has been opened on Harrison
these clubs last summer.
avenue with Miss Linda Purnell of
Miss Mildred Graham, who was lead- the department
as chaperone, and
er of a club in Louisville, was Misses Lelah Oault and Laura Lee
first on the program and she told of Jameson as the housekeepers for the
her experience of having a club in the first month.
city, altho the work is primarily
"The Practice House" is not only a
planned for the country or small luxury of the department, but a necestowns. Miss Eliza Piggott, whose sary, made so by the
bill
club was in Irvington, showed how' that requires all teachers qualifying
they
with various war en- under
it to live in a practice house
terprises, especially working for thel
and have the actual work of running
First Kentucky Regiment. Miss Ruth it.
Mathews gave a resume of her sum- The time for living in the house
mer'a work with a club in Lexington,' will be divided among the seniors of
LUNCHEON IS GIVEN
and Miss Austin Lilly gave a brief the Home Economics Department and
pQR PROFESSOR REID
j
sketch of her work in Richmond.
for the length of time they are In the.
A training class for Eight Week) house the entire charge of is turned
The graduates of the Louisville
it
Club leaders will be started soon un- over to
them. All marketing, shop- Girls' High School entertained Superder the direction of Miss Mary Beall. ping, cleaning, cooking and entertain- intendent O. L. Reld, of the Louisville
ing is put in their hands and all ex- Public Schools, President McVey and
penses must toe the line of a well Bean C. R. Melcher, at luncheon at
S. A. E. ENTERTAINED
planned budget. The practice teaching Patterson Hall Tuesday.
BY MR. D.TURNER
Among those present were: Superis done in the house and the High
Reld, President McVey,
School girls in these classes have a intendent
The active chapter of the Sigma Alaste of the real work of keeping a Dean Melcher, Misses Mildred Grapha Epsilon fraternity was entertainSpurrier, Margaret Jeffered Tuesday night by J. D. Turner, an house in addition to the theory of it. ham, Eliza
son, Ruth Gregory, Ruth Duckwall,
alumni member, at his home on WashAppreciative Audience Louise Will, Eliza M. Piggott, Mary
ington avenue. The regular weekly
(Continued from Page One)
Heron, Virginia Helm Milner, Kather-in- e
meeting exercises were held by the
Weakley, Hannah Weakley, Louise
chapter after which the host assisted
his best. His good voice, commanding Mayer, Elizabeth Kraft, Irma Wolf,
by Mrs. Turner, E. B. Webb and Mrs.
presence and uncompromising nature ilrma Wentzel, Julia Burbank, Made
Webb and T. R. Bryant and Mrs. Brygained him great favor with the au- line Felgel and Catherine Snyder.
ant served a delicious luncheon and
dience.
the party enjoyed the rest of the
In depicting the supercilious Joanna SPEECH AT PROHIBITION CLUB.
evening socially. Mr. Webb and Mr.
Gooilake, haughty, scornful court inBryant are also alumni members of
triguer, Eliza Spurrier was a revelaThe Prohibition Club will hold its
S. A. E. The guests of the evening
tion as an amateur. Utterly oblivious regular monthly meeting this afteralready
besides those
mentioned
of her audience, her acting, when her noon at 4:30. L. F. Bischof is on the
were: A. D. Hall, A. M. Wood, J. A.
own and Peggy's cards were on the program. He will deliver the speech
Dishman, Ben Orr, M. K. Revell, F. W.
table and she was the loser, the he is going to use at Berea the latter
Dempsey, N. D. Witt, Jake Herndon,
wrathful vengeful part of a woman de- part of this month when he represents
R. M. Guthrie, R. L. Jones, J. B. Taber,
feated in her purpose is rarely ex- this University in the Kentucky
Dick Hagan, O. W. Collins, C. L. Cropcelled by professionals.
Association.
per, Lockett Robards, Geo. Mathews,
Others in'the Cast.
Craig) Riddle, Sam Lambert
and
As Roger Goodlake, husband to the
DEAN COOPER AT THE "Y"
Thornton Connell.
haughty Joanna, Grover Creech was
at home. He played the part of an Dean Cooper spoke at the Y. M. 0.
easy going, retired courtier, friend to A. last Sunday night. He advised the
AG. SOCIETY MEETS
Embury and loving, but not beloved boys in these trying times to keep
The Agricultural Society held an in- of his wife.
"Physically strong, mentally awake,
teresting meeting last Monday evenFred Augsburg, whose light as a and morally straight."
ing. Anthrobus spoke on the "Differ- minstrel should not be hidden under
ent Kinds of Kentucky Sheep." Tabb a bushel, was faultless in the part of nearly so long as was desired by the
advised the use of corn cakes and a reckless,
knight in audience.
urged everyone present to use wheat the service of his queen.
Hats Off to McClain
substitutes In as many ways as
And, in conclusion, Lee McClain,
Edna Berlelo and Fred Jackson,
respectively as Mrs. Deborah, Em stage manager of the Strollers, perbury's housekeeper, and Peter, Em-- haps played the biggest part in the
bury's servant, were good in their success of "Mice and Men." Lee did
CATS TAKE FIRST
parts, tho small, and provoked much not appear on the stage to be greeted,
Page One)
(Continued from
by rousing cheers, as was the case
mirth among the audience.
Three-basHits Kohn. Sacrifice Hitsj Charles Planck as Kit Barnlger, a with tho members of tho cast. But,
Gregg, Ogden, Nash. Stolen Bases fiddler and professor of deportment; back of it all, between tho lines, as
Zerfoss, Cambron, Kohn, Dempsey, Dorothy Walker as Molly, a kitchen 'twere, his tireless work and unceasSullivan, Bauer, Jennings, Duvall (2). maid; Ruth Cassady as Matron and ing effort appears.
Surely as worthy, perhaps more
Earned Runs Kentucky, 10; George- Robert Ralble as Beadle of the Foundtown, 1. Loft on Bases Kentucky, 2; ling Hospital were excellent In their worthy of praise and deserving of congratulations, than any member of the
respective roles.
Georgetown, 9. Struck Out By
on
Norma Rachel, Eliza Piggott, Isabel cast is Lee McClain.
3.
Bases
5; by Sullivan,
The thanks of tho Strollers are
Balls Off McClollan, 3; off Sullivan, Dickey, Katherino Weakly, Elizabeth
also to Miss Christine Hopkins,
5.
Hit by Pitcher By Sullivan, Arnett, May Stevens, Elizabeth Card,
Young, Florence Brown, Lois Foxhall Dalngerfleld, Maurice
Propps, Kohn; by McClollan, Nash. Bernlce
and Professor Grohan, whose
Double Plays Bastln to Dempsey; Powell and Ann Molloy, took tho
was of ImDeane to Jennings. Umpire Pat Dev- - parts, of orphans in the play. These help aud
were not on the stage measurable assistance.
young women
ereaux.
I

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CO.

GRADDY-RYA- N
INCORPORATED.

CLOTHING, TAILORING, SHOES & FURNISHINGS

War

Poets," at the regular weekly meeting of the PhlloBophlan Literary Society, Wednesday evening, April 3, at
Patterson Hall.
In a discussion of the poetry written during the American Revolution,
which was especially emphasized In
the talk, the speaker made the statement that the work of patriot poets
' at time, the most noted of whom
Is Frenau, was far superior to that of
contemporary Tory writers, both In
humor and Ideals. He said also that
no other nation can boast of patriotic
poetry which breathes so lofty a spirit of loyalty as that which character
izes the poem of the American patriots.
Another Interesting feature of the
talk was the comparison of the poetry
written during former wars, with that
inspired by the present war.

J.

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FOR SMOKERS AND BANQUETS
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233 West Short Street.

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KENTUCKIAN

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Ben Ali Theatre
LEXINGTON, KY.

WEDDINGS
.

CORNER
PATT HALL PERSONALS
Miss Adele Slado spent last week
end at her home In Cincinnati.
Misses Ada Hardesty, Ruth Card
well, Mary Beall, Lillian Haydon,
Elizabeth Card, May Stephens and
Ruth Cassady will spend the week-enin Cynthiana, attending the Ash'
brooke-Gibsowedding.
Miss Julia Fisher, Versailles, spent
week-enthe guest of Miss Louisa
Smiser.
Miss Marion Sprague was the guest
of Miss Louise Mayer Monday.
d

Miss Mary Heron was the guest of
Miss Marie Young Friday.
Miss Logan Flgg spent the week-enthe guest of Mrs. L. H. Davis on the
Tates Creek pike.
d

Mesdames Grant, Lilly and Mary
Sullivan were the guests of Misses
Austin Lilly and Zerelda Noland Mon
day.
Mrs. Curtis Latimer, La Grange, and
Mr. and Mrs. John A. Latimer, Cincinnati, were guests of Miss Christine Latimer last week.
Misses Henrietta and Dorothy Jackson, Versailles, were guests of Miss
Birdie Peak, Friday.

HELSURN PRICE
Miss Ether Helburn, Eminence,
former student in the University, was
married Sunday to