xt7jws8hhj0t https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7jws8hhj0t/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19630918  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, September 18, 1963 text The Kentucky Kernel, September 18, 1963 1963 2015 true xt7jws8hhj0t section xt7jws8hhj0t wtT7"

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Vol. LV, No. 8

LEXINGTON,

KY., WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 18, 19G3

Eight Page

Trustees Accept $50,000
From Emergency Fund
By SI E ENDICOTT
Kernel Managing Editor

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...

Kernel Photo by Sam Abell

fin 77ire 4iVl No Fire!

Spirits ran high as Pi Kappa Alpha ran their pledges and fire truck,
complete with Dalmation, through the driveway in front of Keene-lan- d
Hall. Fraternities pledged 239 upperclassmen, a record number
for deferred rush.

The largest number of pledges,
under the deferred
rush system were pledged to the
19
fraternities on
University's
Sunday. In 1961, 176 men were
pledged and in 1962, 211 men
pledged. This is the fourth year
deferred rush has been In effect
at UK.
Two years ago no other school
Interfra-ternit- y
In the Southeastern
Council had deferred rush.
Last year four of the approximately 50 schools in the organization had deferred rush according to Fred Strache, fraternity adviser.

ALPHA GAMMA RIIO C'O)
Felix Jerome
Ernwn, Lexington:
Jim Bruce Bunce, Clermont: Kim.ild
Bruce Cocanougher, Springfield: Larry
Joe Criglcr. Hebron; George William
Day. Henderson; Paul Douglas Deaton
lieie-i- :
Thomas Brown Edwards III,
Prospect: John Kobcrt EfTinger, Anchorage; Charles Norman Evans, Cory
don. and William Edgar Ferguson,
Wolf Creek.
Kobeit Joseph Guinn, Paint Lick;
William Stephen Johnson Jr., Owens-borJohn Evan Lee. Shepherdsville;
Franklin Thomas McCoy, Ekron: Carl
Bruist Moneyhon. Augusta: George
McGee Phillips, Campbellsville: Donald Lee Schaefer. Lyndon: Thomas
Glynn Shemwell, Wingo; Boyd Dougand
las Wainscott.
Lawrcnceburg.
David Burks Williams. Shepherdsville.
OMEGA
A 1.1' HA TAU
(II)
Joseph Donald Frank. Swedesboro.
N. J.: James Edward Griffin, Paducah;
Paducah:
Khett
Kenneth
Harper,
James Carmen Lettierl. McKeesport,
Fenn.; Max Harkless Miller, Paducah;
John Leonard Price, Kankakee, III.;
James Wallace Kasnick, Jacksonville,
Fla.; Robert Joseph Ross, Lexington;
Ernest Lee Weber, Louisville; Lonnie
Kay Williams, London, and Kenneth.
Bruce Wright, Ashland.
DELTA TAU DELTA IJ)
Joel Timothy Adams. Whitesburg:
William B. Arthur
Jr., Ashland;
Steven Lynn Beshear, Dawson Springs;
James Gary Buchanan, Madisonville;
Ronald Eugene Butler, Madisonville;
Richard Hillman Hite. Lexington: Herman Elvin Knight Jr., Madisonville,
and Herbert Arnold Ligon Jr., Madisonville.
Don
Munson, Moorestown N. J.:
Alan Bowers Peck, Shurpsburg; Floyd
Miles Pollock, Jr., Madisonville; Noel
Thomas Randolph, Louisville; Michael
Lee Seltsam, Danville; Carl Michael
Space. Madisonville. and Robert Summers Young. Lexington.
FAKMIIOl'SE
John George Davis. Nortonville:
Owen Iiwrence Powell, Henderson:
Bobbv Orren Reynolds, Waynesburg;
Richard William Sexton, Dayton; Admiral Darrell VanFleet. Hartford; Calvin Loran Wagoner, Lexington; Lynn
Allen Webster. Gratz; Joseph Walter
Wyles. Lexington; James William
Henderson.
KAPPA ALPHA l
Maurice Ray Cox, Louisville; John
Greathouse
Wallis
Jr., Midway:
Thomas Taylor Hammond. Lexington;
Fred Marion Keller, Jr., Lexington;
Robert Berry Trabue, Louisville, and
Stanley Eugene Tucker, Louisville.
LAMBDA
t ill ALPHA (l:t
Frank Von Burns, Ashland; Charles
Edward Combs, Jr., Middletown; Dean
John Dunns, Blue Island, III.; Glenn
Benton
Dishman
Jr., Frankfort;
Stephen Dudley Johnson. Concord.
Mass.; Ronald Lynn Kennedy.
and James Joseph McCarInd..
thy, Newport.
Kondle Lee Nelson, Evansville. Ind.;
Alfred Eugene Oakland. Staten Island,
N. Y.; William Breckeniidge
Pipes,
Lexington; Thomas Joseph Renders,
Louisville; John Andrew Stream, Le

()

banon, and Benjamin Sheley Woodard,
Lexington.
PHI DELTA TIIETA (III)
George Washington Birk. Amity-villN. Y.; Owen Stephenson Cox,
Lexington: John Jewell Davis, Lexington; Williarr Dorsey Erwin. Lexington: Gene Porter Fouts. Hazard:
James Sheldon Gardner, Delray Beach,
Fla.; Quentin Roosevelt Graham Jr..
S. Charleston W. Va.; Carter Gamett
Hackney, Bowiinrt Green; John William Link. Lexington, and William
Leslie Martin Jr., Louisville.
KAPPA SIGMA I IK)
James Edgar Armstrong, Russell:
Thomas Henry Baron. Buffalo. N. Y.;
John Anthony Falocco, Warren. N. J.;
Michael Dale Johnson. Ashland; Kenneth Fred Kempel, Franklin Square,
N. Y.; Thomas Miller Kron. Tell City,
Ind.; David Michael Lind. Jamestown,
N. Y.; Timothy Lane Lower, Louisville, and Jerry Keith Lupton, Short
Hills, N. J.
Benjamin Johnson Mann, Versailles;
David Lawrence McEwui), Cynthiana;
Paul George Michaux Jr., South
Charleston, W. Va.; Lewis Stanley
Napier Jr., Jackson; Barry Benjamin
Sclar, Millbury, Mass.; James William

Continued on Page

The money will be the first increment toward the new center,
to be sponsored by three groups
interested in deaf, blind, and
physically handicapped children.
The location of the building will
be determined by the University

Col. Alcorn

Awarded
Army Medal

Fraternities Pledge
239 Upperclassmen
239, obtained

The University Hoard of
Trustees yesterday accepted
$50,(100 from Gov. licit T.
Combs' emergency fund to be
used for a handicapped children's center in conjunction
with the College of Education.

8

Col. James P. Alcorn, professor of military
science, was
awarded an Army commendation
medal from the Undersecretary
of the Army, Stephen Ailes,
yesterday at the first meeting
of the University Board of Trustees.
The award was presented by
Dr. John W. Oswald, president of
the University. In giving Col.
Alcorn the award, Dr. Oswald
said it was a pleasure to have so
distinguished a military man at
the University.
Col. Alcorn is a native
and a graduate of UK.
He is a veteran of World War II
and the Korean conflict and
served on the staff at the Armed
Forces Staff College in Norfolk,
Va. He recently served as military
assistant for operations to the
undersecretary of the Army.

planners and will be designed a
a training and research center
for the preparation of teachers
in the three fields.
The only obligation the University would have would be for the
maintenance of the building.
Dr. John W. Oswald, president
of the University, presented a
to the Board
recommendation
asking that four standing committees be established. They are
finance, educational polices, physical plant, and University relations and were outlined in the
Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co.
report submitted to the University trustees last spring.
Dr. Oswald said he wanted to
consubmit
recommendations
cerning the functions of the Individual committees at the next
board meeting and hoped they
would be in operation by Jan. 1.
He suggested that the president
of the University be an
member of each committet.
Dr. Oswald, In his Initial meeting with the Board of Trustees,
Introduced two reports to members which he said he hoped
would aid in keeping the Board
on happenings between meetings and which would
facilitate the handling of routine
business of the Board. One was
the President's Report to the

Are You In School?

All students
who ranie to
summer orientation and
that have not filled
out address cards are requested
to report immediately to Room
104
of the Administration
Building to fill out student directory and address cards. The
I'niversity will have no record
of students attending school
this fall that fail to fill out
these cards.

First Annual

Homecoming Revue Planned

The UK. Alumni
tion has announced
sponsor the lirst
I
lomecoming Revue
nection w ith the
coming activities.

Associa-

plans to
Annual
in con-

13

I lome-

This revue, which will be presented on Friday night, Oct. 25,
preceding the Georgia football

ALD Begins

Aid Project

Alpha Lambda Delta, freshman
women's honorary, has begun a
service project which will aid
academically ailing freshman
women.
Betsy Clark, ALD president,
said that the club's members will
offer individual instruction free
of charge to UK freshman women
who request the aid. The club is
preparing a list of its members
and the subjects in which each
can offer aid to be distributed
to the freshman advisers in the
dormitory. This list should be
available in about three weeks.
To be eligible for membership
in Alpha Lambda Delta a woman
must have attained a 3.5 or better scholastic average during the
first semester of her freshman
year or must have a 3.5 or better
overall average by the end of the
flist two semesters.

game on Oct. 26, will consist of
a series of skits produced by the
members of various campus organizations.
The revue will have a triple
purpose to provide an activity
for the returning alumni, to give
more students an opportunity to
participate in homecoming festivities, and to aid the scholarship program.
The winning organization will
receive a $220 tuition scholarship and the three runners-u- p
will receive a $110 scholarship.
Each winner will also receive a
plaque. Each organization will
award the scholarship to a member of its own group, basing the
selection on need.
A committee from the Alumni
Executive Board will be responsible for conducting the event
under the leadership of Dr. Oif-foBlyton, selected as revenue
manager. Dr. Blyton and the debate team will serve as Judges in
The Alumni
the preliminaries.
Committee will elect Judges for
the finals.
The competition is open to all
student groups and organizations.
Participants must be members of
the organization which they represent and must be enrolled in
the University. Groups may not
combine to present Joint skits,
and professional groups may not.
take part in the competition.
Theme selection will be the
responsibility of 'the individual
group with the choice subject to

the approval of the revenue manager. Each organization will have
five minutes in which to present
its skit with one minute before
and after the presentation for
handling props. The minimum
number of participants in each
skit will be five. There is no maximum.
wil take place
Prelimniaries
between 4 and 9 p.m. Oct. 2!!
and 24 in Memorial Hall. From
this 16 groups will be selected to
compete in the Oct. 25 finals
in Memorial Coliseum.
A highlight of finals night will
be the crowning "of the 1963
Homecoming Queen.
Skits will be judged on the
following point system: Entertainment vaue, 20 points; Staging, 25 points; Choice of material, 25 points; Tempo, 10 points;
Audience response, 20 points.
Entry blanks may be ootained
from Dick Rushing, Helen G.
King Alumni House, corner of
Euclid and Rose. The deadline for
entries is 5 p.m., Monday, Sept.
30.

Yearbook Pictures
A $3 sitting
fee will be
charged to all students receiving individual pictures for the
Kentucklan. This Includes all
seniors and fraternity and sorority members. The fee is to
be paid when the picture is
taken.

Trustees and the other was Recommendations of the President.
In addition, he presented to tlvi
Board a recapitulation of recent
concessional bills affecting higher education.
A
recommendation
by Dr.
Robert Haun, temporary business
and financial officer of the University, concerning short term
investments of University funds
temporarily not needed for University operational expenses was
by Clifford Smith,
presented
board member from Frankfort.
Possible forms of investement will
include United States Bonds,
Notes, and Certificates or United
States Treasury Bills and interest
bearing deposits in banks.
Smith, chairman of the Board
finance committee, moved that
Dr. Oswald and such member!
of tht staff as he felt necessary,
review the student loan fundi,
both federal and otherwise, and
make a report as soon as possible.
In a discussion of the dormitory
complex originally scheduled for
completion in 1965. George Kava-naug- h,
associate business manwork
ager, said architectural
would begin soon but would cost
approximately $600,000. Dr. A. D.
Albright, executive vice president,
said the funds would be advanced
by the state for this purpose. Hi
said the original plans would
have to be redesigntd to soma
extent in order to keep the cost
down to $13.5 million for bond
purposes. It will take two years
to build the complex once the
plans are redesigned.
In other business, the board
accepted gifts totaling $376,906.62.
Of this amount, $279,469.72 was
for research and training grants,
and
$3,230.50, for scholarships
miscellaneous grants, and
$94,206.40, for contracts.
A recommendation was passed
that tht I'niversity owned property at 15G and 1G6 Virginia Ave.,
West, be made available to the
Kentucky Authority for Educational Television for the construction of its principal production center.
Dr. Lucille Lurry was promoted
to the rank of professor of education effective Sept. 1, 1963.

Foreign Students
international

student
should report to Mrs. Kathy
White at the International
Center. Each should bring a.
small photograph of himself.
All

Coed Wins

Beauty
Pageant

Sally Anne Duncan,
Henderson County girl was
crowned Miss Kentucky RECC of
1963 Tuesday at the Kentucky
State Fair.
The University freshman was
selected from 21 contestants. She
is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Marvin E. Duncan and represented the Henderson-- U n I o u
Rural Electric Cooperative Corporation.
The new Miss Kentucky RECC,
will repwho measures
resent the state in the Miss Rural
Electrification of 1964 contest at
Dallas next March. She received
a silver tea set, portable stereo
phonograph and portable tele
vision set.

* 2

- THE KENTUCKY

KERNEL, Wednesday, Sept. 18,

19fi.1

Mulligan Named New
Health Service Head

Chapman Appointed
To Ailvisory (iroup
head of the
Dr. It. A.

Dr. J.uk I.. MnlliK;m. .Y, has Iktii appointed head of
the 1'niveisity Health .Service to replace Dr. R. K. Nohack.
Dr. Nohack will continue with the University as Coordinator
of Patient Clare at the Medical Center.
In
Dr. Mulligan, who joined the the St. Joseph Infirmary
staff Sept. 1, plans no immediate
Louisville. He is presently a memchange in the operation of the
service. He stated that Dr.
had done a "real tremendous" Job here and that he hopes
to continue to carry out the program.
Dr. Mulligan added that the
and staff would
organization
have to be among the best in
Kentucky. The health service has
the use of all laboratory and
y
facilities of the Medical
Center and is unique in that it
is part of the Center complex,
continued Dr. Mulligan.
Dr. Mulligan, a native of Sals-bur- y.
N. C. moved to Kentucky
in 1931 and attended the Greenville public schools. He received
his U.S. degree from Notre Dame
in 1948 and his M.D. degree four
years later at the University of
Louisville.
Following his internship he
opened his private practice of internal medicine in Louisville.
During this period he was lecturer at the Kent School of Social Work at the University of
Louisville. He was also a member of the Cardiac Work Classification Unit in Jefferson County
in 1957.
In 1961 Dr. Mulligan was
named Director of Medical Education and Chief of Medicine at

ber of the Board of Directors of

the Kentucky Cancer Society.

Tan Sigma
of
Tau

Dr. Mulligan urged everyone
to follow up on their immunizations. He said this was not only
important to the individual, but
to his community. The service is
offered to the student at a nominal charge.

Publishes

New Booh
"The Himalayan Kingdoms,"
a book by Dr. P. P. Karan, University associate professor of
geography, has just been published by the D. Van Nostrand
Co., Princeton, N. J.
The book, dealing with the
political geography of the Himalayan border stales of Nepal,
Sikkim and Bhutan, is based in
part on field studies which Karan
made in this region during a
sabbatical leave from the University in 19G1-.6A native of Bihar in northern India, Karan received degrees from Tatna University,
Benares Hindu University and
Indiana University.
Karan, who organized the Institute of Indian Geographers
is a member of a number of
professional societies in India
and the United States. He has
written studies for numerous
scholarly publications, including
of
the "Geopolitical Structure
India," which was published by
the International Geographical
Congress in 1952.

(ra(hiate Exams

Try-Out-

s

Orchesis, modSigma
ern dance fraternity, will hold
try-oits first dance
session
at 4 p.m. Thursday, in the auditorium of the Euclid Avenue
Building.
Those interested in becoming
pledges of Tau Sigma must attend three out of four practice
sessions.
Active members of the organization will meet at 7 p.m.
Thursday for a dance session
and initiation ceremony.

Dr. Karan

Graduate reading exams in
French and Spanish will be
given at 4:15 p.m. Thursday,
in Miller Hall. Exams in German and other languages will
be given at 4:15 p.m. Friday in
Miller Hall.

BE

AT .

FITTED

BETTER

Chapman,
Department of Plant Pathology,
was appointed chairman of the
plant Hematology committee of
the American Phytopathological
Society at its recent meeting at
the University of Massachusetts.
He was also appointed to the
society's advisory committee to
the American Type Culture Collection.

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, VVcdnmlay, Sept.

Kernel Woman's Page

What To Wear At UK
Editor's Note: With the football season opon us and fraternity parties In full swing it's time to
survey
you know what to w?ar to which UK events.

jour wardrobe and make sure

ATTIRE
WOMEN

MEN
slacks, shirt, sports coat, sweaters,
sneekers, loafers, bass mocs, car coats,
trench coats

skirts, sweaters-- , blouses, shifts, shirts,
jumpers, madras dres.-es-,
sneekers,
loafers, flats, boots, purse, gloves, polo
cr chesterfield coats, trench coats, pli.s,
tharm bracelets, anything madras Is
perfect

CLASSES
AND

JAM
SESSIONS
ATHLETIC
EVENTS
THAT
FARTIES

suits," wool dresses, heels, gloves purse,

simple jewehy, dressy coats, especially
shifts
wool and rilk dresses, suits, heels,
Elsves, purse, simple jewelry,

dresses, heels,
ploves, purse, simple Jewelry, hat,
dressy coat

suit, sports jacket, slacks, dark socks,
loafers, oxfords, overcoats

UNIVERSITY
FORMALS

cocktail dresses, dressy wools heels,
LONG SLENDER FORMALS, long or
short feloves, evening bag, jewelry,
evening wrap, dressy coat, basic black

dark suit, tuxedo, dinner jacket,
oxfords, overcoat

MOVIES

skirts, sweaters, blouses, flats, heels,
dresses, shifts, purse, coat, (classroom
attire usually), cirive-in- s:
anything goes

slacks, shirts, sweaters, sports coats,
loafers, oxfords, trench coats, jackets,
drive-in- s:
anything goes

LOAFING

burmudas, kilties, slacks, cutoffs, sweatshirts, sweaters, sneekers, loafers,
scarfs, car coats, knee socks

burmudas, slacks, levis, sweaters,
sweatshirts, shirt jacket, Jackets,
sneekers, loafers, parka

The Book Beat
High-Stak- e
AUCTION! By James Brough.
Merrill. 7.95.
Anyone interested in art ar.d
ait objects will find Erough's
book a lively account of auctions,
auction houses, and auction fever.
There also Is a bonus. For the
author has strung together a
gossipy collection of stories about
tome modern collectors, some
art finds and art thefts,, art faking, and the backstage rivalries
cf dealers, collectors, and museum
officials.
pasThere are illuminating
sages devoted to three of the
world's formost auction houses
Paike-Bernin New York and
Sotheby's and Christie's in London.
To the interested
beginner,
this book can be a thorough inar.d perils
troduction to the
of buying and bidding, a gallery
of color snapshots of personalities in the trade, and a compendium of recent news in the art
world, including many of the tig
tales.
Brough does not hesitate to
report, on his own authority,
some of the juicier aspects cf
his subject, and perhaps many

Marci.i Kelts, a sophomore
Spanish major from Niaaara
Falls, N.Y., and a member (f
Delta Zeta. to Don Gorn, a junior pccuuiiiing major from Lexington and a member of Phi
Kappa Tau.
( inrty Fleming, a sophomore
nursing major from Portsmouth,
Ohio, to Jerry lutshkc, a sophomore pre-lamajor from Webster, and a member of Phi
Kappa Tau.
Sandy Robinson, a sophomore
commerce major from Lawrence-ber- g,
to Mike Cassicly, a junior
electrical engineering major from
Lexington and a member of Phi
Kappa Tau.
Anita YVi?gs, a sophomore education major from Louisville, to

Academy Buys
Building

Auction!
of the yarns cannot be verified.
But we cannot fault him on that
score, for he is operating in a
field long notorious for its similarity to a tight-lippe- d
poker

game for high stakes. He has
collected some fascinating material in these pages.
Miles A. Smith (AP)

Roe Still In Baseball
KOSHKONONG,
time major league
Preacher Roe is
boy's team in the
Baseball League.

Mo.

(.i

One-

pitching star
managing a
Ozark Junior

Phone
"24-Hou-

r

252-712-

Jim Jacobs, a sophomore mechanical engineering major from
Silver Grove and a member of
Phi Ka;.pa Tau.
C'ool.ic I.d'vsnn, a sophomore
mu.'ic major f:om Lexington, to
maSiitli. a senior mu.-i- c
jor from Dry Rid.Le, and a member cf Phi Kappa Tau.

Recently Wed
Kathy Jordan, a freshman
major from Lexington, to
Jim t'hadwick, a senior electrical
engineering major from Albuquerque, N. M., and a member
of Alpha Tau Omega.
Donna Tire, a registered nurse
to Richard
from Connecticut
Ridge, a senior education major
from Cheshire, Conn., and a
member of Alpha Tau Omega.

Young Democratic Club

NEW YORK (AP) By way of
getting ready for its 80th anniversary next year, the American Academy of Dramatic Arts
has bought a
Madison
Avenue building in which to exactivities.
pand
Alumni of the school include
Spencer Tracy, Kirk Douglas,
Rosalind
Russell and Grace
Kelly.
The structure originally was
the home of the exclusive Colony
Club and was designed by Stanford White, New York's leading
architect, during the early years
of the 20th Century.

Complete Automotive

Sorority pledge presentation
Tech
Opening football game 8 p.m. Stoll Field. UK-VFraternity parties immediately following football game
Tin-Mal-

dressy coats

CHURCH

Inter-Varsi-

TGIF

suit, sports coat, slacks, oxfords, dark
socks, overcoat

wool suits, afternoon

Christian Fellowship
Dames Club meeting 7:30 p.m.
Fraternity and sorority active meetings
19 Spindletop Hall Club bridge party
SuKy Circle meeting 5 p.m.
Pep' Rally 6:30 p.m. Euclid Avenue side of Holmes Hall
Young Democrats meeting 7 p.m.
Agronomy Club meeting 7 p.m. Student Room Old Ag
Building
20 AW5 Convention Steering Committee meeting at 4 p.m.,
Keeneland
Fraternity parties
18

21

slacks and sport Jackets, suits, tics,
vests loafers, oxfords, dark socks,
overcoats

CONCERTS
TEAS

FIRST MEETING

THURSDAY NIGHT
7:00 p.m.

Student- Center

E.

Corner of S. Lime and Maxwell

Service
THE COLLEGE STORE

7

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Guignol Tryouts

Tryouts will be held at 2
p.m. Sunday in the main theatre of the Fine Arts Building
Shaw's
for George Bernard
"Pygmalion." A cast of 14, 8
6 women all having
men and
fcpeaMng parts, will be chosen
for the first Guignol production
of the 1963-6- 4 season. Interested
townspeople, faculty, staff, and
students are invited to tryout
at this time.

FLOWERS
For Any

Occasion

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 4

Tickets Mow On Sale
AT:
University Book Store
Kennedy Book Store
Graves, Cox
Barney Miller's
Dawaharc's

CALL

MIC

ADVANCE TICKETS $2.00
AT THE DOOR $2.50

II L E R

FLORIST
Dial

255-658-

0

417 East Maxwell

13 - 3

Campus Calendar

Edited by
Nanry Lougliridgc
Sept.

EVENT

18,

ALL SEATS RESERVED
Memorial Coliseum

8 p.m.

BEST SEATS SOLD FIRST
Sponsored by Student Center Board

* Moderation
Only Solution
Few tilings stir the conscience so
profoundly as the sullering of a child.
in the naForces of moderation
tional racial crisis have reason to fear.
The grim reality of death in a
Birmingham Sunday School is difficult to rationalize. Poignant is the
irony that four Negro girls lost their
hves in a church bombing while
a passage from Matthew:
"But 1 say unto you, love your enemies."
Negroes, moderates and extremists alike, may be expected to react.
One can only hope that the reaction
will be non violent. White supremists
will seize upon any aggressive action
by Negroes as justification for renewed violence.
One can only hope the forces of
moderation triumph, but this will
occur only if masses of citiens are
stilted by the Birmingham situation.
Should the federal government
inter pose its authority, only a temporary solution could result. The ultimate solution lies with the people
ol Alabama and the citiens of the
United States.
Negioes must display patience and
for violence breeds
understanding,
violence unless the influence of reason is bi ought to Lear.
White citiens must display unusual lestiaint and tolerance, with a

view to the fact that prior injustice
was the seed from which the present
crisis sprung.
The division between order and
chaos in Alabama is thin. Racial
crisis could generate spontaneously
into open and widespread conflict.
The choice is between reason and unleashed passion.
For each of us remains the responsibility of accepting reasonable compromise, thus massing public opinion
in favor of sanity. There is no turning
back, for history moves in swift currents. Our ship of state will either
sail the peaceful sea of compromise
or lloundcr on the rocks of discord.

Letters To Editor
Welcome From ASME
To The Editor:
As chairman of the Student Section of The American Society of
Mechanical Engineers, I would like
to welcome all students, both new and
old, to the campus of UK. for the
school year.
At the same time, I would like
to extend a personal invitation to all
who would be interested in attending
our regularly scheduled meetings at
10 a.m. each Thursday in Memorial
Hall.
At these meetings we try to schedule talks, lihns, displays, etc. which
aie piimarily intended lor engineering students, but this is not always
the case. For example, our first speaker
is a lawyer Irom Louisville whose talk
is entitled "A Day in a Law Ollice."
I intend
to make available a
schedule of topics for the fall semester as soon as possible. If you think
that any of them will be of interest
to you, feel free to attend our meetings.
HoMIR E. WU.TFR
Chairman, ASME

The Kentucky Kernel
The Sonth's Outstanding College Daily

University of Kentucky

Euttrrd nt the p"t offirr
Published lour timrl

fit

a nrrond cl
mntlrr timlrr the Art of Mirch 3, 187J.
wrik during the rrgular xhool vtar oirjit dining holiday! and exanu.
SIX DOLLARS
A SCHOOL YEAH

Lrinutnn, KrnlniVy

StE Endicott, Editorial Executive and Managing Editor
Daili Editors and Editorial Board:
Elizabeth Ward, William Chant, Richahd Stevenson, and John Townsend
David IlAwrE, Assistant Managing Editor
Caul Modecki, Campus Editor
Tom Finnie, Circulation Manager
John Bvhkhahd, Advertising Manager
of Sports
Jehby Schcheman and Walter Pacan,
John Pfeiffer, Arts Editor
Nancy Lovghridge, Women's Page Editor
Kernel telephones: News, extension 2302; Advertising and Circulation, 2306
itiiiir

iTmrmimrrriWiiifniM'm

trr mmiinrtrrmTrrmrrrar

What's The Price
Of Integrity?
Last week, the Kernel ran a frontpage story concerning the newspaper
thelts from the five Herald-Leaderacks on and near the campus. It was
our hope that University students
and others connected with the University would then realize that these
papers are not free and that they are
robbing a
newsboy when
they take papers without paying for
them.
However, this does not seem to be
the case. The thelts have continued
at the same rate as they have in the
past. At this point, Jim Skees, who
operates the racks, has no choice but
te take them out. He is losing more
money daily. We are going to be without local papers soon if we don't begin paying for them.

fore they go on the racks. The only
people who are being hurt are the
paper boy and you.
The paper bey is losing money at
the rate of $100 a month; a sum he
cannot a fiord since the paper route
is his only source of income and the
money from it must go to pay for
orthodonic appliances.
And YOU, you who are taking the
papers are losing too. You are losing
if your honesty and integrity are
worth no more than seven cents. You
are losing the respect of others if you
have to steal from a
boy.
In addition, you will be losing
the newspaper which apparently you
want since you take it so freely unless you begin paying for it.

We would like to think that because many of you assume the Kernel
is free to students and faculty you
might assume also that the Lexington papers also are free. Actually, no
newspaper is free, not even the Kernel.
You pay for it when you pay your
fees at the beginning of each semester, whether you realize it or not.
Why not pay for the downtown papers

The fine for stealing a newspaper
runs to $50, and it is very easy to
catch the thief. At seven cents a copy
you could buy a lot of newspapers
with the fine you would have to pay
it caught stealing one.

r

as well?

'I here aie those who will say that
cents is a very small amount and
no one will miss it. The Herald-Leade- r
Co. won't miss it because the
paper boy has paid for the papers be

setn

Think about it: about your
about the results if you are
caught, about the adverse opinions
of Univeisity students you are creating by your actions (for whether or
not students are taking the papeis,
the blame is falling on them because
of the location of the stands) and then
begin paying your way and not taking
from the pocket of a
boy.

President Tito Heads For Latin America
By WILLIAM L. RYAN
Associated Press Correspondent
Piesident Tito of Yugoslavia, newly anointed by Soviet Premier Khrushchev as a good Leninist Communist,
is heading lor Latin America this
week. The trip may stir misgivings
about the soundness of a huge U. S.
investment in his regime.
Advance billing pictures Tito as
a salesman for the idea of nonalign-men- t
in cold war blocs. But the brand
of "peaceful coexistence" Tito is espousing is beginning to sound much
like Khrushchev's own.
Tito probably has many reasons
lor going to Latin America. They include strictly Yugoslav national interests. Some may involve enhancement of his own aiul his regime's prestige as the supposed voices of neu-t- i
a I ism.

lint Tito is a Leninist Communist
who piolesscs to believe that communism is the world's wave of the
inline. He could be influential in
piepaiing a Latin American climate
moie itceptive to Communist ideas.
The
Yugoslav president expects to turn up next month
in the United States, which has bet a
billion dollars in aid of one form or
a not her-this independence from
Moscow would be permane