xt7k3j39165k https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7k3j39165k/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19380204  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February  4, 1938 text The Kentucky Kernel, February  4, 1938 1938 2013 true xt7k3j39165k section xt7k3j39165k Fhe Kentucky Kernel

FRIDAY EDITION
KERNEL

SEMI-WEEKL-

Second-Semest-

LEXINGTON. KENTUCKY. FRIDAY. FEBRUARY

Registration

er

Total Breaks

All-Ti-

For First

Three-Da-

y

ARE

Confident After Three Consecutive
Triumphs, Wildcat Sharpshooters
Will Meet Xavier U. Saturday

GRADUATED

i

3.21 G

Ask
Church Council Iler-Members Of Senior Class
For Renewed Confidence
In Democracy

Office Yesterday
Afternoon

MONDAY IS FINAL
DATE FOR ENTERING
2.000

Men Sign

Than
For Second Term Ulasses
At University

More

e
record for
Breaking an
the first three days of registration,
total enrollment in the University
through Thursday was placed at
with the closing of the Registrar' office late yesterday after-

noon.
Last year's record for this period
of registration was 252 below
total. 'Enrollment for
the first two weeks of last year totaled 1.267 with an increase to
registrations for indepen
dent work had been added. It was
stated in the Office of the Registrar that this year's total is expected to reach 3.400.
For the first semester of the current school year, registration totaled
3.565. The number of students registering in the second semester during the past always has been approximately 150 less than the number for the first semester.
Although the cards of the men
students have not yet been separated from those of the women students, it was estimated that more
than 2j000 of those registering during the first three days were men

rtr

i

is

Kernel Staff
Will Meet At
3 p.m. Today

:?

i

It is imperative that
present members of The Kentucky Kernel staff be present
at a meting which is to be
held at 3 p. m. today, in the
Kernel News Room.
All students who expect to
wcrk on the paper this semester are requested to be present their standings of the
A sl'tnt reorganisation of the staff will take
place at the meeting and
plans will be made for the remainder of the year.
There also will be a discussion of a staff for next year,
consequently all students who
intend to hold pos lions on
the staff at that time must be
present at the meeing.
(Signed)
ROSS J. CHEPELEFF, Editor

NEW PROFESSOR

TAKES POSITION

mmJL

nipt

mi

Ti

rl

A

PLANS MADE TO

ience on two West Virginia dailies
and two weekly publications, as well
as occasionally serving as Associated
Press correspondent from Beckley
will teach classes in feature writing.
verbal criticism, public opinion, and
a class in beginning reporting.
Executive Committee Of Pan A graduate of River State College.
Tolilikon TTans Program Montgomery, West Va.. he received
For Student Educational his M. A. from West Virginia University. He is at present working
Project
toward a PhD in English from Ohio
State University. While an underPlans for a student educational grade vte. Mr. Tucker edited his
program on Austria to begin in college weekly for 3 years, and was
March were discussed at a meeting business manager of the student
of the executive committee of
year book.
ysterday afternoon in the
He is a member of the American
offices of Miss Sarah Blanding. dean Association of Teachers in Journalicf women.
sm, and the Kappa Alpha social
Heads of the different depart- fraternity.
ments will lecture to student body
groups on contributions of Austria
to their fields of interest, according
to the committee.
Art and architecture exhibits of
Austria will be placed in the Art
center and in the lobby of the Li- "World War Debt" Is Topic
brary sometime during March, it
Of Dean At Annual
was decided by the committee.
Convention
Two speakers from Austria will
address a general convocation durDean James H. Graham, of the
ing the program.
Members of the Pan Polit ikon ex- College of Engineering, was a speakecutive committee are Harry Hale, er at the Friday night session of
the Kentucky Society of Professionchairman; OUie Montgomery,
d
Anna Jane McChesney, al Engineers, which last week
at th Lafayette hotel for its
secretary; Barbara MacVey, public-- .
convention.
annual two-daIty director; Frank Davis and
-The World War Debt" was the
Cram, organization committee, and Adolph E. Bigge, head of topic of Dean Graham's address.
the German department, faculty ad- He explained the reasons why European nations have been reluctant
visor.
about repaying the large sums of
money due the United States.
The convention, attended by engineers from all sections of the
state, was opened Friday afternoon
Tri-Sta- te
with an address of welcome by Mayor E Reed Wilson. George H. Sag-s- r
Jr.. Louisville, presided.
Instruction started this week in
four or five classes being offered
MOOItE TO BROADCAST
the second semester to part-tim- e
students in Northern Kentucky
Beginning February 15. Henry B.
through the University Department Moors, associate professor of Ecoof Extension. Three classes are now nomics at the University, will make
bring held in Covington, and one in
broadcasts
six weekly
Newport.
from the University studios, in
"FK'lds of Psychology" was give
will outline for the averfor the first time Monday at Holmei mhich he
High school. Covington, under the age business man a number of
direction of Dr. M. M. White. The sources of business information
which will prove of value to him.
'Geolcourse offers three credits.
ogy of Kentucky." under Dr. A. M
McFarlan, was introduced Tuesday
nfternoon at the Covington Public
Library. It also offers three credits
and is a study of the mineral re
wurces of the state, their distribution, origin and use.
The third course offered is "Pub
lie School Art," involving the use
Biinging three of radio's favorite
of tools and various materials suitable for use in the elementary gagsters to the screen for the first
schools. It met for the first time time, "This Way Please," with Mary
Wednesday, with Mrs. Ruth Haines Livingston, and Fibber McGee and
as instructor. Only two credits are
Molly, will be the feature presentaciven for this study.
"The Contemporary Drama," an- tion of this week's College Night,
course, began scheduled to bogin at 8 o'clock toother three-cred- it
Yesterday afternoon at Newport night at the Strand theatre. Blonde
High school under the direction of Betty Grable and suave Buddy RogProf. E. F. Farquhar. This course ers have the romantic leads in the
is designed to show the development production.
"Spy Ring" starring Jane
and tendencies in the Continental,
comprises the other half of the
British and Ami Iran dramatic litdouble-featurprogram. Hal Kemp
1850 to 1918.
erature from
The fifth extension course offered and his orchestra are featured in
will begin Tuesday night, Februarj a band short, "Breezy Rhythm." Of
i5. at the Baker Hunt Foundation. interest to Lexington dance fans of
Covington, under the instruction of a few years back should be the fact
Mrs. Eflie Cox Starns. Offering that a member of the old Kentucky
three credits, the study deals with Colonels orchestra of Lexington,
the History of the United Stales Gus Mayhew, is the trombonist with
Kemp's aggregation. "Choose Yoiuv
since 1850.

STUDY JjJSTRIA

Graham Addresses
Engineer Meeting

con-ven-

UKy Begins Five
Extension Courses
Area
In

1

ilia

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in

mi"

WILD AN THOMAS
Pepiot 1'hoton

Ailam

Third Guignol Production
To Open Monday, Feb.
Series Of Vaudeville Acts,
.
Headlined By Mystery
Thriller, To Be
Presented

Guignol season at 8:30 o'clock
day night at the campus theater
The show is scheduled for a week's
with a matinee
run. February
on Saturday.
"The Spider" is a mystery thriller
written bv Lowell Bertano and Ful
ton Oursler. editor of Liberty magazine. It will be the feature attrac
tion of the vaudeville acts.
A ballet number, directed by William Carter Stair, will be the first
act of the vaudeville presentation.
Members of the ballet are Gene
vieve Howard, Mary Austin Wallace, Myra Hummer, Virginia Hay-doSusan Price and Barbara
Rehm. A dance by Sara Revill Estill and Mr. Stair also will be in the
act.
Jean Megerle and Wildan Thomas will present a song and dance
skit as the second act of the production.
As the. climax of the show. "The
Spider." a play having a magical
background, will present L. Cass
Robinson as Chatrand. a magician,
assisted by Mary Howard. Genevieve Howard, and Greer Johnson.
The last three acts of the vaude-viwill be the Smith Brother Jugglers. William and Jack Smith:
Skating Marvels of the Century.
George Mack and Lillian LaRue.
ll
and Chocolate Cake Eaters, Al
and Edward Fant.
Members of the production staff
of the play are Frank Fowler Davis,
William Quirey.
house manager;
staee manager; James Holt, electrician; Barbara MacVey. property
mistress, and VI Crutcher, costume
mistress.
The show is under the direction
of Frank Fowler, with Hazel Perkins, a member of the advanced
dramatics class, as assistant.
ll

Ly-te-

y

Wil-l'a-

iiiwiissiswwtiisfi"tiiii-iiiW-

JEAN MEGERLE

Willis C. Tucker, Of Marshall A series of vaudeville acts, headCollege, Takes Appointment lined by a mystery thriller, "The
at the
separated
To Fill Vacancy In Depart- Spider," will be presented current
third production of the
students,
ment Of Journalism
Mon-

students.
nudnts have not yet been
from those of the women
it was estimated that more than
200 of those registering during the Willis C. Tucker. Beckley. West
first three days were men students. Va.. newly appointed Journalism
Classes will be closed to all regu- instructor, yesterday assumed his
lar students after Monday. February duties in the department. Profes14. the final date for registering, it sor of Journalism for six and one
Only those stu- half years at Marshall College.
was announced.
dents entering for independent work Huntington. West. Va.. he fills the
will be allowed to register later.
vacancy caused by the death in
December of Prof. Enoch Grehan.
Mr. Tucker, who has had exper

MrVEY TO BROADCAST
"An Economist Looks at the
World" is the title of two talks to
be presented by Dr. Frank L.
from the University studios at
1:45 p. m. on February 28. and
March 28.
Mc-Ve- y

7

Hop
Scheduled For
Saturday Night
Two-B-

it

Any student having training in the operation of a linotype machine and desiring
part-tim- e
employment is requested to report to the Kentucky Kernel business office.
Edgar Penn. Kernel business
manager, announced yesterday.

e

Weppins." a Popeye cartoon, completes the program.
Price of admission is 16 cents
when accompanied by the coupon
appearing elsewhere in today's Kernel.
As a result of the popularity of
the old silent serial recently presented to College Night audiences,
the management has decided to run
a similar "thriller." and has prepared a list of pictures which are
procurable. Students are asked to
choose the one which they would
like to see next, and hand in their
selections at the Kernel office. Following is the list of films: On The
Go, with Buffalo Bill as the featured actor; Helen's Babies, with
Baby Peggy; Rarin- - To Go. Buddy
Roosevelt; Circus Lure; Smoky Bal-leBattling Danger; Courageous
Fool, Reed Howes; Horse Shoe

Urging members of the graduat
Ing class to "pursue industry, dili
gence and hard work." the Rev. Dr.
Edgar DeWltt Jones, Detroit, presi
dent of the Federal Council of
Churches cf Christ in America,
asked for a renewed "confidence in
the principles of democracy," dur
ing the commencement address he
graduat
delivered at the mid-yeion exercises Monday afternoon in
degrees
Memorial hall. Eighty-fiv- e
were conferred by President Frank
L. McVey.
"Nothing can ever be taken for
granted in a democracy." said Dr.
Jones, whose subject was "Proverbs
You Ought to Know."
Freedom of any kind is gained
and preserved at a great cost. This
generation must renew its confi
dence in the principles of democracy, and a tremendous faith is
required to believe with all one's
heart in democracy, for when you
rest your case with the people, ycu
take a chance a risk is involved.
"But if democracy is full of head
aches. It Is also full of glorious
"
the Rev. Dr. Jones
said. "The abuse of liberty and inefficiency seem to be
of a democracy, but the weaknesses
of a democracy are better than the
on Page Six)
i (Continued

FARMERS

HEAR

MANY SPEAKERS

ks

entertainment.

toin-pltlel-

INA RAY KUTTON

,

Annual Farm
Convention

25-2- 8.

Ina Ray Hutton and her Melo-deahave been secured for the an-

rs

nual Military Ball, sponsored by
Scabbard and Blade, frcm 8:30 to
12 o'clock Saturday night. February
26. in the Alumni gym.
A queen and two attendants for
the formal will be selected by representatives of the R. O. T. C. regiment, possibly next week, it was
announced yesterday.
who have been
Committeemen
chosen fcr the dance are Jack
Shanklin and Coleman Judy, dance
Smee. Jarred
committee: Jimmy
Barron Arthur Plummer Jr.. and
Jack Hoover, decoration committee;
Fred Flowers and C. D. Morat. arrangements committee.
Tickets may be secured from any
member of Scabbard and Blade.
The tariff is $2 at the door or $150
for the advance sale.

Ballroom Danci,ng
Course Is Offered

the convention was divided each
into three sections: a general session, women's session and groups
for study of specialized fields.
These special sections were held
on beekeeping, rural electrification,
soils and crops, poultry raising, and
rural churches.
Speaking before more than 5.000
persons in the Alumni gymnasium
Wednesday night, January 26, Mrs
Roosevelt urged a continuation of
the federal government's movement
for better housing conditions.
"I feel that very often we think
of housing as just so many houses
being built," Mrs. Rosevelt declared,
"but do not actually realize just
what it really means to the nation
as a whole."
Mrs. Roosevelt spent an active
day in Lexington making several
talks to various sections of the convention and visiting many spots of
Interest in the Bluegrass including
the local federal housing project,
the WPA women's sewing project,
and the United States Public Health
Serrice hospital.
Other important speakers during
meeting included Dr
the four-daWalter C. Lowdermilk. associate
chief, soil conservation service: Dr.
H. R. Trolly, administrator, agricultural adjustment administration:
A. L. Goss, Washington, federal land
bank commissioner, and Dr. Chester
C. Davis, member of the federal reserve board. Washington.
Speaking before a meeting of rural pastors. Doctor Lowdermilk, who
has studied soil erosion in China
for five years, said, "However much
the people of the United States may
desire it. we cannot remain aloof
from the menace to our future welfare existing in the undeclared war
In the Orient."
Dr. Trolly, addressing a general
session on "Building a National
Agriculture Policy" said that protective tariff, inflation and price
fixing would not solve our national
problems.
"A farm program cannot be justified if it injures the national
welfare," said Doctor Trolly, "the
pressure group idea of grabbing to
the limit from other groups would
be a faulty foundation for our farm
policy."
"Borrowing is easy but paying
back is more or less painful." Goss
told assembled farmers in discuss- e
ing "Use and Abuse of Credit-Hlisted what he termed 'four
simple rules" that prospective borrowers should observe in obtaining
credit.
Addressing the closing session of
the convention. Doctor Davis claimed. In touching on the current recession, that there would not be
another crash.
"Informed men I meet do not
believe this business half marks an
end to the recent progress of recovery. The elements that usually
surround a prolonged depression
are lacking," he said.

e
Plans Completed For
Banquet Honoring Legislators
Pre-Gam-

Held Monday Night
In Commons
Approximately 160 state officials
and 55 Lexingtonians will be present
banquet
for the
to precede the
State game, it was announced late
yesterday upon completion of plans
for the affair.
The banquet will be held from 6
to 7 o'clock Monday night, February
7. in the University commons, ac
cording to members of the Men's
student council.
The Frankfort delegation will be
headed by Gov. A. B. Chandler and
Lieut.-GoKeen Johnson and will
consist of members of the state
legislature and other state officials.
Roger Brown, president of the
Men's student council, will make
the opening address at the banquet
and will introduce Dr. Frank L.
student-legislatur-

e

Wildcat-Michiga-

non-cred-

Luck: The Mask; White Outlaw.
Art Accord; Lena Rivers; Broken
Spur; Grey Vulture. Ken Maynard;
Confession; I Like The Law. Wallace Berry; Goat Getter. Billy Sullivan; Demon Rider. Ken Maynard:
Recreation of Brian Kent; Gold'and
Grit. Buddy Roosevelt; Captain
January, Baby Peggy.
Tessie, Tearin' Loose, Action Galore. Crack of Dawn, Isle of Lost
Men. Vanishing Hoofs. Wally Wales.
Weak Knees. Felix Baffled With
Banjoes. Felix Rests in Peace. Australia's Wild Northwest. Felix Grabs
His Grub, Under Cuban Skies. Salt
of Apping, Mexico Oil Field, Klondike Today. Past Present and No
Stepping
Future.
On the Gas,
Liehtning
Lightning
Vengeance,
Honor, Law of the Mounted, Rovers and Ropes, and Sight Seeing in
New York completes the list.

Tampering With
P. O. Boxes Is
Federal Offense

n

McVey.

After a short talk Doctor McVey
introduce Governor Chandler
who will address the group. Brown
will make the closing talk on the
program. Music will be furnished
by the Girls' Glee club under the
direction of Miss Mildred Lewis.
Guests, other than the state of
ficials, include:
Doctor McVey. Coach Adolph
Rupp. Coach Chet Wynne. James
S. Shropshire, director of student
publications; Robert Salvers, alumni executive secretary Dean James
H. Graham. College of Engineering:
Dean P. P. Boyd, College of Arts and
(Continued on Page Six)
will

y

course in ballroom dancing is
being offered this semester by the
Dhysical education department. It
it
course and is held
is a
on Tuesday and Thursday afternoons from 4:45 to 5:45 p. m., in
the Women's gym.
No one will be allowed In the gym
during the class hour except those
enrolled in the course. A student
signing up for this course must attend every class period.
Instructors in this course will be
Bernie Shively. C. W. Hackensmith.
M. G. Carsner. Mary King Montgomery and .Margaret Warren.

Alabama And Vanderbilt Are
Defeated On Recent

Journey

Rejuvenated as a result of three
consecutive
conference
triumph.
Coach Rupp's Kentucky Wildcats
invade Cincinnati tomorrow night
fo do battle with Clem Crewe's Xavier Musketeers.
The 'Cats, according ti advance
dope, should have little trouble in
annihilating the Queen City
Notre Dame was very lucky
indeed to squeeze through with
victory over the Rupps. while it
practically scored at will in down
ing the Xaviers by a
margin.
However. Coach Rupp Is taking
no chances with the Yankees pull
ing an upset. As he realizes that
Xavier would rather trounce Kentucky than any other five, he has
sent the Blue and Whit through
several tough practice sessions.
Kentucky, showing the best form
cf the season, had little difficulty
in soundly thrashing its conference
foes. As a result the 'Cats are now
tied with Georgia Teeth's Yellow
Jackets for the Big 13 lead.
Playing before a near capacity
crowd, the 'Cata delighted the partisan fans with the ea.se with which
they conquered Tennessee's Volun-terIn their first conference
'est. They pulled into an early lead,
gradually increased It. and rasrd
away rn the final session.
Next. Kentucky's cagers journeyed
'o Nashville where they racked up
another conquest, defeating the
weak Vanderbilt Commodores, 42 to
19. Kentucky pulled into an early
ead and was never headed.
Coach Rupp substituted freely but
'he 'Cats continued their bombardment of the hoop, increasing their
tdvantage to 28-- at the half. The
Wildcat mentor made use of his en-itraveling squad of 11 men.
Scoring was well divided fcr the
Cats with Hagan. Thompson, and
Opper tied for high point honors
with 10 markers each.
In their last collision, the Rupps
oiled over Alabama's Crimson Tide.
i7 to 31. before a capacity crowd
n the Birmingham Athletic Club.
The defending champs, taking an
iarly lead, won in a walk.
Again. Coach Adolphus made use
5f his entire squad. Hagan and Op- oer stood out during the victory.
A3 in the vandy tilt, scoring was
well divided as Opper made 10
points, while Hagan. Goodman.
Rouse, and Curtis tied for second
honors with 8 points each.
net-ter-

e
Students who open
boxes not belonging to
them are committing s federal offense. Miss Carrie Bean.
I'niversity postmaster, warned
post-offic-

yesterday.
"I realise students do not
mean any harm by opening
the boxes," Miss Bean sasd,
"but, much as I would dislike it, I should have to report any students I saw tampering with boxes."
Miss Bean asked that stu-

the

with

dents

postoffice by not telling their
bcx combinations to anyone.
"We car not be responsibto
for the mail of students who
let all their friends know their
combinations," she said.
DRAMATIZATIONS

s.

Prominent young music students
Central Kentucky will be featured on the University's ninth pros.
gram of Sunday afternoon
the presentation of the annual Young Artists' concert, at 4

of

viusi-cale-

February 6, in Memorial hall.
Appearing first on the program
d
pianist.
will be a
Patricia Griffin, who tied with Paul
Latimer for first place in the piano
contest last year. The contest was
conducted by the Kentucky Federation of Music Clubs and was Judged
by Dr. Carol Lachnienska.
Arthur Smith, who will sing three
selections in the concert, has been
oraised for his excellent tenor voice.
He is a member of the University
Men's Glee Club.
The stringed quartet Is composed
of Lee Crook. J. Preston Bryan.
Paul Mclntyre, and Virginia Rowland. An outstanding violinist in
Lexington for several jfearsv Mr.
Crook at present has charge of instrumental work at the Bryan Station and Kenwick schools. Mr.
Bryan is one of the younger violinists doing graduate work in violin
at the University. Mr. Mclntyre
received his musical training at the
Eastern School of Music. Rochester,
and the Cincinnati Conservatory of
Music. Miss Rowland, a senior in
the University music department,
has appeared before several Lexington audiences in the last two years.
Following the selections by the
p. m. Sunday.

twelve-year-ol-

9

re

Kampus
Kernels

TO START

for the next issue
dramatizations dealing of Contributions campus humor magSour Mash,
with the life and accomplishments
azine, must be turned in t I'niverof John James Audubon, pioneer sity postofriee box 1872 by noon
A series of

ornithologist whose wanderings are Saturday, February 5.
so closely associated with Kentucky,
will be presented at weekly interAil parking permits for the second
vals on Tuesdays at 1:45 p. m. from
procured at the
the University studios starting May semester should be of Men on Frioffice of the Dean
24. it was announced yesterday.
day and Saturday, January 4 and
.
For those registering their cars
at this time, the fee is 25 cents.
Late registration fees will be 35
cents.

Young Music Students Will
Appear On Vesper Program

photography club
p. m. Thursday.
February 10. in Room 108. Science
stringed quartet. Mrs. Mary Elea- hall. Dr. R. S. Allen, professor of
will anatomy and physiology will speak
nor Goodwin,
sing three numbers as the fourth on "Nature Photography."
part of the concert.
Theta Sigma Phi will meet at 4
Frances Binford. a student in the
music department of Georgetown p. m. Friday in the Woman's buildCollege, will close the program with ing.
a
a group of modern piano composiThe music group of the Y. W. C.
tions. Adele Gensemer. accompanist for Mrs. Goodwin and Mr. Smith, A. will meet at 3 p. m. Monav,
did her undergraduate work at February 7, in the Woman's building.
Wooster College. Ohio.
The complete program is as fol"Students and the World Comlows:
munity" will be the topic of a talk
i
Brahms by Mary Elizabeth Koppius at the
Walu. Op I. No. 11
Dennw meeting or the world fellowship
8prlngtline in the Forest
Patricia Griffin
?roup of the Y. W. C. A. at 3 p. m.
Monday .
Albert Malott
The Lord Prayer

The University

will meet

at

7:30

mezzo-sopran-

A Hardelol
Richard KountJ
The handicraft group of the Y.
Arthur Smith
W. C. A. will meet at 3 p. m. Mon
III
dav. February 7, in the Woman's
Emil PochtmB
Qimrtettr. Op. 70. No. 1
building
AlleKro moderato ed energKO
Andante Soalenutn
mo- - Al le ret to
Scher
majors are
A ' physical education
Finale Allegro inolto
urited to be present at 4 p. m. Man-cla- y
Lee Crook, first violin; W Paul
d
viola: J. Preston Bryan,
in Room 302. Frazee hall, to
Virginia Rowland, 'cello
violin:
hear James E. Rogers, national phyIV
sical educational association repreI E&t Doul; U Est Bon: Herodiade

Because

The Sleigh

Ma.vvenel

Pan and the LiUle Oreru Reed
Mrs

..

Spanish Romance
Mary 'Eleanor

P

sentative.

.

Guiesiani

H

M

E

Sawyer

Goodwin

V

Cvril Svott
Lento
Maurice Ravel
Pavane
Pour une Infante defuute iFor a
Dead Child)
Le Petit ane blanc. .
Jacques Ibert
Prances Binford
Adele Geusemer at the piauo.

s.

top-heav- y

52-2-

And Home

With
TO PLAY FOR HOP headlineda gargarftuan speaker's list,
by Mrs. Franklin D.
Roosevelt, the 26th annual KenQueen. Two Attendants Will tucky Farm and Home convention
Be Selected By ROTC For was held at the College of Agriculture, January
Annual Military Ball To Be A statewide conference
to proHeld February 26
mote a more satisfying farm life,

.SETTERS NOW TIED
FOR LEAGUE LEAD

v

p

First Lady Headlines Large More Than 200 Persons ExLecturers' List At 26th
pected At Affair To Be

A

Job Open

Mc-ev'-

heart-beats,-

Owing to the
cancellation of the home basketball game originally scheduled for tomorrow night in
Alumni Gym. an
hop will be held from 9 to 12
o'clock, with Bernard Crutch-e- r
and his Frankfort Trouba-dor- s
supplying the music.
Price of admission will be
the usual 25 cents per couple
will
or stag. Six
be included in the evening's

Radio Gagsters Head College Night
Double - Feature Allurement At Strand

Wy-ma- n

wiili alumni ami Muikni opinion lonitriiing the
of llie University's athletic association, the
s
Reorganization committee assembled in Dr. Frank I..
olhie vesieulay and groaned through two hours of "discussing generalities."
"I hat this whole situation has been handled in a
civilized manner goes without saying. Manhood has
attained a cultured status when it lakes its problems, invites
ideas for reform or rebuilding, and studies them carefully
and sanelv. This Reorganization committee has ei loi mctl
admirably but now the state and the campus are clamoiing
for action.
The ciusaders might discuss this point at their next
meeting and publicly illuminate their findings and fm.il
plan for the reorganization of the University's sports department. The patience of the populace might snap if definite
statements, provisions, and reorganization plans are not
proposed by the committee at the next council meetings.
If the committee, through its polling the state for a new
athletic constitution, deems it imperative thta the Univerh ing
sity oH.nly subsidize its athletes, appoint a non-coa- t
athletic director, include an increased alumni membership
on the athletic council, or demolish its contract with Head
Coath C. A. Wynne, then let the committee stride into the
limelight and announce its advice and suggestions.
Everyone associated with the University was completely
were selected and instructed
pleased when the reorganize
to ferret out all the fetters blocking Kentucky's path lo athletic supremacy. Now that the ball is rolling forcefully and
lighteouslv, toward a rejuvenation of the Athletic association, the committee must act to mend the wrongs of the past
and to satisfy every Kentucky fan who is avidly cheering
and houset leaning
the promotion of a thorough shake-uin the University's sports policies.

Loin

High Distinction Honors Go
To Brown. Mitts And
Sheehan

,""-v- l

'Cats. According To Advance
Dope. Should Have Little
Trouble In Beating
Musketeers

Now Some Action!

DR. McVEY PRESENTS
DIPLOMAS TO STUDENTS

all

P. M SATURDAY
ALUMNI GYM
NEW SERIES NO. 32

AS 85 STUDENTS

Period

HOP

S

1!M

DR. JONES TALKS

GUIGNOL PLAYERS

Record

me

4.

d

Students Enrolled At
Hosing Of Registrar's

2

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

Z246

VOLUME XXVIII

ALL-CAMPU-

There- - will be an important meet
.I'g of the American Student Union
at 7:30 o'clock Monday night in
Room 210 of McVey hail.

There will be a meeting of the
oil rv v circle
9 pi bl wuy ui uic
' Alumni gymnasium.

u

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL

Tage Two

THE KENTUCKY KERNEL
omciAL irrwsPApn op thi vtudents op
umiunTT op KBrrncKT

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Bniwe al tba Port 0K M tnttoo.
elaaa aiattrr ander Iba Act af Maxell I.

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Kurtvckf lalareaUatiau Pmas Aaaoclatloa

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National Advertisin Service, Inc.
T i"-- MUn m VCMK. N. V.
420 MAOoKM Ave.
reeuciece

CMC

am

aoeron

lm eoctiM

Ross J. CHFPEixFr

Editor-in-Chi-

Managing Editor

Raymond T. Lathrem
F.HC.AR

Business Manager

D. Tenn
ADVERTISING

STAFF

Jim"

Robert Cohen
Kiltingrr

Rmlth

OrcU

Dnolfy

Circulation Manager

NEVILLE TATUM

ANDREW ECKDAHL
Associate News Editor

CLIFF SHAW
Sparta Editor

GEORGE H. KERLER
COPT FBTTORS
afarrtii Oa
Woe
Baiter

LoBlt Itankln

SPORTS WRITERS
Vack Rare
JM Creasin

Ea MueKhlee

i.

Alio

Tom Watklna
Bo. Rankin

COMPLETE CAMPUS

Murdering

P

B. Ptulrontr
Loala Haynea

CO

V

ERA

GE

sve hoi. o c; m

v;uh of
five students al l lie
Sleep
University of Georgia
At Georgia
go without sleep lot
e- KM! hours, hope to learn something from the
ol the psycholo,Kiimeni. It is an experiment
gists. It. too. is an experience, ami an ordeal for
watching

students.
I he thing overlooked, it seems, by the psyis thai the lest, as given, is not a lull
ihologists
course, really ii
iesi of human sleeplessness. Of
is a lest of human sleeplessness under certain
i

lie

conditions.
The Georuia students did not have the stinv
uli thai usually are associated with sleeplessness
of oidinarv human beings. Ordinary men stay
awake for extraordinary periods, ii is true, but
the mere
i hev usually have reasons other than
effect this lack of sleep has upon
Mudx of what
them.
W hile the Georgia students stayed awake as
the iisvchologists studied them, their abstinence
anmrentlv carrv oxer into the remainder of their
usual life routine.

The question that comes to mind is what
would have been the results and reactions if the
Gcoigia students, instead of merely not sleep
in", had !een fighting forest fires, fighting in
battle lines, flying oceans, balancing
books, playing itokei. attending proms, or even
going to school regularly.
Kxidcnilx the psychologists in charge of the
x riment know lhat iheir tests were made
certain conditions, and jieiTiaps they
that if the fixe students had len occupied.
vix as playing poker, attending proms, or going
10 vhool. the students would not haxe leen so
icadv to pause for sessions with the sphygmomanometer and the Army Alpha test.
year-en-

PAN-PO-

organiza-

d

tion for fostering international relations,
announces in this is
sue of The kernel an extensive program to
during March. This annual series of stud.
ies will include lectures, illustrated talks,
exhibits, and displays. It will fulminate in
a general convocation.
Included in the presentation of the various
units will lie something extra, however. usi
what that thing is, perhaps is inexplicable. Hut
it is there. For during the series there will lie
ample optoitunitx for certain students to learn
something new and fresh; especially can those
who Uliexe they cannot excise themselves to
"another, old lecture." By attending any. or all.
proof the various phases of the month-longram, those students will exixricnce something
decidedly different from just another lecture.
The programs, judging from last year's, are nol
conducted along "lecture lines."
Of the eleven meetings held last year, none
xvas without lienclil of a speaker who xvas intelligent and well versed in his subject. This
lifts the talks aliove the nature of anything that
mav lie likened to 'those dull lectures" students
congregating in the Post Office frequently complain of xvhen cutting convocation.
From experience gained when attending last
meetings, it can be saitl
year's
safely that the programs are unlike those elull
leciuies which crop out suddenly and periodically in exen the liest of universities. The discussions of last year which usually followed the
scheduled talks were participated in by both
students and f