xt7k3j392z2g https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7k3j392z2g/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19681001  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, October  1, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, October  1, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7k3j392z2g section xt7k3j392z2g Tee Kmthjcky Kernel
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HHH Says Halt
The South's Outstanding College Daily

Tuesday Evening, Oct.

1, 1908

UNIVERSITY

OF KENTUCKY,

LEXINGTON

Vol. LX, No. 25

j--

i

1

All U.S. Bombing

President Hubert H. Humphrey
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP)-V- ice
says if elected president he would stop the bombing of North
Vietnam as an "acceptable risk" for peace if Hanoi shows willingness to restore the demilitarized zone.
In his first paid nationwide
television
broadcast
Monday al," and added, "nor would I
night, and speaking from Salt escalate the level of violence in
Lake City before flying here, either North or South Vietnam.
the Democratic
presidential We must seek to
candidate said:
He based his stance on a
"As president, I would stop bombing halt by citing the Demthe bombing of the North as an ocratic platform which says the
acceptable risk for peace because next president should take reaI believe it could lead to sucsonable risks to find peace in
cess in the negotiations and a Vietnam
shorter war. This would be the
On the other major points, the
best protection for our troops." vice president said:
The vice president placed a
"The ultimate key to an
qualification on his proposed honorable solution must be free
bombing halt, saying that be- elections in South Vietnam,"
fore taking action he would with the Viet Cong and other
"place key importance on evi- dissident groups allowed to pardence direct or indirect, by deed ticipate if "they were willing to
or work of Communist willing- abide by peaceful processes."
ness to restore the demilitarized
"I would propose once more
zone between North and South an immediate cease-fir- e
with
Vietnam."
the United Nations or other inHumphrey added that "If the ternational supervision and sugovernment of North Vietnam pervised withdrawal of all forwere to show bad faith, I would eign forces from South Vietnam.
reserve the right to resume the
"I would sit down with the
leaders of South Vietnam to set
bombing."
There was no immediate re- a specific timetable by which
sponse to Humphrey's speech American forces could be sysfrom Sen. Eugene J. McCarthy, tematically reduced while South
a fellow Minnesota Democrat Vietnamese forces took over more
who was the vice president's and more of the burden." He
principal rival at the Democrat- said he thought this would be
ic convention in Chicago.
possible next year.
But Sen. Edward M. Kennedy,
Humphrey said he would apwhose late brother, Robert, was ply the lesson of Vietnam, as he
another Humphrey rival for Dem- put it, and, with a set of fresh
ocratic nomination, sent a con- advisers, review "other comgratulatory telegram. He wired mitments made in other times"
to determine which should be
Humphrey:
"To all who look for peace in retained in the national interest.
Saying he did not condemn
Vietnam, you have given great
and hope. To all any past commitment, he went
encouragement
who seek new and more con- on:
"But I do say, if I am presistructive directions in American
foreign policy in the nuclear age, dent, I owe it to this nation to
you have taken a position of bring our men and resources in
Vietnam back to America where
distinct leadership.
"You are the only candidate we need them so badly, and to
for president who has offered be sure we put first things first
the American people proposals in the future."
Humphrey said the views of
for ending the war in Vietone of his election opponents,
nam
third-part- y
candidate George C.
Aides to the vice president Wallace, "indicate that he would
made a point of emphasizing
sharply escalate the war." And
that, "We have made no effort," he said that the record of the Reto inform President Johnson in
publican candidate, Richard M.
advance of the contents of the Nixon, shows that since 1954
vice president's speech.
"he has taken a line on VietThe vice president said at the nam policy which I believe could
outset that "peace would not be lead to greater escalation of the
served by weakness or withdraw war."

..."

Ulmer To Resign In June
As Pol Sci Chairman
Sidney Ulmer will resign as chairman of the Political
Department a position he has held since he came to
UK six years ago effective June 30, 19G9.
Dr. Ulmer said "timing" was the main reason for his resignation
next June. A department chairman may serve for only eight years
Dr.
Science

S.

chairmanship.
concurrently or work in a revolving four-yeAfter Ms resignation, he will lecture for six to eight weeks
at the University of Buffalo. Then he will take a semester or
year sabbatical leave to do analytical work on a study for the
Social Science Research Council.
Dr. Ulmer said he will use the sabbatical time to finish the
period longitudinal study of
analysis and writing of a
Supreme Court Judicial behavior.
The question of timing, he said, was in the best interest of
the department since then a new chairman would be cltosen who
"wouldn't be looking over my shoulder."
The new chairman will be diosen sometime before next June
selection committee clwsen by the Dean of Arts
by a three-ma- n
and Sciences.
Dr. Ulmer says he will return after his sabbatical, be it a
semester or a y ear, and spend "at least another year at UK."
30-ye- ar

Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

LrrOlip

1

llCrapyf

What's it all about? Is this some freak circus or are they monkeys
scratching for salt? Spin the bottle? Or the reenactment of the Battle
of Chicago? Your guess is as good as mine. The truth about this
sordid scene is on page three, but I'm not looking. Are you?

Grand Jury Indicts Two Officials
For Bribery; Raps Judge, Media
LEXINCTON,

Ky.(AP)-T- he

Fayette County Grand Jury returned bribery indictments Monday against a county commissioner and the chairman of the
Planning and ZonCity-Coun-

ing Commission.
David G Lagrew, the planning board chairman, was accused of agreeing to take two
bribes one this year and one
last year and Commissioner J.
Carl Hanks was named in one
bribery count.
The charge against Hanks, a
member of the county's Fiscal
Court, said he "by false pretenses or statement, with intent
to commit a fraud, obtained from
Donald Bates the sum of approximately $1,000."
Bates testified at a court of
inquiry session held here in July
that he had given Hanks money
allegedly to buy planning commission votes to influence a zone
change for property Bates was
developing.
The Grand Jury, in its final
report, also rapped County Judge
Joe Johnson for his accusations
Atty.
against Commonwealth's
Donald P. Moloney.
Jury Statement
And, in somewhat guarded
statements, the jury:
Said some cases presented to
it seemed "to us to be frivolous
and an attempt to 'get at' or
'get even with' a person." It
said no indictments were returned in these cases.
Criticized local news media,
saying "The public is not getting
all the news with respect to the
various activities of all the public offices, agencies, courts and
governmental matters."
The jury said it found that
the essential work of the planning and zoning commission had
been carried out faithfully, adding that the actual zoning process is a minor part of the board's
work.
"Nevertheless, we have been
shocked and angered by the apparent amount and extent of corruption and influence peddling
which has occurred recently in
zone change matters and cases,"
the Jury said.
Operation Changes
The jury suggested a number of changes in the board's
operations, including a larger

board and higher pay for its
members, and said it hopes they
will be adopted immediately.
"No one of the . . . recommendations, or all of them, are

going to make a dishonest person honest or a corrupt person
incorruptible, but, hopefully
those which are adopted will
make it more difficult and more
dangerous to act corruptly and
less likely that the conditions
encouraging corruption can exist amongst us," the jury said.
Lagrew was accused by the
jury of agreeing "to take a bribe,
to wit: an option to purchase a
piece of property at a substantially undervalued price in return
for voting in favor of, and securing from other members of
the commission, to this jury unknown, their vote in favor of
a zone change.

This, the jury said, occurred
in May of this year.
Lagrew also was charged with
agreeing last year "to take a
bribe, to wit: four acres of land
at an undervalued price" for his
vote in a commission hearing.

The investigation of planning

and zoning operations here began July 24 when Judge Johnson
convened a court of inquiry into
alleged irregularities.
One witness in that court,
Thomas W. Freeman, testified
Lagrew had sought a bribe in
return for a zone change. Freeman said he placed a tape recorder in his car, then pretended
to accept the proposition.
Johnson's court of inquiry was
held in public session for a time,
but was forced into private session by an order of Circuit Court,
Continued on Page 2, Col. 1

Grape Workers Urge
Nationwide Boycott
DELANO, Calif.

(CPS)-"- In

In 1968, farm workers remain

the souls of the people, the grapes excluded from this act. To overof wrath are filling and growing come this handicap and win the
heavy, growing heavy for the benefits enjoyed by other workersminimum wage, collective
vintage."
So runs the final sentence in bargaining, fringe benefits the
a chapter of John Steinbeck's farm workers of Delano, Cali"The Grapes of Wrath." What fornia voted to go on strike for
was true almost 40 years ago union recognition three years ago
is still true this month as a strike this month.
farm workers
by California
spreads into a nationwide grape
boycott.
Farm workers in the U.S. are
still forced to lead lives geared
not to advancement but to bare
survival. A California grape worker does not have to face the dilemma of whether to buy loafers or
for his children-- he
must worry about having enough
money to get shoes of any kind
for the members of his family.
At present, many grape workers earn less titan $1,800 a year.
Even if a worker were able to
work 40 hours a week every week
of the year, he could only earn
$2,386 annually approximately
one-hathe average wage for all
Californians.
In the llXiO's, America's workers won the right to organize
and bargain collectively through
the National Labor Relations Act.
hush-puppi-

lf

Attempts To Unionize
Since the turn of the century,
attempts had been made to unionize the farm workers in California,
but all of them had failed. This
time, however, under the leadership of Cesar Chavez, director
of the United Farm Workers,
farm workers have succeeded in
winning collective bargaining
agreements for the first time in
history. Several major wine companies in California have signed
agreements with their workers.
But the strike is now in its
43rd month, and the workers are
still out. Some victories have
been won, but the goal of total
union recognition is still far in
the future.
In an effort to put additional
on growers during
pressure
September the peak of thegrac
harvest and to win t 't ion wide

Contlii,

"

3

* 2-- TIIE

KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday, Oct.

1, 19G8

Hanks, Lagrew
Indicted For Bribery

Continued from Tare One
which said undue publicity could
hurt innocent persons.

Moloney Charged
After it became apparent that
the zoning matters were going
before the Grand Jury, Johnson
asked Atty. Gen. John Breckinridge to take over presenting evidence, charging Moloney might
act improperly.
Breckinridge declined.
The jury, in its report, said
law prohibited Moloney from replying to the charges during the
jury session. The panel then
praised Moloney as "a dedicated,
conscientious, honest person of
the highest integrity."
The jury noted that it had
declined to return indictments in

the "frivolous" cases presented
to it, biit added that they had
been turned over to the commonwealth's attorney "for preservation."
Extreme Caution
"In this connection," thejury
said, "public officials who possess great power by reason of
their office must use extreme
caution not to abuse that power
for any personal advantage, ambition or other purposes not in
the public interest."
In a separate indictment, the
jury charged that Hanks "leased
or rented a building knowing,
or with good reason to know,
that it was intended to be used
for prostitution, lewdness or

YEAR OLD BOYCOTT
CLOSING MARKETS
Kennedy before his death, EuContinued from Page One
for the strike, the UFW gene McCarthy and Hubert Humsupport
is devoting most of its energy phrey. Richard Nixon has not
this fall to enlarging and pub- endorsed the strike. One of the
'workers' avowed enemies in Callicizing a nationwide boycott of
ifornia is Governor Ronald Reatable grapes by supermarkets,
gan, who last fall reportedly alindividuals and companies.
lowed growers to keep the childThey have distributed posters
for car and store windows telling ren of workers out of school for
consumers that every grape they two weeks in order to finish the
while other children
buy denies a grape worker's child picking,
a meal. Workers have been sent were sent back.
The boycott, which began in
to 26 U.S. cities and Toronto to
talk in support of the boycott. earnest last year, has had some
effect on the market. Sales in
UMAS
California are down 20 percent,
College campuses, which in and grape markets in New York,
the West were the earliest areas Boston, Detroit and Chicago are
of support for the Delano strike,
being closed down. Growers have
area major target for the workers,
begun routing their grapes to
who are being helped by local cities where the
boycott is
branches of the United Mexican-America- n weakest.
Students (UMAS) orA successful
strike could
ganization, a new one on many change the status of farm labor
campuses this fall.
well beyond the California valUMAS groups are spending
leys. Once the pickers are ortheir time rallying campus sup- ganized, the way will be open
port for the Delano strikers and to unionizing all of California's
picketing supermarkets that carry 300,000 harvest hands. And once
California grapes (with some reCalifornia, the "General Motors
sults, apparently: one Denver su- of agriculture," has been organpermarket chain now has signs ized, the task of farm labor ortelling shoppers the grapes "were ganizers across the country will
n
workers").
picked by
be well under way.
Chavez and the strike have
The workers say they are seekreceived support from Robert
ing four things with the strike:
a minimum hourly wage at all
times of the year, sanitary working conditions in working areas,
a seniority system to protect
workers of long standing, and.an
end to harassment through the
appointment of stewards who
would represent any worker who
five till nine
felt he had been treated unfair- non-unio-

dining room only

99c

ly.

SO WHAT!

4-

-

(

)

-

sistent through fragmentary signs
that Wallace may be stronger
in the state than either major
party cares to admit.
A newspaper reporter posts

A

highly-regarde-

state fairvisitorsfindsheavy Wallace support during spot interviews.

Wallace Majority

of state fair visitors gives Wallace a big majority.
A junior college election shows
Wallace the big winner. A high
school poll comes out similarly.
Yet the First Research poll,
which a GOP official leaked to
northern Kentuckians the other
day, seemingly showed a maximum of 25 percent backing for
the former Alabama governor.
Warren Schweder, executive
A sampling

Jerry Rubin Hustled

Large Plurality
Rarely during modern polls in
Kentucky has such a large plurality of undecideds emerged only
six weeks before an election.
GOP strategists, who insist
their poll shows Nixon leading,
have reported the undecided bloc
figures to national headquarters,
which reportedly has reacted with
concern.
The next step is to interpret
the statistics and determine, if
possible, what they portend for
Nov. 5.
The optimistic thinking is that
a considerable number of the
undecideds simply will not vote.
Dems Hurt More

Out Of HUAC Hearing
WASHINGTON

hustled peace

HELD OVER!
ENDS THURS.

J
f

ADM. $1.50

w

Rubin, wearing a bandolero
ribbed with live bullets, out of
a congressional office building
today after he tried to enter a
hearing on Chicago's bloody an-

tiwar demonstrations during the
Democratic National Conven-

Grant Helps UK Prof
Develop Safe Mine Roof

COLOW

testify.
Rubin and Hoffman are leaders of the Youth International
Party, known as Yippies. Dellinger led the peace march on the
Pentagon a year ago. The others
joining in the court suit were
Rennie Davis, Thomas E. Hay-de- n
and Robert Creenblat.
Rubin, who appeared at a
HUAC hearing two years ago
wearing an American Revolutionary War uniform, said he was
dressed for this week's investigation in "the guerrilla outfit of

The mining professor preNational Science Foundation grant is making it possible sently is studying stresses on
rock ceilings while making mofor a University of Kentucky proc
materials
fessor of mining engineering to dels out of
a new roof for mines which for technique stress analysis.
perfect
will help answer safety to KenA graduate student in mining
tucky coal miners.
engineering, Jon Edward Kelly,
D. Wright has been alFred
is assisting
is from
lotted $39,000 to further his de- MadisonvilleWright. Kelly
where the tragic
of a Voussoir beam mine
velopment
mishap which claimed
which will serve as an arch over nine lives occurred last summer.
photo-elasti-

Wright is constructing his models in the old mining building
where he will have a mechanics
laboratory.

d

TT

r CINEMA
mm

the future."

Asked where he got the brass
jacketed rifle bullets that studded
the bandolero, Rubin cracked,
"I got them off an American
soldier."
Last week, Rubin and
founder of the Students for

Starts Wednesday!

66 A riot. The funniest since the

Hay-de-

-- MADEMOSEUl

fcMmHiwXM.

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FILMS

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AT THE FIREPLACE
CONTINUOUS
MONDAY

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MUSIC
NIGHT

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FOR

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The Charmains

50c

TUESDAY NIGHT CHAMPAGNE NIGHT
FOR LADIES
TGIF JAM SESSION
FRIDAY, 4-- 7
Muit B 21 To Enter

n,

a Democratic Society, which has
campaigned for abolition of the
HUAC, bumed their committee
subpoenas on the University of
California's Berkeley campus.

tMULTWASCOPt

ftraugk AUOtiaON

AND

2a

Thursday, the day the protest
leaders have been summoned to

ZERO MCSTEL.Mooi,

Tho Total Female Animall
Bi.i

he was wearing on his chest
along with his love beads.
Two policemen grasped him
by the biceps where Rubin had
red and orange antiwar symbols
painted, marched him down two
stories of marble stairs and escorted him out of the House Of"
fice Building.
There was no attempt by other
P demonstrators
to interfere with
the police action.
Police said Rubin would be
barred until he shed his ammunition. The guards also confiscated a black bull whip from another protest leader, Abbie Hoffman.
Rubin, Hoffman and four
other leaders of peace protests,
including David Dellinger, told
a news conference before the
hearings that they are asking
for a federal court injunction to
forbid issuance of any citations
for contempt of Congress against
them during the hearings.
They said there would be a
rally on the Capitol Mall on

A

Till; PRODUCERS"
EASTMAN

hearing chambers halted Rubin
at the door and ordered him to
strip off the belt of bullets which

ice

-l

Marx Brothers .
a

(AP)-Pol-

protester Jerry

tion.
Rubin, a major participant
in the controntation between protesters and Chicago police, was
among witnesses subpoenaed to
testify as the House Committee
on
Activities began
By plain arithmetic, this an investigation of the disorders.
should be good news to RepubRubin, who had not been
licans, for registered Democrats called to testify until Thursday,
in Ken- led a straggly band .of demonoutnumber them
tucky. Chances are, therefore, strators to the committee door.
that defections obviously will He marched bearded, barefoot
hurt the opposition more.
and barechested, carrying a toy
The gloomy view in the GOP M16 rifle, wearing a pistol belt
hierarchy is that an alarming and presenting a resplendent disnumber of Wallace votes may be play of war paint and multihidden in the undecided cate- colored peace symbols daubed
on his body.
gory.
This brings to mind the per
Capitol police guarding the

m

I

director of the Republican State
Central Committee, added that
much of this Wallace pattern
seemed "soft" that is, the
backers did not think he could
win.
A COP official at Frankfort,
noting the contrasts between the
poll and the disquieting Wallace
portents, said simply: "We have
to rely on what we know."
The tally at the state fair,
for example,
obviously was
boosted heavily by rural people
who ordinarily flocktosuch event
and amongwhom Wallace always
has presumably been strong.
In high school and college
nock elections, almost everybody
votes, often in fun and without
much meaning.
But a reliable political poll
uses a variety of tangible and
subtle factors that is supposed
to give depth, at the same time
weeding out irrelevant material.

himself at a random intersection
in the Bluegrass area and finds
heavy Wallace support during
spot interviews. A sampling of

Voussoir
beam,"
Wright said, "is named after
the Voussoir arch."

with Hawaiian
(
pineapple, served
with tossed salad,
and french fries
a regular
I
1.55 value

Lexington
Locations

AP

"The

HAM

1

FRANKFORT

strange and disturbing equation
d
has crept into one
presidential poll in Kentucky.
It shows that as many as one-thir-d
of those surveyed are undecided among Republican Rich-ar- e
Nixon, Independent George
Wallace and Democrat Hubert
Humphrey.
The information, believed reliable, comes indirectly from First
Research of Miami, Fla., which
has been used by state Republicans in past years and has
turned out generally accurate reports.
The data indicates that, as of
perhaps a week ago, 30 to 35
percent of eligible voters did not
know or would not say whom
they favored.
The finding is all the more
significant when one realizes that
all polls of substance include
a built-i- n
category of "no
undecided
choice." The one-thir-d
is in addition to the built-i- n
factor.

s.

S
J DINNER

Center cut ham
steak broiled

Straw Polls Favor Wallace

mine ceilings to protect mines
from sudden cave-in-

hawaiian

S

In Kentucky

A

825 Euclid

Chevy Chase

1

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Tuesday,

Dy GUY MENDES

-

sTT-vy-

Associate Editor
The students were told to sit in small groups and that, one
at a time, each would go to all other members of his group and
do three things: look at them eyeball to eyeball, touch them and
smell them.
At first, tthe students were cautious. It wasn't easy for them
to overcome years of training from a culture in which "knowing"
is mainly verbal. The
movements of the first few
students were somewhat mechanical. They used the
combination of look, touch and smell the same routine on each

)(t.

1, 1908- -3

T

v.

1

S

11

I
,

individual.

But the atmosphere soon eased; people began to vary their
actions. They touched arms, legs, hair. They smelled hands, elbows,
necks. They played with curls of hair, ran their fingers over cheekbones and noses. And they stared into one another's eyes.
They began to experience an inkling of "multisensuous knowing" the topic of the initial class of the Free University of Central
Kentucky.

r

More Than 'Parroting' Facts

In what was a slight manifestation of student disenchantment
with present educational processes, over 50 students crowded
into a small,
apartment to "do something more than
parroting back facts," as one student put it.
The group was guided by Dr. David Denton, UK assistant
professor of education, who told them Western culture has "fragmented" man because it is primarily oriented to verbal knowing,
and that other experiences such as feeling and smelling have been
allowed to relatively shrivel.
exercises
Dr. Denton led the class through several "warm-up- "
in multisensuous knowing for an hour and a half, and said he
will move to higher levels next week.
students stood with eyes closed and felt
In the first warm-u- p
the space around them. Then in the second they moved about the
room groping, feeling, bumping into each other. For more than
one it showed the perceptual need for a combination of senses
rather than reliance on one or two such as the verbal and visual
reliance of our day.
exercise was "better than a name tag,"
The
as one Free University registrant put it. Students got to know
each other well in less than half an hour, and they did it
y.

You've met people you've wanted to touch or sniff, people whose
hair you wanted to feel in the palm of your hand or whose neck
you were moved to smell but you were unable to because of the
conventions of our society.

Free To 'Know' Other Students
In this exercise conventions were thrown out (except a few basic
moral ones, of course) and students were able to. touch and smell
as they wished. With this freedom from convention they began to
truly "know" the students around them. They knew the pale blue
sincerity in the eyes of the girl in the yellow blouse, the smoothness of the
jaw of the man on the couch and the
fragrance of the coed in the green coat.
In the "Metaphysical Cocktail Party" exercise, students were
told to presume they were reincarnations of animals and people and
to assume the role of the spirit from which they were reincarnated.
Then they were to move about as at a cocktail party and mingle
with other guests. At times they were allowed to speak, at other
times they could communicate only
A shrewd merchant quizzed a rabbit on the value of his watch,
while the rabbit spoke of the new burrow he just moved into.
A bird pecked away, a dog barked occasionally and the Virgin
Mary handed out blessings.
segment, communication was a bit difDuring the
ficult. It was hard to tell a rhino from a mosquito or a rock from
a flower. The rhino and mosquito both had a finger extending
from their noses; the flower and rock stood motionless.
clean-shave- n

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al

non-verb-

...He

He Were
Would Be . . .
In the final exercise, one student stood in the center of a group,
open to the touch and smell of the others. After examining him
with eyes, hands and noses, the group members spoke of the student
in metaphorical terms such as, "If he were a food, he would
be.

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Why Do You

Have A Poor
Memory
A

noted publisher in Chicago
reports there is a simple technique for acquiring a powerful
memory which can pay you real
dividends
in both business and
social advancement and works like
magic to give, you added poise,
and
necessary
greater popularity.
to this publisher,
According
many people do not realize how
much they could influence others
simply by remembering accurately
everything they see, hear, or read.
Whether in business, at social
functions or even in casual conversations with new acquaintances,
there are ways in which you can
dominate each situation by your
ability

III

?V

I
I

to remember.

To acquaint the readers of this
paper with the
rules
for
skill
in
developing
remembering anything you choose
to remember, the publishers have
printed full details of their
method in a new booklet,
"Adventures in Memory," which
will be mailed free to' anyone who
requests it. No obligation. Send
your name, address, and zip code
to: Memory Studios, 835 Diversey
Pkwy., Dept. 167-41- 9,
Chicago,
III. 60614. A postcard will do.
Adv.

mvxv9'

:.v..:.:v.v'x:

"

One student was an elm tree, kidney pie and East Berlin.
Another was Denmark and the Bristol Stomp.
The "Multisensuous Knowing" class resumes next week. The
students fared well in their lesson; they come to "know" a few
of their classmates. They didn't always know their names, but they
still knew.

FACULTY STAFF
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The Kentucky Kernel, Univeriity
ol Kentucky,
Station, University40504S.
Second claiu
Kentucky
l Lexington, Kentucky.
publage pa1
Mailed five tunes weekly during Uie
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer
sestiion.
by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Ollice Box 4Vtttf.
Uegun as the Cadet in lttt and
pubtuthed conunuously as the Kernel
since IvlS.
Advertising published herein Is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The JUlitors.
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Yearly, by mall
Per copy, from flies

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KERNEL TELEPHONES
1321
Editor, Managing Editor

Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
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PIaytexinvents the first-da- y

The Kentucky Kernel

SUBSCRIPTION

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Kentucky Typewriter Service
OLIVETTI-PORTABL-

Woods arson
is a crime.

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Double Standards
joint congressional committee nents of legislation to deny federal
negotiating an $18 billion Health, aid to college students who engage
in "disruptive" protests whatever
Education and Welfare appropriations bill has exposed the hypocrisy that can be construed to mean.
If the use of federal funds to
and finagling that operates in our
threaten dissenting students in innation's legislature.
stitutions of higher learning is not
The committee allowed an
measure attached to the a "dangerous" misuse of federal
bill in the House remain intact. power, then one can hardly mainThe measure would do away with tain that this practice to guarantee
the practice of denying federal funds to all citizens the right to equal
to public school systems perpetuat- educational facilities even apA

anti-integrati-

Tap-Dancin-

proaches danger.
It seems, however, that our erstwhile congressmen are more concerned with placating prejudices
and their constituents' whims than
with making rational and moral
decisions based on substantial

Gorilla

g

We see by the old scoreboard in last

Saturday's

Herald-Leade-

r

that

per cent of the respondents to its weekly opinion poll said that
student groups should not "be permitted to make demands for changes
in Lexington-Fayett- e
County law, policies, personnel and adminis77

tration."

We refuse to believe this is representative of the majority of the
citizenry, for we do not believe the people of Lexington want to
suppress the students of this town. We hope that Lexingtonians be-

lieve that all members of the community should be able to at least
attempt to bring about social change. And it's hard to take as credible the thought that our forefathers would like us to stay cooped
up in our ivory tower, away from the real world.
But' mostly, we don't believe the grossly unrepresentative Herald-Leade- r
poll which is comparable to the one Ted Mack used to use
on his Original Amateur Hour. You remember that one, don't you?
That's the one the Tap Dancing Gorilla used to win week after week
because he had all of his friends call in their votes after the show.

m Kernel

90,000

IPs.
Syk

II

1

I

The Kentucky

1
ft

I

Iernel

The South' a Outstanding College Daily
ESTABLISHED 1894

University of Kentucky
TUESDAY, OCT.

1, 1968

Edi