xt7k3j392z57 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7k3j392z57/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19610215  newspapers sn89058402 English  This digital resource may be freely searched and displayed.  Permission must be received for subsequent distribution in print or electronically.  Physical rights are retained by the owning repository.  Copyright is retained in accordance with U. S. copyright laws.  For information about permissions to reproduce or publish, contact the Special Collections Research Center. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, February 15, 1961 text The Kentucky Kernel, February 15, 1961 1961 2015 true xt7k3j392z57 section xt7k3j392z57 Jo!) Outlook Good

Today's Weather:
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For June Grads;
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Four

Low

38, High 58

University of Kentucky
Vol. LI I, No. 62

LEXINGTON,

jy

KY., WEDNESDAY, FEU. 15, I9fil

Judiciary Committee
Appointed, Approved
By KERRY POWELL

Kernel Staff Writer

"

)

vl
C

J

Student Congress Monday
night unanimously approved
the appointment of five stu- dents four men and one vo- man to serve terms as "stu- dent judges" on the legislative
groups important Judiciary
Committee.
.

-l'
C'lifford Long, I'nlverslty policeman, and a vending machine
k
machine in the Journalism
maintenance man inspect a
Ituilding after it had been opened and the rash box taken from
it Monday night.

it

John Williams, Junior Commerce
representative, was appointed
chairman of the committee by

Three Vending Machines
Are Looted On Campus
WARREN WHEAT
Tuesday News Editor

By

IM)trs broke into three
campus vending machines last
taking altout eight dol- and causing $2, damages
to the equipment.
machines in Bradley Hall
and the Journali.-Building and
a coffee vendor in McVey Hall
were entered and robbed of coins
which had accumulated since be- fore noon.
The McVey looting was report- ed at about 6:45 p.m. and the
Journalism Building machine was
Coke

hit at

8:30 p.m.

The machine, were forced open,
breaking or fcpruiglng the locks,
and the coin boxr, removed. The
emptied coin boxes were then d.s- carded outside the buildings.
Winn Trumbo, service manager
for the Central Kentucky Enter- prises. Inc., said the machines

Eight Pages

congress President Garrjrl Sipple. gress set op a committee to study
Sipple. speaking of Williams. the possibility of having- nest year's
udent directory printed by s
said the new Judiciary Committee
chairman "was one of the few Texas publishing firm.
Bob Smith, vice president of the
years ago.
congress, said that Golden Key
His experience with Student Publications, Inc. would sell "yel- Congress, his high grade point low pages" to national and local
C0St
averae- - nd his b as head resi !d1vef?l8e?wtoHfay'or
dent of Ha88in Hall should be
directory,
valuable to him as chairman of
Sipple said that the new dl- the Judiciary Committee."
rectory might cost as much as 73
Other newly appointed members cents, but "artistically, it would
of the committee are Myra Tobin, make the Lexington phone book
like B 'funny' page."
Junior Home Economics represent- The congress also gave its "moral
ative; Deno Curris, Junior Arts and
Sciences representative; Bob Fields, support" to a movement to bring
Junior Arts and Sciences repre- - Russian
author Leo Tolstoy's
sentative; and Leroy McMullan, daughter to the campus for a
senior Agriculture representative, brief lecture series.
"This committee has three
Dr. Oifford Blyton, parliament
Oreeks and two Independents." tarian of Student Congress, sug- Sipple said. "It is not loaded; It gested that congress members
Is a fair cross section of studest might sell lecture tickets to Lex- llle.
lngton townspeople and solicit con- The Judiciary Committee tra- - trlbutions from the various aca- fonally advises the administra- - demic departments of the Unl- nuu
uistipiiiiary ucuou versuy.
against students.
However, no specific plan of
In other action, Student Con- - action was approved by the group.

would suspend them, as has been
the practice in past cases.
There Is no Indication whether
the burclarlv is the work of stu- dents or not, but robbing the
chines at the late evening hours
after they had been collected Indi-lacatM m ,ack of knowledge of when
the coin boxes would contain the
most money,
The Journalism Building's vend- ing machine was broken into and
robbed In approximately a ten- By REX BAILEY
minute period,
The fraternity system yesterday ended successfully its first
Bob Anderson, Kernel editor-in- chief, locked the south door of the attempt at deferred rush as 25S men were officially pledged
building and checked the mach ne
Iterfraternity Council President David McLellan and
at about 8:20 p.m. after receiving
wv.
:
a police warning aoout two earner ""l" rhairman Wn cnraaa
Y''K "
I ":
?ne,V
stated that the number pledged .nn Little, Ntchoiasviiie; Dale Loveii,
break-in- s.
exceeded all expectations
Charlei Davis Omer, Morganfleld: Johii
u
niiuutca iLcr milliner
As all men pledged will be Marshall Peters. Lily; Richard Brown
The local courts would not be member found the machine's door
dIvw Bry'-- nl
eligible for initiation this semester.
disposed to turn the criminals over open and tne cash boX misslng. McLeI,an said there will
TayiorsviMe: Gen. Farreil
more
U!Mli wu- to the University if they are ar- Tow,S'l. .
.
ncei .Glenn
,
Qm
mmhr
rested,
end of this semester than for any u,vme- - if Pill Tlif
a
and are investigating the case.
After the courts finish dealins
John Edward
Q
could not
reached yes- comparable period in the previous
with the violators, the University T1
two Or three years.
Lynn Wallace Keyser. Huntington. W.
terday to learn their progress In
"The number pledged proves the
the case.
deferred rush system is good and rt Raymond Radke, Madisonville;
with a few adjustments it will
definitely improve the fraternity Kay Vandyke, Cincinnati. Ohio; James
r.,
system on this campus," Sprague ..dim vMirucis Jr., urnriteiown; tnaries
Early Wyatt
Mayfield; Forrest
stated.
Wayne Callico, Lancaster; Jose Garcia
De Paredes. Panama.
McLellan said a major step must
DELTA TAU DELTA
be taken to alleviate the financial
Kennrth nrrl Blvlns, Central Cltyi
begin a study of two problems
drain h cvtlpm pnpii nn h Io" Crroll Chnhlre Jr., Krankfs'l
Uofrr Thomas (ritlrndrn. Frankfort;
insoluble to some students.
fraternities. This problem along Ted Scott tiara. I.rxlniton; Kevrn
with many more will be discussed Nwrll Hennessey, Lexington; John
ties, but nothing has ever come of
Mortimer Knepp, Intllanspolls,
Ind.
soon by IFC.
their suggestions.
Ksrl Ktandaford McClure, Psduosh;
For the third consecutive
The Rose Street crosswalk has
The IFC president said he was Woodtton Wallace McCrsw, Louisville;
Mark Vincent Marlowe. Lexlnston: C,er
been advocated editorially by the vear. a College of Law nro- - "very pleased with the way all 'i wmism roweii, tsivert city; Bea
,
i
Kernel hilt, the nssnriute citv traf- - r
jsmlit Mitchell Rose Jr.. Anchorase;
i
u imiui
'
"ii
Arlnur ,)avld 81molli p.dnrah; oaver
lessor lias been cnosen as tne
fir engineer has enne nil rernrd ns
Kse Willism.on. Lexlniton
ting a good pledge class.'
FARM HOUSE
University's most popular pro- - Sprague added that "the con- being opposed to it.
Student Congress President Gar- - f.ssor.
nections fraternity men made dur- - Darren rioyd Roberts.' B. ifrey.
book-b- y
ryl Sipple introduced the
KAPPA ALPHA
W. Whiteside will i"8 the rush period will be very
store proposal for discussion in be Dr. Frederick
crowned as "Rex" of the Mardi helpful for next fall's rush."
Continued on Page 2
Here are the names of men who peter Cassidy. Atlanta, Ga.;' Samuel
Gras dance Saturday night by
Barry Averill. president of the Pledged and their fraternities:
ThonnHb!?yi exmgto"' Tommy aTr- son Hopkins. Biirdon; Robert Joseph
ALPHA GAMMA RHO
Newmail Club. Dr. Whiteside Will
LexinKton; William Irin,
Thomas Bonro. Greenup; James "undlef
a "Queen" Of the Mardi
then Crown
Doyle
wuuam uavenpon jr.. Bowling ureen;
7,
Gras.
Continuedj on Page 8
Brady James Ueaton, London; Richard
would remain in operation and he
expected to repair the locks by late
yesterday.
Tinnihn eniH thp casp hnri heen
rrported to the Lexington Police
Department, but a clerk in the
department's report division said
of the casp
had nQ rec
The clprk sajd a sUff fine for
breaking iiito vending machines
and damaging private property
the charges
would compound
against the thieves.
Dean of Men !sjie f Martin
KaiA breaking
Into vending ma- bines is a problem wherever they
.re Installed. If the thieves are
arrested, they will be under the
jurisdiction of Lexington courts
regardless of whether they are stu- -

Deferred Rush Nets
58 Over IFC Goal

"

in

Xii.TTd;

p".

,,.

rj?r

lJint S
TyKS

SC Will Begin Study

7

Of Campus Problems Whilcside
Is Named
Student Congress will soon
that have lately seemed almost
The two problems are:.
1. How to successfully operate a
d
bookstore.
2. How to convince the City of
Tviiurtnii In nut a rrosunllt nil
Rrio Rtrpt in front nf fn Pitn
Arts Building.
bookstore
The student-owne- d
proposal ha brrn recommended
various Tnivrrsity groups, in- eluding the student political par- -

student-owne-

"

Dance 'Rex9

witlBytfi

Ag Services Building Site

To Become Parking Area

Workmen are tearing down the Agriculture Service Building to make space for additional facilities and parking areas
at the new Medical Center.
were
lnsi.fU,ldes 8nd frrtl
The steel structure, located at Bis0 stred there,

the east end of the Medical Center,
..Tne Coilege of Agriculture has
was used as storage, research, and dolie research on pesticides and
office space by the College of As- - animal nutrition, and has given
rkulture.
small livestock shows in the old
It was originally a World Wur building," Dr. eay said.
II surplus aii plane hanger, ac- - Farm maintenance operations
have been moved to a steel struc- ,
a
raa.au
rw wiiii.
ture east of the Dairy Center.
acting dean and director of the Other operations were moved to
College of Agriculture.
buildiiiRs oil Coldstream Farm, Dr.
The building housed operations Seay added,
The water tower, situated tiear
and offices for farm maintenance,
animal
entomology, the service building, will be moved
husbandry,
and agronomy. Farm equipment, to the south farm.

IL.

qm H"

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ejjr ol

AtlKICl'LTl'HE

SI KMC ES

Kl ILDINU COMING

DOW N

f.

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 1961

Basil Rathhone To Give
Dramatic Poetry Reading
DraiiKilisl Feels
iPoelry Should Be
KIrarri, Not Kcail
Basil Rathbone, noted

Broad-Wa-

In explaining his dramatic approach to poetry, Mr. Rathbone
points out that "although the poet
uses words, he Is in many ways a
composer, in that- - his words are
more closely related to music than

y

and Hollywood actor, will
j;ive a dramatic presentation of
oetry at the Central Kentucky
Concert and Lecture Series
Thursday.
The

V

presentation, call-r- d
The Best From My Bookshelf."
ieatures the works of the English
world's great
( peaking
poets,
: ovelists. and playwrights.
It in-- (
ludes selections from Sir Arthur
Conan Doyle, Edgar Allen Poe,
A. E. Housman, Robert Browning,
end William Shakespeare.
Air. Rathbone begins with remi!
niscences of his career in the theater, proceeding to a poetry session, with closing scenes from
one-ma-

n

(

V

V

vh
-

"The Best From My Bookshelf"

tour comes directly on the heels
(fa transcontinental trek in the
play "J.B."

BASIL RATHBONE

UK Scholars' Grades

V

to any other form of literature.
With poetry the essential sense is
the ear.
"In poetry, sound is the vital
element. It is not meant for reading, but is designed for a spoken,
dramatic
That is
presentation.
what we are trying to do in "The
Best From My Bookshelf."
Having learned his craft from
the groundcloth up. first in a repertory company, then in leading
roles on the stage and screen in
London and the United States, Mr.
Rathbone is well qualified when
he asserts, "Shakespeare should
not be 'taught' in school. It should
be performed.
"This is the very essence of the
words Mr. Shakespeare
wrote.
They are to be heard and undernot glanced over and misstood,
interpreted.
"The plays of Shakespeare." says
Mr. Rathbone, "if they are to mean
anything to the young people in
our schools, should be acted by
the school drama class for the
benefit of the entire student body.
"Some things, poetry included,
lose much of their essential quality when read silently. There is
drama in words but you find it
only when someone shows it to
you that is, presents it to you on
its own terms."

Lower Than ExpectedFire Drill
JjjCXtC3S
kTll f fll

i,.

-

6,

program
generally they
and valuable and want
to continue as honors scholars," he
dded.
The fall semester was the first
for the honors program and all the
honors scholars but one were experiencing their first semester of
lollege study.
The transition from high school
(o university level instruction, Dr.

falling below 2.0.
A large number of the scholars
in science or engineering.
usually considered difficult submight be another explanajects,
tion for the 3.26 average. Eleven
in the honors program are majoring in mathematics or physics, five
in engineering and three in

Journalism School Site
For Publications Clinic

The annual publications clinic sponsored by the Kentucky
High School Press Association will be held March 10 at the
School of Journalism.
Faculty members of the School
f Journalism and members of
Sigma Delta Chi, professional
journalistic society, will meet in
workshop sessions with several
hundred student staff members of
high school newspapers and year- books, along with their advisers,
The clinic will be made up of
three specific sections evaluation
:ind workshop information sessions
Kor high school newspapers; eval- nation and discussions of yearbooks
submitted; and judging and pre- (

sentation of awards of Sigma Delta
Chi for the best newspapers.
Highlighting; the yearbook clinic
will be a talk by C. J. Medlin,
graduate manager of publications
at Kansas State University and
one of the foremost yearbook
authorities in the United States.
Some 50 hours of class instruction will be given during the day
which begins with registration at
9 a.m., Dr. Niel Plummer, director
of the School of Journalism, said.

Central Kentucky's Largest
OPEM

DAILY 1:M

P.I

USED BOOK STORE

"Most of the confusion occurred
on the first and second floors,"
said Miss Sandra Waybright.
sistant head resident of Holmes
Hall.
"We've had difficulties in hearing the alarm before. When we
consulted the Division of Maintenance and Operations, we found
that larger bells could possibly be
installed."
Betty Shipp, a freshman living
on the second floor, commented,
"I heard a faint bell but thought
it came from Jerry's. I didn't realize what was happening until
someone ran down the hall shouting 'fire drill'."
When questioned
about last
night's incident. Miss Dixie Evans,
director of women's residence halls,
replied, "This was the first fire
drill of the semester. It was held
for the purpose of determining
areas which need improvement in
our fire drill procedures in Holmes
Hall."

DENNIS

Ctiavy ChiM
TODAY

"MIDNIGHT LACE"
Dam Day Ri Harmon
"WILD RIVER"
Monty Clift Lc Rtmick

Impress Your Date
Take Her To . . .

LA FLAME

RESTAURANT
941 Winchester Rd.

BOOK STORE
257 N. Lime

Near 3rd

Kentucky
THEATRE

NOW

The Hilarious
Thosa

Wild

bx.t

UA

Mardi Cras Queen Candidates

Candidates for Mardi Gras queen to be crowned Saturday' night
are (bottom row, from left) Kitty Hundley, Kappa Kappa Gamma;
Nell Vaughn, Chi Omega; Jacquelene Cain, Alpha Delta PI; Linda
Tobin, Ilaggin Hall; Priscilla Lynn, Keenland Hall; (second row)
Diane Merek, Alpha Gamma Delta; Joan Jameson, Kappa Alpha
Theta; Bobby Kelly, Sigma Alpha Epsilon; Ann Price, Donovan
Hail; Phyllis Patterson, Triangle. (Third row) Madge Graf, Holmes
Hall; Kathy Songster, Delta Tau Delta; Janet Lloyd, Alpha Gamma Rho; Patricia Cassidy, Kappa Delta; (fourth row) Marilyn
Swift, Zeta Tau Alpha; Lot ana Meredith. Alpha XI Delta; Judy
Lawrence, Delta Delta Delta; Mary Ware, Patterson Hall; (fifth
row) Judy O'Dell, Sigma Phi Epsilon; Carolyn Reld, Pi Kappa
Alpha; Barbara Whitarre, Phi Kappa Tau; Ann Kelly, Dillard
House. Jean Richard, Delta 7.eta, and Peggy Olmstead, Phi Sigma
Kappa, are not shown.

Continued from Page 1
Monday night's congress meeting.
He had no difficulty in drawing
response from the congress members.
"Somebody makes a pretty good
profit when you sell your books to
the present bookstores," volunteered one delegate, "and it's not
the student."
"We're buying books for $8 that
aren't worth $1.50." another said.
"Wouldn't we run into competition with Kennedy's and Campus Book Stores?" one delegate
asked.
Then it was proposed that a
committee be formed to investigate the possibility of establishing"
a student-owne- d
bookstore, perhaps to be located in the Student
Union Building.
The motion passed without a

Liii'

k

dissenting vote.
When the Rose Street crosswalk
discussion began, Sipple vacated
the president's chair so he could
speak in favor of the proposed
crosswalk.
of our
"I estimate that one-fift- h
coeds live across Rase Street," Sipple said, "and it is impossible for
them to cross that street unless
they drive or fly."
One delegate wanted to know
why the crosswalk wasn't installed
years ago.
Sipple replied, "According1 to the
Kernel and the Kernel isn't gospel the city has felt the crosswalk to be unnecessary."
The congress approved, without
opposition, a motion calling for
the formation of a committee to
study the problems connected with
the Rose Street crosswalk

Are You Planning?

DINNER
PARTY
DANCE
BANQUET
if JAM SESSION
Not Try the Smartest Place In Town?
Why

CONGRESS INN

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1

CINEMASCOPE .
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MORNING

in

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10:30
p.m.;
p.m.;

OO

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Children

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p.m.; 3:00-3:4p.m.;
p.m.; 7:30-9:5-0
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RENTAL SKATES
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ARRANGE A PARTY. NOW
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$1.00 Adults

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pucu .

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CRYSTAL ICE CLUB

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PUT MORE FUN IN YOUR LIFE

MON. THRU THURS.
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FRIDAY
10:30
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SUNDAY

Color by D Luka
Cinemascope
Dick Shawn
Diana Baki
Barry Coa

If

for Information and Reservations

PHONE

Inside. Story of
Spring Vacations!

tho

,

1700 N. BROADWAY

"FINE FOODS, LOUNCI
AND DANCING

SO

See or call Dick Wallace at

(Other Than Text)
Euclid Avanua.
STARTING

J -- "if

SC To Study Campus Problems

University honors scholars were not as scholarly during the
fall semester as had been hoped but this has not dampened the
director's enthusiasm for the program.
I
oKMuiino
uiacnun Deiieves, is a partial ex- A fire drill in Holmes Hall
UK Honors Program averaged 3.26 Dianation of the 3.2G averaee. The
on a 4.0 scale during the first honors scholars, gifted as they
londay night brought some
v....v.,
.t.wu.., may D(., nave problems oi aajust- - mixed
responses from the resiUirector of the program, said.
to uniVersity instruction just
ing
"This is not as good as we had as do other students, the director dents.
- The drill alarm was sounded at
hoped," Dr. Diachun said. "But a(ded.
.
I.rades are only one criterion by
c
but the girls on the
oA midnight,
vihlch to Judge the program or the 3.5 or
higher with two having a north side of the residence hall did
I ludents.
not hear the bel1- Others became
perfect 4.0. Twelve others averaged
"Even though nine of the stu- 3.0 or
better, six between 2.9 and alarmed by tne uniaentinea rmg-2.dents made below a B average,
and three below 2.5, with one in8is
feel the

u timulating

l--

A

t.

JIL

'DONT HIBERNATE

ICE SKATE!

it.- -

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, WcilncMijy, Feb.

15.

3

11 -- 3

Select Pieces Of Modern Furniture
Emphasize Color, Texture, Comfort
V-

-

'

h

iv

lACJ

Dark brown wood and many fert of blark Austrian leather make
up this matching swivel arm chair and foot stool. Designer is
Charles Eamei of the Herman Miller Co.

The contemporary furniture now
on display in the Art Gallery of
Fine Arts Building emphasizes
color, texture, and comfort.
Don Wallace, Lexington architect and chairman of the exhibit,
?nld color was an important aspect
of contemporary furniture.
The Herman Miller Furniture
Company used purple, black, brown,
red, and gold in its exhibit. Red
is used with aqua in one display.
Dark wood is used with liht wood.
One chair was made of blue
wood
interwoven
with purple
thread. Orange and blue are also
used together.
Since most of the furniture on
display was designed for office
use, it was desiRned to withstand
constant wear. The chairs are up- holstered in wool or cotton which
will not stain readily. Leather is
also used. The furniture Is adaptable to home use.
Wallace said that contemporary
furniture Is not necessarily a re- cent trend. The Barcelona Chair
was designed by Mies Van Der
Rohe in 1921. The chair, made of
stainless steel with leather up- holstery, is simple and functional
In design.
"The furniture exhibited repre- n
sents the finest
of the
best contemporary furniture avail- able today," Wallace said.
Jammed zipper Is most
caused by threads of fabric
icles. Try pulling them out
fully as you move the slide
and forth.
A

This
"marsh mallow" soft teat, used primarily for reception rooms and lobbies, can be easily adapted for domestic use.

Dr. Charles P. Oraves, head of
the Department of Architecture,
said, "This exhibit should be one
of the finest in the country because the firms have supplied us
with only their most select pieces
most of them not yet on the
market."
The exhibition is sponsored by
the American Institute of Architects. Its purpose is to stimulate
interest and promote understanding of the trends and designs
created by many outstanding designers of contemporary furnii
ture,

In the University of Kentucky

often

BRAND

partcare-

back

Linda Midkiff, sophomore home
economics major from Hartford,
to Mike Daniels, Sigma Chi. sonh-omomodern foreign language
major from Lexington.
Charlene Williams, sophomore
home economics major from
Montlcello, to Don Duncan, Sigma
Chi, Junior English major at Wake
Forrest College.
Diana Blair, Alpha Xi Delta,
renior medical technology major
from Louisville, to Charles Elmore, Alpha Tau Omega, sophomore in the College of Arts and
Sciences from Glasgow.
Peggy Holland, Alpha Gamma
Delta, sophomore in the College of
Arts and Sciences from Cincinnati,
Ohio, to Grady Spiegel, Sigma Phi
Epsilon, sophomore in the College
of Arts and Sciences from Owens-bor- o.

Engagement
Celia Cawood, Kappa Kappa
Gamma, a sophomore French major from Harlan, to Dick Parsons,
a senior physical education and
from
biological science major
Harlan.

HALL

HALL

Miami
OXFORD, Ohio ,V
University of Ohio has named
many of its buildings after former
presidents of the school. For instance, it has un Upham Hall, a
JJenton Hall and a Hughes Hall.
But it's doubtful if the man who
Was president during the Civil
War ever will be honored in such
a manner. His name: John W.
Hall.

KEYSTONE HOME MOVIE OUTFIT

Nancy Morrow, Kappa Kappa
Gamma, sophomore commerce major from Lancaster, to Don Hill,
Phi Delta Theta. freshman architectural engineering major from
Danville.
"r-

-

VL,

riTKIN CLUB

v

'JT

rjL- '-

Till DELT DINNER
Pitkin Club will meet at noon
Phi Delta Theta Fraternity will
today at the Maxwell Street Pres- hvae a dinner at the Coach House

DOING IT THE HARD

NO

first Prize

Recently Wed

byterian Church. The Rev. John this evening following formal
King will be the speaker for the pledge initiation ceremonies.
meeting.
DAVIS ELECTED
SIB COMMITTEE
Jack Davis, junior civil enThe SUB Social Committee will gineer major, has been elected
meet at 4 p.m. today in Room 128 house manager of Phi Delta Theta
of the SUB.
Fraternity for the spring semester.
ALPHA GAMMA DELTA
CANTERBURY CLUB
The Alpha Gamma Delta pledge
Holy Communion services will
class held a "Come As You Are" be held at 7 a.m., 9:30 a.m., and
5 p.m. today, at the Canterbury
breakfast for the actives on SaturLinda Harbison, an Alpha Delta
day, Feb. 11 at the sorority house. Chapel.
Pi pledge and freshman commerce
major from Louisville, to Mike
Oray, a Kappa Alpha from Louisville and a Junior history major
WAY
at Georgetown College.
Carolyn Fetchner, Kappa Kappa
a sophomore art major
RID OF DANDRUFF, THAT IS!)
Gamma,
(GETTING
from Chicago, to Tom Grey, Beta
Theta Pi at Dartmouth.
Jimmie Tweel, Kappa Alpha
Theta, Junior, from Huntington,
W. Va., to Bill "Stud" Carter,
Kappa Sigma, from Cincinnati.
Margaret Masters, Ashland, to
Johnny Hoehle, Kappa Sigma from
Louisville.

mi UPS1LON OMICRON
The Iota active chapter of Phi
U p s i 1 o n Omicron, professional
home economics fraternity, Joined
the Iota alumnae chapter for a
Founder's Day service and lunch-co- n
recently.
Kathleen Poore, a senior in
home economics, spoke on "School
Days in England."

ROUND-U- P

Contest Ends Noon, March 18, 1961

Social Activities
Pin-Mat- es

The AIA wants to present exceptional samples which reveal tho
imagination and skill employed to
create furniture of utility and,
beauty.
Contributors are Dux, Herman
Miller, John Stuart, Kasparians,
Knoll Associates, Jens Risomt Lehigh, Paul McCobb, Richard
Trefzger's, Hubbach In
Kentucky, and Architectural Pottery.
The paintings accompanying the
displays were done by UK students. The sculpture used came
from Indianapolis.

way for men: FITCH

with
Men, get rid of embarrassing dandruff easy as
I ITCH! In just 3 minutes (one rubbing, one Liilicrinp, one
rinsing), every trace of dandruff, grime, gummy old hair
tonic goes right down the drain! Your hair looks hand
healthier. Your scalp
feels so refreshed. Use
I Dandruff Remover
CI
every week for

FITCH!
LEADING

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RULES FOR CONTEST
1.

Contest starts February 6th, 1961
1961.

1

1

t.

i

h
Ml

...it's

Get on the BSANDWAG0N

CO?l
krr-'- i

i)

Ends 12 noon March

18th,

2. All packages turned in for contest must b of current pack
aging.
3. All authoriied Campus groups and organiiations art eligible.
4. All packages MUST be turned in at tht Student Union Building
to your Philip Morris Campus Representative Mr. Jack Guthrie,
between 10:00 a.m. and 12:00 noon on March 18th, 1961.

u?T

posiiie dandruff control. )
Keep your hair and scalp 'J
really clean,

2nd Prize
Choice of Popular Records
($60.00 value)
3rd Prize
2000 Marlboro Filter

Who

Ml:

easier

MJf

1'

Rib

'fi

SZZUl

3r
AJpnuv

4r5J

on display at UK Campus
Bamey Miller Inc., Record Dept.,
Prizes

SPONSORED

lots

BY PHILIP

ti fun!
r-- -K
I

tJkiLSj

Book Store and
232 East Main.

MORRIS, INC.

* Outdated Virtue

The Kentucky Kernel
of
University

Kentucky

poitx
paid at Lexington. Kentucky.
Fubllnhed four times a week during the regular arhool year except during holidayi and examt.
SIX DOLLAHS A SCHOOL. YEAR
Second-cla-

Bob Anderson, Editor
Mike Wennincer, Manning Editor
Newton Spencer, Sports Editor
Bobbie Mason, Assistant Managing Editor
Lew King, Advertising Manager
Beverly Cardwell and Toni Lennos, Society Editors
Skip Taylor and Jim Channon, Cartoonixts
Perry Ashley, Business Manager
Nicky Tope, Circulation
WEDNESDAY NEWS STAFF
Tevis Bennett, News Editor
Ed VanIIook, Associate
Bill Martin, Sports

Job Outlook For June Grads Good
The outlook for this year's college
and university graduates
finding
worthwhile niches in the world of
commerce and industry appears most
heartening.
Despite recessionary tendencies in
many facets of the economy, the demand for 1961 graduates will be fully
as heavy as last year with starting
salaries moderately above the record
levels of I960, it is indicated.
Such demand provides a pretty
fair gauge of managements' confidence in the outlook beyond today's
moderate adjustment in the business
situation. They are apparently looking for industrial expansion to resume
over the intermediate term.
This year's quotas of college graduates will set another new peak and
to
starting salaries will increase 2
above the record ceiling set for
3
the 1960 class, according to the National Industrial Conference Board
survey conducted by Dr. Frank E.
of placement,
EndicQtt, director
Northwestern University.
Lengthy Subvey Made
The survey covered 210 companies, which for the most part are
large manufacturing firms with special interest in young men with technical backgrounds. The grand total
6
of graduates desired this year is
compared with 18,383 hired in
1960, with greater emphasis on engineering and less on
graduates. This year the recruiters are
seeking 7,326 engineers against 6,906
hired in 1960 and only 9,570
graduates against 9,888
hired last year.
Ranging upward from $439 per
month for general business trainees
to $520 for engineers, the average
starting salary is $470, but Dr. Endi- 18,-45-

cott notes these considerations to be
weighed in connection with the latter
figure.
First, the graduates who will be
recruited by companies in the Endi-cosurvey are by no means typical
of the 1961 class.
Specifically, there will be a concentration of males among those
selected, a concentration of recruits
with outstanding campus records.
The average member of the Class of
1961 will not be offered $470 a month.
Second, the salary scale projected
by the 1961 survey is likely to "give"
a little under the pressure of competitive bidding during this spring's
recruiting seasons. Thus, the actual
average paid is expected to be above
tt

$470.

Acute Situation Developing
Third, if the recruit's salary is
considered on an annual basis, it will
almost surely be more than 12 times
the
rate. It is common
practice to review the salaries of recruits after six months of employment. After one year, beginning salaries on average are up about
Endicott finds an acute situation
developing as the demand for engineers rises in the face of lagging
college enrollments in engineering
courses.
of the 1961
He states that 40
quotas of the companies surveyed
are for young men with training in
engineering and predicts that few
graduating engineers will be passed
over this spring by company recruiters.
But the same can hardly be predicted for those graduating with liberal arts training. Here the company
quotas are down while the supply of
students is up.
Los Anceles Times
h

10.

Definition Of Plagiarism
ideas

The Vanderbilt

Honor

Council,

under President Marion Creekmore,
recently issued the following clear
and succinct definition of plagiarism
in respect to term papers and themes.
Plagiarism, according to the Honor Council's definition, is the act of
taking someone's words or thoughts
and using them as own. Footnotes
are required not only for direct quotations, but also for ideas or thoughts
taken directly from another source.

or generally acOnly original
cepted facts do not require footnotes.
The Honor Council further noted
that if a student should discover in
the course of his research that his
original ideas run parallel to another
author or critic, he should acknowledge the similarity, either by direct
statement, or by proper notation in
the footnotes. Accurate bibliographies
are always required.

Vanderbilt Hustler

Little Interest
In the past two months, the dictator of a Caribbean country has expelled an archbishop without allowing him to pack; arrested another bishop in his bed and expelled him without his dentures, and arrested and expelled priests at random. Have there
been mass meetings in the United
States? Bristling editorials? Denunciations in Congress? Curiously, no.
Could it be no one is interested in
such Caribbean vagaries unless the
scene is Cuba (instead of Haiti) and

the dictator Castro (instead of

The Nation

Kernels
"Diplomacy is to do and say the
nastiest thing in the nicest way.
Isaac Goldberg.
"There is no defense against
proach but obscurity." Joseph

re-

After reading articles and books
written around the turn of the century one may get the idea that honesty was a virtue respected by everyone.
Beading articles and 'talking to
people today one often gets the impression that only the fool is honest and those who don't "fudge" just
a little will never be successful.
Half a century ago the cheater
was disgraceful or even cowardly. Today he is merely clever.
In 1958 75 percent of college seniors questioned in a survey admitted
cheating and only 13 percent felt
cheating was basically dishonest.
Undergraduates whine that they