xt7k6d5p9d7w https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7k6d5p9d7w/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19580516  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, May 16, 1958 text The Kentucky Kernel, May 16, 1958 1958 2013 true xt7k6d5p9d7w section xt7k6d5p9d7w Academic Standards Raised By UK FacultyThe University faculty has approved an eight-poiprogram deigned to raise UK's academic standards.
The program was passed Monday and referred to the
Rules Committee for integration into the present probas.
tion
It was drawn up by a tommittee of the College of Arts and Sciences and was passed by that body
last werk.
t
Dean M. M. White introduced the proposal. They were
opposed by representatives of the Engineering, Agriculture
and Education Colleges and by SC. A president Dave
but were approved as a unit by voice vote of the
nt

by-law-

Rav-encra- ft,

assembly.
The new changes, which would generally require a
standing of 2.0 for all students, will probably apply to new
enrollees this fall and to all students of the University in
the fall of 1959.
Under the new rulings, students who fail to make a 20
standing in two of their first three semesters in school
will be dropped. If a student docs not have an overall
standing of 2.0 after four semesters he will lx dropped
and if a student falls below an overall of 20 thereafter,
he will be given one semester to bring his average to a 2 0

Distribution Of Kyian
Will Begin Thursday
get their copies. An announcement
of days and hours will be carried
in the May 23rd "Kernel."
All "Kentucktans" will be handed out in room 115 of the Jour-

Distribution of the "Kentuck-ians- "
to seniors will begin Thursday. Undergraduates may pick
their copies up after distribution
has been made to the seniors.
A senior must have paid his
graduation fee before picking up
his copy. The receipt from the
Comptroller's office is necessary as
proof of payment of fees. The cost
of the yearbook for seniors is included in the graduation fee.
Distributi.cn to seniors will be
held Thursday and Friday.
2

nalism Building.
Seniors who will not be here
during the times of distribution
may leave their name and address with the secretary of the
Journalism Department and the
book w ill be mailed to them In the
near future. A mailing fee of 30
cents will be charged.
After all copies reserved by the
Saturday
and
and Mon- undergraduates have been picked
day. May 26,
and 12-up, a limited number of "Kentuck-ians- "
During the rest of the week,
will go on sale for six dollars
after May 26, undergraduates may a copy.
10-1-

10-1- 2.

3.

8-- 10

4.

Vol. XL1X

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or be dropped.

Present probation rule require freshmen t avrragA
ftophomore 1.6 and Juniors and seniors l.ft. jit
more than 2,000 I'nivemity students had standing
under 2.0.
The University faculty also approved some changes In
English requirements. These will require students in English la to make a grade of C or better to puss the course
and will make penalization for errors In English us Age an
accepted and regular practice in all departments.
1.4.

is:

University of Kentucky, Lexington, Ky.. nitlay, M.iy

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19"8

Niimler

27

Perlman And Strache
Elected. To Head SC
By DAN MILLOTT

Carnahan
Staff Center
Is Dedicated

Pete lVilman was elected president of the student IhkIv
a record student vote Wednesday.
Tollman, Students' Party candidate for president, defeated
Dave Becker, Campus Tarty candidate, by a vote of 1.2S0 to
1,069 as 2,oSfi students voted.
The vice presidency was won ly Fred Strache after three
having a hard time. The com
lly BILL JIAMMONS
recounts. After the first tabulation
panies can get better students now r
Strache. Students' Party candidate,
Graduating UK seniors have not since an employer's market exists.
led Dan West. Campus Party canhad, as many job opportunities to
Average beginning salaries are i
didate, by 7 votes, while on tho
choose from this year as in pre- down, Dr. Carter said. He believes
second recount West held a narvious years.
that by graduation, 95'v of the aprow margin. The final vote was
Directors of the University's plicants will have an acceptable
1.171 to 1.1G2.
;
three main employment bureaus offer, and that by June 15 the re- - t

Employment Scarce
For Departing Grads

Carnahan House, which now has

J

a membership of

550, has cost
Kentucky taxpayers nothing, Dr.
Frank D. Peterson, president, said
this week at a dedication program
for the UK
center on
Coldstream Farm.
Dr. Petersen reported on the development of Carnahan House
since its inception a year ago and
paid tribute to James W. Carnahan, Chicago, textbook publisher
and a University alumnus whose
gifts made the facility possible.
Mr. Carnahan was present for the
dedication.
Other pepkers on the program
were President Frank G. Dickey,
Professor Vincent E. Nelson and
Robert IT: Ilil'enmryerrrcprcsent-in- e
the University administration,
faculty-T?!- f.
and alumni..,.
Dr. Petersen said approximately
1.200 persons rye using the facilities of Carnahan House.
taff-alum- ni

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Dr.

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Peterson,

of U.K.,

vice-preside-

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presents

James XV. Carnahan with a certificate making him an honorary Kentucky Colonel. Carna

pointed out this situation last
week. They added that firms have
been more selective in their choice
of applicants.
Mrs. Katherine Kemper, director
of the University Placement Service, said that the typical applicant
has one job offer this year compared with five or six last year.
"The individual who is limited to
a certain locality is the hardest to
place now," she added.
The most distrsMiiK thine; about
the changed situation to Mrs.
Kemper is that the current graduates did not expect it and do not
know what to make of it. Some
begin to doubt themselves when
they have difficulties in finding a
job.

There have been no great number of cancelled interviews because
recruiters are lining men up, hoping that their firms' prospects will
brighten. ,
The demand for teachers is as
strong as ever, Mrs. Kemper said.
There are also a good many opportunities in sales, but the jobs
are not necessarily in this area.
- Mrs. Kemper hasn't noticed - an
appreciable drop in salaries. She
said that she is not sure that having a multitude of jobs to choose
from is the best situation for an
applicant, because in'this case his
choice is based solely on money.
Dr. Lucian Carter, director of
the Commerce Employment
Agency, said companies have postponed commitments to applicants.
The 'nuniber of interviews has not
dropped here, although they are
down throughout the country.
Students have two job offers
this year compared with five last
year, he said. There is no problem
in placing students with a high
academic Average, but students
who have just barely passed are

mainder should be placed.
Three alumni have asked re- placement in the past year, Dr.
Carter said. This indicates that
UK College of Commerce graduates
are not being laid off generally.
Opportunities are larger in gov- eminent service this year. There
is a shortage of accountants, secretaries and salespeople, Dr. Carter
said.
(Continued on Page-161-

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II) PICTURES
Today Is the last day returning students will have II) pictures taken for next year. The
photos are being; takrn in the
hall of the Si ll.

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PRESIDENT PERLMAN

President and Mrs. Frank G. Dickey
cordially incite
The January, June, and August graduates, with their families
The alumni, tcith their families
The faculty and staff, tcith their families
and
The friends of the University of Kentucky
to attend the Commencement Tea
on Saturday, May 21

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at-

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o'clock
(Central Standard Time)

Two-thirt- y

to

four-thirt- y

at
Maxwell Tlacc

In winning the presidency, Perl
man commended the Campus Par
ty for their great campaign, lie
also announced the appointment of
Dave Iircker as the new head of
the judiciary board.
Jim Heil, Students' Party chairman, said he was gratified by the
result of the election and added
'I'm glad to see the large turnout
for this election."
Itoli Chambliss, chairman of the.
Campus Party, frit lUe closeness of
the race plus the party's victories
in Engineering
ind Commerce
"made us feel assured that our efforts to put a two party system
hack on campus have been .successful
In the assembly races, five pot
went to the students" Party and
four to the Campus Party. Seven
candidates were unopposed m the
assembly contests.
The Campus Party won two seats
in the Commerce College as Jack
Rigby and Ed Stepp won out over
Bill Alexander and Niel Sulier of
the Students Party.
In the College of Engineering,
Bob Adams and Tni King defeated Murph Green and Colin
Lewis, Students' Party candidates.
Several candidates were unopposed in the election and three,
Gregg Rhodemyre, Dick Howe and
Jerry Johnson, were running on
both tickets. The other unopposed
candidates were Whayne Priest in
Arts and Sciences, Graham Eger-to- n
in Law and Ted Powers and,
Carroll Graves in Graduate School.
The Students Party won the
races in Arts and Sciences, Education and Agriculture.
The official count in the Arts &
Sciences races was Joanne Itrowit
(SP) 379, Jim Jeffries (CP) 22tf,
i Continued on Page 1C)

Flygirls Add Color To Parading Air Force Cadets
views even before they had received their uniforms.
The Sponsor Corps of the UK
The main functions of the SponAFROTC made their first full sor Corps are to act as a service
dress appearance at The Brigade organization for the AFROTC
Review Saturday morning and Cadet Corps, and to increase preslater appeared marching as a tige of AFROTC at UK.
group in the Little Kentucky
During the April 14 Federal InDerby Parade.
spection of the AFROTC the Corps
The Spender Corps is made up gave a "Tea" for the Federal Inof 13 girl (ho en by popular .vote spectors and senior cadets and
of thf AFPOTC Corps trom over their wives.
one hundred coeds. The group
The Corps has made few apmet for the first time in March pearances as yet, due to the planto elect cfiicers and select their ning and organization process.
uniforms. They have met each Next fall the unit will be a fully
Monday nifeht since then to con- recognized organization.
duct recul.'' r meetings. The girls
One of the major functions of
meet with their respective units on the Corps is the planning of social
Wednesdays to practice marching. activities for the cadet wing. They
The Corps has marched at pre- have made plans to "welcome" the
vious AFROTC parades and re freshman next fall and "to aid in
By NEAL CLAY JR.

their registration. Dancing classes

and several social activities have
been planned for the fall semester.
Planning for the Sponsor Corps
started in Sept. 1957. Working
with campus organizations and
leaders, candidates who were active
in campus affairs were selected
by the Cadet Corps. From this
group the 13 members of the Corps
were chosen. Uniforms were designed by the group at their first
meeting.
Facli girl is associated with a
particular unit of the AFROTC
calet organization. Tlje cadets look
uixm her with respect and admira-.tioCadets are not required to
salute the sponsors, though they
have the rank of cadet officers,
but mav salute as a sign of
on Page 1G)
n.

court-(Continu-

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* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Friday. May

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6 Hi A G Prof UK 'Alumnus Of The Year
Leaves Post Top Senior To Get Awards
Kentucky
assistant
At University
at

nuel Lanpher. and agriculture
economist, became the sixth member faculty member to resign unofficially from the UK College of
in recent weeks, it was learned
Monday.

Dean Hugh B. Price, acting head

of the College of Agriculture and
Home Economics, would not con-

firm that the economist has submitted his resignation.
He said action by the UK board
V of trustees is necessary before
can be officially con- firmed by college heads. The
board will meet Maay 16.
;
Lanpher came to the University
in 1955 as an agriculture business
outlook specialist. He received an
undergraduate degree and a mas'
i
ter of science degree from the
University of Missouri and a Ph.D.
from Iowa State College. He at..
'
tended the Harvard School of
Business Administration.
Lanpher has not yet commented
Pictured above are the recently elected 'officers of the Cosmopolitan
on his resignation. Of the five
Club for the comin; year. They are, from left to right: Rottom row,
others reported resigning, three
TurK. M. George, president, India; Ayhan Aydogdn,
have confirmed their resignations
key. Top ror,Pat Sfmrrll, secretary, Amerlra, and Eddy A.'Mokodom
and listed higher salaries as a
pit, treasurer, Indonesia.
reason for leaving.
Lanpher is expected to take a
The UK faculty In 1925 gathered
wild flowers that grew where the position with the U.S. Department1
Funkhouser. Home Economics, and of Agriculture.

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The University of
"alumnus of the year" and the
outstanding senior will be pre-- 1
sented awards during the annual
Association banquet at 6
p.m. Saturday, May 24, in the
Bluegrass Room of the Student
Union Building.
The awards will be presented y
William Martin of Martin, president of Alma Magna Matar, campus group for children of former
UK students, which is sponsoring
the awards.
Robert H. Hillenmeyer, president
of the Alumni association, will
side. He also will introduce special
Buests and recoenlze reunion
classes. The invocation and bene- -

vice-preside-

nt,

CAMPUS AGENT

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WEE WASH

90

DRY
FOLD

MINUTE

1. Retirement Benefits

2.
3. Hospitalization
4. Business Life Insurance
5. Accident and Sickness Insurance
6. Group Life Insurance

10c lb.

SERVICE

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representing

Provident Mutual Life Ins. Co. of Phila.

Also Dry Cleaning and Shirt Laundered
.

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equipment into the
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interested in Life Insurance as a career,
supply you with the information.

If you are

IT
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AND WOODLAND ST.

Cooperstown

22

racket!

Who started it? Miis
Mary Outerbridg of
Staten Island, N. Y.
brought the first tennis

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United States in 1874
from Bermuda.

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MEN OF AMERICA:

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1865

FOUNDED

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WEE WASH

IN:

SPECIALIZING

LAUNDRY PROBLEMS

the lady

and 1950. .
Banquet reservations must be
made in the UK alumni office by
May 22, or by telephone the office
Ext. 2152 and Ext. 2154,
at
by 4 p.m. Thursday.
1931. 1947, 1948, 1949

Thomas "Jack" Hall

HERE'S THE ANSWER TO . . .

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of 1910, 1911, 1912. 1928, 1929, 1930,

SEE A SPECIALIST

Family-Protectio-

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diction will be given by Howard
director or
Stephenson,
YMCA. The group will sing
the
the conclu-Alum- nl
"On, On. U of K"
program,
sion of the
Classes holding reunions will
nave special laoies reserved ior
them at the banquet. Special reunions will be held for the classes
of 1908, 1918, and 1933. Reunions
also will be held for the classes

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Soakin up a tan
In the summer sun,
Smiles come easy .
And the livin's fun!
Make it part of your
Vacation plan
To take big pleasure
When and where you can

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Tennis brings to mind

our sportswear
because so man tennis
players prefer it. h our .
selections, you'll find
colorful and comfort-

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able knit shirts, slacks,

shorts and hosiery
We've-bo- th

regulation

epparef-an-d

flu.- - ecu- -

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$5.95 up

Hosiery .

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Shorts .

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Knit Shirts

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BIB GLEMJ TASTE OF

TOP-TOBAC- CO

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KING'

* Tilt
UK.Ag Economist
Going To Asian Meet

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Ilijili Schoolers
(iol Sehola.sl.ips
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Dr. Lawrence Bradford, professor
of agriculture economics at UK.
has been .selected as one of the
fix American economists to attend
the International Conference of
Agriculture Economics at Mysore,

India this August.

The purpose of the conference

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is. to aid in understanding agricul-

ture problems of Asian countries.
Dr. Bradford also received a
grant to tour Asia for a month to

Mudy the agriculture conditions of

its countries.

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Thirty Kentucky hith school
graduates have born selected to
receive Department 'of Highways
employee scholarships for engineering study at the University
of Kentucky, UK College of Engl- neering Dean R. E. Shaver announced yesterday.
The students will be paid $0
per month during the freshman
year and will work saimmers plus
one year after graduation with
the department of highways. Their
starting salary for summer employ- ment is $209 per month.
Selection of the students n.s
made by the U. of K. Scholarship
Committee.

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Music Dept., Gtiignol
Give Opera May 19-2- 0
The University Music Department, in conjunction with the
Guignol Players, will present
Giacomo Puccini's "Gianni Schic-chi- ",
an opera in one act. May 19
and 20 in the Guignol Theatre at
8 p.m. There will be no admission
charge.
Included in the all student cast
are Martin Ambrose, Janice Cook,
Phyllis Tilton. Peggy Cowgill, Robert Davis. Jacquclyn VVesterfield,
Alice Jane Lanier. William Ramsey. Leonard Wolfe, Josephine
Barker, David Copeland, and
Robert Elam.
Ann Huddleston will be the ac- companist for the group. Direc- tors are Aimo Kiviniemi and James
King. Stage director is Dudley
Saunders.

"And if I am Elected

i

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99

STOP
Don't Bother Packing Those
Winter Clothes. Let Us Store
Them For You This Summer.

Just Leave Your Heavy Garments With Us This Spring
and Pick Them Up In the
Fall . . . Nothing To Pay
Till Then.

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Next to the Coliseum

Phone

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Yirtfley products for America r created in England and finished in the U S Afrom the
ori(inal English formulae, combining imported and domestic ingredients. S20 Filth Ae , N Y C.

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School.

Drop In or Call Us

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Application
of
for
counselor and head counselor at
Donovan Hall are now bring
for the selection of a full
staff. It was announced
this week.
Robert W. Blakeman. Director
of Men's Housing, said the applicants should report directly to the
office at DoTiovan Hall to comptrte
application forms and ti make
appointments for preliminary interviews.
Counselors receive full room anil
board In return for their work,
w hile head counselors rerelve room,
board and a $30 monthly stlpeiui.
Several positions on the 14 mnri
staff at Donovan are yet to be rilled, Blakeman said.

Complete protection in an unbreakable, push-u- p
case; no
foil to fool with; easy to pack;
size. $1.10 plus tax.

The Unhcrsifv of Kontuckv
:ynii;honic Bund, under Bernard
Fit,:r.erald. will present its final
c'ir.ccit of current school vcar
Thursday, May
in Memorial
Amphitheatre at 7:00 p.m.
Two graduating seniors, Henry
Hubert and William Watson, will
be presented as conductors. Hubert
will conduct the "Huldisuncs-march- "
by Griei? and Watson will
conduct the "Ballet of Pleasure"
by Charpentier.
Three hUh school seniors will
appear as clarinet soloists with the
band, performing "Adagio and
Tarantella" by Cavallini. The students are L. W. Browning from
DuPont Manual High School in.
Louisville; and Joan Cooper and
Mary Jo Hyden from Paris High

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Dorms Seek
Counselors
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DEODORANT STICK FOR MEN!

Year's Final
Band Concert
Set 'Thursday

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NEW! TODAY'S HANDIEST

Rallies before this week's student government election attracted much
attention on campus. This scene in front of Funkhouscr Building
shows a group of students preparing to drum up support for their
favorite candidates.
UK Spotlight, a shorthorn steer.
.exhibited by the University of
Kentucky at the 1955 International
Livestock Exposition, won the. re- serve grand championship over all
breeds.
(

kl'NTl'CK V KTRNTI.,

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* ....

The Kentucky Kernel
University of Kentucky

i.,;.

Bntered at the Pout Office at Lexington. Kentucky
second clam matter vndef
the Art of March 3. 1879.
except holldTt and exama.
PublUhed weeVIr dunn arhool
THREE DOLLARS A SCHOOL YEAR

-

JAMES BLAND, Editor
DAVE ALTEMUEIILE, Managing Editor
ANN SMITH, News Editor
JOHN EGERTON, Makeup Editor
ED FORD, Sports Editor
Tracy Walden, 6ociety Editor
Andy Epperson, Makeup Assistant
Jim Hampton and Norma Shelton, Feature Editors
Bill Tully, Assistant Sports Editor
Ray Cravens, Cartoonist
Charlotte Bailey, Exchange Editor
NORMAN McMULLIN, Adv. Mgr.
FERRY ASHLEY, Bus. Mgr.
JOHN MITCHELL, Staff Photographer

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FEPORTERS Gilbert Barley, Jane Hairlson. Betty Holtzrlaw, Judy Trlvette,
Alice Redding, Gurney Norman. Kenny Robinson, Paul Scott, Barbara Lake,
John Egerton. Dan Millot. Jean WeAtherford, Jim Hudson, Anne Crutcher, Mary
Crutrher, Nancy Meadows, Neal Clay, Tom Budd. Don Deaton, Sally Osteen,
Jim Hampton, Bill Hammons, Joy Bell, Joanie Welsiinger.

-

on any particular political administration, and certainly not
on the University itself. TheTsad but evident truth is that the
people, of Kentucky have not yet awakened to the need for
teachers.
The new University budget made possible increases in
$alary for many faculty members; Even so, a professor here
gets only as much for twelve months' work as professors at
many other state universities get in nine.
IT RESTS with the people specifically, the voters to take
action which will put this state's educational system in a com
petitive position. Only then will the University be able to
offer its faculty salaries which are concomitant with the im
portance of education.
better-pai- d

We hope next year's Student Congress campaign will inpolitical mud- clude a little more of the good,
slinging. It should be much easier to wash off the sidewalks
man an tnat wnue parm.
old-fashion-

ed

.

Wasthe greatest

ise.
"In UK hlstoryTpercentage-The Campus Party, although formed only two
interest
weeks ago, stimulated a greater-than-usuw

al

in the election.

.

Perlman's victory by 211 votes over Dave Becker,
Campus Party presidential candidate, was decisive.
However, voting in the vice presidential race was
so close that three counts were required before

--

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FACULTX

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The University faculty this week
adopted a - proposal which will
probably raise a great-h- ue
and
cry from students who are barely
staying off probation under present
academic requirements.
Jh?. new Program elevates the
standing required to .remain in
the University to a 2.0, with some
variations. When this change was
firt discussed, the Kernel pointed
out that more than 2,000 students
had ess tnan 20 averages last
semester.
in the light of these statistics,
the new ruling might seem des
tined to turn the campus into a
land.
We think not.
What it will mean is that a few
scholastic knuckles (and books)
are going to get cracked.
We are a state university, and
thus cannot set our entrance requirements as high as those of a
privately-endowe- d
school. The
only alternative is to weed out the
incompetents by requiring a relatively high overall standing in
order to stay in school.
The Kernel endorses Dean M. M.
White for introducing the new
measure and the faculty for approving it. It may well prove to
be an unpopular piece of legislation in some quarters notably
among its future casualties. We
may lose a little quantitative
ground, but we will certainly have
climbed a few rungs up the quanti
tative ladder in the meantime.
no-ma-

n's

the general public are up against.
Organized medicine Is" ruthless
and callous, but individual doctors,
like your own President, haven't
the couraee to buck them, and the
public Is the poorer.
It will be interesting to watch
organized labor and organized
medicine lock horns.
May your numbers increase.
(Name withheld by request)

We understand that Pershing
Rifles' teams took all first places
at a recent drill meet at Ohio
University. This Is indeed a significant accomplishment. Every society needs a few hundred individuals who are able to count

Greener Grass

New Ruling
On Grades

am a registered nurse married

to a doctor. I therefore request
that you withhold my name.
Even though I am riding the
gravy train, I realize what you and

Kernels

'

cadence.

Derby Problems
From all appearances, the Little Kentucky Derby was a
much. bigger success this' year than last. This was probably
due to better planning and nnuh better publicity.
HOWEVER, there were certain Haws which stink out like
a sore thumb and the main ones were in connection with
the concert.
The Derby committee should have expected at least 1,000
persons to attend the conceit. As it turned out, there were
about (j.000 by most estimations, possibly some fewer. Of
were students.
these, more than
r
A
belore and up to concert time there were
only two ticket men on the student side trving to send about
1,000 students through the turnstiles. It created a colossal jam
wait at the minimum. That was
and made lor a
purely poor planning and should be taken as a lesson for next
two-third-

s

hall-hou-

)ear.
AT INTERMISSION time the crowd flowed into the corridors seeking refreshments. There was one stand on each
side of the Coliseum with two persons in each serving. Then,
within minutesthe stand on the student side'sold out. Once
again, poor planning and it cost some concession profits and
caused some grumbling.
Armstrong's conceit was a good idea and one the committee should continue to use. It fills a large gap in student
activities as has been mentioned on this page before. But,
please people, have a little more foresight next )ear.
-J-- B.

Editor's Note
All editorials not followed by the
initials "J.B." were written by next
year's Editor-in-Chie- f.
His name.
as well as those of other Daily

nounced in next week's edition.

Student Congress Elections
The Kernel wishes to extend its congratulations
to Pete Perlman and Fred Strache, SC's new president and vice president.
It is gratifying that this year's election turnout

t

-.'

Ml

top-notc- h

W'e can hardly attempt to fix the blame for this situation

I

-

.

IK s

g

own.

To The Editor:

-

.

Faculty Resignations
The list of resignations from the University faculty has
grown substantially within the past few weeks. Six stall members in the College of Agriculture have resigned to accept
positions elsewhere, and lor primarily the same reasons:
Money or rather the lack of it.
positions has not
RUT THIS EXODUS to better-payinbeen limited to these latest resignations. Two years ago a
UK political science professor resigned to accept a position
at the University of Nebraska.' Today he is head of that
poSchool's political science department. Another
litical scientist will go to the University of Florida next year,
with a considerable increase in salary.
A prominent UK official remarked recently thatJie had
sold a lot of Bluegrass to faculty members who were con- Sidering leaving. His point is well taken, we think. Central
.
Kentucky is an area of great scenic beauty. And the cultural
atmosphere is stimulating and steeped in traditions.
.
.
YES, the Bluegrass is marvelous. Horses can eat it and
thrive. Professors, unfortunately, cannot.
A history professor will find a lot of interesting traditions
in this area. But traditions won't pay the grocery bill or help
put braces on junior's teeth. Nor will being able to visit
beautiful "old homes help meet the mortgage payments on his

Nurse Supports
Editor's Stand

.....

.

Strache was declared winner over Dan West by

nine votes.
After the election, Straehe requested that the
Kernel print the following statement:
"Dan and I agreed that we'd accept the third
count as final. He has promised us his support
in student government. I admire
and
and respect him for this."
As long as the new SC administration pursues a
course that is .in the best interests of the students
of the University, it shall receive the Kernel's unequivocal support.

Sliawneetown
When the University officials
Li
move out to Shawneetown today
1 ....... r
to dedicate the housing project, f
they might see room for immediate
improvement.
Following rains the streets and
lawns (?) are veritable lakes. Sevs"
eral holes in the streets are
to automobiles.
What are supposed to be lawns
are naked ' patches of barren ?
ground. Perhaps a rainy day in
,
which the responsible officials
would have to wade through this
me Situa
iiitM nuuiu iicip
tion.
"It's easv to kren off the crass
J. B.
around here.!
dan-erou-

UNIVERSITY SOAPBOX

Critic Presents An Entirely 'Mad ' Revieiv
Kernel
By GURNEY NORMA.V

Mad, anyone? It's available now, in a $2.95 hard-bac- k
edition.
If you happen to be among the uninitiated, then perhaps it should be explained that Mad is a magazine a
funny, funny satirical comic book, really. The $2.95 book
referred to is a collection of what Mad editors consider
to be the best satirical features that have appeared in the
magazine since it first began publication five years ago.
thing, and normally sells
Ordinarily, it is a
lor 25 cents cheap. But this volume is something special.
Mr. Ernie Kovacs, neurotic humorist, wrote the introduction for this edition. Following his page is 128 more
art and assorted zanyisms that tear
of satire, off-beInto the heart of the American domestic scene by ridiculing television, movies, advertising super markets, Ed Sullivan space travel, sports, magazines and people In general. As Mr. Kovacs expressed it, "Very little in the
American scene has escaped the cockeyed swipes of the
editors.'
It is refreshing Indeed, and encouraging, to see that
At least ft lew people bare that certain outlook on life
semi-month- ly

at

which permits them to see the farce that exists almost
universally in most social institutions which the average
person accepts with no questions asked..
The $2.95 special edition under consideration contains
treatments of stamp collecting, (the gentle art); the
Snow White story (who wasn't really poisoned, Mad tells
us); the Ed Sullivan Show; comic strips; horse racing
(starring the million dollar horse, Naushea); a
feature; a "review" of the movie, "The Seven
Itchy Years": a 16 page color section featuring "Melvin
of the Apes," by Egad Rice Burrows: and the true ttory
of Captain John Smith and his Indian princess, Pospoiled brat).
cahontas (who was really a
However, don't ever sit down to read Mad unless you
have at least an hour to throw away. It is impossible to
see and appreciate any single article to its full extent in
less time.
As you look at the picture panels and read the dialogue to get the main story, you may be misting another
exciting adventure if yon fail to scrutinize carefully the
background in each picture, where a completely inde-me- n
bustle attractive females, robberies take place or
pendent drama may be taking place la miniature as tiny

wierd little figures make faces at you. While Burt
Lambaster and Anna Lasagna cavort in the "review" of
the academy award-winnin- g
"He Rose Tattooed," the
story of bannister-slidin- g
contests in Wisconsin may be
unfolding right before you in the background.
But being a reader of Mad from way back, I am forced
to point out a fault in this bound collection of past
articles. It seems the editors who selected the features
to
exercised poor judgment, because' H isn t
really the best from Mad's first five years. It is good,
but not the best.
Painful though it be, it must be admitted that this
$2.9a edition is not as good as it should or could be.
While the editors are successful in putting on &ale an
excellent magazine, they must be criticized for failing
to bring out a super excellent book, for certainly they
have in the past five years run stuff that was super excellent, which, unfortunately, does not appear in the
collection.
So if you like yourself, treat ycureelf. Go Mad. It's
recommended.
re-pri-

nt

* THE KtXTJT.KV KERNEL Eri.bv. May

'The Poor JfmiV Couch'

Horse Show

rf

The Block and Bridle Club, hon-

orary animal husbandry club at
UK. will hold its 13th annual horse
show at the Lexington Trotting
Track Saturday.