xt7k6d5pc597 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7k6d5pc597/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19680126  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, January 26, 1968 text The Kentucky Kernel, January 26, 1968 1968 2015 true xt7k6d5pc597 section xt7k6d5pc597 Sonic Bright, Sonic Don't Show Up

Student Legislative Aides PraisedDamned

FRANKFORT

Kentucky college

(AP)-Th- irty

dents are trying to help the legislature,
selves, in a

and

experiment whose

cess seems in

stu-

themsuc-

doubt.
They are participating in a program suggested by
Gov. Louie B. Nunn, who wanted promising
youths
to give the lawmakers assistance on varied tasks.
By spending at least 20 hours a week at the Capitol, the students would obtain credits from their schools
and an insight into government functions.
Fred Karem, the governor's legal aide who set
up
the operation, said Thursday he hopes it will grow
into an integral part of the Cencral Assembly.
"This is the first time anything like this has been

done in Kentucky," he said.
Basically, the students are assigned to help about six
legislators each.

A few student leaders work with the House and
Senate leadership to coordinate activities.
The students theoretically can help the legislators
in research, drafting material for speeches, processing
mail, entertaining and guiding constituents who visit
Frankfort.

In practice, their accomplishments

quantity.

Mr. Karem acknowledged
lukewarm to the idea.

are an unknown

that many lawmakers are

"But the fact is that most of the boys are being
kept busy," he said. "They are being used by enough
legislators to be involved all the time."
He said the output and usefulness of the students
compares favorably with that of paid legislative

THE KENTUCKY
EC
IK N
L

E

E

j- - The South's Outstanding College Daily

Friday, Jan. 26, 1968

University of Kentucky, Lexington

Vol. LIX, No. 85

Aptheker Ban Will 'Sure
As Hell9 Face Assembly
By TERRY DUNHAM
Cov. Louie B. Nunn's press
secretary said Tuesday that to
his knowledge no bill has been
proposed that could interfere with
the scheduled appearance of
Communist
Herbert Aptheker
here April 22.
But, he went on, "when this
man's speech is announced, one
suie as hell will be."
Gov. Nunn has in the past
favored some sort of restrictions
on certain speakers on state university campuses, but has as yet
made no comment on Aptheker's
upcoming visit.
. His
press secretary, Warren
Schweder, said the governor
"won't be happy to hear about

A

if

Kg

this."

Aptheker's speech is spoii
sored by the Student Center Forum Committee, and, according
for student afto
fairs Robert Johnson, violates no
university speaker restrictions,
nt

thus leaving potential state legislation as the only apparent impediment.
In past sessions such "speaker

bans have been proposed but
have died in committee.
Still, the possibility remains
that such a bill could be presented and adopted before Aptheker's scheduled speech.
Aptheker, who is director of
the American Institute for Marxist Affairs and a member of the
Communist Party of America, is
being brought to UK by the
Student Center Forum Committee as part of a semester-lon- g
program.
In keeping with the Forum
Committee's platform of presenting speakers representing both
sides of controversial issues, a
program in February will present
anticommunists including Cuban
and Vietnamese refugees.
The General Assembly convened Jan. 2 and meets for 60
days. It normally has voted a
30-dextension which permits
the assembly to continue until
the end of March.
ay

"I'm delighted with their spirit, ability and knowlsaid.
edge," Sen. Vernon McGinty
"They've been a real help to me."
An opposite view comes from Rep. Tom Ray
while praising the motivation, he said the

program has been a flop.
"The main trouble is scheduling," Rep. Ray said.
"We had hoped to use them in the morning for committee work, but they don't show up until the after-

noon."

Some students don't even show up at that time, Mr.
Ray added.
"We just have not been able to get the program
started in an effective manner," he said.
said the stuSen. Lawrence Wetherby
dents he has used seem to be active and bright. Rep.
Continued on Page 8, Col. 3
--

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Candidates for this year's Miss University of Kentucky title
i

IHisS UK

in-

from left. Donna Fickle, I .aura Miller, Donna Taylor,
I'"an, Korth, Niesje Allen, Carolyn Spencer, Mary Donna Preston,
Brenda O'Connell, Jeanne Williamson and with the baton -- Jo Ann
Windish. Winner of the campus pageant will compete in tlte
Miss Kentucky coinfjetition. (Story on page five.)
clude,

"

Kernel Photo by Rick Bell

Former UK student Don Pratt said "when voters, officials, leaders,
their followers, and the nation as a whole does not take, or is
unable to take, responsible action in stopping an agressive war,
it becomes the responsibility of the individual" to stop it. Pratt
left Lexington for Louisville at 5 a.m. Friday morning, when this
picture was taken, to refuse induction into the U.S. Army. Over
20 students- - were at the Lexington induction center to lend Pratt
moral support.

Student Convicted But
Abortion Charge Fails

A UK graduate student charged with abortion was found guilty
on a lesser charge yesterday in Fayette County Circuit Court and
sentenced to six months in the county jail.
The student, Ralph Charles
Students charged with lesser
Brown, whose home is Louischarges are often released to the
ville, was convicted of "attempting to commit a felony." He im- University.
mediately filed a motion for probation which will be heard Jan.

31.

f

J

Brown had a graduate research assistantship in the English Department last semester.
He is not receiving an assistantship this semester but an
English Department spokesman
said this was not the result of
any University action resulting
from the court case.
Two other men were also charged with aliortion, stemmingfrom
the same incident last spring.
James Netherton was found
guilty of the charge and sentenced to one year imprisonment
and fined $500. He too filed a
motion for probation, and it also will le heard Jan. 31.
The third nun, Michael Ted-urdid not appear and forfeited
$2,000 txmd.
Assistant Dean of Students
Ken Brandenburg said the abortion involvoled a girl w!k has
"at times" been a UK student.
Mr. Brandenburg and Dean of
Men Jack Hall attended the court
session, "observing procedures
Ucause a student was involved,"
Mr. Brandenburg said.

HEW Chief

Quits Cabinet
By WALTER GRANT
WASHINGTON (CPS)-Sec-re-

tary

of Health Education and
Welfare John W. Cardner, who

has been considered one of education's closest friends, resigned
today.
Mr. Gardner told President
Johnson he plans to leave the
posi' n he has held for two
and a half years "on or before
Niuich 1." He said he plans to
return to the Carnegie Corp. of
New York as a consultant and
to undertake special projects relating to the problems of cities.
Mr. Cardner was president of
Carnegie before his appointment
to the cabinet position July 27,
1965.

In his letter of resignation
Gardner said, "When I came
to Washington I took a two-yea- r
leave of absence from the Carnegie Corp. and overstayed that
leave half a year."
Contlnurd on laje 2, Col. 1
Mr.

* THE KENTUCKY

and glory , and t he new hair pieces
available make it easy for a woman to add to her crown.
A wide variety of hair pieces
allow any woman to solve her
particular hair problem stylishly
and unobstrusively. For women
who are bald, have badly damaged hair or just wish to keep a
stylish coiffure on hand for special occasions or daily wear, Mrs.
Elleonore Ziegler, an instructor
at Hager Beauty Academy, recommends a "European, hand-wecd, custom-mad- e
wig."
ft

European hair is a fine grade
of human hair which is pretreated
so it retains much of its natural
body. Each hair is fitted into the

base and knotted by hand then
fitted cxiecially to the individual's head.
Mrs. Sharron Adams, manager
of local beauty salon also recommended a custom-mad- e
wig. "It
has a completely natural hairline
and it's made to fit the head.
The hair is put into it so that
it has natural partinglines," Mrs.
Adams stated.
Mrs. Ziegler advised against
synthetic wigs made of dynel
(a mixture of nylon and saran)
because they are "very unmanageable. They also are more costly
in the long run than machine-mad- e
human hair wigs because
they don't have any body or flexibility. Dynel knots badly and
can't be cleaned with fluids-j- ust

water."

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Kernel Photo by Dick Ware

Mr. Dennis Keller, professional producer, director and judge of
beauty pageants, is presently at UK working with the Miss University of Kentucky pageant.

Beauty Judge Enjoys Work
By KATHY ROSSER
Few men can say they enjoy their work as much as Dennis Keller,
producer,
director and judge of beauty pag-

eants.
Currently, Mr. Keller is working at the University planningthe

Miss University of Kentucky
Ijcduty pageant.
He is a careful dresser, wearing a cravat and dark sport jacket. During rehearsal, he nervously
paces the stage, positioning the
contestants and giving advice.
Besides producing and directing the show, Mr. Keller also gives
the girls hints on how to walk
and stand. One of his most repeated sayings is ".Smile! That's
probably the hardest thing you'll
have to do."
He continually moves around
the stage, listening to questions
and giving advice about lights,
music and judges, using many
gestures while he talks.
Dennis Keller is originally
from Ripley, Ohio. He attended
Ohio State University, taking a
double major of
and radio, television and

although he sometimes has been
to one or two in the fall.
After Mr. Keller leaves the
University

Five years ago, Mr Keller belonged to a theater guild in Ripley where he helped with his
first pageant.
He both produced and directed the preliminaries of the
Miss Ohio Contest, and later was
made one of the 18 official judges for the Miss America pag-

Wigs actually require less care
a woman's own hair. Hand-weed (hand woven) and machine-made
wigs and hair pieces
should be brushed often. Mrs.
Adams explained that if they are
not brushed regularly, the hair
may work itself back into the
inside of the base.
Special sprays and conditioners are required for human-hai- r
wigs. Wigs should only be
sprayed with hair spray containing "little alcohol and gum w hich
collects dust on the hair," advised Mrs. Ziegler.
"Wigs have to be conditioned
every other cleaning because
there is no natural oil in them,"
Mrs.
Adams
recommended.
Cleaning should take place whenever the wigbecomes dirty, which
varies according to how often it
is worn.
Women with curly or short
hair that want the long, straight
look but don't have the time to
grow their own hair can remedy
their problem with a fall. Falls
consist of a full, long, straight
swatch of hair that fits into the
crown by a hair comb attached
to the base.
Gary Walker, a Lexington hair
stylist, explained that falls can
be made of dynel or, preferably,
Oriental hair. This is heavy,
coarse, human hair that is generally less expensive than European hair.
Falls are dyed to match a
piece of hair so that when they
are worn, they blend in with the
woman's actual hair. They
should be cared for in much the
same way that wigs are cleaned
professionally, brushed regularly
and sprayed only with special
wig hair sprays.
Mrs. Adams advised the use
of a wiglet for women whose
hair is "thin at the crown or
around the face. It gives fullness
which is needed."
"Most women," adds Mr.
Walker, "wear wiglets for height.
It saves their hair from being teased and is great when their hair
is dirty and they want to go out.
Just put it on and go."
Again the prices range according to the grade of hair with
which the wiglet is made.

than

2(J, lOfiS- -.l

ft

--

Sandwich, Anyone?
Things aren't always the way
for instance,
s
don't always carry lunches.

they seem

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"Win

Fountain

atte-

HALE'S

PHARMACY

915 S. LIMESTONE

Phone

GO TO

PASQUALE'S
for the BEST PIZZA in fown
at the

MOST REASONABLE

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284 South Limestone
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Aj

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ill

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go-g- o

Ky.

Across from UK Medical Center

M

cg

Coeds

Lexington,

255-774- 9

JOIN the CROWDS

Vrty

i

Sundt

Drugs

lunch-boxe-

Some UK coeds use lunch-boxe- s
as purses to transport their
personal and trivial items across
campus.
These purses are often used
for conversation pieces and
ntion-getters.
Several girls admitted having made new acquaintances through answering
questions about their decorative
lunchboxes.
According to one sophomore
coed, "Lunchbox purses really
arouse curiosity. I guess people
think I'm crazy when I tell them
I enjoy showing my feelings
through my purses.

-7

for the Bass Weejun
j

and here it is at Meyers. . . .
There is positively no substitute for this real moccasin construction, so don't be fooled by imitators. Here's the genuine "Bass
in antique
Weejun" . . . waiting for you . . . right here now
brown. 14.00
...

eant.

He has produced and directed several other pageants which
include t he Miss Ohio Valley contest and the Miss Northern Kentucky contest.
Being involved in beauty pageants is not Mr. Keller's only
business. He also owns an insurance agency in Ripley. He is
married and has one daughter. He
is usually away from home in the
spring for the eauty contests,

he will fly to be a

judge in the Miss Tennessee
beauty pageant.

history-governme-

theater.

Friday, Jan.

OR NECESSITY?

HAIRPIECES-VOG- UE
By MARY ANN OBERNIER
A woman's hair is her crown

KERNEL,

...

)

tlte ladies slioe salon, second floor

Meyers,

fashionable-main-street-ea-

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...

252-750-

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* 2

-- THE KENTUCKY

Friday, Jan. 2f,

KERNEL,

10fi8

LITTLE

Gardner Quits Top HEW Post;

WENT CMiWI

Vietnam War Protest Speculated

Continued from Taje One
However, Mr. Gardner reportedly is quitting the cabinet because he is displeased with the
severe budget cuts in his depart ment, particularly in the area
of education. Mr. Gardner is also
considered a dove on Vietnam
and reportedly wants to disassociate himself from the Johnson administration's foreign policy.
Mr. Gardner joins a growing
list of government officials who
are resigning. Many reportedly
are leaving the government because of the heavy escalation
of the war and the resulting
reduction in funds available for
domestic programs.
Neither Mr. Gardner's office
nor officials at Carnegie Corp.
would comment on the possibility that he might stay at Carnegie for only a short time, and
then assume the presidency of
major college or university,
A HEW official said, "He's said
he's going to Carnegie. I assume
he's going to Carnegie." Carnegie officials would not elaborate on what Mr. Gardner's
projects would specifically involve.
Mr. Gardner is known to have
been considered for the presi
dency of Stanford University but
reportedly took himself out of
the running. He is usually the
leading candidate when a pres- idential vacancy occurs at a col- lege or university.
Mr. Gardner's office had no

comment on his resignation. Officials refused to confirm or deny
that he was leaving to protest
the war and the cuts in his oper-

ating budget.
The official announcement of
the resignation came from the

White House, which released to
reporters copies of Mr. Gardner's
letter of resignation and a letter
from President Johnson to Mr.
Gardner. The White House refused further comment and would
not say when a successor might
be named.
President Johnson had little
comment beyond the customary
statement that he was accepting
the resignation with "deep re-

gret."
Education officials greeted
Mr. Gardner's resignation with
regret, noting that he has been
a close

friend to all levels of

that other top HEW officials

would resign shortly after Mr.
Gardner leaves. However, these
rumors, which are traditional
official rewhen a cabinet-leve- l
signs, could not be confirmed.
Some education officials express fear that the new HEW
secretary may not be as close
a friend to education as Gardner has been. Many top educators, they said, would not want
the job for the same reasons
Mr. Gardner reportedly is leaving.
During the current fiscal year,
Mr. Gardner has had to cut nearly
$550 million from HEW programs
that were to be funded over the
next six months. The cuts were
made in response to last December's budget-cuttin- g
legislation which was necessary because
of the high costs of the war.

education, particularly higher ed- ucation. Jack Morse of the Amer- ican Council on Education said,
"From his days at Carnegie he

has been regarded as one of
higher education's most knowl-edgabl- e
and articulate spokesmen. He has always been deeply interested and concerned about
the problems of education."
Officials were hesitant to speculate about who might succeed
Mr. Gardner. However, the Pres- ident frequently promotes a top
department official when a va- cancy occurs in the cabinet. This
would make Undersecretary Wil- burt Cohen a leading canidate.
There was some speculation

.r

r

j

A total of 13,673 students have
enrolled in classes on the Lexington campus for the spring
semester.
Dr. Elbert W. Ockerman, dean
of admissions and registrar,
the number is up 1,200
over last spring's enrollment of

12,408.

Dr. Ockerman' s report does
not include the community colleges, the evening class program,
or correspondence
extension
classes, and "there are a few
late registrants to be counted."
The 1968 spring registration,
which officially ended Jan. 23,
includes 8,190 men (59.9 percent,),
and 5,483 women (40.1 percent).

students total
students, 1,422.

e

breakdown
freshmen;

A

2,935

12,251;

by class lists
2,682

sopho-

mores; 3,247 juniors; 2,866 seniors; 1,885 graduate students; 45

FLOWERS

1

For Any

Occasion
CALL

r

ii.

l,

fry

,4
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Dick

VV.i

17

KARATE TOURNAMENT

MGM presents
Ptler Gleovillri Production

KENNEDY BOOK STORE

Tickets ore also available ot the door.

BOOKSTORE

A student chapter of the National Society of Professional Engineers was activated at 7:30 p.m. Jan. 25 in UK's Anderson Hall.
According to Dean Robert M.
Drake Jr. of the College of Eng- ional Development Committee,
NSPE.
ineering, the purpose of the stuAlso speaking were Arthur
dent chapters is "to acquaint the
future engineer with the ethnical Snyder, executive secretary, Kencode of conduct of the professtucky Society of Professional Engional engineer, to provide a proineers, and members of the Blue
Grass Chapter, KSPE, sponsors
gram of professional development
and orientation for the student." of the UK student chapter.
Dr. Robert Cosgriff, chairman
The chairmen and. professors
of the UK Department of Elecfrom the several engineering departments met with the students trical Engineering, who develto hear a talk by Prof. Robert oped a similar student chapter
Jewett, University of Illinois, and at Ohio State University before
chairman of the Student Profess joining UK;also will participate.

Service Seminar Nears

Christian Appalachian

mmssn

The Kentucky Kernel, University
r,
Station, University of Kentucky,
Kentucky 4U5O0. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five timet weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, and once during the summer

AND

session.

A MOOD

Published by the Doard of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Pox 4UUtl.
liegun as the Cadet in 18t4 and
publuhed S. continuously as the Kernel
since 191
Advertising published herein Is intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.

THAT

(

Kernel

The Kentucky

POWER,

UNDER
YOUR

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SUBSCRIPTION

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Per copy, from filea

UNIVERSITY BOOKSTORE
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Student NSPE Begun

GUTS,

and Canada.
Finals and demonstrations begin at 7 p.m.,
SATURDAY, JAN. 27 Memorial Coliseum
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auditors, and 13 transient stu- completed liberal arts require
ments in the A & S college.
dents.
Others colleges and schools
The Arts and Sciences College reports the largest number give the following enrollment figof students among the 15 UK ures: Architecture, 107; Technical
schools and colleges. The A & S Institute, 99; Allied Health, 40;
total of 7,291 students represents Home Economics, 146; Nursing,
the entire freshman class and 127; Dentistry, 180; Agriculture,
most of the sophomore class. 268; Business and Economics,
601; Education, 1,542; EngineerUnder the present academic ing, 539; Graduate School, 1,885;
system, students do not enter Law, 409; Pharmacy, 150, and
their major field until they have Medicine, 289.

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A Student Social Service Seminar will be held in the Student
Center Theatre Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
M I C II L E R
The seminar, which is open
to the public, is meant to give Harmon, Kentucky commissionFLORIST
college students a chance to dis- er of child welfare. He will speak
cover ways they can devote some on "Student Involvement as Related to Specific Fields of Study."
of their time to service organi255-658- 0
Dial.
Six UK students will report
zations.
417 East Maxwell
The featured speaker at the on various social service programs in which students may
event, sponsored by the Newman Center, is to be Maurice participate. They are Phyllis
Teszler, Eastern State Hospital;
U. S. Public
Joe McKnight,
FRIDAY & SATURDAY FEATURES at 1:15. 4:10, 7:00, 9:40
FEATURES SUNDAY thru THURSDAY, 2:15, 5:30, 8:40
Health Hospital; William Davis,
Action Neighlxir-h(X)- d
Community
Centers; Carolyn Atkinson,
Tutoring Program; Gary Friesz,
EARLY
BIRD MAT.
Kentucky Village, and Dale Anas-tas- i,

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Edito", Managing Editor

Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sport
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Advertising, Business,
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"19

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Friday, Jan.

26, 19f8- -5

Says No To Complicity

Rabbitt Speaks To PAG

By DARNELL RICE
talk by visit ingDulxn's Club
member Patti Rabbitt and a discussion of K)litical mcthrxls occupied most of Thursday night's
Peace Action Group (PAC meeting in the Student Center.
Miss Hahhitt blamed the congressional investigation of the
Dubois Club anl the recent indictments of Dr. Renjamin Spxk
and other anti-wa- r
activists on
A

the Johnson administration's
difficulties.

"To get

Miss Rabbitt said, "Johnson has to do
something, and he's got to do
something fast."
She also spoke of the relationship of universities to the
war in Vietnam by their defense
contracts and by connections with
the Central Intelligence Agency.
"We call this campus complicity
with the war," she said.
Miss Rabbitt feels this "complicity" results in universities'
teaching students about the lightness of the Vietnamese war and
about the greatness of this country, whether the facts support
these teacliings or not.
The Dubois Club is pushing
for international strikes, she said,
against the war and against racism. "It is saying 'no to the
universities' complicity with the
war, the CIA and racism."
Speaking of the need for activism here. Miss Rabbitt said,
"I know all the things that influence Rerkeley also influence
Lexington; they're not all that

dissimilar."

About 30 people attended the
meeting, and there was
much discussion as to what political means the group should
use in carrying out its objectives.
The discussion focused on two
for a
major alternatives-workin- g
third party in the state, the Peace
and Freedom Party, or supporting Sen. Eugene McCarthy
who is taking a dovish
stance in challenging President
Johnson for the party's presidenPAG

tial nomination.

Wendell Rerry, assistant professor of English, suggested it
mi glit be most effective for the

Miss UK

Competition
Is Tonight
white
"Have

shoe?

you seen a

Honestly, I've lost my white
shoes and I need them for tonight."
"Smile, girls!"
Those were two of the comments heard at the Miss UK
pageant dress rehearsal last
night.
Confusion and activity were
the keynotes at Memorial Hall.
"Did you find a brown dress?
I need it for tonight," one coed
said. A maintenance man adjusting stage' lights answered, "No,
but I found one brown shoe backstage."

On stage, one
practiced her dance routine to
"Casino Royale" while people
shouted stage directions above
the music.
They scurried over the stage
calling for spotlights, making
notes and adjusting microphones
as another
practiced
her talent routine.
hurried
The 10
to dressing rooms to change into
formals, while others discussed
ushering for Friday's pageant.
Most of the confusion ended,
however, when the actual dress
rehearsal
Only an occasional "Smile, girls!" was heard
semi-finali-

semi-finali-

party's nomination, then there
would still be the Peace and
Freedom party to work with.
Some members of PAG criticized a Kernel editorial about
demonstratheir recent anti-CItion here.
A

PAG Chairman Rill Allison
said in reference to the editorial,
"How do you ever judge the
value of a denxmstration? Even
if no one saw us, we made a
if it
noral commitment-eve- n
was existential."

Nth
-

David Elkinton, whotook part
in the protest, said, "I think
we did a lot more than carrying
signs. We reached the papers
and radio and television."

"We may not be effective in
keeping recruiters away, which
was not our purpose anyway,
but we did a very effective job
of raising the issues," he said.
"The Kernel said people already know Dow makes napalm,"
Elkinton continued, "but I don't
think a lot of people even know
what napalm is."
Motions were passed to elect
a
committee at the next meeting and to
give Allison a mandate to file
papers with the University for
official recognition of PAG.

A

.

.

st

UK pageant begins
at 8 p.m. tonight at Memorial
Hall.

a

11

1

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M

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i1

View From The Top
Kernel photographer Rick Rell climbed to the top of Complex
Tower A to capture this campus night scene. The street running
across the picture near the top is Cooper Drive.

Foreign Students Puzzled By Accents

said Chowolhuvy. However, he
sees differences between U.S.
and Indian math departments.
"Here students are given
more homework and usually a
sia.
greater number of examinations," Chowolhuvy said. "To
Zouqul Hussain Chowolhuvy,
do well the day to day progress
Rrijmohan Roopchand and Has-hiNoor learned about UK is more necessary here because
class impressions are very imand are here now.
Chowolhuvy, who is working
portant. It is the only way to get
on his Ph.D. in mathematics,, in contact with the teacher."
studied under Prof. S. M. Shah
Chowolhuvy said in India the,
when he was at the Aligarh student has more contact with
Muslim University near New the teacher on two levels: the
Delhi. Mr. Shah is now a UK student level and the level "of
a human being." He believes
professor.
the difference is a way of life.
"I knew about the math deIntelligence seems to be the
partment, some about Kentucky
but very little about UK," said most important concern at UK,
said Chowolhuvy. "Intelligence
Chowolhuvy.
also from India, is the only criterion by which
Roopchand,
learned of UK through the people usually judge a person
United States Information Serv- because in this fast life there
ice. Through USIS, he applied seems to be no other way to esto five universities in the U.S. timate the capacity of a person."
found his enand to some in Germany. "I
Roopchand
preferred the United States to gineering studies easier. "The
Germany because I don't know professors here are more specGerman."
ialized than in India. They have
Of the two U.S. schools that a better understanding of the
called him, Roopchand chose subject."
UK because he had a friend
Roopchand said he had more
here. Roopchand is working on homework in India. He likes the
his masters degree in engineerrelaxed atmosphere here. "Here
ing.
(we can ask questions. In India
"I really didn't have a students are more scared of the
choice," said Hashim Noor of teacher."
However, Roopchand had a
Malaysia. He is on a Ford
Foundation scholarship. "They disappointment. "W hat the
chose me."
USIS said was offered isn't alNoor, who came to UK durways offered. Roopchand said
ing his junior year, will receive the Engineering College is imhis masters in agricultural ecoproving now.
Noor likes the informality of
nomics this semester.
All three like the departthe classes and teachers but it
ments they are in but have difgave him a shock at first. "The
ferent opinions about the work. second day I was here, I had
"I definitely like the study," a talk with a professor. He had
By MARVA GAY

When some UK students go
home their friends don't even
know where UK is. It's seldom
mentioned in India and Malay-

m

his legs on the table and was
smoking." In India teachers are
very formal, he said.
The common problem these
three have is one of which even
Kentuckians complain
varying
accents on words.
"In other countries most professors use standard language,
but here the professors use
colloquial English," said Chowolhuvy.
Some English expressions
have puzzled them. When someone says, "May I borrow a cigarette?" instead of, "May I have
a cigarette from you?" Chowolhuvy notices.
Roopchand was amused when
a professor said, "Well, lxjy,
you're in business."
"You bet your sweet life!"
is one of Noor's favorites. "Grab
a hamburger for lunch," amuses
him also. "The people really are
that busy."
Some of the customs here
surprised them. "One of my first
shocks was the color of Christmas trees: purple, blue, yellow.
This pained me for it should be
a tree of reverence," said Chowolhuvy.
"Americans are the most optimistic people in the world,"
continued Chowoluvy. "They
want to get entertainment out
of everything but some things
could be left out."
told how he
Chowolhuvy
learned another custom. "When
I first arrived, I met a girl. She
smiled. I thought I must be
so charming. Then I realized
it was just a custom."
Like most college students,
they are confused by course
numbers, grade numbers and
registration. All said that regis

st

semi-finalis-

then.
The Miss

group to support Sen. McCarthy,
as he would probably be the
more "respectable" candidate as
far as the majority of voters
are concerned.
Robert Frampton, however,
brought up that Hie Peace and
Freedom Party should be supported with the emphasis now
on gaining local offices to build
a structure for future national
elections.
He said only 1,000 signatures
would be required on a petition
to get the party on Kentucky's
ballot in November.
After much discussion and
some attempted motions, the
group decided informally to work
as individuals for the 1,000 signatures required for the Peace
and Freedom Party and to support Sen. McCarthy at the same
time.
The reasoning was that if
Sen. McCarthy failed to get his

0

tration

is not difficult because
many people help them.
"One complaint Chowolhuvy
made is a common one: "Often,
if you miss a course in the fall,
you must wait another year to
take it."

Despite

fiendish torture

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Die's rugged pair of
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* The Kentucky

Iernel

i

in

University of Kentucky
Editorials represent the ojnnions of the Editors, not of
John Richard Kimmins, Editor
Robert I' Brandt, Managing Editor

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