xt7k9882nd76 https://nyx.uky.edu/dips/xt7k9882nd76/data/mets.xml University of Kentucky Fayette County, Kentucky The Kentucky Kernel 19690403  newspapers sn89058402 English  Contact the Special Collections Research Center for information regarding rights and use of this collection. The Kentucky Kernel The Kentucky Kernel, April  3, 1969 text The Kentucky Kernel, April  3, 1969 1969 2015 true xt7k9882nd76 section xt7k9882nd76 Tie
Thursday Evening, April 3,

llC

19C9

Senate Ends Rights Bill Debate;
Will Vote On Proposal April 24

ill.

By DANA EYVELL

Assistant Managing Editor
The University Senate concluded debate of the proposed
Student Bill of Rights Wednesday
and the final draft of the bill will
be presented for an actual vote at
a special meeting of the senate

April 24.

...

Before
that meeting the
senate's Committee for Student

Affairs, which originally drew up
the Bill of Rights and which has
been leading the discussion of it
at the senate's last five meetings,
will revise the document to agree
with the consensus expressed by
the faculty senators.
i

I)

X.
i

"V

Circus
Aq u anus

Vol. LX, No. 123

UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY, LEXINGTON

Marsie Martien, on the trapeze, and Ann
Strunk, in the pool, are two of the members
of the Blue Marlins aquabatic team which
will perform Thursday through Saturday
nights at the University pool. Admission to
the 8 p.m. show, "Circus Aquarius," is $1
Kernel Photo by Dick Ware
per person.

Wednesday's discussion, with
only about 50 faculty members
present, centered around the
powers to be vested in a faculty
ombudsman and a student rights
board, as provided for in the proposed Bill of Rights.
Should the ombudsman be the
final authority in cases of student rights violations or should
the student have the right to appeal the ombudsman's decision to
student rights board, composed of
faculty and students?
The majority of the senators,
when a vote was taken, favored
the concentration of power in the

board's haids.

Although several professors dent rights board the twwer to
expressed the necessity for a change a grade to a P (passing)
strong ombudsman final autho- or W (withdraw) if the board
finds the grade has been awarded
rity, the majority favored the concept of ombudsman as mediator, unjustly.
This authority of the board
a "middle man to avoid a public
student-facultconfront tion refers to two sections of the article
when possible." Theombudsman concerning rights in the classwould also lighten the load of room which assure the student's
cases which would otherwise go right to differ with his professor's
directly to the student rights views without fear of penalty
and the right to be graded by
board.
his "instructor's good-faitIn what Dr. Michael
judgchairman of the student af- ment" and not by such "irrelefairs committee, said might prove vant considerations as race, relito be "an historical departure' gion, color, national origin, sex,
from the present grading system," political affiliation or activities
an overwhelming majority of the outside the classroom that are
senators favored giving the stu unrelated to the course work."
y

Adel-stei-

h

n,

CARSA Polls Candidates,
Will Release Their Views
CARSA has distributed questionnaires to candidates for the
Student Government Assembly and will have the filled-iquestionnaires at a table in the Student Center basement on Friday
for interested students to scrutinize.
According to CARSA chairman Geoffrey Pope, the questionnaires concern issues relevant to Student Government.
Pope requests that all candidates who have not returned the
questionnaires do so by Friday so that students will be able to
learn their views. The questionnaires may be mailed to him at
Box 948 Donovan Hall or dropped off at the table on Friday.
Those candidates who might not have received a questionnaire
can obtain one from Pope.
n

Candidates Offer 'Student Services9 To Haggin Audience
By JANICE BARBER
Assistant Managing Editor
Candidates from the four SG
presidential slates courted the
dormitory vote with an emphasis on student services and
student power through participation in a debate Wednesday
night in Haggin Hall.
Tim Futrell began the emphasis on student services early
in the evening, when speaking as
the current SG vice president, he
announced that plans call for
private phone lines to be installed in all dorm rooms by
August 1970.

Futrell said that the new the other candidates' platforms,
phone system would allow direct except for a plank to reform
distant dialing on the private the Kernel. "We disagree with
lines from the dorm rooms. No Thorn Pat's method of execucalls would go through the Unition," Futrell said, speaking for
Jim Gwinn, his running mate,
versity switchboard, he said.
Futrell, summarizing some of and himself.
Thorn Pat Juul, in answer to
the student services planks in
a later question, outlined his
his platform, emphasized athd
letics and academics. He said
"method of execution"
plans are presently underway for to effect two projects students
a multimillion dollar indoor to be recognized as citizens at
sports facility for the southside age 18 and use of legal action.
of campus.
"We're using the court system
In answer to a question, Fu- to make the administration see
trell admitted that his platform that we are citizens first, students
did not differ significantly from second," Juul said.
Commenting on the attitudes
"the other candidates hold
toward the dorm students," Juul
said his SAR ticket and running
mates "aren't treating you like

Varying Methods Used For
ReiterationAndElaboration
By STONEY FRANKLIN

two-fol-

sheep."

r

Juul pointed out that almost
percent of all SG

seventy-fiv- e

legislation, before SAR, was constitutional amendments and only
ten percent was student services.

Juul said that ninety percent
of the bills this year were for
student services and only ten percent were constitutional amenddemand."
ments. "We have worked and
Steve
SG vice preswe will work again next year," idential Bright,
candidate, speaking for
Juul said.
his running mate Bruce Carver,
with the "average said they were running on "a
Identifying
students," Jim Williams said his concrete platform." "We're not
running a destructionist camcampaign was being nin on honand on democracy.
esty
paign."

Patterson'Late Night Show'
Ends Evening Of Debates
By GEORGE J EPSON

Kernel Staff Writer
Bright referred to his team's ability "to work with the administration"; Futrell echoed "stronger student participation"; Juul
clamored for "legal action" to administrative restraints, and Williams' change of pace approach quietly appealed to the senses,
as the second round of political debate focused on Keeneland
Hall Wednesday night.
Futrell again described his executive in the"actual decisional"dynamic executive plan," and making" of the assembly. He
of the so emphasized the student's need
reiterated the importance
for more participation.
"We are doing more than proposing; we want to do something
for students in terms of pushing
for stronger student participation," Futrell said.
He added that this phase of his
could be realized
platform
through stronger student participation in the areas of the hiring
1
and firing of the University faculty, their tenure and other related
functions.
Cwinn spoke briefly on the
housing issues, opposing regulations forcing students into University housing. In supporting
women's hours, he said he felt
RODNEY TAPP
Continued on l'age 5, Col. 1

Calling for student participation in the SG, Williams said
he hoped the students wouldn't
choose their officers blindly.
The candidates seemed to
agree that any action accomplished by the new Student Government would have to come
about through "genuine student

Kernel Staff Writer

The candidates for Student Government president climaxed
their Wednesday evening debating schedule with an appearance

0

J

A

BRUCE CARVER, recuperating
from complications from a cold,
is to be released today from the
University Medical Center to resume campaigning.

before some 50 women at Patterson
After Jim Gwinn, vice pres- idential candidate running with
Tim Futrell, gave a brief talk,
each of the candidates for the
top spot in SG gave a 10 minute
talk.
Futrell talked of the lowopin-io- n
most students have of SG,
saying that "even the Kernel
calls it a circus."
He said he was not at all
satisfied with what had been
done in SC this year and that
the executive had been too "tied
down with little jobs" that should
have been done by someone else.
This would havo allowed the president and vice president to pursue the bigger issues, he said.
Futrell labeled himself and
his running mate, Gwinn, as the
"only team that's already started

producing."

Thorn Pat Juul spoke of the

Hall.

necessity of having an executive
in SC who could act as a check
on the administration. As an
example of this need he pointed
Continued on Page 5, Col. 1

'

L

--

.

t

JIM CWINN

-

f

* 2 -- THE KENTUCKY KERNEL, Thursday, April 3,

19fi!

Wolfe, Kesey, McLuhan Ride Hieronymous Bosch Bus

The Electric Kool-AiAdd Test,
By Thomas Wolfe, Farrar, Straus
and Ciroux, 413pp.
By JACK LYNE
Kernel Arts Editor
Two Thomas Wolfes have occupied prominent positions in
the literary scenario in the past
forty years. Both hold Ivy League
degrees, but there the similarities
abruptly end.
The first Thomas Wolfe reputedly sat in the Harvard library
in 1923, openly and bitterly weeping uponrealizingthemathemati-ca- l
impossibility of reading all the
books surrounding him. He
shortly dried his eyes, however,
and began to assimilate all the
material possible prior to his
premature death in 1938.
TW II, equipped with his
Yale doctorate, has chosen as
his latest venture the recreation
of the hallucinogenic adventures
of author Ken Kesey and The
Merry Pranksters, his hand of
"day-gl- o
crazies," tracking their
path from Kesey's
d

mind-bendin- g

electric suit to the crypt trip to
the gaudy, 1924 Hieronymous
Bosch Bus.
As evidenced by the Juxtaposition of the Wolfes, yes, Virginia,
times have changed.
Drv Well?
At first glance Wolfe's venture might secmanotherlethargic
attempt to pump a dry well, to
enter a dead womb. The west
coast experiments in living have
received extensive press coverage
over the past several years and
the ideas and garb have been
blatantly milked by the mass
consumer market to the point
of becoming passe. (When country and western balladier Eddy
Arnold comes strolling onto Kraft
Music Hall with bellbottoms and
beads, you know there's a hypo
afoot.)
Yet, the perspicacious Wolfe
manages to bring off what probably ranks as the most accurate,
most vividly descriptive account
yet available on the hip scene.
In doing so he enjoyed two

Summer Employment
On THURSDAY, APRIL 10, a representative

mntt$mtxk

of

distinct advantages. First, Kesey, disentergratc! Like run! Cornel
author of
Wilde Running Jacket hanging
Flew over the Cuckoo's Nest," on the wall, Jungle-Jicorduroy
was very far into the superchargJacket stashed with fishing line,
electric circus in early knife, money, DDT, tablet, balled,
1961 when most of young America points, flashlight, grass 10 SEinto beer, CONDS LEFT, YOU FREAKwas
and The Four Preps. ING
weejuns
With his lurchingChicken LitThough shallow, peripheral accounts of Kesey's adventures have tle style, Wolfe follows Kesey's
limped onto the marked before, maiden voyage from his early
"Kool Aid" marks the first time decision to venture out on his
novelist has psychedelic pilgrimage ("I
the
revealed his strange beginnings would rather be a lightning rod
for publication.
than a seismograph."), his hallucination of "Cuckoo Nest" proTowards An Oral Tradition
tagonist Chief Broom on a hospiWolfe's second advantage lies tal ceiling ("Man, it was an
in his zany, helter-skeltstyle, orgasm behind the eyes"), his
even more in evidence in "Kool ingratiating confrontation with
Aid" than in his previous 1965 Hell's Angels, the frictional visit
with the Timothy Leary cult, the
strange brew, "The
Streamline
Tangerine-Flaktake over of a
Baby." Outfreaking "Tangerine
Unitarian Church convention,
Flake" is in itself somewhat of a Kesey's short and abortive run for
feat, tantamount to confusing the presidency sample slogan:
Professor Irwin Corey, or to gross- ("Kesey stands on his record. 3
ing out Jim Morrison."
busts; 3 paroles."), and finally
As evidenced by the diver- to his eventual arrest.
gence of the fields of attention of
McLuhan Doin's
the two Wolfes, the electric matrix
Wolfe's weavings draw across
that surrounds us is rapidly mov- the
paths of many now prominent
ing industrialized, electrified nafigures befriended by Kesey and
tions from a print to an oral tradithe Pranksters in those early daytion.
glo drippings. Paul Krasseer, Bill
Wolfe has one of the few
Graham (the promoter, not the
styles capable of synthesizing
traditional linear, fragmented preacher, if you can tell the difference), Owsley Stanley, Jr. and
literate-visuforms with the nonnonfoims Jerry Carcia of the Grateful Dead,
linear,
e
that structure (or rather unstruc-ture- ) all side through the
word show.
fathered by the electric
work
Throughout his run-ru-n
malaise.
Wolfe drops bits of wisdom rangMexican Trip
ing from the works of I Ching and
For instance, in describing Herman Hesse to the aphorisms
Kesey's paranoid Mexican flight of Pranksters Pan cho Pillow, Has-slfrom stateside
drug charges,
and Mai Function emphasiWolfe reels off a veritable phanzing with surprising clarity the
almost evangelistic fervor, the
tasmagoria of print:
"Haul ass, Kesey. Move. embrace of the occult that has
Scram. Split flee hide vanish typlified the subculture.
Although he never appears as
a character in "Kool Aid," con- - .
troversial mass media guru Marshall McLuhan should merit
hands down the position of driver in abstentia of the Pranksd
ter's
Bosch Bus,
for the electric-hairegrouping
village is a walking, flying validation of his controversial theories. Their tribal mode of living,
their obsession with extension
of the senses via intricate sound
hookups and mixed media melanges, their rejection of the"
specialist's conception of the
mind as a reducing valve, their
quest for consciousness of the
unconscious, their penchant for
participation mystique, all are in
the finest, confusing McLuhan-esqu- e
tradition.
Soft Sociology
Indeed, in a recent interview
McLuhan finally broke his silence
about the
"hippie"
movement, citing it as a rejection of mechanical society's
theprize-winning"O-

ne

far-ou- t,

snug-harbore-

d

EE-JOT!-

award-winnin- g

er

Kandy-Ko-lore- d

e

al

ed

will bo on campus from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00

Kesey-Wolf-

p.m. to interview and test male applicants
for summer employment. Applicant must be
willing to travel .Kentucky and Southern Indiana' during June, July and August. The
position will pay $80.00 per Veek salary plus
travel expenses (meals lodgmgand transportation). Please contact yW placement
officer for time and place of interview.

er

s7

XUUUHiHUJ

,J

!!

super-circuite-

d

m'-- it
i

.

PM

A

The perfect outfit
for those specia

afternoon occasions
A guj just naturally
comes to life in
this year's new
bold pattern sport
coats . . . and how's
the rest of your
wardrobe? Simplicity
is the key to
"cool." Let the new
colors of our tailored
look of spring help
you do your thing.

--

11
Tn

W

f

ill-titl-

V

ivi

WALLACE'S

P

PRIVATE

mi

407

S. LIMESTONE

255 - 7523

and rejecting
values .. .again

obsolescent
rejuvenating

obsession of
the audile-tactil-e
tribal man."
Like MuLuhan, "The Electric Kool Aid Acid Test" almost
defies description or classification. Adequate review of the work
is about as possible as biting a
cloud. Yet Wolfe's heaving leaning on the hyperbole, his contorted, belching syntax often
make for difficult reading, yet
they are essential for the recreation of the subjective reality of
the Pranksters.
Despite this fleeting quality
of evanescence, "Kool Aid" is
an important book, probably
what noted Swedish sociologist
HansZetterburg would call "soft
sociology" a term he used in addressing a graduate seminar here
last year, horrifying his contemporaries of a doctrinaire
bent with his casual
observation that "Shakespeare
was probably one of the best
sociologists ever."
Unfreaking Believable
Granted, Thomas Wolfe is not
William Shakespeare. Likewise,
Kesey is not Guttenberg, the
Pranksters are not the Literary
Guild. It is just these differences,
though, that make Wolfe's efforts significant, for he has forged from wildly disparate bits and
pieces a maddening, yet lucid,
account of a subculture so well
described by Columbia Professor
and pop culture critic Arthur
Goldman: "Life, not theory, and,
more particularly, the electric
maelstrom that has shaped the
sensibility of our youth best explain the syncretism of the present moment. Our youth are accustomed to being bombarded
from every side by sounds and
images that have been torn loose,
distorted and scrambled in a
thousand ways . . .and, if this
were not enough, the youth have
given their bizarre world one
last crazy spin by turning on
with anything they can get into their mouths or veins."
Wolfe has managed to capture the essence of this
slice of life,
biting a large portion out of the
Kesey cloud and bringing it back
for public concumption.
Due to its controversial subject matter it will be alternately
adored and despised. However,
for all its eccentricity and occasional sloppiness (Wolfe's ventures into poetic form are stone
disasters), it cannot be ignored.
I do hope that you receive
it well, depending on the way
that you feel that you live.
al

University Poetry, a new publication offering poetry by UK
students, is now on sale in the
Complex Cafeteria and the basement of the Student Center. Copies cost 50 cents. The publication
is financed by the Poetry Guild
under the editorship of John
Cooper.

The Kentucky

on
I

short-cuttin- g

Poetry Released

fcpOK STORE

?

values: "These kids are fed up
with Jobs and goals and are
determined to forge their own
roles and involvement . . .
into the electrical vortex

BANQUET

Rescrvotion
119

ROOM

252-934- 4

South Limestone

Kernel

The Kentucky Kernel, University
Station, University of Kentucky, Lexington. Kentucky 40506. Second class
postage paid at Lexington, Kentucky.
Mailed five times weekly during the
school year except holidays and exam
periods, rid once during the summer
session.
Published by the Board of Student
Publications, UK Post Office Box 4sttfl.
Uegun as the Cadet In im and
published continuously as the Kernel
since 1819.
Advertising published herein is Intended to help the reader buy. Any
false or misleading advertising should
be reported to The Editors.
SUBSCRIPTION RATES
Yearly, by mail
$0.27
Per copy, from files
$.10
KERNEL TELEPHONES
2321
Editor, Managing Editor
Editorial Page Editor,
Associate Editors, Sports
2320
News Desk
2447
Advertising, Business, Circulation lilt

* THE KENTUCKY KERNEL. Thursday, April

UK

Commander 'Too Busy,' 'Won't Send Out

3, 1909

-- S

A Lot Of BulV

Pershing Rifles' 'Espionage' Not Being Pressed Here
says Michael M.
Flack, commander, Pershing Rif-

write a summation report of all
these type groups.
"There is a Pershing Rifle
representative in the Capitol,
with an office in the Pentagon,
and it might be they're going
to submit a report to the Department of Defense. They probably
already have the information, but
it would show them we're doing

les has Just completed a successful season in drill competition.
les.
Last weekend at Ohio State they
captured three first places in com"They want individuals to
submit articles describing activipetition against 17 other schools,
ties of SDS, the Black Panthers,
and Flack says there's enough
other work to keep the group
and any other group that has
here busy without the extra work
as its objective the downgrading
of ROTC or the military. I'm
of "subversive groups" reports.
not sure what their purpose is,"
"I'm not going to make a
he says, but adds, " I think they're things."
push for it," he says. "I don't
Tops In Competition
think it's worth our trouble." He
going to collect the reports from
The University's Pershing Rif- - says he believes UK has a fairly
throughout the country and then
"typical" school, and that sufficient groups will be described
from other campuses. "If we had
anything unusual going on, we'd
week, you don't have the cash for the court cost.
By MARILYN BLAKESLEE
a
he says.
In other words, you can't go to court because prepare report,"
Kernel Staff Writer
He says the reports need not
Earl Johnson Jr. spoke Wednesday on "Legal you can't pay the high price of court."
be written by members of the
This is where legal services for the poor comes
Services for the Poor" in the colloquia series
Pershing Rifles, but could be
in, said Johnson, who asserted that the U. S. written by any student. "A per"Working Solutions to the Dimensionsof Poverty."
Johnson, former director of the Legal Services legal system is the most unjust in the world. son's own observations, written
Program of the U. S. Office of Economic OpEach year, almost every poor family has several out in longhand, would be all
portunity, claimed it is impossible for a "middle-occasions which call for legal aid or a lawyer, he right," Flack says.
class
person" to appreciate fully what Legal
added.
But the responsibility for
Services is attempting to achieve.
As recently as 1965 the only legal aid societies
screening such reports before
To temporarily solve that problem, he asked
sending them on to the Nebraska
members of the audience to put themselves "in available to the poor were supported mainly by national
headquarters is his,
chairities and big businesses, explained Johnson,
the place of the poor", then cited an example
of one percent of Flack admits, and adds, "I'm not
adding that only
of "injustice" prevalent in the U. S. today.
families who needed legal aid were being covered. going to send out any bull."
"Your landlord evicts you for not paying rent
According to a Liberation
on time. To take it to court you must pay $80
According to Johnson, Legal Services set up News Service (LNS) story, the
or bond for two months rent (your rent costs a main goal of law reform that focused on cororder to "Forward any material
$40 a week). Now since you only, make $40 a recting such "imbalance" in the legal system.
published by Students for a Democratic Society (SDS), Black Panthers and all other local subversive groups or local chapters of
national organizations to National Headquarters," was sent
out on Feb. 3 by a Major Cock-soI
-- ' r
""
l
'"""""
s
X"
f"- -a student at the UniverMMM
EMUMU
AMBUBw
MgHMM
sity of Nebraska.
"We Can Say Things
According to the LNS account,
Cockson said, "Since the Pershing Rifles are not really officially
NJ
J)
Ij
y
connected with the Army, we can
say things about the radicals that
the Department of Defense can
CZZ )
CUD CLv
not say."
He said the National Headquarters started a file on "subversive propaganda" in December, and that the current pro- -

By TERRY DUNHAM
Assistant Managing Editor
The national headquarters of
Pershing Rifles, the elite ROTC
organization, has asked campus
chapters to submit reports on
local "subversive groups," but
the Commander of UK's PR's says
he doubts any reports will be submitted from here.
"We were told of the requests
for reports at a regimental meeting at Ohio State University in

February,"

Legal Services For Poor Explained

eventual
gram's
application
would depend on "how much
information we get and what the
national commander decides."
In addition to personal reports and publications of the
groups themselves, the headquarters' orders instnicted companies
to forward news clippings on
groups' activities.
The Pershing Rifles is a growing group on the UK campus,
with 32 active members at present. They are affiliated with a
women's drill team, the Kentucky
Babes, which also placed first in
competition at Ohio State last
weekend.
Flack is a senior majoring
in political science.

Unitarian
Universalist

Church

one-tent- h

of Lexington
Clays Mill Pike
8
Phone
277-624-

CAN RELIGIOUS
LIBERALS
CELEBRATE
EASTER?

n,

..

m

MTC

..."

J

q

f

v

ursJj

The KENNEDY BOOK STORE

is pleased to announce the sale of a Special College
Sampler Pac of Toiletries at a fraction of its retail value !
The manufacturers and the

CHRISTIAN
STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP

KENNEDY BOOK STORE

in cooperation with the Guest Pac Corporation,
Mount Vernon, New York offer this Special Pac

SUNDAYS

V

10:15.

Study Groups
1
p.m. Mon toys;
Open Foru
Tuesd

Macleans Toothpaste

Halo or Enden Shampoo
Pamprin
Excedrin

Scripto Word Picker
Jergens Soap

SOUTHERN

SPECIAL STUDENT PRICE
Hurry! Supply limited to
PER STUDENT! Get your

"Will Jobs ana A Minimum Yearly
Income Strengthen the Ghetto
Family"

all students to a
demonstration protesting the
DRAFT Friday from noon 'til
3 p.m. at the Lexington Draft
Board, Southland Drive.
CRL invites

6:30 p.m.

HILLS MKT HODIST CHURCH
DONALD

2356 HARRODSBURG RD.
6:30 a m. Sunrise Serv
8:45 a.m. and 10:50 a ATransportation Provided tor Studen

Minister

R. HERREN,

Bluegrass Memorial Gardens
- Actior
And Plenty of It!"
6
Call
or

277-402-

277-617-

Complete Optical Service
to Central Kentucky
Since 1923

Other Special Toiletry Items and
additional Money Saving Offers are
in each Pac.

about one for every five students!
Pac today.

ONLY ONE PAC

ienne dy Book Store

9

n

$0.50

EACH

Student Center

Z

3 Wednesdays

Clairol Kindness

ONLY

SCOTT

Campus

William Buck, CSF President
Larry L Brandon, Campus Minister

Adorn Hair Spray

LEE

Religious Liberals
8 p.m.. Room 115

rrv O

V

Gillette Techmatic Razor
and Razor Band
Foamy Shaving Cream
Manpower Aerosol Deodorant
Excedrin
Old Spice After Shave Lotion
ScriptoWord Picker Highlighter
Macleans Toothpaste
Dial Soap

PETER

502 Columbia Aye.
Worship

AT THE CHURCH
10:30 a.m.

Topic
"The Meaning of Life and Death
As Seen By Christianity"

Easily accessible to residents of
Cooperstown, Complex, Fraternities, and Sororities.

each Pac...

SUNDAY

Speaker

(

to familiarize you with these fine products.
There isa Male and a Female Pac, each worth
approximately $8.00. The principal items in

The Unitarian Universalists' observance of Easier reaches back to
the natural human, celebration of
the Spring, that was basic to mankind long before the addition of
the Christian story of the Resurrection of Jesus. Our celebration
is of the resurrection of Earth from
the tomb of winter, of the ongoing
miracle of life. We invite you to
share with us in this joyous occasion, and to discover with us a
religion that makes sense.

3 Locations
143-14-

WW

5

North Upper St.

1220 South Broadway
2121 Nicholasville Rd.

255-071-

6

252-758- 5
278-602- 6

HEARING AID CENTER
177

North Upper St.

254-93C- 6

* The Kentucky
ESTABLISHED

Iernel

University of Kentucky
1891

THURSDAY,

APRIL

3, 19G9

Editorials represent the opinions of the Editors, not of the University.
Lee B. Becker,

Editor-in-Chi-

Guy M. Mcndcs III, Managing Editor
Tom Dcrr, Business Manager

Darrcll Rice, Editorial rage
Jim Miller, Associate
Howard Mason, Dwtography Editor
Chip Hutchcson, Sports
Jack Lyne and Larry Kcllcy, Arts Editors
Frank Coots,
Dana Ewcll,
Janice
Terry Dunham,
Larry Dale Keeling,
Assistant Managing Editors

Editor
Editor
Editor
Barber

Focus On What?
About 150 people at best attended Friday night's Focus program conducted in the spacious
Memorial Coliseum. The sight of
this multitude spread along the
expanses was quite embarrassing
for the program's creators and for
the University. But Saturday after-- '
noon an even better record was
set when all of 60 people showed
up to hear the speakers.
This sort of turnout reflects badly on the students and the University community in general. When
the coliseum is filled to capacity
night after night for basketball
games and when only a few stragglers show up to hear nationally
recognized men speak on the issue
of social morality, something is
dreadfully wrong.

Although few glamorous speakers were scheduled for the program, all were competent and had
much to add to the program. It
was particularly alarming that so
few law students attended Friday
night's session to hear William
Kuntsler, who is probably the nation's leading civil liberties attorney and who had some articulate
opinions to express on contemporary issues.
This is the second year that the
d
Focus program
has been conducted. And both years
the turnouts have been dismal.
But the program should be continued despite the apparent level of
interest here. Sooner or later basketball is going to have to be replaced by more substantial things.

'

highly-conceive-

!

( fn

fit

l

!

Pray For Richard Nixon's Baby

Kernel Forum: the readers write
EDITOR'S NOTE: All letters to the editor must be typed, double-spaceand not
more than 200 words in length. The
writer must sign the letter and give classification, address and phone number. Send
or deliver all letters-tRoom 113-of
the Journalism Building. The Kernel reserves the right to edit letters without
changing meaning.
d

o

Responsible Tactics

sible. If he had not been made aware
of the facts, he had, as a casual Kernel
reader, been reading extremely casually.
Films on the migrant situation were shown
in the Student Center,, and pertinent
concise reviews were printed in the Kernel. The Kernel Forum did include many
letters revealing important facts about
the grape strike. For several weeks the
CARSA information table was in the
Student Center. Information was always
available and presented; it is up to the
students to digest it.
We have rescinded our irresponsible
actions and I have apologized for them.
However, I hold no sympathy for people
who condemn the goals of the boycott
on the basis of its perpetuating tactics.
CARSA meetings are open; criticism is
welcome, and if enough concerned students took the time to attend the meetings, I'm sure there would be no more
questionable tactics.
Bill Rauch
A&S Freshman

To the Editor of the Kernel:
Mr. Britz's appraisal of the UK"grape
situation" was entirely objective and truly
As past chairman of
CARSA, I have experienced the vicious
circle of impulsive action, reaction and
indignation towards the reaction.
Our efforts to perpetuate the grape
boycott on campus were extremely questionable. The cavorting during the Grille
picnic was not in good taste; the penny
protest was disruptive and infringed upon
students rights to purchase food in the
Grille. These were moves stemming from
Budget Cuts
our chagrin with the Food Service's unA university is a faculty and students.
concerned attitude toward the oppression
of farm workers and our despair at stu- Its functions are teaching, research and
dents' unreasonable opposition to the public service. These functions involve
boycott (not denying that there was rea- directly only the faculty and students,
sonable opposition, which CARSA en- but indirectly a large assortment of needed
couraged).
personnel which I shall call Admin, Etc.
A growing
The unreasonable opposition to the
university seems inevitably
our irresponsible to have more legitimate needs than funds
boycott helped promote
actions. This opposition was'in the form to fulfill the needs. Therefore priorities
of an enonnous argument ad hominum; must be developed. Such priorities should
the disruptive, bearded outside agitators be established by the faculty andor stuare once more trying to put something dents, rather than by Admin, Etc.
over on the decent students. Not only is
The financial situation for next year
an argument ad hominum faulty, but has been described as "grim". Admin,
this generalization of boycott supporters Etc. informed '.he Department of Zoois entirely unbased. An examination of logy (and apparently other units in the
CARSA members would prove that many A &S College) that there can be no
fill into the clean-culocal resident recruiting of additional faculty for next
category (which should not besignificant,
year and that the budget for teaching asbut disproves the generalization). An exsistants will be 80 percent of this year's.
amination of our Food Services petition Since our department has had no increase
would yield names of administrators, facin faculty for three years, during which
ulty members, ROTC candidates, Greeks enrollment in our courses has increased
and University staff members. This is a by 40 percent, such a cut makes it necesgroup to which no term other than " husary for us to cancel some course offermanitarian" would aptly apply. The en- ings and cut back enrollment in others.
tirely unreasonable opposition produced Admin, Etc., has been so informed in
frustration and indignation within the writ